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Full text of "Panama Canal record"

Gift of the Panama Can, 



Giftof* hePanama CamlMuseum 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/panamacanalr12191819isth 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



PUBLISHED WEEKLY UNDER 
THE AUTHORITY AND SUPER- 
VISION OF THE PANAMA CANAL 



AUGUST 21, 1918, TO AUGUST 13, 1919 



VOLUME XII 

WITH INDEX 



THE PANAMA CANAL 
BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE 

1519. 



THE PANAMA CANAL PRESS 

MOUNT HOPE. CANAL ZONE 

1919 



For additional copies of this publication address The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C., or Balboa 
Heights. Canal Zone. 



INDEX. 



ACCOUNTABLE OFFICIALS — 

Appointments, 88, 121, 298, 339, 342, 347, 
382, 405, 443, 509, 510, 541, 558. 626. . -i 
Invoicing manufactured property delivered 
direct, 129. 
Acts of Congress — 

American seamen, relief and protection of. 

396. 
Appropriations: 

Deficiency. 1918-19, 200. 
Fortifications, 1920, 395. 
Authority to prescribe charter and freight 

rates and requisition vessels, 13. 
Canal Zone census. 395. 
Entrance or departure of persons during 

hostdities, 38. 
Payment to Panama, 396. 
Admeasurement Board, member appointed. !(> 
Administration of Estates, time allowed, 397. 
Administrator of Estates and Shipping Commis 

sioner, appointed, 129. 
Administrator's sale, 233, 364, 386, 408, 418. 427, 

510. 
Admitting office, Ancon Hospital, 640. 
Agents, collecting, remittances, 465. 
Air station. Naval, Guarapo, 185. 
Aliens employed on vessels, 303. 
Alien enemies, certain regulations canceled, 303 
See also Travel regulations, Enemy Trading 
Lists, etc. 
Allotment of sugar, 29, 39. 
Ancon Hospital — 

Admitting office, 640 
Visiting hours, 539. 
Annual Report, 306. 381. 
Appointments — 

Acting Architect, 405. 

Acting Auditor, 39, 245. 

Acting Captain of the Port, Balboa. 338. 

Acting Captain of the Port, Cristobal, 164. 

Acting Chairman, Board of Local Inspectors, 

464. 
Acting Chief, Board of Health -Laboratory, 

360. 
Acting Chief Health Officer, 13, 274. 
Acting Chief Hydrographer, 29. 
Acting Chief of Police and Kir.- Division, 254, 

509. 
Acting Chief Quarantine Officer. 1 1 2. 
Acting Chief Quartermaster, 219. 275, 366. 
Acting Collector. 347. 

Acting Commissary Manager, Balboa, 541. 
Acting Commissary Manager. Garaboa, 263, 

458. 
Acting Commissary Manager, La Boca. 386, 

522. 
Acting Commissary Manager. Pedro^Miguel. 

361. 
Acting District Quartermaster, Cristobal, 112 
Acting District Quaitermaster, Pedro Miguel. 

66. 
Acting Executive Secretary, 509. 



Appointments — 

Acting General Foreman, Wholesale Dry 
Goods. 458. 

Acting Genera! Foreman. Wholesale Gro- 
ceries, 510. 

Acting General Manager, Commissary Di- 
vision, 626. 

Acting General Storekeeper, 99. 

Acting Genera! Vardmaster, Cristobal, 558. 

Acting Governor, 211. 

Acting Hotel and Restaurant Inspector, 367, 
383. 

Acting Magistrate, Cristobal, 540. 

Acting Municipal Engineer, 66. 

Acting Paymaster, 396. 

Acting President, Panama Bailroad, 211 

Acting Quarantine Officer, 211. 

Acting Resident Engineer, Building Division, 
522. 

Acting Station Agent, Colon, 121. 

Acting Storekeeper, Cristobal Stores, 298. 

Acting Superintendent, Ancon Hospital, 274. 

Acting Superintendent, Cattle Industry, 477. 

Acting Superintendent, Coaling Plants, 211. 

Acting Superintendent, Colon Hospital. 646. 

Acting Superintendent, Pacific Locks, 15. 

Acting Superintendent, Pier 6, 361. 
Vcting Superintendent, Southern District, 
Municipal Division, 67, 604. 

Acting Supervisor of Construction and Plan- 
tations, Cattle Industry, 510. 

Acting Surveying Officer. 509. 

Administrator of Estates and Shipping Com 
missioner, 129. 

Assistant District Attorney, 477. 

Assistant Engineer, Section of Surveys, 287. 

Assistant Superintendent. Mechanical Di- 
vision, 308. 

Assistant Watch Inspector, 399. 

Business Secretary, Bureau of Clubs and 
Playgrounds, 1 30. 

Chief Clerk, Commissary Division, 112. 

Chief Clerk, Executive Office, 443. 

Chief Health Officer, 396. 

Chief of Record Bureau, 443. 

Collector, 76. 

Commissary Manager, Cristobal, 78. 

Commissary Manager, Paraiso, 465. 

Deputy Collector, 1 50. 

District Attorney, 509. 

District Judge of Canal Zone, 262. 

District Quartermaster, Gatun, 66. 

Foreman. Industrial Laboratory, 386. 

Inspector of Silver Roll Employees. 477. 

Inspector, Supply Department, 1 5. 

La Boca Commissary Manager, 78. 

Member of Board of Admeasurement, 76. 

Office Engineer, 129, 262. 

Receiving and Forwarding Agent, 591 . 

Steamship Ticket Agent, 88. 

Superintendent of Ancon Hospital, 464. 

Superintendent, Mechanical Division, 338. 

Superintendent, Southern District, Municipal 
Engineering, 5. 



INDEX 



Appointments — 

Watch Inspector. Panama Railroad, Colon, 

458. 
Wire Chief, 30. 
Appraisal, Board of, 65. 
Army — 

Army or Naval vessels of other nations, other 
than transports, using Canal — Set Gover- 
nor's monthly reports. 
Camp Otis subpost to Camp at Empire, 4. 
Command assumed, 442. 
Control of Canal and Canal Zone, 315, 359. 
Entrance of personnel into Panama pro- 
hibited, 4. 
Intoxicants, furnishing to military and naval 

personnel, 199, 274, .517. 
Men transfer to Panama Canal, 476. 
Prohibition, liquor, opium, prostitution, etc. 

in Canal Zone, 274. 
Transportation on railroad, 245. 
Architect, acting, 405. 
Aspinwall Hotel- 
Increased rates, 62 3. 
Payment of bills, 272. 

Rates and launch schedule, 346— (Sec also 
various issues.) 
Assistant Engineer, Section of Surveys, 287. 
Atlantic Entrance, changes in buoys, 336. 
Attorney, District, Canal Zone, 509. 
Auditor, Acting, 39, 245. 
Australia thanks Canal people for courtesies to 

soldiers, 219. 
Automobiles — 

Automobile and motorcycle license tags, 218. 
Employees' rates for shipment, 522. 
Special service, 527. 
Aviation — 

Field named in honor of Lieutenant France, 

38. 
Station, Guarapo, 185. 
Awards — ■ 

Joint Commission, 5. 263, 275, 356, 361, 386, 
541,604, 616. 



Baggage — 

Checking when sailing, 47 7. 

Employees going on leave, 615. 
Bakery output, 611. 
Balsa wood, rate on, 557. 
Band concerts, schedule, 143,201,246, 299. 
Barbados, rates to, 637. 
Barges; — 

Derrick, rates, 339. 

Rock and sand, sale, 418. 

Steel, sale, 353, 361, 370. 
Bathing, Farfan beach, 254. 
Bay rum, pure. 511. 
Bicycle licenses, renewal, 531. 
Bitts and chocks, 415. 
Board of Appraisal, 65. 

Board of Local Inspectors, meeting, 233, 256. 
Board on Rates of Pay, Gold Roll, 534. 
Boats, small, data for Board of Local Inspectors, 

221. 
Bohio. trains stop Saturday and Sunday, 200, 246. 
Boi.us, discharged soldiers, 397. 



Books — 

Children's, 615. 

Economy expense, 62. 

Fiction, etc., 40, 70, 86, 102, 113. 210, J7U. 

410. 446, 592, 615, 617. 
Mileage, purchase, 245. 
Box cars, keeping doors closed, 510. 
Boxes, safe deposit, 4 2 7. 
Building Construction — See Governor's monthly 

reports. 
Building Division work, Coco Solo, 29. 
Bunker rules and regulations canceled, 600. 
Buoys, temporarily discontinued, Cristobal Har- 
bor, 83. 
Business of Canal — See Governor's monthly 
reports. 



Cable — 

Business messages for Germany, 604. 
Information, 618, 626. 
Service — 

Acceptance of deferred rate discon- 
tinued, 150. 
Belgium, 185, 211. 
Bermuda and Turkestan, 540. 
Extensions. 306. 
Philippines and China, 251. 
Calliin, steamship — 

Rebuilding of, 419. 

Shipping Board expresses appreciates of 
work at Balboa Shops, 431. 
Cameras, passengers not allowed to use aboard 

ship, 2. 
Canal — 

Army control, 315, 359. 

Operations — See Governor's monthly re- 
ports. 
War work, 271, 291. 
Canal force, war services rendered, 291. 
Canal men in Army and Navy, 84. 
CANAL RECORD for Canal service men, 2-See 

also various issues. 
Canal Zone, entry and departure, 38, 134, 180. 
Captain of the Port, Balboa, acting, 338. 
Captain of the Port, Cristobal, acting, 464. 
Carbon copies, indistinct, 150. 
Cargo — 

Dispatched by Receiving and Forwarding 
Agency of P. R. R. — S<.e Governor's monthly 
rcpoits. 
Handled — See Governor's monthly reports. 
Manifests, 214, 335. 

On which no tolls were charged — See Gov- 
ernor's monthly reports. 
Received by Receiving and Forwarding 
Agency of P. R. R. — See Governor's 
monthly reports. 
Rehandled by Receiving and Forwarding 
Agency- of P. R R.—See Governor's 
monthly reports. 
Safe-keeping of specie and valuable, 339. 
Stevedored — See Governor's monthly re- 
ports. 
Through Canal — See Governor's Monthly 

reports. 
Valuable, and specie, 339. 



INDEX 



Cars — 

Box, side doors closed, .510. 

Sale, 468. 

Scales, 184. 

Western dump, capacity, 510. 
Cashing War Savings Stamps, 295. 
Catalogue, stock, 367. 
Cattle, beef, proposals for furnishing, 263, 275, 

290, 29'). 
Cattle Industry — 

Correspondence, 78. 

Supervision, 255. 
Cattle Industry and Plantation Division — 

Supervision, 88. 
Censorship — 

Funds for Canal Zone, 126. 

Mail, 4. 

News stories, 1 1. 
Census, Canal Zone, 395. 
Certificates, employees sick in quarters, 38. 
Chagres River and Canal lakes, stages. See 

various issues. 
Chagres River launch service, 31. 
Charges — 

Customs inspection of household goods, 540, 

Itemized statements for work at Canal shops. 
615. 

Special customs service. 627. 

See ah o Tariffs. 
Charleston, S. C, calls at, by Panama Railroad 

vessels discontinued, 148. 
Charter and freight rates, vessels, 13, 21. 
Charter and freight rates and requisitioning, 

vessels, authority. 13, 21. 
Chauffeurs, examinations. See various issues 

Licensing, regulations, 131. 186. 
Chickens — 

Keeping, 307. 

Sale, Summit Poultry Farm, 214, 458. 
Chief, Board of Health Laboratory, Acting, 360 
Chief Clerk, Commissary Division, appointed, 112. 
Chief Health Officer, Acting, 13. 
Children, dangerous sport of, 252. 
Chocks and bitts, 415. 
Christmas gifts for lepers, 199. 
Christmas purchases, 69, 102, 113. 131, i 46, 183, 

189, 205. 
Civil engineering positions, rates, 15. 
Civil Service — 

Amendment to rules, 380, 499 

Credentials, 15. 

Examinations — See each issue. 

Reductions of force, 24 5 

Reinstatement, 380. 
Clerk, Chief, Executive Department, 443. 
Clerk and stenographer examination postponed. 2 
Club, golf. 464. 
Clubhouses — 

Accept bond subscriptions, ;'> 

Libraries at Ancon and Balboa, 5 16 

Sailors invited. <>03. 
Coal- 
On hand — Sire Governor's monthly reports 

Quantities handled in three years, 502. 

Received during months — See Governor's 
monthly report. 

Supplied the Anay and Navy — Sea Gov 
ernor's monthly reports 



Coal- 
Supplied individuals and companies — See 

Governor's monthly reports. 
Supplied The Panama Canal — See Gov- 
ernor's monthly reports. 
Supplied Panama Railroad Department — 

See Governor's monthly reports. 
Supplied to vessels — See Governor's month- 
ly reports. 
Coaling four cruisers at once, 611. 
Coast Guard cutter, built by Mechanical Di- 
vision, 237. 
Cold storage plant, new, 344. 
Cold storage shipments, affected by marine 

strike, 640. 
Collecting agents, remittances from. 465. 
Collector, Acting, 347. 
Collector, appointed, 76. 
College entrance examinations, 504. 
Colombian ports, reduced rates to, 37. 
Colon Harbor, gas buoys replaced, 336. 
Command, Panama Canal Department. 442. 
Commercial ships — 

Furnished with commissary supplies — See 

Governor's monthly reports. 
Furnished with fuel oil from Canal tanks — 

See Governor's monthly reports. 
Making transit of Canal — See Governor'9 

monthly reports. 
Supplied with I unkei coal — See Governor's 

monthly repoits. 
Through Canal in ballast — See Governor's 

monthly reports. 
Through Canal without cargo, but not in 
ballast — See Governor's monthly reports. 
Commissary — 

Books, sales to silver employees, 287. 
Christmas operations, 69, 102, 113, 131, 146. 

183, 189. 205. 
Complaints and suggestions, 1S9. 
Hours, 353. 

Law governing sales, 447. 
Manufacturing plants, in charge, 646. 
Notes — See each issue. 
Sales to commercial vessels — See Governor's 

monthly reports. 
Sales to Government and Panama Railroad 
vessels — See Governor's monthly reports. 
Sales to other Government vessels — See 

Governor's monthly reports. 
Sales to Panama Railroad vessels — See 

Governor's monthly reports. 
Sales, preference after 4 p. m., 40. 
Violations of laws governing sales, 447 
Commissioner, Shipping — 
Bureau, 600. 
Sale, 323. 
Communications — 

Costa Rica, interrupted, 458. 
German Austria, 408. 
Neutral vessels, ISO. 
Rhine pro-, inces, 405. 

U. S. merchant ships and U. S. Naval radio, 
147. 
Conduct of alien enemies, cancellation of certain 
regulations. 303. 



INDEX 



Conservation — 
Gasoline, 35. 
Wheatless Mondays, 65. 

Consular visa not required on passports of Amer- 
ican citizens returning to States, 393. 

Copies, indistinct, 150. 

Copper and brass, stolen, Q ( >. 

Corn Hakes, not wheat substitute, 15. 

Coronel, Chile, discovery of hidden rock, 502. 

Corrections — 

Cable notice, S3. 

In estimates as printed, 275. 

Correspondence, indistinct carbon copies, 150. 

Cottage, Krench, sale, 67. 

Cranes, rates for service, 112. 

Credit- 
Circular No. 1, 397. 
Circular No. 2, 398. 

Customs- 
Charges for special service, 62 7. 
Duties, exemption from payment, 218. 
Baggage of incoming passengers, 442. 
Household goods, inspection, 538, 540, 591. 

Cutter, Coast Guard, completed, 237. 



Daylight, variations the year around, 519. 

Deaths. See various issues, 251. 

Deckhands, extra, 415. s 

Declarations, shipper's export, discontinuance, 589. 

Defensive sea areas abolished, 335, 336. 

Deficiency appropriation, 191S-19, 200. 

Dentist — 

Additional, Ancon-Balboa district. 463. 

District of La Boca, 337. 
Departure from Canal Zone — 

New travel regulations, 180, 393. 

Instructions and information, 38, 134. 
Departure from United States, restrictions, (3, 

43, 115. 
Deputy collectoi. appointed. 1.S0. 
Diesel oil — 

On hand — See Governor's monthly reports. 

Quantities handled in three years, 502. 

Sales and issues — See Governor's monthly 
reports. 
Directory, Panama Canal, 267. 605. 
Diseases — 

Contagious, 411. 

Venereal, to be discussed, 450. 
District Attorney, Assistant, 477. 
District Judge, Canal Zone, 262. 
Dogs, hunting, 323. 
Draft- 
Assistance in filling out questionnaires, 117. 

Registration, citizens of draft age, 35, 227. 

Selective Service Registrants, 182, 262. 
Drain, portable concrete sections, 461. 
Dredging — See Governor's monthly reports. 
Drums, gasoline and kerosene, 183, 399, 443. 
Dry docking — 

Record at Cristobal, 603. 

Vessels subject to inspection, 591. 

See also Governor's monthly reports 
Dry season, 1918-19, 453. 
Dunnage, exportation, 59. 



Economy expense book, 62 
Eggs — 

Hatching, 592. 
Setting, 214. 
Electrical Division — 

Foreman, Northern District, 30. 

See also Governor's monthly reports 
Electric generating station, Catun, 420. 
Electric storms, 637. 
Electricity, caution against waste, 462. 
Emancipation Day, observing, 61 4. 
Employees — 

Baggage, 613. 

Conduct and workmanship. 222. 
Deceased. See each issue. 
Delayed by seamen's strike — quarters, 616. 
Duty on goods taken into United States, 71. 
Insurance rates for sea shipments and auto- 
mobile shipments, 522. 
Leave of absence, 232. 
Leave regulations, 323. 
Leaving service to returnj>hoto-metal checks, 

112. 
Meals, pasture and plantation camps, 309. 
Military or Naval Service, leave due, 359. 
Monthly payments while on leave. 411. 
Papers and metal checks, surrendered when 

leaving service or on leave, 323. 
Quarters, fuel and electric current — gold roll, 

and American citizens on silver roll, 492. 
Rates on household goods, 464. 
Reservations on United Fruit Company ves- 
sels, 510. 
Reinstatement of civil service, 321. 
Returning from United States. 11. 
Sick leave for aliens. 243. 
Sick in quarters, certificates, 38. 
Supplies from Army commissaries, 477. 
24-trip tickets lost, 290. 
Transportation to hospitals, 308. 
Visiting United States. 35. 
Employees and families intending to sail for New 

York. 534. 
Employees, silver — 

Physical examination, 347, 367, 626. 
Sal s oi commissary books, 287, 442. 
Sick leave for aliens, 231, 382. 
Subsistence, 188. 
Employmen t — 

Army men for Panama, Canal and Panama 

Railroad, 476. 
Clerical positions paying not over 5106 a 

month, 191. 
Men who have become U. S. citizens by rea- 
son of military service, 308. 
Enemies, alien, cancelling certain regulationsjfor 

conduct, 303. 
Enemy Trading List — ■ 

Additions, 57, 66, 77, 100. 
Additions and removals, 106, 107, 143, 150, 
188, 201, 222, 232. 255, 263, 298. 309, 349, 
383, 399, 415. 
Removals, 182, 256, 298, 361. 
Engineer, Office, appointn ent, 129. 
Entrance or departure of persons during hostilities, 
38 



INDEX 



Entry into United States, restrictions, 33, 43. U.S. 
Entry into Canal Zone, regulations, 38, 131, ISO. 
Estates, administration, time allowed. 307. 
Evaporation in Canal Zone, 520. 
Exam inations — 

Board of Local Inspectors. See various issues. 
Civil Service. See each issue. 
College entrance. 504. 
Physical, silver employees, 347. 367. 
School, 37, 60. 
Teachers. 37, 50. 
Executive Ordei — 

Canal control, Army, 315, 359. 
Civil Service reinstatement, 380. 
Civil Service rule amended, 380, 490. 
Controlof Canal and Canal Zone. 315, $59. 
Employment by Panama Canal, without 

Civil Service examination, 191. 
Entrance or departure of persons during hos- 
tilities, 43, 115. 
Extension, Civil Service reinstatement time 

to service men, 1 . 
Funds for censorship of mails in Canal Zone. 

126. 
Guarapo Naval Air Station, 185. 
Leave due employees returning from military 

or naval service, 359. 
Leave for Grand Army men to attend re- 
union, 1. 
Leave for Spanish War Veterans to attend 

reunion, 1. 
Orders for establishment of defensive sea 

areas revoked, 335. 
Payment of wages at ports. 622. 
Chauffeurs licensing, 131. 
Reinstaten ent of Frank II. Wang, 600. 
Sick leave for alien employees, 2 13. 
Special service automobiles, 527. 
Tonnage certificates, amending form. 379. 

380. 
War Trade' Board funis transferred for e: 
penditure in Canal /'one. 227. 
Executive Secretary, acting, 50''. 
Expendable items, new, 348. 
Export declarations, discontinuance, 589. 
Export licenses, enemy trading lists withdrawn, 

448. 
Exportation of Panama coins prohibited, 66. 
Exportation of dunnage, regulations governing. 

59. 
Exports — 

Control, 304. 600. 

Regulations governing conserved commodi- 
ties from United States insular possessions 
and Canal Zone. 71. 



Farfan Beach, bathing, 254. 

Farm implements, new and second hand, sale, 

361, 3S6. 
Farm income and expenses, 404. 
Fish, fresh, proposals for supplying, 233. 
Fishing in vicinity of Gatun Spillway, 222. 
Fleet, Pacific, passage through Canal, 607. 
Floating cranes, rates, 211. 
Floating equipment, inspection, 230. 
Flour purchases, restrictions removed. 183. 



Food handlers, permanent, physical examination, 

458. 
Foreman, industrial laboratory, 386. 
Foreman, general, wholesale groceries, acting, 510. 
Foreman, general, wholesale dry goods, acting, 

458. 
Foreman's orders, nonexpendable property, 399. 
Foremen, responsible for safe-keeping of mate- 
rials and equipment, 142. 
Fortifications: 

Appropriations, 1920. 395. 
Permits, 245. 
Publications, 245. 
Fortification Division personnel, 100. 
France Field, for aviation, named, 38. 
Freight charges, distribution, 130. 
Freight classification, Panama Railroad, 227. 
Freight rates, ocean, increase, 76. 
French bread and rolls in commissaries, 201. 
French cottage, sale. 67. 
French Line, new office, 1X1. 
French, night school. 128. 
Fuel oil: 

Issued to Canal departments — See Governor s 
monthly reports. 
Issued to L". S. Army and i\avy — See Gov- 
ernor's monthly reports. 
On hand — See Governor's monthly reports. 
On hand May 1, 441. 
Prices, 31, 441, 471. 
Quantities handled in three years, 502. 
Received during the month — See Governor's 

monthly reports. 
Sold to commercial ships Iron' Canal tanks 
See Governor's monthly reports. 
Fusible plugs, refilling, 558. 

G 

Gasoline - 

Drums, 183, 399, 443. 

Quantities handled in three years, 502. 

Restrictions, 129. 

Save. 35. 
Gatun hydroelectric station, d( velopment, 420 
Gatun Lake: 

Stages of surface. See each issue. 

Use of, by small boats, 245. 

Water level schedule. 427. 
Gatun Locks: 

Concrete stairs on backfill, 460. 

See Governor's monthly repoits. 
Gatun Spillway, fishing in vicinity, 222. 
General Manager, Commissary Division, acting, 

626. 
German ships rebuilt. 419. 431, 460. 
Gold, not to be exchanged for other money, 121. 
Golf links, 454. 
Governor, acting, 211. 

Grand Army men, leave to attend reunion. 1. 
Grass cutting: 

Health Department. 47 7. 

Quarters and parks. 521. 

H 

Health Department — See Governor's monthly 

reports. 
Health Officer, Chief. 396. 
Acting. 274. 



INDEX 



\ 



Holiday, November 4, 118. 

Horses, saddle, 263. 

Hospitals, transportation of employees to, 308. 

Hotel and restaurant inspector, acting, 383. 

Hours — 

Commissary, 353. 

Receiving and Forwarding Agency, 442. 
Household goods — 

Requests for customs inspections, 538, 540, 
591. 

Shipments to New York, 591. 
Humidity and hot weather, 473. 
Hunting — 

Licenses, renewal, 531. 

Restrictions of areas, 129, 211, 534, 646. 

Transportation of dogs on railroad, 323. 
Hydroelectric station, development, 420. 
Hydrographer, Chief, 338. 

Acting, 29. 
Hydrographic reports — See Governor's monthly 
reports and various issues. 



Ice, handling at quarters, 339. 
Ice cream plant, removal, 592 
Identification certificates — 

Photograph, 118. 

Revised form, 133. 

Visa for return transportation, 104 
Income tax — 

Farm returns, 404. 

Installments due, 475. 

Notice, 334. 
Influenza, quarantine precautions, 130 
Inspection for intoxicants, 254. 
Inspectors — 

Hotel and restaurants, acting, 367. 

Silver roll employees, 477. 

Supply Department, 15. 
Insurance — 

Business in Canal Zone, 1918, 425, 505. 

Rates for employees' sea shipments, 522. 

Seamen's, 49, 219. 
Intoxicants — 

Furnishing to military and naval personnel. 
199, 274, 347. 

Prohibition for Canal Zone. 274. 
Iron and steel scrap, 121. 
Items of interest. Canal, 604 



Jars, paste, empty, 342. 
Jelly and jam, local. 15. 
Jitney service — 

Official, passes for, 263, 415. 

Official, schedule. 415, 446. 454. 
Joint Commission — 

Awards, 5. 263, 275. 356. 361, 386, 458, 541. 
604, 616. 

Certificates of disagreement, 6, 95, 290, 309, 
361, 511, 541, 616. 

Decisions of the Umpire, 51, 73. 93. 108. 642. 

Notice of public hearing, 646. 

Rule for announcements of awards, 1 19. 

Rules of dismissal, 6. 204, 309, 386, 478. 522, 
534. 558. 604. 616. 



K 



• 



Kerosene drums, 399. 



La Palma radio station — 

Charges for transmitting messages, 589, 599. 

Placed in operation, 559. 
Laboratory, chemical and physical testing, Me- 
chanical Division, 343. 
Laborers, overtime, 396. 
Lamp posts, street, damaged by careless driving, 

462. 
Largest Canal operation, 607. 
Largest vessel through Canal, 607. 
Las Cascadas, closing of railroad station, 427. 
Launch schedule, Aspinwall Hotel, 346, and vari- 
ous issues. 
Launch service, Chagres River, 31. 
Launches through Canal. See Governor's month- 
ly reports. 
Laundry, rush work, 357, 361. 
Leave of absence: 

Cumulative, 232, 323. 

Due employees returning from military ot 
naval service, 359. 

Monthly payment for employees on leave. 
411. 

Sick, for alien silver employees, 382. 

To attend GrandArmy of Republic reunion, 1 . 

To attend reunion of Spanish War Veterans, 1 . 
Lepers, Christmas gifts, 199. 
Liberty bonds, post office delivery, 387. 
Liberty Day, holiday, 76, 87. 
Liberty Loan: 

Clubhouses accept bond subscriptions, 76 

Distribution of bonds. 365. 

Fourth campaign, 40, 79, 103. 

Information for silver employees, 117. 

No deductions in October, 116. 

Statement of expenses, fourth issue, 336 

Third issue, distribution, 93. 

Victory, 403, 446. 
Library : 

Ancon and Balboa clubhouses, branches, 346. 

Balboa school, during vacation, hours. 558. 
603. 

Gift books, 452. 
Licenses: 

Automobile and motorcycle. 218. 

Chauffeurs, 131, 186. 

Hunting and bicycle, renewal, 531. 

Marine applications. 604. 

Marine examinations. See various issues. 
Lights — 

Canal, relighted, 147. 

San Jose Island, Pacific side, establishment 
59. 

West Caribbean Sea, 553. 
Limon Bay — 

Small vessels, movements at night, 246. 

Use of entrance, 279. 
Linen, shortage, 146. 

Loading rules, Panama Canal vessels, 500. 
Local cargo rehandled. See Governor's monthly 
reports. 



INDEX 



Local Inspectors, Board of: 

Applications for marine licenses, 604. 

Examinations, 16. 

Meetings, 187, 211, 274. 
Lock operations. See Governor's monthly reports. 
Locomotives, sale. 468. 
Lumber: 

Not to be burned, 31, 509. 

Shipments from west coast during years 
1917. 1918, and to June 1, 1919, 516. 

M 

Magazines, needed for soldiers and sailors. 37. 
Magistrate, Cristobal, acting, 540 
Mail- 
Censorship, 4, 126. 
Chief Pharmacist, 88. 
Expediting deliveries, 200. 
Misdirected. See each issue. 
Ordnance Depot and Armament Officer, 71. 
Maintenance work, requests, 592. 
Malaria: 

Avoiding infection, 504. 
Post hospital treatment, 641. 
Unnecessary infection, 538. 
See also Governor's monthly reports. 
Manifests, cargo, 214, 335. 
Marine license, examination, Board of Local 

Inspectors. See various issues. 
Marine license applications, 604. 
Marine repairs, 87. 
Marine strike, affecting cold storage shipments. 

640. 
Mariners, lighthouse subdivision, 147. 
Marshes, salt, breeding of mosquitoes, 520, 521. 
Material, special surplus, returned to storehouses, 

443. 
Materials and equipment, foremen responsible 

for safe-keeping, 142. 
Materials and supplies, stock protection, 65. 
Meals at plantation on pasture camps, 309. 
Metal checks, substitution for photo-metal checks, 

614. 
Meteorology. See Governor's monthly reports and 

various issues. 
Mileage books, half-rate, purchase, 245. 
Military service — 

Employment of men who have become U. S. 

citizens through, 308. 
Partial list of Canal employees in, 84. 
Reinstatement of employees returning. 393 
Milk- 
Deposits for, 78. 
Prescriptions. 121. 
Miraflores: 

Approach beacons temporarily discontinued, 

335. 
Approach gas buoy temporarily removed. 

440. 
Gas buoys established, southern approach. 

335. 
Gas buoys temporarily established, southern 
approach (west bank), 611. 
Misdirected letters. See each issue. 
Money, amount which may be taken from Canal 

Zone, 2. 
Money orders. Coco Solo, 446 



Mosquitoes: 

Beginning of rainy season, 520, 521. 

Malarial infection by, 504, 538. 
Motorships through Canal. See Governor's 

monthly reports. 
Motor vehicles — 

Data for accounting, 646. 

Tags, 246. 
Movements of ocean vessels. See each issue, 
beginning page 202. 

Publication, 147. 
Municipal construction. See Governor's monthly 

reports. 
Municipal Engineer, acting, 66. 

Absence of, 262. 



N 



Nationality of ships through Canal. See Gov- 
ernor's monthly reports. 
Navy — 

Air station, Guarapo, 185. 

Units at Coco Solo. 471. 

Vessels through Canal. See Governor's 

monthly reports. 
See also Army. 
Net tonnage of ships through the Canal. Set 

Governor's monthly reports. 
New Zealand troops, resolution by Wellington 
City Council, relative to treatment at Canal. 
518. 
News agency privilege, proposals, 458, 522, 534 
News of Canal operations, 604. 
Nonexpendable property — 

Drawing from commissaries, 397 
Foreman's orders, 458. 
List, 290, 408. 
Made expendable, 318. 
Notice to Mariners — 

Changes in Atlantic entrance buoys, 336. 
Colon Harbor gas buoys replaced, 336. 
Defensive sea areas abolished, 336. 
Discovery of hidden rock in port of Coronel. 

Chile. 502. 
Gas buoys established, southern approach of 

Miraflores Locks, 335. 
Gas buoy temporarily established, Miraflores 

southern approach (west bank), 611. 
Lights, West Caribbean Sea, 553. 
Miraflores approach beacons temporarily 

discontinued, 335. 
Miraflores approach gas buoy temporarily 

removed. 440. 
Radio service to Cape Mala, 459. 
Radio station, La Palma, in operation. 559. 



Office, French Line, 181. 

Office engineer, reinstatement, 262 

Office equipment — 

Private quarters, 87, 254. 

Surplus, 15. 
Oil, Diesel — 

Price. 217. 

Quantities handled in three years. 502 



10 



INDEX 



Oil, fuel- 
On hand, 441. 
Price, 31. 
Quantities handled, 502. 

Oils and greases, prices. See various issues 

Operation and Maintenance, Department organi- 
zation, 443, 522. 

Overhead expense, 620. 

Overtime, provisions, 396. 



Pacific fleet, passage through Canal, 607. 
Painting Canal quarters, 557. 
Panama — 

Exportation of coin of, prohibited, 66. 
Orders regulating entrance of military men, 4. 
Parcels post, C. O. D. to Canal Zone. 462. 
Panama Railroad — 

Amendment to timekeeping rules, 201. 

Annual passes, 246, 309. 

Army transportation, 245. 

Changes, trains Nos. 65 and 12. 256. 

Gang passes, 308. 

Holiday schedule, 477. 

Las Cascadas station closed, 42 7. 

News agency piivilege, proposals. 458, 522, 

534. 
Organization, changes, 24(>. 
Parlor car accommodations changed, July 4, 

530. 
Stop-over privileges on passes, 604. 
Timekeeping rules, amendments, 201. 
Timetables, 190, 226, 358, 482, 530. 590. 
Trains stop at Bohio and Rio Grande, 
Saturday and Sunday, 246. 
Panama Railroad Steamship Line — 

Additional charges for heavy lilts, 459. 
Balsa wood, rate, 557. 
Not stopping at Charleston, 148. 
Sailing---, 3.37, 477. 

Steamship Cristobal returns to service, 298. 
Ticket office, moving. 460. 
Vessels supplied with bunker coal — See 
Governor's monthly reports. 
Parcels post, C. O. D. from Panama to Canal Zone, 

462. 
Passengers — 

Arriving — See ( Governor's monthly reports. 
Departing — See Governor's monthly reports. 
Inspection of incoming baggage, 442. 
Instructions, leaving the Canal Zone. 9. ■ 
Kodaks and cameras, 2. 
See also Travel Regulations 
Passes — 

Annual, 246. 309. 
Gang, 308. 
Restricted area. 245. 
Stop-over privileges, 604. 
Passports, subjects of Spain, 72 
Paste jars, empty, 342. 
Pastry, Commissary Division, 256. 
Pastures and plantations, meals at camps, 309. 
Pay, rates — 

Building trades, 3m. 
Gold roll, 14, 27. 65, 207, 215. 
Gold roll, Board, 387, 534. 
Silver roll. 153. 562. 



Paymaster, acting, 396. 

Payment of seamen's wages at ports, 622. 

Payment to Panama, 396. 

Pearl Island, light on San Jose. 59. 83. 

Permanent property board, 287. 

Permits, restricted area. 245. 

Personnel, transfer between departments, 99 

Photographs — 

Identification certificate, 118. 
-Made by Signal Corps, purchase, 505 
Official, sale, 449, 514. 
Of Panama Canal, 22, 182. 
Photography, restrictions, 22, 182. 
Photo-metal checks, 287. 

Employees leaving service. 112, 287. 
New numbers, 339. 
Replacement by metal checks, 614. 
System. 32 5. 
Physical examination, food handlers, 458. 
Piano. Balboa playground, 72. 
Pilot affairs, Board of, 552. 
Pisco, completed at Balboa Shops, 460. 
Playground, Balboa, piano, 72. 
Plugs, fusible, refilling, 558. 

Police and Fire Division, Chief, acting, 254, 509. 
Port Captain, Cristobal, acting, 464. 
Post offices — 

Cashing war savings stamps, 295. 
Closing on Sundays and holidays, 61 t. 
Delivery of Liberty Bonds, 387. 
Establishment of Canal Zone C. O. D. parcel 

post service, 461, 462. 
Money order business at Coco Solo, 446. 
Postal savings, 261. 

Posters, war, produced on Isthmus, 5 38. 
President, Panama P_ailroad, acting, 21 1 
Prices — 

Mexican fuel oil, 471. 

Coal, fuel oil and beef, 465. 479, 511, 522. 

541, 558. 
Commodities for ships and oils and greases, 

various. 449. 506. 556, 619. 
Beef, coal and fuel oil. 448, 
Scrap steel, 477. 
Price list — 

Comparison, 17 U.S. cities and Panama Rail- 
road commissaries, 89. 
Prohibition — 

Liquor, opium, prostitution, etc., 274 
Photography, 22, 182. 
Small boats in Gatun Lake, 245. 
Small vessels in Limon Bay, 246. 
Photography, 22. 182. 
Property — 

Board. 2X7. 

Expendable items, new, 348. 
Nonexpendable, 290, 348, 397, 408, 458 
Public health. See Governor's monthly reports. 
Publications — 

Concerning fortifications, 245. 
Ship's movements, 147. 

Q 

Quarantine — 

Influenza, 130. 
Night service, 380 
Officer, acting, 211. 
Officer Chief, acting. 112 



INDEX 



11 



Quartermaster, Chief, acting, 129, 275, 366. 
Quartermaster, district, Ancon-Balboa, acting, 

604. 
Quartermaster, district, Cristobal, acting, 1 12. 
Quart erm aster, district, Gatun, 66. 
Quartermaster, district. Pedro Ntiguel, acting, 66. 
Quarters — 

Canal, for Army officers, 87. 

Circular governing, tenure, 492, 505. 

Employees delayed by seamen's strike, pro- 
tection, 646. 

Family, applications, 68. 

Fuel and electric current, 492. 

Occupants, numbers, 60. 

Painting, 557. 

Set also Governor's monthly reports. 



Radio: 

Cape Mala service, 459. 

Charges for transmitting commercial mes- 
sages to or from La Palma, 589, 599. 

Commercial business with vessels, 147, 180, 
237, 459, 589, 599. 

La Palma in operation, 559. 

Outlying points, 459. 

Recstablishment of service in (anal Zone 
waters, 217 

Reports, ships approaching Canal, 595. 

Service extended to neutral vessels, 180. 

Stations, commercial business, 147, 180, 237, 
459, 589, 599. 

Weather reports from Punta Mala, 403. 
Radiograms, Canal Zone residents, delivery, 251. 
Railroad; 

Amendment in Sunday and holiday tickets. 
183. 

Bohio, trains stop Saturday and Sunday, 200, 
246. 

Closing of station at Las Cascadas, 427. 

Colon and Fort Randolph, transportation, 30. 

Connections, Fort Randolph with morning 
train to Panama, 600. 

Discontinuing train service between < iulebra 
and Las Cascadas. 589. 

Gang passes on passenger trains. 262. 

Holiday schedule, 222, 408. 

Night ticket office, Balboa Heights, i losed, 
458. 

Partial suspension of train service, S.u 
urday. June 14, 503. 

Passenger train transportation, 315. 

Rio Grande, trains stop Saturday and 
Sunday, 246. 

Special rates 142. 
lers, 57, 112. 

Sunday and holiday tickets, 150, 183. 

Time tables, 190, 226. 358. 428, 530. 590. 

Train services, July 3, i, and 5, 530. 

Trains stop on Sundays at Rio Grande, 222. 

Trains stop at Bohio, Saturday and Sun- 
day, 200. 
Rainfall- 
Excessive, Empire and Rio Grande, 105. 

Heavy, Atlantic Side, 105. 



Rainfall- 
New stations, 228. 

Porto Belio, 228. 

See ahn Governor's monthly reports and 
various issues. 
Rates — 

Balsa wood, change, 557. 

Barges, 427. 

Derrick barges. 339. 

Employees' household goods. 464. 

Floating cranes, 211. 

Knight of Columbus Welfare Workers. 626. 

Reduced on cable messages. 285. 

Reduced to Colombian ports. 37. 

Service of cranes. 112. 

Special, Panama Railroad, 142. 

Tariff charges. 388, 441, 543. 

Transportation to Trinidad and Barbados, 
637. 

Watei !8 ! 
Receipt.-, transfer, 557. 
Receipts and expenditures — See Governor's 

monthly reports. 
Receipts and sale of materials and supplies — 

See Governor's monthly reports. 
Receiving and Forwarding Agency — 

Agent appointed, 591. 

Hours, 442. 
Record — 

Dry docking at Cristobal, 603. 

High wind velocity at Gatun, 515. 
Record Bureau — Chief appointed, 413. 
Recorders, student — Promotion, 186. 
Red Cross — Election, 72. 

Finances, 1 15. 

Magazine in Spanish. 133. 

Subscriptions to magazine, 209. 
Reexportation — Sugar, 11. 

Registered gross and net tonnage of commer- 
cial ships through Canal — See Governor's 
monthly reports. 
Registration for military service, 35, 117,_182, 

227, 262. 
Reinstatement, Frank H. Wang. 600. 
Repairs, marine, 87, 460. 
Repairs, minor, to ships at Cristobal, 460. 
Report, — 

Annual, 1918, 306, 381. 

Preparations. 534. 
Reports) monthly — 

Governor's, 22, 79, 123, 191, 237, 279, 327, 
371, 431, 483, 543, 627. 

Transfers of rolling stock. 99. 
Reporting for duty prior to expiration of leave. 

614. 
Requisitioning vessels, 13, 21. 
Resident Engineer, Acting — Building Division, 

522. 
Restaurant Service, 442. 
Restricted area permits, 245. 
Reunions, G. A. R., and Spanish War Veterans. 

leave to attend. 1. 
Rio Grande, trains stop on Sundays, 222. 
Roofing, tile, sale, 418. 
Roosevelt. Theodore, death. 251. 



12 



INDEX 



Sailing ships through Canal — See Governors 

monthly reports. 
Sailings — Fanama Railroad Steamship Line, 337, 

477. 
Sales — 

Administrator's, 233, 364, 386, 408, 418, 
427. 

Amounting to more than 8200, 502. 

Commissary books to silver employees, 
442. 

French cottage, 67. 

Hoisting engine, 275, 290, 299. 

Locomotives, dump and flat cars. 468. 

Miscellany, of machinery, 610. 

New and second hand farm implements, 
364, 3S6. 

Bock and sand barges. 418. 

Roofing, tile, 418. 

Shipping Commissioner's, 323. 

Steel barge, 353, 361, 370. 

Tug Chame, 366. 

Unclaimed and insufficiently addressed 
mail, 299. 
San Jose Island, establishment of light, 59, 83. 
Sand and gravel, charges, 183. 
Savings, Postal, 261. 
Scales, car, Mt. Hope Yard, 184 
Schools- 
Assignment of teachers, 77. 

Beginners' class in Spanish, 382, 395 

College entrance examinations, 504. 

Examinations, 60. 

High, entrance examinations, 37. 

Library, Balboa, hours, 558, 603 

Night, 92. 

Night trench lessons, 128. 

Tickets in holiday time, 222 

Vacation, 408. 
Scrap — 

Iron and steel, 121. 

Prices, 446, 465. 

Rubber, rope, etc., 129. 
Sea areas, defensive, abolished. 336 
Seamen's insurance, 49, 219. 
Seamen — 

Payment at ports, 622. 

Relief and protection, 396. 
Secretary, Business — Bureau of Clubs and Play- 
grounds, 130. 
Service, selective, 35, 117, 182, 227, 262. 
Services to American seamen— See Governor's 

monthly reports. 
Services to Canal Shipping — See Governor's 

monthly reports. 
Service Men — 

Extension of Civil Service reinstatement. 1 

Insurance of, 641. 
Shipments, local, making, 130. 
Shipper's export declarations discontinued, 589. 
Shipping Act — Terms as amended by Act of 

July 15, 1918, 34. 
Shipping Board — Appreciation of work at 

Balboa Shops, 431. 
Shipping Commissioner, Bureau. 600. 
Shipping Commissioner's sales. 478, 510. 511, 
522 



Shipping information, mined areas, 237. 
Shipping statistics, manifests for, 214. 335. 
Ships, publication of movements, 147. 
Ships making transit of Canal — See Governor'! 

monthly reports. 
Ships through Canal — 

By months, 450, 471, 598 
Without cargo, but not in ballast — See Gov- 
ernor's monthly reports. 
In ballast — See Covernor's monthly reports. 
Shops, foundry and dry dock work — See Gover- 
nor's monthly reports. 
Shops, charges, itemized statements, 615. 
Sick in quarters, employees, 38. 
Sign painting — Requests, 360. 
Smallpox, 40. 

Smallpox epidemic, no deaths, .505. 
Small vessels in Lim.on Bay, 246. 
Soldiers and sailors — 

Bonus for discharged, 397. 
Magazines needed, 37. 
Spain, subjects, passports, 72. 
Spanish War Veterans — Leave, to attend re- 
union, 1. 
Special material, surplus, returned to store- 
houses, 443. 
Specie and valuable cargo. 339 
Speeders — - 

Main line of railroad, 57. 
Operation, 57, 112. 
Stability tests, Panama Canal vessels, 500. 
Stam ps — 

Rubber, return to The Panama Canal 

Press, 76. 
Thrift and War Savings, pay roll ded uctions 

discontinued, 188. 
War Savings, 

Cashing, 295. 

Continue to buy, 198. 

1919 stamps not to be sold on Canal 

Zone, 198. 
Sales to October 31, 1918, 148. 
Sales discontinued on Isthmus, 220. 
Standardization of stock in storehouses, 65. 
Statement of Canal operations — See Gover- 
nor's monthly reports. 
Station Agent, Colon, acting, 121, 129. 
Statistics, shipping, manifests for, 214, 335. 
Steamships — 

Sailing, Panama Railroad Steamship Line. 

337, 477. 
Through the Canal. See each issue, be- 
ginning page 202. 
Steamship lines — Notice to, 303. 
Steamship service — Inviting new, 447. 
Stock — 

Catalogue, 367. 

Protection, material and supplies. 65 
Standardization. 65. 
Storekeeper — ■ 

General, acting, 99. 
Cristobal Stores, acting, 298 
Storms, electric, 637. 

Strike, Marine, affecting cold storage Ail- 
ments, 640. 
Student recorders, promotion, 186. 
Submarine, exhibited at Canal ports. r>»7 



INDEX 



13 



Subscriptions, payroll deductions, changes, 540. 
Sugar — 

Allotments, 29, 39, 183, 364. 
Reexportation, 11, 60. 
Yellow, not injurious, 78. 
Superintendent of Cattle Industry, acting, 477. 
Superintendent of Coaling Plants, acting, 211. 
Superintendent of Colon Hospital, acting, 646. 
Superintendent of Pacific Locks, acting, 15. 
Superintendent, Pier 6, acting, 361. 
Superintendent, Southern District, Municipal 

Engineering Division, acting, 66, 604. 
Superintendent of Ancon Hospital, 464. 
Superintendent of Ancon Hospital, acting, 274. 
Superintendent, Assistant. Mechanical Di- 
vision, 308. 
Superintendent, Building Division in charge of 

work on Pier 6, 541. 
Superintendent of Construction, in charge of 

Building Division work at Coco Solo, 29. 
Superintendent, Mechanical Division, 338. 
Superintendent, Southern District Municipal 

Engineering Division, 5. 
Supervisor of Construction and Plantations, 

Cattle Industry, acting, 510. 
Supplement No. 5 to Tariff No. 2, 133. 
Supplement No. 6 to Tariff No. 2. 388. 
Supplement No. 7 to Tariff No. 2, 441. 
Supply Department Inspector, IS. 
Surplus special material returned to storehouses, 

443. 
Surveying Officer, acting, 509. 



Taboga — 

Guests, number, 12, 85. 

Launch service, 346, and various issues. 

Tailoiing, commissaries, 78. 

Tariff of charges for supplies and services, No. 
3. 543. 

Tariff No. 2, Supplements, 133, 217, 339, 388, 
441. 

lax, income, 1918, 334, 404, 475. 

Teachers — 

Assignments, 77. 

Examinations, colored schools, 36, 50. 

Telephone — 

Directory, 141, 285, 504. 
District quartermaster's office, Ancon- 
Balboa district, 521. 

Ten\pcrature and humidity, 473. 

Terminal Construction — Sec Governor's monthly 
reports. 

Testing laboratory, 343. 

Ticket Agent, Steamship, 88. 

Tickets, r-.ihoad, official business. 222. 

Tide- 
High, Panama Bay, 119. 
Levels, Balboa and Cristobal, 532. 

Time ball service — Notice to Mariners, 49. 

Time table, Panama Railroad, 190, 226, 358, 
482, 530, 590. 

Tolls- 
Refunds. 257, 297, 343. 44», 502. 
Levied on ships through Canal — See Gover- 
nor's monthly reports. 



Tonnage certificates, form amended, 379, 380. 
Toys, in commissaries, 146, 183, 402. 
Traffic — 

Canal, summary, 450, 471, 598. 

New Orleans, Swan Island, and Canal Zone 
resumption, 148. 
Transfers of material, 557. 
Transfers of personnel, 99. 
Transit cargo handled — See Governor's monthly 

reports. 
Transits and levels — 

Check and report, 458. 

Report to surveying officer, 360. 
Transportation, animal and motor, charges, 246. 

Colon-Fort Randolph, 30. 

Employees to hospital, 308. 

July 4, 530. 

Passenger train, 315. 

Rates to Trinidad and Barbados, 637. 
Travel regulations, 2, 9, 3i, 38, 43, 115, 134. 

180. 285, 393. 
Trespassing — Watersheds of reservoirs, 232. 
Trinidad, rates to, 637. 
Trucks, economy in heavy hauling, 442. 
Tug Chame, sale, 366. 
Typhoid fever, protective inoculation, 450. 

U 

U. S. Government vessels — 

Furnished with fuel oil from Canal tanks — 

See Governor's monthly reports. 
Transiting Canal. See each issue, beginning 
page 202. 
U. S. Government and Panama Railroad vessels 
furnished commissary supplies — See Gover- 
nor's monthly reports. 



Vaccination — 
Smallpox, 40. 
Typhoid fever, 450. 
Yellow fever, 463. 
Vegetables, shortage partly relieved, 611. 
Venerea! disease discussion, 4b0. 
Vessels — 

Clearing port, not transiting Canal — See 

Governor's monthly reports. 
Entering port, but not transiting Canal — 

See Governor's monthly reports. 
Largest, through Canal, 607. 
Movements, Sie each issue beginning 

page 202. 
Supplied wi th water — See Governor's month- 
ly reports. 
Transiting Canal. See each issue beginning 

page 202. 
Transiting Canal free of tolls — S*e Gover- 
nor's monthly reports. 
Transiting Canal, handling passengers or 
cargo at port — See Governor's monthly 
reports. 
Victory Loan, subscriptions on Isthmus, 403, 
447. 



14 



INDEX 



W 

War price*, everywhere, 3. 

War Relief Fund, collections by payroll de- 
ductions, 117, 540. 
War savings stamps, 72, 148, 198, 220, 295. 
War services rendered by Canal force, 271, 291. 
War Trade Board — 

Kxports, control. 304, 448, 589, 600. 
Regulations governing exportation of dun- 
nage, 59 
Regulations governing exports of conserved 
commodities from United States insular 
possessions and Canal Zone, 71. 
War Trade funds, transfer for expenditure in 

Canal Zone. 227. 
War Work campaign, Canal Zone, 127, 149". 

273. 
Watch Inspector, railroad. Colon, 458. 

Assistant, 399. 
Water, minimum charge, 382. 
Water level, Gatun Lake, schedule, 427. See 
also various issues. 



Water sales to ships — See Governor's monthly 
reports. 

W r eather conditions, monthly, 90, 141, 199, 262. 
297, 346, 413, 453, 508, 593, 640. 

Probabilities, 61, 119, 181, 228. 253, 337, 
365, 413, 475, 518, 601. 

Weather Reports — Radio, Punta Mala, 403. 

Wheatless Mondays, wheat conservation, 65. 

Wind records, Balboa Heights and Sosa Hill, 
92, 181, 199. 254, 308, 365, 412, 473. 518. 601. 

Wire chief, 39. 

Wood, kindling, 31. 

Working force — See Governor's monthly re- 
ports. 

Work requests, 540. 



Y 



Yachts — See Governor's monthly reports. 
Yardmaster, General — Cristobal, acting, 558. 
Yellow fever, vaccination. 463. 



-\t yt\ t a. • p ($ o 3 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, SI. 00 per year; foreign, $1.50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Volume XII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 21, 191 8. No. 





EXECUTIVE ORDER. 



Leave for the Spanish War Veterans to Attend Reunion. 

It is hereby ordered that all veterans of the Spanish-American War 
in the service of the Government of the United States who desire to 
attend the Twentieth Annual Encampment of the United Spanish 
War Veterans to be held in Baltimore, Md., September 3, 4, and 5, 
1918, shall be granted leave of absence with pay, in addition to annual 
leave provided for by statute, from September 3 to 5, inclusive, that 
they may have the opporunity to attend the encampment, and that 
they be granted as many more days' additional leave with pay in 
each case as are necessary for the journey to Baltimore, Md., and 
return to their posts of duty. 

WOODROW WILSON. 

The White House, 

June 13, 1918. 



EXECUTIVE ORDER. 



Leave for Grand Army Men to Attend Reunion. 

It is hereby ordered that all veterans of the Civil War in the service 
of the Government of the United States who desire to attend the Fifty- 
second National Encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic 
to be held at Portland, Oreg., August 18 to 24, 1918, shall be granted 
leave of absence with pay, in addition to the annual leave provided 
for by statute, from Augtist 18 to 24, inclusive, that they may have 
the opportunity to attend the encampment, and that they be granted 
as many more days additional leave with pay in each case as are 
necessary for the journey to Portland and return to their posts of duty. 

WOODROW WILSON. 
The W t hite House, 
June 21, 1918. 



EXECUTIVE ORDER. 



Extension of Civil Service Reinstatement Time to Service Men. 

A person leaving the classified civil service to engage in the military 
or naval service of the Government during the present war with Ger- 
many and who has been honorably discharged may be reinstated in 
the civil sendee at any time within five years after his discharge, pro- 
vided that at the time of reinstatement he has the required fitness to 
perform the duties of the position to which reinstatement is sought. 

WOODROW WILSON. 
The White House, 

18 July, 1918. 

No. 2917. 



2 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Notice to Passengers. 

The Panama Canal, Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 19, 1918. 
No passenger shall be allowed to carry a kodak or other photographic 
camera aboard any boat or vessel in waters of the Canal Zone. Such 
kodak or camera must be turned over to a Canal Zone customs in- 
spector who will deliver it to the purser or other officer of the vessel 
with instructions that it must not be returned to the owner until the 
vessel is out of sight of Canal waters. 

Passengers arriving at Canal ports in transit having kodaks or 
cameras in their possession shall deliver them to a Canal Zone customs 
inspector for custody until departure of the vessel upon which the 
owner intends to sail, when the procedure above outlined shall be 
followed. 

Chester Harding, Governor. 

Amount of Money Which may be Taken from Canal Zone. 

Paragraph 6* of the "Instructions to Passengers Intending to Leave 
the Canal Zone," published in The Panama Canal Record of June 
19, 1918, has been amended to read as follows: 

6. The taking out of the Canal Zone, by travelers, of any amounts of money in 
excess of those specified below is unlawful: 

(a) United States notes, National bank notes, Federal Reserve notes, or Federal 
Reserve bank notes, not to exceed $1,000 for each adult; or an equivalent value of 
currency, bank notes and coin, other than gold, of the countries for which passports 
have been duly issued to them. 

(b) Subsidiary silver coins not to exceed $ioo for each adult, such coin to be in 
lieu of a like amount of notes under (a) above. 

This means that no gold of any kind, no American silver dollars and no United 
States gold certificates or silver certificates shall be carried out without a license; 
and that no other coin or paper currency of any country, in excess of $i,ooo, shall be 
taken out of the Canal Zone by any person, except under licence. 

Applications for license may be obtained from customs officers, and license to take 
out greater amounts of money than those specified will be issued by the Governor 
only for good and sufficient reasons. Such application must be made at least 72 
hours before time of sailing. 

The penalty for a violation of the above statute is a fine of $10,000 or two years 
imprisonment, or both. 

♦Paragraph 6 does not apply to passengers leaving the Canal Zone for the United States by direct 
boat. 

Clerk and Stenographer and Typewriter Examinations Postponed. 

The local Civil Service Board announces the postponement of the 
examinations for clerk, and stenographer and typewriter, Panama 
Canal Service. The stenographer and typewriter examination was 
scheduled for August 11, and the clerk examination for August 18, 
1918. 

The board is in receipt of cable advice that the examination papers 
were shipped on the 14th instant. It will not be possible to hold either 
examination before the 25th instant. All applicants will be promptly 
notified of the dates when these examinations will be held as soon 
as the papers are received. 

Canal Record to Canal Service Men. 

American citizens who have served on The Panama Canal and are 
now in the military service of the United States will be sent a copy of 
The Panama Canal Record each week if they make application for 
this privilege. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at Canal 
post offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not posted, 
persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, Balboa 
Heights (telephone 286) : 

Specialist in agricultural economics (male and female); Grade 1, $1,800 or over a year; August 27, 
1918; No. 468.* 

Senior cost accountant (male and female) ; $2,200 to $4,200 a year; No. 155-amended.t 

Junior cost accountant (male and female) ; $1,200 to $2,000 a year; No. 155-amended.t 

ClerK qualified in accounting (male and female); $1,000 to $1,800 a year; No. 155-amended. 
Grade 1, $1,000 to SI, 400 a year; Grade 2, $1,400 to SI, 800 a year.t 

This announcement cancels announcment No. 1297-amended, issued June 13, 1918, of the examina- 
tion of clerk qualified in accounting, the examination for clerk qualified in statistics, which was also in- 
cluded in announcement No. 1297-amended, being now embodied in announcement No. 2147-amended 
of the examination for statistical expert and statistician. 

Architectural designer (male); SI 75 to $185 a month; Panama Canal Service; September 17, 1918.* 

Architectural draftsman (male) ; S142 to$175 amonth; Panama Canal Service; September 17, 1918.* 

Assistant editor (male); $2,000 a year; September 7, 1918.* 

Scenario editor (male and female); $1,600 a year; September 22, 1918.* 

Minor clerk (male and female); $900 a year; September 8, 1918. 

Inspector of safety appliances (male) ; $3,000 a year; October 6-7, 1918; No. 933. 

Inspector of hours of service (male) ; $3,000 a year; October 6-7, 1918; No. 933. 

♦Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business 
on that date. 

fNonassenibled. Applications will be received at any time, until further notice. 



Deceased Employees. 

The estates of the following deceased employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad 
Company are now in process of settlement by the office of the Administrator of Estates, and any claims 
against these estates, or any information which might lead to the location of heirs, or to the recovery of 
property, bank deposits, postal savings or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys due them, 
should be presented at his office at Balboa Heights at once in order that the estates may be settled as 
soon as possible. All claims should be itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or other public 
officer having a seal, and submitted in duplicate. These names will be publisned but once: 



Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by — 


Date of 
death. 


James Clark... 


88009 
153282 
114702 
205204 
115745 

59684 

114533 

1912 

52382 
115186 

112603 
132015 
131965 

27529 
89636 
74U67 
88114 

89408 
115737 


Barbados 

Guadeloupe 
Fortune Island. . 

Barbados 

Barbados 

Barbados 

U. S. A 

Panama 

Jamaica 

Barbados 

Barbados 

Barbados 

Jamaica 

Haiti 

Colombia 


Colon 


Panama Railroad. . . . 

Coaling Station 

Panama Raiiroad. . . . 
Panama Railroad. . . . 
Panama Railroad. . . . 
Mechanical Division. 
Panama Railroad. . . . 
Division of Posts 


Julv 30, 1918. 
July 28, 1918. 
Julv 26, 1918. 
July 24, 1918. 
July 23, 1918. 
July 25, 1918. 
July 31, 1918. 
July 14, 1918. 
July 5, 1918. 
July 27, 1918. 

August 12, 1918. 
August 2, 1918. 
August 10, 1918. 

August 10, 1918. 
August 7, 1918. 
August 11, 1918. 
August 7, 1918. 
August 11, 1918. 
August 5, 1918. 






Benjamin Jones 


Camp Bierd 






James Atwell 




Max S. Fox 


Camp Bierd 






Joseph Reid 




Panama Railroad. . . . 

Panama Railroad. . . . 

i >. & M 


Thomas Espoot alias 
Espute 








Jonathan Francis... . 
Herbert Haultauf- 


Panama 

Panama 

Cristobal 

Colon 


Supply Department. . 

Mechanical Division . 
Panama Railroad. . . . 

Marine Division 

Panama Railroad. . . . 
Panama Railroad. . . . 
Panama Railroad. . . . 


FitzIBIl 




Peter Paul 

James Phillips 


Camp Bierd 
Colon 


Carlos Paez 


Colon 



"War Prices" Everywhere. 

In a recent issue of a trade journal published in the United States, 
the statement is made that practically every country in the world has 
been effected by the advance in prices which accompanied the war. 
In the peaceful banana plantations of Central America, the rice fields 
of the Orient, the sheep ranges of Australia, the silk worm establish- 
ments of Japan, the sugar plantations of Cuba, the tin mines of the 
Malayan peninsula, the olive fields of Spain, the swine ranges of China 
and the bean plantations of South America and Manchuria, the advance 
in prices has been general. A compilation shows that the prices of the 
merchandise being exported from all parts of the world have increased 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



in most cases from 50 to 100 per cent above those prevailing before the 
war, and are materially higher than those of one year ago. 

The following table will show at a glance increases which have oc- 
curred on some of the more prominent staple items: 



Edible olive o.l llon 

§ 10e flour pound. 

geans- bushel. 

£ a w n sfk- pound y 

naw siik pound . 



1914. 



1918. 



$1.25 


$3.05 


.017 


.04 


1.66 


3.93 


.04 


.066 


'3.63 


5.50 



'1915. 



Official Circulars. 



Order Regulating Entrance of Officers and 
Enlisted Men in Republic of Panama. 

General Orders 1 Headquarters, 

No. 26. J Panama Canal Dept., 

Ancon, C Z., July 30, 1918. 

1. Effective 6.00 p. m., August 2, 1918, and 
until further orders, no officers, field clerks, or 
enlisted men of the Army, will be permitted to 
visit the Republic of Panama, or any part thereof, 
except as herein provided: 

2. (a) Married officers, field clerks, or enlisted 
men, who married prior to Mlay 29, 1918, and 
who reside in the cities of Panama or Colon, will 
be permitted to go to and from their homes upon 
obtaining a written pass, signed by the Provost 
Marshal, Ancon, or the Commanding Officer, 
Company B, Military Police, Cristobal. Such 
pass shall only entitle the holder to go to and 
from his home by the most direct route, and does 
not permit him to remain upon the streets, or to 
enter any building other than his home. 

(6) Passes for officers, field clerks, or enlisted 
men to enter the Republic of Panama on official 
business, or for limited periods for special pur- 
poses, the same to be determined by the Provost 
Marshal, or the officer designated by him, will 
be issued by the Provost Marshal, Ancon, or 
the Commanding Officer, Company B, Military 
Police, Cristobal. 

(c) All permits for the introduction of intoxi- 
cants into the Canal Zone for medicinal, sacra- 
mental, or scientific purposes, and for the delivery 
on board ships, consigned to points outside of the 
Canal Zone, and for ship's stores and for shipment 
upon the Panama Railroad from the City of 
Panama to the City of Colon or vice versa, "will 
likewise be issued by the Provost Marshal, Ancon, 
and the Commanding Officer, Company B, Mili- 
tary Police, Cristobal. 

3. All officers, field clerks, and enlisted men are 
prohibited from engaging rooms in, or going 
above the first floor of the Washington Hotel, 
except when arriving for duty in the Canal Zone 
or departing therefrom. Under such circum- 
stance, their stay will be limited to a period of 24 
hours. 

4. Officers, field clerks, and enlisted men are 
authorized to pass between Cristobal, Panama 
Railroad Station, Colon, Fort de Lesseps. and the 
Hotel Washington, using only the side walk on 
the west side of Front Street. When traveling 
in a vehicle they will use only the most direct 
route authorized by the traffic regulations. The 
above routes of travel will be more definitely 
indicated by the Provost Marshal and covered 
by local orders of the post concerned. 

5. For the purposes of this order Taboga Is- 
land, excepting such places thereon where liquor 
is sold, bartered, given away, served, drank, or 
dispensed, and the Washington Hotel, with the 
limitations above (paragraphs 3 and 4) shall be 
treated as part of the Canal Zone. 

6. General Orders No. 20, these headquarters, 
c. s., is revoked upon the taking effect of this 
order. 

(090 Panama) 



By command of Brigadier General Blatchford: 
W. D. A. Anderson, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 
Official: Acting Chief of Staff. 

Hugh T. Johnston, 
Captain, A.G. Dept., 

Acting Department Adjutant. 

Camp Otis, Subpost to Camp at Empire. 

General Orders \ Headquarters 

No. 28. / Panama Canal Dept.. 

Ancon. C Z., August 5, 1918. 

1. Effective this date. Camp E. S. Otis, ceases 
to be a separate station, and is hereby designated 
as subpost to Camp at Empire. 

2. All papers intended for Camp E. S. Otis, 
for the Commanding Officer, Porto Rico In- 
fantry, or for the detachment of the 5th Infantry 
at Camp at Empire, will be addressed through 
the Commanding Officer, Camp at Empire. 

3. Supplies required for troops at Camp E. S. 
Otis will be furnished by the proper supply officers 
at Camp at Empire. 

4. The Quartermaster at Camp'E. S. Otis will 
effect transfer of money and property accounta- 
bility to Quartermaster, Camp at Empire, as 
soon as practicable. 

(323.7) 

By command of Brigadier General Blatchford: 
W. D. A. Anderson, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 
Official A ding Chief of Staff . 

Hugh T. Johnston, 

Captain, A. G. Dept.. N. A., 
Acting Department Adjutant. 



Censorship of Mail. 

General Orders \ Headquarters 

No. 30. / Panama Canal Dept., 

Ancon, C. Z., August 16, 1918. 

1. The following instructions are published in 
amendment and addition to those contained in 
General Orders, No. 23, these headquarters, c. s., 
and supersedes the letters of instruction from these 
headquarters, subject: "Censorship of Mail," 
dated June 27, 1918. July 11, 1918, and July IS. 
1918. 

2. Incoming mail that has been censored by 
some other office need not be reexamined. 

3. When the list of magazines and newspapers 
addressed to individuals and organizations during 
the period of one month has been compiled and 
sent in to this office as directed in letter of June 
27, 1918, no further censorship of this class of mail 
need be made, except as ordered. 

4. Incoming mail to officers and their im- 
mediate families need not be censored; mail 
addressed to other members of their households 
shall be examined. 

5. Mail received from points on the Canal 
Zone, if not previously censored, should be ex- 
amined. 

6. Paragraphs 2, 3, 4, and 5, above, are amen- 
datory to paragraph 6, General Orders, No. 23, 
these headquarters, c. s. 

7. Incoming papers, packages, etc., not regis- 
tered, insured, or C. 0. D., may be turned over 
to the Censorship Officer of the organization to 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



which the addressee belongs for examination. 
This is an amplification of the instructions con- 
tained in paragraph 8, General Orders, No. 23, 
these headquarters, c. s. 

8. Paragraph 10, General Orders, No. 23, these 
headquarters, c. s., is rescinded and the following 
substituted therefor: 

All official correspondence between officials of 
the Army, officials of the Army and Navy, and 
officials of the Army and those of the Panama 
Canal, where such correspondence is sent to 
parties in the Canal Zone, need not be censored; 
such uncensored mail will therefore not be held 
by the postmasters as directed in paragraph 9, 
General Orders, No. 23, these headquarters, c. s. 
Official correspondence between officials of the 
Army and officials of any department in the 
United States Government not stationed in the 
Canal Zone will be censored in the same manner 
as the mail noted in paragraph 7, General Orders, 
No. 23, these headquarters, c. s. 

9. At those posts in this department where 
civilian families are stationed in Government 
Reservations and are connected with the military 
organizations in any capacity, instructions should 
be given them regarding the fact that their mail 
must be censored, and incoming mail addressed to 
such parties will be turned over by postmasters 
at such camps to the Censorship Officer. 

10. Letters in foreign languages, except Ger- 
man, that can be read and examined by officers 
in the command should be turned over to them 
for censoring. Foreign language mail, except 
German, which can not be translated at the camp 
will be sent direct to the Mail Censor, Canal 
Zone, Box 100, Cristobal, for censoring. Com- 
manding officers will notify all members of their 
commands that mail sent or received by them, 
written in uncommon languages, will have to be 
sent to the Postal Censorship Committee at 
New York City for translation before delivering 
to addressee. 

11. Objectionable matter shall be deleted 
from correspondence, etc., by cutting out of the 
letter that part which is improper and objection- 
able. To prevent the destruction in this manner 
of harmless correspondence that may be on the 
other side of the sheet, it is deemed advisable 
that letters should be written on only one side 
of the sheet. 

12. No matter in the German language, either 
printed or written, will be passed by the censors, 
except permissible mail to and from prisoners of 
war and interned enemy aliens. All communi- 
cations printed or written in the German lan- 
guage, with the above exceptions, will be sent to 
the Intelligence Officer of this department for 
censoring. 

13. The provisions of paragraph 16, General 
Orders, No. 23, these headquarters, c. s., especial- 
ly as relates to the movement of any troops, will 
receive particular attention. With special 
reference to the families of noncommissioned 
officers whose organizations may in the near 
future be ordered from the Isthmus, it is per- 
mitted such families to inform their friends or 
relatives in the States, where this may be neces- 
sary, that they (the family) expect to corre to the 
States to stay for a while, or to make their home 
there. It is absolutely necessary though that 
such information be so worded as to convey no 
knowledge of the actual movement of the troops 
concerned, and the foregoing will not be permitted 
unless investigation shows that the deletion of 
such information would work a serious hardship 
on the families in question. 

14. Attention of all officers is specially directed 
to Section III, General Orders, No. 58. War 
Department, 1918, concerning correspondence 
with strangers. 

(000.73) 

By command of Brigadier General Blatchford: 
Roy O. Henry, 
Major, 152d Depot Brigade, 
Official Acting Chief of Staff. 

Hugh T. Johnston, 

Captain, A. G. Department, 
Acting Department Adjutant. 



Superintendent, Southern District, Munci- 
pal Engineering. 

The Panama Canal, 
Municipal Division. 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 1, 1918. 
All concerned — Effective August 13, 1918, Mr. 
R. C. Hardman is appointed Superintendent of 
the Southern District, Municipal Division, vice 
Mr. W. J. Spalding, resigned. 

D. E. Wright. 
Municipal Engi7ieer. 



Joint Commission. 



Awards. 

In the mailer of the claim of Juan Diaz for prop- 
erty located at BailamoHos, award No. 181, docket 
No: 1730, August 5, 1918. — On the 6th day of 
June, 1914, Juan Diaz filed this claim before the 
Joint Commission asking that he be awarded 
damages in the sum of $10,000 on account of the 
Government of the United States having expro- 
priated 26 hectares of fenced pasture land, 
upon which were growing a number of fruit trees. 

After filing the claim, and before the same came 
on for trial, said Juan Diaz died testate, leaving 
his infant son, Simon Diaz, as his sole heir at law. 

By the terms of his will he left to his son his 
entire estate, and named Justo Ortiz as the 
executor of his last will and testament, who now 
prosecutes this claim. 

The claim was tried upon the theory that Juan 
Diaz held title to said land by right of prescrip- 
tion, but at the conclusion of the evidence counsel 
for claimant admitted that the evidence wholly 
failed to show that he had ever held title to said 
real estate by prescription, or otherwise; and 
for that reason no award can be made for the 
land. 

The evidence shows that he occupied the lands 
for many years as a cultivator, and owned im- 
provements thereon consisting of a fenced grass 
pasture and a number of fruit trees. 

From all the evidence we find a fair value of all 
improvements to be $750. 

Therefore, an award is hereby made against the 
United States of America in favor of the estate of 
Juan Diaz, deceased, in the sum of $750 United 
States currency, for all right, title, and interest 
the said Juan Diaz may have possessed in and to 
all improvements of whatever nature located on 
said land, and any and all damages sustained on 
account of the expropriation of this property by 
the United States of America. 

It is ordered that said sum of $750 United States 
currency be paid to Justo Ortiz, said executor, 
provided he has, as such executor, filed in the 
proper court of the Republic of Panama a bond 
covering the amount of this award. 

If payment or tender of payment of this award 
is not made on or before the 5th day of September, 
1918, said award shall thereafter bear interest at 
the rate of six per centum per annum until paid. 

Federico Boyd, Burt New, R. J. Alfaro, 
George A. Connolly', Commissioners. 



In the matter of the claim of Enrique Bizot for 
a portion of the trad of lands known as "La 
Polvareda," award No. 182, docket No. 1757, 
August 8, 1918. — After the trial and determina- 
tion of the claim of Henry and Emile Bizot, 
docket No. 1 759, for lands known as "El Guabal," 
counsel for both sides filed a stipulationsubmit- 
ting the claim of Enrique Bizot, docket No. 1757. 
to the Commission on the evidence aduced by the 
claimants and the United States during the trial 
of the prior case. 

In accordance with this stipulation, the Com- 
mission has considered the evidence in the case 
of Henry and Emile Bizot, docket No. 1759, in 
appraising the value of the property claimed by 
Enrique Bizot in his claim, docket No. 1757, and 
has unanimously decided on an award of $1,500, 
United States currency. 

Therefore, an award is hereby made against the 
United States of America in favor of Enrique 
(Henri) (Henry) Bizot, in the sum of $1,500 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



United States currency for all right, title, and 
interest the said Enrique Bizot may possess or 
may have possessed in and to the property known 
as "La Polvareda," located in the district of 
Ancon, near the town of Arraijan, subject of 
claim, docket Xo. 1757, including all damages 
sustained by him on account of the expropriation 
of this property by the United States of America. 

If payment or tender of payment of this award 
is not made. on or before the 8th day of Septem- 
ber, 1918, said award shall thereafter bear inter- 
est at the rate of six per centum per annum until 
paid. 

Federico Boyd, Burt New, R. J. Alfaro, 
George A. Connolly, Commissioners. 



In the matter of the claim of Francis Schuber, 
for propertv located near Panama, award No. 
183, docket No. 3098, August 9, 1018. — An award 
is hereby made against the United States in favor 
of Francis Schuber in the sum of $250 United 
States currency, for all right, title, and interest 
the said Francis Schuber may possess or may 
have possessed in and to the property located 
near Panama subject of claim docket No. 3098, 
including any and all damages sustained by him 
on account of the expropriation of this property 
by the United States of America. 

In accordance with the request of counsel for 
the claimant made during the trial of the above 
entitled case, the Commission has disregarded 
the motion of claimant's counsel filed February 1, 
1918, to amend this claim in the sum of S10.000. 

If payment or tender of payment of this award 
is not made on or before the 9th day of September, 
1918, said award shall thereafter bear interest at 
the rate of six per centum per annum until paid. 

Federico Boyd, Burt New, R. J. Alfaro, 
Georfe A. Connolly, Commissioners. 



Rule of Dismissal. 

In the matter of the claims of Demetria Perez 
and Evangelina Angulo, in which rules of default 
have been entered, rule of dismissal No. 395, docket 
No. 2771, docket No. 3556, July 8, 1918.— On 
April 13, 1916, the Joint Commission, with the 
approval of the two Governments parties to the 
treaty, adopted a rule relative to the continu- 
ance or dismissal of claims in which the claim- 
ants are not ready for trial on the date their claims 
are set for hearing or who fail to appear for hear- 
ing. This rule provides for the entering of a rule 
of default against claimants who fail to appear 
when called. 

The said rule also provides that: 
"Upon the entry of such rule of default (at 
the end of each month) notice thereof shall be 
given by four successive publications, one each 
week, in the English and Spanish languages, in 
newspapers of general circulation in the Republic 
of Panama, notifying such claimants to appear in 
person or by attorney within sixty (60; days from 
the first of said publications and show good and 
sufficient cause why such default should be set 
aside, and take active steps to prosecute their 
claims, and failing to so appear within CO days 
ram said first publication their claims will be 
considered as having been either settled or aban- 
doned and the same will be dismissed and forever 
barred." 

In the claims of Demetria Perez, docket No. 
2771 and Evangelina Angulo, docket No. 3556, 
set for hearing on March 13, 1918, and April 1, 
1918, respectively, there was no appearance on 
the part of claimants or of their attorneys, and 
rules of default were accordingly entered against 
them. 

Due notice having been given as provided for 
in the above-quoted section of the rule of the 
Commission, and there having been no appear- 
ance by the claimants in person or by counsel 
during the 60-day period fixed in the rule referred 
to, which began on May 7, 1918, the foregoing 
claims against the United States are hereby 
dismissed and forever barred. 

Federico Boyd, Burt New, R. J. Alfaro, 
George A. Connolly, Commissioners. 



Certificates of Disagreement. 

In the matter of the claim of John J. Gibbons, for 
25 hectares of land located near Ancon in the prop- 
erty known as "Guayabal," certificate of disagree- 
ment, rule No. 396, docket No. 1365. — Pursuant 
to the provisions of Article XV of the Treaty 
between the United States of America and the 
Republic of Panama, ratified February 26, 1904, 
the Commission hereby desires to bring to the 
notice of the Umpire, duly appointed under the 
said Treaty, that the Commission has been unable 
to reach an agreement in the above entitled 
matter on the following, to wit: 

The Question of Value. 

The Commission herewith certifies this dis- 
agreement to the Umpire appointed under the 
Treaty as provided for Article XV thereof. 

Done at the Xational Palace, Panama, Re- 
public of Panama, this 8th day of July, 1918. 

Federico Boyd, Bvrt New, R. J. Alfaro, 
George A. Connolly, Commissioners. 



In the matter of the claim of Jose Maria Bar- 
ranco, for property known as "Los A7igeles," 
certificate of disagreement, rule No. 397, docket 
No. 1696. — Pursuant to the provisions of Article 
XV of the Treaty between the United States of 
America and the Republic of Panama, ratified 
February 26, 1904, the Commission hereby 
desires to bring to the notice of the Umpire, duly 
appointed under the said Treaty, that the Com- 
mission has been unable to reach an agreement 
in the above entitled matter, on the following, 
to wit: 

The Question of Value and the Question of Liability 
as to Twenty-five Hectares. 

The Commission herewith certifies this dis- 
agreement to the Umpire appointed under the 
Treaty as provided for in Article XV thereof. 

Done at the National Palace, Panama, Re- 
public of Panama, this 7th day of August, 1918. 

Federico Boyd, Burt New, R. J. Alfaro, 
George A. Connolly, Commissioners. 



Misdirected Letters. 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 21, 1918. 
The following insufficiently addressed letters 
and papers have been received in the office of the 
Director of Posts, and may be obtained upon 
request of the addressees. Requests may be made 
by telephone, calling No. 182, Balboa: 
Daly, Hugh F. Landus, Mrs. J. W. 

Etrler, Charlie Maheris, John (Box 26) 

Eliet, Simon Miller, Miss Marae 

Evans, Albert Henry Soto, Fruto T. 
Gatehouse, Fred E. Susenbach, W. F. 
Gilkes, Leon A. Thomas, G. S. (Box 656) 

Hamilton, John Winkels, Mrs. Fred 

John, Miss Theresa 



Stages of the Chagres and the Lakes. 

The maximum elt-vations of the Chagres River, 
Gatun Lake, and Mirarlores Lake, in feet above 
mean sealevel, during the week, ending at mid- 
night of Saturday, August 17, were as follows: 



1 
Date 


Chagres River 


Gatjn Lake 


Mira- 
fiores 
Lake. 


Vigia 


Alha- 
juela 


Gam- 
boa 


Gatun 


Sun., Aug. 11 

Tue3., Aug. 13 

Wed., Aug. 14 
Thurs., Aug 15.... 

Sat, Aug. 17 


129.05 
129.30 
132.90 
130.30 
12S.95 
128.70 
12S.60 


93. 9S 
94.20 
96.88 
95.43 
93.81 
93.47 
93.37 


85.22 
85.18 
85.20 
85.25 
85.18 
85.25 
85.18 


85.15 
85.15 
85.20 
85.20 
85.09 
85.19 
85.15 


53.90 
54.00 
54.17 
54.50 
54.20 
54.26 
53.90 


Height of low water 
to nearest foot. 


126.0 


91.0 









Cable Address of The Panama Canal. 

The cable address of The Panama Canal, on 
the Isthmus, is "Pancanal, Panama;" in the 
United States, "Pancanal, Washington." 



THH PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Maximum Quantity Sugar. 

Effective August 14, sales of sugar (white, yellow, brown, and Panela) arc limited to 
5 pounds to a customer. 

Chocolate. 

A supply of chocolate in cake form was received from the Panama Canal plan- 
tations last week and forwarded to the line stores where it met with ready sale. 

Packing Cases. 

Empty packing cases are sold to patrons needing them at 10 cents for each 20 
pounds weight. This price includes delivery by the commissary making the sale. 

Cabbage. 

Five tons of best Southern cabbage were received by a recent steamer for the 
manufacture of sauerkraut in the industrial laboratory. 

Salad Dressing. 

The commissaries are featuring a salad dressing made of crisp, luscious olives, and 
sweet pimento peppers, with oil, eggs, and spices. This is a new condiment and is 
selling very wed. 

Preserves. 

The marmalade and watermelon preserves put up by the Industrial laboratories 
are being well received in the line commissaries, favorable comments being heard 
regarding their appearance and flavor. 

Apples, Potatoes, Tobacco. 

A trade journal states that a good crop of apples is indicated in New York, the 
leading producing state. 

Good reports concerning the potato and tobacco crops have also been received. 

Fruit. 

Another shipment of pears was received from the United States this week and was 
distributed to the line stores where ready sales were reported. The first shipment of 
Casaba melons of the season was received on the same boat. 

Ice Cream in Fibre Containers. 

Beginning at once brick ice cream will be packed at the plant in fibre containers 
until the stock of approximately 5,000 now on hand is exhausted. 

A very convenient way of serving is afforded by this container, it being necessary 
merely to cut through the container and cream at the marks indicated at the edges. 

Ice cream is being sold in |-pint containers. 

Shoes. 

Recent inspection of the shoe stocks in the line stores show^s them to be in very 
good condition. Every commissary is reporting good sales, particularly on the new 
styles in ladies' shoes. The brands now carried are giving almost complete satis- 
faction and few complaints or claims are made. A new line of men's shoes has been 
on requisition for some time and should be received soon. 

Footwear. 

A recent advice from the Commissary Purchasing Agent in New York again 
emphasizes the continued difficulty in obtaining the varied grades of footwear to 
which the Canal Zone Trade has been accustomed. Information is given that makers 
of men's slippers are unable to procure the necessary leather for their manufacture, 
consequently the order for a supply thereof has been cancelled. 

Swiss Embroideries. 

Occasionally small shipments of goods are received from Europe, the Commissary 
Division's connection in London looking out for whatever bargains are obtainable 
from time to time. A consignment of Swiss embroideries has just been received and 
.will be placed on sale at all commissaries on Saturday, August 24. These embroideries 
comprise a wide range of patterns and widths of edgings, insertions and flouncing* 
and should prove particularly acceptable to the trade. 



8 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Balsa or Kapok Pillows. 

_ The Commissary Division is selling at present pillows of Balsa wool at $1.15, made 
in The Panama Canal mattress factory. The filling is a prime wood fibre, shipped 
from Costa Rica. Balsa (or kapok, under which name it is more widely known\ 
is now used almost exclusively by the United States Navy for mattresses, pillows, 
cushions, and life preservers. 



MEATLESS RECIPES. 



Peanut Loaf with Cream Sauce. 

1 cup chopped peanuts or \ cup milk 
\ cup peanut butter 2 eggs 

If teaspoons salt \ teaspoon pepper. 

4 cups mashed potatoes 
Mix peanuts, potato, salt and pepper; add milk and well-beaten eggs. Stir until 
thoroughly mixed, pour into a greased baking dish and bake in a moderate oven 30 
minutes or until firm. Serve with cream sauce. 

Cream Sauce. 

2 tablespoons fat \\ cups milk 

3 tablespoons flour 1 teaspoon chopped parsley 
! teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon chopped onion. 
\ teaspoon pepper 

Melt fat, add flour, salt and pepper; when mixed remove from fire and add milk. 
Return to fire and bring to the boiling point, stirring constantly. Add parsley and 
onion and serve. 

The parsley and onion may be omitted if desired. 

Bean and Nut Loaf. 

1 cup baked beans \ cup peanut butter 

1 cup crumbs 1 tablespoon flour 

1 teaspoon salt \ cup hot milk or water 

1 teaspoon grated onion \ cup of chopped walnuts. 

\ teaspoon pepper 
Mash beans and mix with crumbs, nuts, seasoning, and onion. Cream the peanut 
butter and flour together and gradually add hot liquid; mix with bean mixture and 
shape in a loaf. 

Place in a greased baking pan, pour 1 cup water around loaf and bake 40 minutes 
in a moderate oven. 

Serve with Italian sauce. 

Italian Sauce. 
3 tablespoons fat ' If cups warm water 

5 tablespoons flour 1 tablespoon grated onion 

1 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon chopped pimentos 
\ teaspoon pepper Juice of 1 lemon. 

Melt fat, add flour, salt, and pepper and cook until brown. Remove from fire and 
add water; return to fire, bring to boiling point, stirring constantly and add onions, 
pimentos and lemon. 

Liberty Loaf with McAdoo Sauce. 

\ cup rice 1 cup chopped walnuts or pecans 

8 cups boiling water 1 cup crumbs 

2 teaspoons salt 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 
\\ cups rice stock or hot water 1 cup grated cheese. 

Wash and cook rice in boiling salted water until tender. Drain, reserving rice 
stock for loaf and sauce. Mix rice, cheese, nuts and crumbs; add stock and Worcester- 
shire sauce, mix thoroughly, pour into a greased pan and bake in a moderate oven 
30 minutes or until firm. Serve with McAdoo sauce. 

McAdoo Sauce. 

2 tablespoons fat 1 \ cups rice stock or hot water 

3 tablespoons flour \ cup chopped pimentos 
1 teaspoon salt \ teaspoon pepper. 

Melt fat, add flour, salt and pepper; when mixed remove from fire and add rice 
stock. Return to fire and bring to boiling point, stirring constantly. Add pimentos 
and serve. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter February (3, 191S, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 28, 191 8. No. 2. 

Instructions to Passengers Intending to Leave the Canal Zone. 

The Panama Canal, Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 15, 1918. 

The following new and revised rules for passengers leaving the Canal 
Zone, many of which have been in effect for some time but are here 
stated for the information of all concerned, will be put in force at 
once. 

In order to enforce the provisions of the Espionage Act and the 
Trading with the Enemy Act, approved June 15, 1917, and October 
6, 1917, respectively, and to promote the comfort and convenience of 
travelers, the following rules should be strictly complied with: 

1. Limit the articles on your person or in your baggage, as far as 
possible, to necessary wearing apparel and toilet articles. 

2. All baggage which is not to be retained in the stateroom should be 
delivered at the baggage room 24 hours before sailing time. All 
passengers having such baggage should arrange with the Chief Customs 
Inspector to have the baggage examined as far in advance of sailing 
time as possible. (See paragraph 10.) 

3. For all articles of commerce a Shipper's Export Declaration must 
be surrendered to the Chief Customs Inspector in the Terminal Build- 
ing at the port of departure before such articles may be laden on board 
of the vessel. Such declaration should be applied for in the customs 
office at least 48 hours before departure. This includes commercial 
travelers' samples, etc , unless they have been previously brought into 
Panama or the Canal Zone by the same carrier, in which case no 
export declaration is required. Customs officials will determine as to 
whether or not an export license is required. Failure to comply with 
the above may result in seizure of the goods and makes the passenger 
liable to prosecution. 

4. It is unlawful for any person to send, or take out of, or bring into, 
or to attempt to send or take out of, or bring into the Canal Zone any 
letter or other writing, or tangible form of communication, except in 
the regular course of the mail. The penalty for a violation of this 
statute is a fine of $10,000 or ten years' imprisonment, or both. 

In absolutely necessary cases a license to take or send such matter 
out of the Canal Zone outside the regular course of the mails may be 
granted upon application to the Chief, Division of Civil Affairs, 
Balboa Heights, at least 72 hours before the time of sailing. Applica- 
tion forms may be obtained from the customs offices or the Civil 
Affairs office. In case the letter or other writing, or tangible means of 
communication, is to be delivered directly or indirectly to an enemy 
or ally of enemy country, the application for a license must be made to 
the War Trade Board at Washington. No such license will be granted 
in the Canal Zone. 

5. Travelers should not have in their possession, either on their 
person or in their baggage, any firearms, ammunition or explosives, 



10 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

nor any written or printed matter, including accumulations of old 
letters and papers, as the possession of any letter or other writing, book, 
map, plan or other paper, or picture, or any telegram, cablegram, or 
wireless message, or any form of communication, may subject the 
person or persons concerned to detention. (See paragraph 10.) 

6. The taking out of the Canal Zone, by travelers, of any amounts of 
money in excess of those specified below is unlawful : 

(a) United States notes, National Bank notes, Federal Reserve notes, 
or Federal Reserve Bank notes, not to exceed $1,000 for each adult; 
or an equivalent value of currency, bank notes and coin, other than 
gold, of the countries for which passports have been duly issued to 
them. 

(b) Subsidiary silver coins not to exceed $100 for each adult, such 
coin to be in lieu of a like amount of notes under (a) above. 

This means that no gold of any kind, no American silver dollars and 
no United States gold certificates or silver certificates shall be carried 
out without a license; and that no other coin or paper currency of any 
country, in excess of $1,000 shall be taken out of the Canal Zone by 
any person, except under license. 

Applications for license may be obtained from customs officers, and 
license to take out greater amounts of money than those specified will 
be issued by the Governor only for good and sufficient reasons. Such 
application must be made at least 72 hours before time of sailing. 

The penalty for a violation of the above statute is a fine of $10,000 or 
two years' imprisonment, or both. (See paragraph 10.) 

7. All persons leaving the Canal Zone (except employees of the 
United States Government en route to the United States, for whom 
special rules are provided) are required to exhibit to the Registration 
Officer in the Terminal Building, at either port, passports from the 
countries of which they are citizens or subjects. Passports must be 
visaed by the local consular representative of the country of destina- 
tion. Furthermore, all aliens who desire to travel on United States 
vessels, regardless of the vessel's destination, must have their pass- 
ports visaed by the American consular official at Panama or Colon. 
Departure permits will be issued by Registration Officers, and no 
ticket will be sold by steamship companies until departure permits 
have been obtained. 

8. All passengers will be required to make declaration, on a form 
provided for that purpose by the Registration Officer, as to the com- 
munications or amounts of money which they contemplate carrying 
with them at the time that departure permit io secured. (See para- 
graph 10.) 

9. On sailing day, passengers must appear at the dock in ample 
time to permit inspection of their documents and stateroom baggage. 
The time when this inspection is to be made by customs authorities 
for any outgoing vessel can be learned from the steamship company. 

10. Paragraphs 2, 6, and 8 do not apply to passengers leaving the. 
Canal Zone for the United States by direct boat. 

As regards paragraph 5, the communications, maps, pictures, written 
matter, etc., mentioned therein, may be taken ouc of the Canal Zone 
by passengers bound direct to the United States at their own risk. 
Upon entering a United States port passengers will be required to 
describe all such papers upon their customs declarations. Such dec- 
laration will relieve the passenger of the penalty provided by law 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 11 

for carrying even innocuous papers, but will not insure the return of 
the papers if they are seized by the United States customs authorities 
at the port of entry. 

11. Friends and relatives of outgoing passengers, or of the officers 
or members of the crew, will not be permitted to enter the docks on 
sailing day, except for very special reasons, when individual passes 
will be issued by the Port Captain. They should be instructed not to 
send any fruit, flowers, candy, cigars, or other gifts to the vessel. 

CHESTER HARDING, 

Governor. 



Employees Returning from United States. 

Since the publication of the notice in The Panama Canal Record 
of July 10, stating that vise of identification certificates by customs 
officials at port of departure in the United States is necessary before 
steamship tickets can be procured, advice has been received that all 
passengers over 14 years of age must call on the Customs authorities in 
person for vise of their steamship transportation authority. Passengers 
should call at the steamship office for instructions as to where and how 
to procure such vise, early in the morning of the date specified for their 
arrival at the port of sailing, or preferably the day before. After 
securing the vise they should return to the steamship office and secure 
their passage tickets. 

Censorship of "News Stories." 
The Panama Canal, Executd7e Department, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 26, 1918. 
Advice has been received from the Censorship Board to the effect 
that all news stories and other matter for publication in the United 
States should be addressed to the Poscal Press Censor, No. 20 Broad 
Street, New York City, N. Y., for instance, as follows: 

Editor, Evening World, 

New York City, N. Y., U. S. A. 
Via Postal Press Censor, 
No. 20 Broad St., N. Y. C. 
The Press Censor will read and pass on all mail the same day as 
received. 

Mail not routed through the Postal Press Censor will be stopped 
at the first United States post office receiving it. The postal author- 
ities will then forward it to the General Censorship, which will send it 
to the Postal Press Censor. Failure to observe the above regulations 
will, therefore, result in delay. 

This is applicable only to mail containing original articles for publi- 
cation, clippings, or quotations from other publications, confirmation 
of press cablegrams, and photographs intended for publication. 

C. H. Calhoun, 
Chief, Division of Civil Affairs. 



Sugar Reexportation. 

The Panama Canal, Executive Department, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 26, 1918. 
The War Trade Board at Washington has placed restrictions upon 
the reexportation of sugar from the Canal Zone, in order to meet the 



12 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

shortage in the United States, and for the time being no licenses for 
the reexportation of this commodity will be granted by the Canal 
Zone authorities. 

C. H. Calhoun, 
Chief, Division of Civil Affairs. 

Canal Record to Canal Service Men. 

American citizens who have served on The Panama Canal and are 
now in the military service of the United States will be sent a copy of 
The Panama Canal Record each week if they make application for 
this privilege. 

Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at Canal 
post offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not posted, 
persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, Balboa 
Heights (telephone 286): 
Assistant in dairy cattle breeding (male); $2,000 to $2,200 a vear; September 24, 1918.* 
Chemical laboratorian (male and female); S900 to $1,500 a year; September 24, 1918.* 
Chemist's aid (m#le and female); $720 to $900 a year; September 24, 1918.* 
Assistant in fish investigations (male); $1,200 to $1,620 a year; September 24, 1918.* 
Sugar chemist and technologist (male); Grade 1, $1,800 to $2,400 a vear; Grade 2, $1,200 to $1 600 
a year; September 24, 1918.* 

Business principal (male and female); SI, 200 a year; October 6 and 7, 1918. 
Telephone auditor (male and female); $1,500 to $1,800 a year; September 17, 1918; No. 510.* 
Physicist; No. 116C; SI, 500 to $1,800 a year.f (The United States Civil Service Commission 
announces that until further notice both men and women will be admitted to this examination. 
Negative cutter (male and female); SI, 000 to SI, 200 a year; No. 506; September 17, 1918.* 
Mimeograph operator (male and female); $720 to SI, 200 a year; No. 488-amended; September 8, 
1918. 

Field matron (female); $600 to S840 a year; No. 495; September 22. 1918. 

Cancellation notice — The United States Civil Service Commission announces that as sufficient 
eligibles have been obtained from the continuous open competitive nonassembled examination for 
assistant to business manager, until further notice no applications for this examination will be received 
for the Departmental Service in Washington, D. C, unless filed with the Commission at Washington, 
D. C prior to the hour of closing business on August 22, 1918. 

Automotive engineer (male); $2,400 to S5.000 a year; No. 185-amended.t 
Automotive designer (male); $1,800 to S3, 000 a year; No. 185-amended.t 
Automotive draftsman (male) ; $1,400 to $2,000 a year; No. 185-amended.t 
Automotive tracer (male) ; §1,000 t<j SI. 400 a year; No. 185-amended.t 

Operative (male and female); $720 to $1,000 a year; No. 223-amended, supplemental, September 
22, 1918. 

Local and assistant inspector of boilers (male); $2,100 to $2,500 a year; No. 469. t 
Local and assistant inspector of hulls (male) ; $2,100 to $2,500 a year; No. 469. t 
Bacteriologist (male); $1,800 to S2, 500 a year; No. 498; September 10, 1918.* 
Horticulturist (male); $2,100 to $2,760 a year; No. 507; September 17, 1918.* 
Addressograph mechanician (male) ; $1,000 to SI, 500 a year; No. 509; September 17, 1918.* 

♦Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business 
on that date. 

tNonassembled. Applications will be received at any time, until further notice. 



At Taboga. 

Guests at the Hotel Aspinwall for week-end, August 26: House 

count and number of meals served as follows: 

Saturday, August 25: 

House count 100 

Sunday, August 26: 

Breakfast 112 

Luncheon 140 

Dinner 64 

Total 316 



Deceased Employees. 

The estates of the following deceased employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad 
Company are now in process of settlement by the orrice of the Administrator of Estates, and any claims 
against these estates, or any information which might lead to the location of heirs, or to the recovery of 
property, bank deposits, postal savings or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys due them, 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



13 



should be presented at his office at Balboa Heights at once in order that the estates may be settled as 
soon as possible. All claims should be itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or other public 
officer having a seal, and submitted in duplicate. These names will be published but once: 



Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by — 


Date of 
death. 


William Dot tin 


133943 
172210 


Grenada 

Grenada 

Barbados 

Colombia 

Jamaica 


Colon 


Panama Canal Press. 
Health Department.. 

Marine Division 

Panama Railroad Co 
Civil Administration. 


August 17. 1918. 
August 9, 1918. 
August 16, 1918. 
August 5 1918. 
August 12, 1918. 




Colon 

Colon 

Colon 




116737 

114026 


Arthur Riley 



Official Circulars. 



Acting Chief Health Officer. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 21, 1918. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

Effective this date, and during the absence of 
Maj. A. T. McCormack on leave of absence, Maj. 
R. L. Loughran will act as Chief Health Officer. 
Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Act of Congress— Authority to Prescribe 
Charter and Freight Rates and Requi- 
sition Vessels. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 19, 1918. 
Circular No. 600-57: 

The Act of Congress Quoted below is published 
for the information of all concerned. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



AN ACT To confer on the President power to 
prescribe charter rates and freight rates and 
to requisition vessels, and for other purposes. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives of the United Stales of America in 
Congress assembled, That when used in this Act — 

(a) The term "United States" includes any 
State, Territory, or District of the United States, 
the insular possessions, the Canal Zone, and all 
lands or waters subject to the jurisdiction of the 
United States. 

(6) The term "person" includes corporations, 
partnerships, associations, and States, munici- 
palities, and other subdivisions thereof. 

(c) The term "charter" means any agreement, 
contract, lease, or commitment by which the 
possession or services of a vessel are secured for a 
period of time, or for one or more voyages, 
whether or not a demise of the vessel. 

Sec. 2. That the President may exercise the 
power and authority hereby vested in him through 
such agency or agencies as he shall determine from 
time to time. 

Sec. 3. That all power and authority hereby 
vested in the President or by him delegated and 
all restrictions imposed in this Act shall cease 
upon the proclamation of the final treaty of peace 
between the United States and the Imperial 
German Government: Provided, That if, in the 
judgment of the President, the tonnage shortage 
at such time is so severe that national interests 
of the United States are jeopardized, he may, by 
proclamation, extend the provisions of this 
Act for a further period of not exceeding six 
months. 

Sec. 4. That the powers herein conferred shall 
be without prejudice to any power heretofore 
conferred on the President, or by him delegated. 

Sec. 5. That the President may, by proclama- 
tion, require that vessels of the United States 
of any specified class or description, or in any 
specified trade or trades, shall not be chartered 
unless the instrument in which such charter is 
embodied, and the rates, terms, and conditions 
thereof are first approved by him. Whenever 
any vessel is comprised in any such proclamation, 
it shall be unlawful to make any charter thereof, 



or comply with or perform any of the rates, terms, 
or conditions of any charter thereof, or to operate 
such vessel under any charter, without first 
obtaining the approval thereof by the President. 

Whenever any charter of such vessel is ap- 
proved, it shall be unlawful, without the approval 
of the President first obtained, to make any 
alterations in such charter, or additions thereto 
or deletions therefrom, or to make or receive any 
payment or do any act with respect to such vessel, 
except in accordance with such charter. 

Sec. 6. That the President shall have power to 
determine, prescribe, and enforce reasonable 
freight rates and the terms and conditions of 
affreightment which shall govern the trans- 
portation of goods on vessels of the United States, 
which shall be filed with the United States Ship- 
ping Board and open to public inspection. It 
shall be unlawful to. charge or collect any com- 
pensation for the transportation of goods on any 
such vessel, or to enforce or attempt to enforce 
any terms or conditions of affreightment, or to 
make or receive any payment or do any act with 
respect to such transportation, not in accordance 
with the rates, terms, and conditions so pre- 
scribed, anything in any contract, whether here- 
tofore or hereafter made, to the contrary not- 
withstanding. 

Sec. 7. That the President shall have power 
to prescribe the order of priority in which goods 
shall be carried or other services performed by any 
vessel of the United States and to specify goods 
which shall be carried or to direct the voyage or 
employment of any such vessel and to make such 
rules, regulations, and orders, with respect to 
any such vessel, relating to the loading, discharg- 
ing, lighterage, or storage of goods, or the pro- 
curement of bunker fuel, or any other matter re- 
lating to the receiving, handling, transporting, 
storing, or delivering of goods, as may in his 
judgment be necessary and proper for the efficient 
utilization of transportation facilities and the 
effective conduct of the war. 

Sec. 8. That the President may by proclama- 
tion extend the provisions of sections five, six, and 
seven, or any of them, to any vessel of foreign 
nationality under charter to a citizen of the United 
States or other person subject to the jurisdiction 
thereof. 

Sec. 9. That the President shall have power to 
make such rules, regulations, and orders regarding 
voyages, courses, the use of protective devices, 
and any other matters affecting the navigation, 
equipment, fueling, painting, or arming of vessels 
of the United States as may, in his judgment, be 
conducive to the protection of such vessels from 
submarines, mines, or other war perils, any 
expense so incurred to be allowed for in de- 
termining freight and charter rates under this 
Act. If in his judgment any vessel or class of 
vessels on account of size, speed, structure, method 
of propulsion, or for any other reason is unfit for 
service in any waters which he may declare to be a 
danger zone, he may, by order, exclude such ves- 
sel or vessels from such danger zone. It shall be 
unlawful to violate any order, rule, or regulation 
made under this section. Rules, regulations, or 
orders issued under this section may, in the dis- 
cretion of the President, be issued confidentially, 
in which event they shall be binding only on such 
persons as have notice thereof. 

Sec. 10. That the President may by proclama- 
tion require that no citizen of the United States, 
or other person subject to the jurisdiction thereof, 
shall charter any vessel of foreign nationality 



14 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



unless the instrument in which such charter is 
embodied and the rates, terms, and conditions 
thereof are first approved by the President. After 
the making of sucn proclamation it shall be un- 
lawful for any such citizen or person to make any 
charter of any such vessel, or comply with or per- 
form any of the rates, terms, or conditions of any 
charter thereof, or to operate any such vessel 
under any charter, without first obtaining the 
approval thereof by the President. 

Whenever any such charter is approved it shall 
be unlawful, without the approval of the Presi- 
dent first obtained, to make any alterations in 
such charter or additions thereto or deletions 
therefrom, or to make or receive any payment or 
do any act with respect to such vessel, except 
in accordance with such charter. 

Sec. 11. That the President shall have power 
to requisition for military purposes, or for any 
other national purpose connected with or arising 
out of the present war, the temporary possession 
of any vessel, or, without taking actual possession, 
to requisition the services of any vessel and to 
require the person entitled to the possession 
thereof to issue to the master such instructions as 
may be necessary to place the vessel at the service 
of the United States. 

Upon requisitioning such possession or services 
or as soon thereafter as the exigencies of the 
situation may permit, the President shall transmit 
to the person entitled to the possession of such 
vessel a charter setting forth the terms which, in 
his judgment, should govern the relations between 
the United States and such person and a state- 
ment of the rental or rate of hire which, in his 
judgment, will be just compensation for the use 
of such vessel and for the services required under 
the terms of such charter. If such person does 
not execute and deliver such charter and accept 
such rental or rate of hire, the President shall 
pay to such person a sum equal to seventy-five 
per centum of such rental or rate of hire as the 
same may from time to time be due under the 
terms of the charter, and such person shall be 
entitled to sue the United States to recover such 
further sum as added to such seventy-five per 
centum will make up such amount as will be 
just compensation for the use of the vessel and 
for the services required. In the event of loss of or 
damage to such vessel, due to the operation of a 
risk assumed by the United States under the 
terms of such charter (in the event that no valu- 
ation of such vessel or mode of compensation has 
been agreed to), the United States shall pay just 
compensation for such loss or damage, to be de- 
termined by the President; and if the amount so 
determined is not satisfactory to the person en- 
titled to receive just compensation, the President 
shall pay to such person seventy-five per centum 
of the amount so determined, and such person 
shall be entitled to sue the United States to 
recover such further sum as added to such 
seventy-five per centum will make up such amount 
as will be just compensation. 

Sec. 12. That the President shall have power 
to prescribe the order of priority in which persons 
in possession of dry docks, wharves, lighterage 
systems, or loading or discharging terminal 
facilities in any port of the United States, or 
warehouses, equipment or terminal railways 
connected therewith, shall serve vessels and ship- 
pers, and to determine, prescribe, and enforce the 
rates, terms, and conditions charged or required 
for the i urnishing of such services, including steve- 
doring and handling of cargo, and the handling, 
dispatching, and bunkering of vessels, and to 
make such rules and regulations with respect 
to the conduct of any such business as may be 
necessary and proper. It shall be unlawful to 
charge, collect, or claim any compensation, or to 
enforce or attempt to enforce any terms or con- 
ditions, or to make or receive any payment or do 
any act, with respect to any such service not in 
accordance with the rates, terms, and conditions 
so prescribed, anything in any contract, whether 
heretofore or hereafter made, to the contrary 
notwithstanding. 

Sec. 13. That the President shall have power 
to lease or requisition the use or temporary pos- 



session of, or to assume temporary contro of, 
any dry docks, wharves, or loading or discharging 
terminal facilities, in any port of the United 
States, or warehouses, equipment, or terminal 
railways connected therewith. 

Whenever the President requisitions or assumes 
control of any such property, the United States 
shall pay just compensation therefor, to be de- 
termined by the President. If the amount so 
determined is not satisfactory to the person en- 
titled to receive just compensation, the President 
shall pay to such person seventy-five per centum 
of the amount so determined and such person 
shall be entitled to sue the United States to 
recover such further sum as added to such sev- 
enty-five per centum will make up such amount 
as will be just compensation. 

Whenever the President acquires by purchase, 
lease, or requisition, or assumes control of any 
such property immediate possession may be taken 
thereof to the extent of the interest acquired 
therein, and such property may be immediately 
occupied and used without regard to the provi- 
sions of section three hundred and fifty-five of the 
Revised Statutes. 

Nothing in this section shall authorize the 
President to requisition the title to any such 
property owned by any State, municipality, or 
subdivision thereof. 

Sec. 14. That whenever by this Act permission 
is given to sue the United States such suit shall 
be brought in the manner provided in section 
twenty-four, paragraph twenty, and section one 
hundred and forty-five of the Judicial Code. 

Sec. IS. That all vessels of which the posses- 
sion or services are requisitioned under this Act, 
and all dry docks, wharves, loading or discharg- 
ing terminal facilities, warehouses, equipment, 
or terminal railways, of which the President may 
acquire the title or possession or of which he may 
assume control under this /\ct, may be operated 
and managed as the President may from time to 
time direct. The net proceeds derived from any 
activity authorized in this Act or the joint reso- 
lution of May twelfth, nineteen hundred and 
seventeen (Public Numbered Two), or the di- 
visions entitled "Emergency shipping fund" of 
the Act of June fifteenth, nineteen hundred and 
seventeen (Public Numbered Twenty-three), 
shall be deposited in the Treasury in a separate 
and distinct fund and may be expended by the 
President in carrying out the purposes of this 
Act, and within the limits of the amounts hereto- 
fore or hereafter authorized, for the construction, 
requisitioning, or purchasing of vessels: Pro- 
vided. That none of the provisions of this Act 
shall apply to vessels plying exclusively on the 
inland rivers and canals of the United States. 

Sec. 16. That whoever does or attempts to do 
anything in this Act declared to be unlawful, 
or willfully violates any rule, regulation, or order 
issued under authority conferred herein, shall be 
punished by a fine of not more than 85,000 or by 
imprisonment for not more than two years, or 
both: Provided, That the district court of the 
Canal Zone shall have jurisdiction of offenses 
committed against the provisions of this Act 
within the Canal Zone. 

Sec. 17. That if any provision of this Act, ot 
the application of such provision to certain cir- 
cumstances, is held unconstitutional, the re- 
mainder of the Act, and the application of such 
provision to circumstances other than those as 
to which it is held unconstitutional, shall not be 
affected thereby. 

Approved, July 18, 1918. 



The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 24, 1918. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

Tne Governor has approved the following rates 
of pay effective July 1, 1918: 

Automatic promotions as of July 1, may be 
made only to the rate in this schedule that is 
next to the rate of pay for a position as of June 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



15 



50. Advances other than these require the ap- 
proval of the Governor. 
Foreman, construction and engineering — (per 

month). $231, $219, $213, $208. $2C0, $188, 

$181, $175, $169, $163, $156, $150, $143, $138. 

$136. $125, $119, $113, $110, $106, $102. 
General foreman (per month) — $175, $187.50, 

$200, $212.50, $225. $237.50, and $250. 
Supervisor (per month) — $200, $225, $250, $275. 
Superintendent (per month) — $250, $275, $300, 

$325, $350. 

C. A. McIlvaine, 
Executive Secretary. 



Civil Engineering Positions. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 23, 1918. 
Meads of Departments and Divisions: 

The Governor has authorized the following 
rates of pay effective August 1, 1918: 
Assistant engineer (per month) — $400 (special), 

$375, $343, S312, $291, $281. 
Junior engineer (per month) — $262, $256, $243, 

$231, $220. 
Surveyor (per month) — $200, $181, $158, $150, 

$137. 
Recorder (per month)— $125, $118, $106. 

C. A. McIlvaine, 
Executive Secretary. 



Acting Superintendent, Pacific Locks. 

The Panama Canal, 
Dept. of Operation and Maintenance, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 17, 1918. 
All concerned — Effective August 22, and during 
Mr. W. R. Holloway's absence on leave, Mr. 
J. C. Myrick will act as Superintendent, Pacific 
Locks. 

W. J. Douglas, 
Approved: Engineer of Maintenance. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Surplus Office Equipment. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 17, 1918. 

To all concerned — All surplus office equipment 
such as chairs, desks, filing cabinets, tables, 
stools, etc., will hereafter be returned to stock 
at Balboa storehouse for reissue. 

All office equipment in unserviceable condition 
will be presented for survey and if in the opinion 
of the Surveying Officer it is worth repairing he 
will recommend repair and return to stock. The 
cost of repairs will be charged to divisions turn- 
ing in the equipment, and all items will be in- 
voiced to stores at original prices. 

It is requested that Heads of Departments and 
Divisions arrange to turn in at once all surplus 
items, in order that present shortage of office 
equipment may be relieved, as it is not desired to 
order any new equipment at this time. 

All requisitions calling for issue of office equip- 
ment from stock must be approved by the Chief, 
Property Bureau, before issue is made. 

All items of office equipment which becomes 
surplus must be returned to stock at Balboa store- 
house, unless transfer to other divisions is ap- 
proved by the Chief. Property Bureau. 

When additional items of office equipment are 
required, requisition will be placed on storehouse, 
Balboa, and if items required are not in stock, 
the General Storekeeper will forward copy of 
requisition to the Chief, Property Bureau, who 
will endeavor to fill requisition by transfer from 
other divisions. 

R. K. Morris, 

Approved : Chief Quartermaster. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Inspector, Supply Department. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 20, 1918. 
To all concerned — Effective August 19, 1918, 
Mr. M. Herz is transferred from the Accounting 
Department, Auditor's Office, to the position of 
Inspector, Supply Department, office of the Chief 
Quartermaster. 

R. K. Morris, 
Chief Quarter master. 



Civil Service Credentials. 

The Panama Canal, 
Board of Civil Service Examiners, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 19, 1918. 
To Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

The Executive Secretary, in order to enable 
applicants for the clerk examination for the Pana- 
ma Canal Service to secure more satisfactory 
credentials for the optional subject, "General 
Business Training and Experience," has author- 
ized heads of departments and divisions to fur- 
nish testimonials to employees under their super- 
vision who desire the same for the purpose of 
taking the examination above mentioned. 

It is desired that these testimonials show the 
period of present or former employment under 
your supervision, the nature of the work per- 
formed, the degree of responsibility involved, 
quality of service rendered and the degree of 
initiative shown by the employee. Copies of 
these testimonials will be placed upon the per- 
sonnel files of the applicants receiving them. 
Albert Wilson, 
Assistant Secretary. 



Jelly and Jam. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Cristobal, C. Z., August 22, 1918. 
Memorandum No. 760-65: 

To commissary managers — We have on hand 
at the wholesale grocery a small supply of P. C. 
cranberry jelly, 10-ounce jars at 10 cents and 
P. C. plum jam, 10-ounce jars at 15 cents. 

Order a small quantity and bring to the notice 
of your patrons. 

Roy R. Watson, 
Acting General Manager. 



Corn Flakes Not a Wheat Substitute. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Cristobal, C. Z. t August 22, 1918. 
Bulletin No. 895-2: 

To commissary managers — Corn flakes must 
not be considered or sold as a substitute for wheat. 
Roy R. Watson, 
Acting General Manager. 



Stages of the Chagres and the Lakes. 

The maximum elevations of the Chagres River, 
Gatun Lake, and Miraflores Lake, in feet above 
mean sealevel, during the week, ending at mid- 
night of Saturday, August 24, weie as follows: 





Chagres River 


Gatun Lake 


Mira- 
florea 
Lake. 


Date 


Vigia 


Alha- 
juela 


Gam- 
boa 


Gatun 


Mon., Aug. 19 

Tues., Aug. 20 

Wed., Aug. 21 
Thurs., Aug 22.... 

Fri., Aug. 23 

Sat., Aug. 24 


128.45 
128.00 
128.05 
127.65 
127.45 
133.30 
137.60 


93.37 
92.85 
93.12 
92.63 
92.46 
96.33 
100.10 


85.18 
85.15 
85.18 
85.16 
S5.19 
85.16 
85.30 


85.17 
85.09 
85.11 
85.11 
85.15 
85.15 
85.17 


54.00 
54.06 
54.20 
53.11 
53.95 
54.00 
53.98 


Height of low water 
to nearest foot. 


126.0 


91.0 









16 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Examinations by Board of Local Inspectors. for examination must be submitted at least a 

For chauffeurs' licenses— At the Pacific end of dav previous to the examination; forms may b* 

the Canal Zone applicants will obtain authority ? btal » ed fr ° m the o ffi ce of the board Balboa 

for examination from the office of the Board of f Helgh ^' or f . rom * he S a ?£ a "E °a ^ V ™ t *-- W 

Local Inspectors, room 237, Administration from tbe ,naln office of the Dredging Division 

Building, Balboa Heights; hours are from 8 to at_Paraiso. ...... _. 

1 2 in the morning, and from 1 to 4 in the after- - Demonstration tests will be given on Thursday, 

noon. The examination will then be given on f th ,e day between the written examinations, as 

application to the fire station at Balboa everv follows: At Cristobal, by arrangement with th« 

Wednesday and Saturday, between 1.30 and Captain of the Port; at Balboa at 2 p. m on 

4 30 o m application to the Captain of the Port; and at 

' At the Atlantic end, applicants will apply on Gamboa at 8 a. m., by the deputy inspector. 

Friday at the office of the Captain of the Port A pp '' ca . nts . must P rovlde themselves with boats 

of Cristobal, at any time during office hours. tor the test. 

The necessary forms may be obtained there, For licenses as pilots, masters, males and niarnu 
without appl'ication to the office at Balboa <««'»« ™~ £ r ""«; n examination only, and only 
Heights, and the test will be given as soon as the a V Balboa I t eight ^ ro01 ? 3 04, on t. he same day 
application is submitted and approved. (Wednesday) as the written examination there 
Applicants must provide themselves with fo F ™ 1 ° tor t b 1 oat I i a , vlBa L ors ,- Forms must be sub- 
automobiles for the test mitted not later than the day preceding, and may 
For licenses as motor boat navigators- -Written be obtained from the same offices as the forms far 
examination is conducted every other Wednes- motor boat navigators The next date on which 
day in room 304, Balboa Heights, beginning at examinations for these licenses and Ifoi : navigators 
8 a. m., and on the Friday immediately following of motor boatswillbeconductedat BalboaHeights 
at the office of the Captain of the Port of Cris- ls Wednesday, September 4, 191S. 
tobal, from 9 a. m. until 3 p. m. Applications Geo. J. Vanderslice, Recorder. 



COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Potatoes. 

The new potato crop is just coming in in Costa Rica and over 100 tons were received 
from that source the past week. 



Bread. 

The bakery production on Friday, August 23, was 28,000 loaves of bread, the largest 
output since the flour conservation rules were put into effect last February. 



Jelly. 

Large quantities of guava jelly are being put up in the industrial laboratory. 
The jelly is darker in color than that formerly bottled, more nearly resembling the 
Cuban, formerly carried, both in appearance and flavor. 

Pears and Melons. 

Another shipment of pears has been received from the United States this week and 
has been distributed to the line stores where ready sales were reported. 
The first shipment of Casaba melons of the season was received last week. 

Boo 

War books and late fiction, a list of titles of which has already been published in 
these columns, will be placed on sale in the commissaries on Saturday, August 31. 
About 500 volumes were received by last steamer. 



Tobacco. 

Information has just been received from the commissary purchasing agent that 
the manufacturers of a popular brand of tobacco have advised that they are now 
in position to fill orders placed through him, which previously had been reported 
cancelled. It is expected that shipments will be resumed at an early date. 

"Confession ol August Thyssen." 

The retail commissaries are distributing this week a pamphlet publishing a com- 
plete revelation of Germany's turpitude, as exposed in the confession of August 
Thyssen, the great German steel manufactuer. It is a valuable contribution to the 
literature of the war and so long as copies last they may be obtained free. 

Beets. 

Relative to recent requisitions placed by the Commissary Division for canned 
beets, the commissary purchasing agent has advised that he was unable to secure 
any of this item in a standard of quality sufficiently high to warrant purchase. He 
states further that until the new pack is ready for distribution no further purchases 
will be made. . 



THE PANAMA CANAL RKCORD 17 

Hosiery. 

No change is apparent in the hosiery situation, the last house from which the 
Commissary Purchasing Agent attempted to obtain samples advising that they would 
be unable to book any new business for at least 10 months. 



Milk Cooler. 

A new milk cooler with a capacity of 4,000 pounds per hour was within the past 
week installed at the milk-bottling plant in Cristobal. Regardless of the temperature 
of the milk when entered into the cooler, it is reduced almost instantaneously to 
34 degrees. The machine formerly in use has been transferred to the Cattle Industry 
Division and installed at Mindi Dairy Farm. 



Cottage Cheese. 

During the past week about 300 pounds of cottage cheese, manufactured at the 
ice cream plant at Cristobal, was distributed to the larger retail stores where it sold 
out quickly. The cheese as made by the ice cream plant is already prepared, it being 
necessary only to add salt and pepper as the pure cream is mixed with the cheese at 
the plant. It is hoped to be able to supply this article in the future, although the 
amount available will be limited. 



Bean Bread. 

Required: 1 cup water, 1 cup beans, 1 or 2 cakes compressed yeast, |-cup lukewarm 
water, 5 teaspoons salt, 2 tablespoons molasses, 8 cups flour. 

Mix as follows: Soak the beans over night. Drain off the water in which they were 
soaked and cook until soft in the 1 quart of water. Put through a sieve or a potato 
ricer, cool and when lukewarm, add (1) the yeast softened in the ^-cup of water (2) 
the salt (3) the molasses and (4) the flour to make a stiff dough. Follow directions 
for kneading, rising, and baking given for potato bread. The beans may be simply 
mashed and the hulls used in the bread if desired. 



Prices of Cotton Fabrics. 

Price fixing is now beginning to assume a more definite aspect in the cotton fabric 
industry. The War Industries Board has recommended the establishment of prices 
to be charged for certain standard gray cloths as a starter, and the recommendation 
has received the approval of President Wilson, effective as of July 8. The order 
applies only to cotton cloth in the condition in which it leaves the loom. Prices on 
cotton duck have also been regulated. 

Announcement made by the Census Bureau a few weeks ago is to the effect that the 
1917-1918 cotton crop is the smallest since 1909. with the exception of 191s- An 
interesting feature of the yield was the increased production in Arizona and Cali- 
fornia. 



Novelty Hand Bags. 

A communication has been received from the firm in Santa Marta, Colombia, 
through which was purchased the shipment of Mochilas (hand bags) which were 
recently placed on sale in the retail stores and completely sold out the same day. 
Many customers have inquired when more of these articles might be obtainable and 
the Commissary Division has been trying to expedite the shipment of another lot, 
but their Colombia connection states that these bags are made by Indians, residents 
of the interior, and that these people are very slow workmen. Although they have 
been engaged on this work for some time, only 30 bags have thus far been finished. 
As soon as 50 are completed shipment will come forward. 



Linen. 

Latest reports on the linen situation are pessimistic in tone, it being stated that the 
scarcity of linen goods is growing more acute. The Commissary Division has found 
it practically impossible to obtain goods from any of the Belfast mills, and for such 
few lots as its London connections are aole from time to time to pick up in the market, 
a high price must as a ruit be paid. As an instance uniform linen tecently received 
is now being sold in the line stores at $2 the yard ; this same material formerly 1 etailed 
for 90 cents. 

The press of army needs has made it very difficult to obtain towels, either linen or 
cotton for the time being. Fortunately the commissaries are well protected on this 
item for several months to come. 



18 THE PANAMA CANAL ^ECOKD 

The Woolen Situation. 

At a recent meeting in New York of representative clothing manufacturers from all 
of the important markets of the country, emphasis was laid on the fact that there 
must be further drastic curtailment of their product as a necessary aid to the Govern- 
ment in the winning of the war. While there is plenty of wool in the world, shipping 
facilities are not yet sufficient to permit the use of an amount even closely approxi- 
mating present needs. Of the present production of cloth, practically 60 per cent is 
required by the Government for the manufacture of uniforms and other items, but a 
recent statement issued in Washington is to the effect that a large part of the raw 
wool stock now on hand, or all to be produced or imported prior to next January, 
will be required for military purposes. Retailers have accepted the situation with 
good grace, and it is the opinion of some of the manufacturers that the situation as 
regards civilian requirements is not as bad as generally believed, inasmuch as present 
6tocks of clothing and cloth are sufficient for practically two years' consumption, even 
were no more woolens to be produced other than for military purposes. 



Restrictions on Purchases. 

Indicative of the way in which government restrictions on raw materials of all 
kinds are affecting every market is a statement contained in a recent letter from the 
Commissary Purchasing Agent with a quotation from letter received from one of the 
large corset manufacturers. 

They state that all supplies of raw material such as steel, elastic webbing, etc., are 
made and taken by the Government in such large quantities that they are unable to 
secure any for their less essential products. All raw materials are being sold with the 
express stipulation on the part of the suppliers that they will not guarantee shipment 
and furthermore will ship only at the prices prevailing at time of shipment. As a 
consequence it is necessary for the manufacturers to pass these same conditions on 
to the trade and future requisitions will be filled only in accordance with the stipu- 
lations as above. 

Relative to requisitions for undershirts, another manufacturer states that owing 
to the demands of the Government for supplies of underwear for the use of the Army 
and Navy, their machinery is working 100 per cent on government contracts and for 
this reason they are unable to accept any additional business until such time as the 
Government needs are fully supplied. 



MEATLESS RECIPES. 



Navy Loaf with Gunner Sauce. 

1 medium sized can or \ cup tomato catsup or Chili sauce 

2 cups cold baked beans 1 egg 

1 cup crumbs 1 tablespoon finely chopped onion 

1 teaspoon salt \ teaspoon pepper. 

Mix beans, crumbs, salt and pepper; add well-beaten egg, catsup and onion. 
Mix thoroughly, pour into a greased pan and bake in a moderate oven 30 minutes. 
Serve with Gunner sauce. i 

Gunner Sauce. 

2 tablespoons fat 3 tablespoons flour 
1 teaspoon mustard (dry) 1 teaspoon salt 

1$ cups milk \ teaspoon pepper. 

Melt fat, add flour, mustard, salt and pepper; when mixed remove from fire and 
add milk. Return to the fire and bring to the boiling point, stirring constantly. 

Rice with Tomato and Cheese. 

f cup rice \ teaspoon pepper 

8 cups boiling water 1 cup strained tomato 

\\ teaspoons salt \ cup rice stock 

1 tablespoon fat 1 cup grated cheese 

2 tablespoons flour ^ cup fine crumbs. 
\ teaspoon salt 

Wash rice and cook in boiling salted water until tender and drain, reserving \ 
cup of the stock. Melt the fat in a saucepan, add flour, salt and pepper, remove from 
fire and add strained tomato and stock; return to fire and bring to boiling point, 
Btirring constantly. Remove from fire, add rice and cheese and mix thoroughly. 
Pour into buttered baking dish, sprinkle crumbs over the top, bake in a hot oven 
5 minutes or until crumbs are brown. Serve immediately. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 19 

Macaroni Loaf with Cheese Sauce. 

1$ cups macaroni 2 tablespoons flour 

8 cups boiling water 1 egg 

1 teaspoon salt 1 cup crumbs 

1 tablespoon fat 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 

1 cup macaroni stock or strained tomato or J- teaspoon pepper. 

5 cup stock and \ tomato 

Cook macaroni in boiling salted water until tender. Drain, reserving stock for 
loaf and sauce, and rinse macaroni in cold water. Melt fat in a saucepan, add flour, 
salt and pepper, and when mixed remove from the fire and add stock or tomato. 
Return to the fire and bring to the boiling point, stirring constantly. Remove from 
fire and add Worcestershire sauce, macaroni, egg and crumbs. Pour into a greased 
baking dish, and bake in a moderate oven 30 minutes or until firm. Serve with 
cheese sauce. 

Cheese Sauce. 

2 tablespoons flour \\ cups macaroni stock 

1 teaspoon salt 1 cup grated cheese. 
\ teaspoon paprika 

Mix flour, salt and paprika and add stock very slowly, stirring to keep mixture 
smooth. If mixture becomes lumpy, beat with a Dover egg beater. Bring to the 
boiling point and boil for 1 minute. Remove from fire, add grated cheese and beat 
until cheese is melted. Serve at once. One-half cup of chopped pimento may be 
added if desired. 

Stuffed Peppers with Brown Sauce. 

6 small or 3 large peppers 1 tablespoon finely chopped onion 

2 cups cooked rice \ cup rice stock or hot water 

1 teaspoon salt 1 cup fine crumbs. 
\ teaspoon pepper 

Wash peppers, cut off stems and remove seeds. If large peppers are used, cut them 
in half crosswise; if small ones, remove a slice from the stem end. Cover the peppers 
with boiling water, boil five minutes and drain. Mix rice, onion, seasonings, and hot 
water and fill peppers. Sprinkle tops with crumbs and set in a greased baking dish; 
pour hot water to the depth of i-inch around the peppers and bake in a moderate 
oven for 45 minutes or until peppers are tender and crumbs are brown. Serve with 
Brown sauce. , 

Brown Sauce. 

3 tablespoons fat \ teaspoon pepper 

5 tablespoons flour 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 
1 5 teaspoons salt 2 tablespoons chopped parsley. 

2 cups hot rice stock or water 

Melt fat in a saucepan, add flour, salt and pepper and stir mixture until brown. 
Add the hot liquid, slowly stirring constantly and bring to the boiling point. Add 
Worcestershire sauce and parsley and serve at once. 

Cheese Pudding. 

6 slices stale bread \ teaspoon pepper 

1 cup grated cheese \ teaspoon mustard 

1 teaspoon salt \\ cups milk 

1 egg Paprika. 

Cut slices of bread in quarters, arrange in layers in greased baking dish, sprinkle 
each layer with part of cheese and seasonings, which have been mixed. Beat egg 
until light, add milk and pour over bread. Sprinkle with paprika. Allow to stand 
5 minutes and then bake 25 minutes in a moderate oven, or until firm. Serve at once. 

Mock Crab. 

3 slices stale bread \ teaspoon dry mustard 

2 tablespoons fat Few grains cayenne pepper 

3 tablespoons flour \\ cups milk 

1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 

\ teaspoon pepper 2 eggs. 

Cut the bread into ^-inch squares as if for croutons. Melt fat, add flour, salt, 
mustard, pepper, and cayenne; when mixed remove from fire and add milk. Return 
to fire and bring to boiling point, stirring constantly. Add Worcestershire sauce and 
cool slightly; add well-beaten eggs, pour into greased baking dish, spread squares of 
bread over top and bake in moderate oven until croutons are brown and mixture is 
arm. 



20 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

WHEATLESS RECIPES. 



Buckwheat Cakes. 

2 cups buckwheat 2 cups lukewarm water 

1| cups meal j cup molasses 

5 yeast cake 5 teaspoon soda 

2 tablespoons sugar 2 tablespoons warm water. 

Mix buckwheat, corn meal, and salt. Add sugar to yeast cake and stir until a 
paste is formed, add to lukewarm water and pour onto buckwheat mixture slowly, 
stirring constantly. Set in a warm place over night. In the morning beat the mix- 
ture 1 minute, add soda, molasses, and warm water which have been mixed, beat for 
2 minutes and bake on a hot griddle. Compressed yeast should be used. 

Rice Fritters with Maple Sirup. 

If cups cold cooked rice 2 eggs 

I teaspoon salt li cups crumbs. 

| teaspoon nutmeg 
Mix 1 well-beaten egg with the rice, add the salt and nutmeg, and form into fritters. 
Beat the other egg with 2 tablespoons of cold water and roll the fritters first in crumbs, 
then in egg, and again in crumbs. Fry in deep fat, drain on heavy paper and serve 
with maple sirup. 

Rice Waffles. 

1 cup cold cooked rice 1 teaspoon salt 

2 egg yolks 2 teaspoons baking powder 

1 cup milk 1 teaspoon melted fat 

j cup rye flour 2 stiffly beaten egg whites. 

The rice for waffles should be cooked until very soft and pasty. Add the milk and 
well-beaten egg yolks to the rice. Mix salt, baking powder, and flour and sift into 
the mixture; add melted fat and beat thoroughly. Fold in stiffly beaten egg whites. 
Pour into a hot evenly greased waffle iron and cook until brown. Fill waffle iron 
two-thirds full each time. Serve with maple or other sirup. 

Boston Brown Raisin Bread. 

2 cups rye flour £ cup molasses 

1 cup corn meal 2 cups sour milk 

1 teaspoon soda ^ cup seeded raisins. 

| teaspoon meal 
Mix the rye and corn meal thoroughly with soda and salt, and add the raisins 
which have been washed, dried, and cut in pieces; add the milk and molasses and 
beat well. Pour into a greased mold, cover tightly and steam from 5 to 6 hours. 
Remove from the tin, and dry in the oven 5 minutes. This may be served hot or cold. 

Southern Corn Bread. 

1 cup cold cooked hominy 1 cup milk 

1 egg 1 cup uncooked fine hominy 

1 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon melted fat. 

Mash the cooked hominy, add salt, well-beaten egg, milk, melted fat. Spread in a 

greased baking dish, sprinkle uncooked hominy over the top and bake 35 minutes in 

a hot oven. Serve at once. 

Hermits. 

1 egg yolk | teaspoon salt 

\ cup sugar 1 tablespoon melted fat 

\ teaspoon nutmeg \ cup chopped raisins 

\ teaspoon cinnamon f cup chopped nuts 

\ teaspoon allspice 1 stiffly beaten egg white. 

\ teaspoon baking powder 
Mix sugar, salt, baking powder, and spices and slowly add to beaten egg yolk, 

with raisins and nuts; fold in stiffly beaten white. Drop by spoonful on a greased 

pan and bake 20 to 30 minutes in a moderate oven. 

Oat Wafers. 

1 egg 1 tablespoon melted fat 

\ cup sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla 

1 teaspoon baking powder 1 cup rolled oats. 

| teaspoon nutmeg 
Beat the egg very light, slowly add sugar, nutmeg, and baking powder, which have 
been mixed; then add melted fat, vanilla, and rolled oats. Spread in a well-greased 
cake pan and bake in a moderate "ven 20 minutes or until crisp and brown. Mark 
into squares and remove from the pan before they become hard. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights. Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 4, 191 8. 



No. 



PROCLAMATION. 



Charter and Freight Rates— Vessels. 

By the President of the United States of America: A Proclamation — 

Whereas an act of Congress, approved July 18, 1918, entitled "An Act to confer on 
the President power to prescribe charter rates and freight rates and to requisition 
vessels, and for other purposes,"* contains, among others, the following sections 
conferring authority upon the President: 

"Sec. 5. That the President may, by proclamation, require that vessels of the 
United States of any specified class or description, or in any specified trade or trades, 
shall not be chartered unless the instrument in which such charter is embodied, and 
the rates, terms, and conditions thereof are first approved by him. Whenever any 
vessel is comprised in any such proclamation, it shall be unlawful to make any charter 
thereof, or comply with cr perform any of the rates, terms, or conditions of any char- 
ter thereof, or to operate such vessel under any charter, without first obtaining the 
approval thereof by the Pi esident. 

"Whenever any charter of such vessel is approved it shall be unlawful, without the 
approval of the President first obtained, to make any alterations in such charter, or 
additions thereto, or deletions therefrom, or to make or receive any payment, or 
do any act with respect to such vessel, except in accordance with such charter. 

"Sec. 8. That the President may, by proclamation, extend the provisions of sec- 
tions 5, 6, and 7, or any of them, to any vessel of foreign nationality under charter 
to a citizen of the United States or other person subject to the jurisdiction thereof." 

•"Sec. 10. That the President may, by proclamation, require that no citizen of the 
United States, or other person subject to the jurisdiction thereof, shall charter any 
vessel of foreign nationality unless the instrument in which such charter is embodied 
and the rates, terms, and conditions thereof are first approved by the President. After 
the making of such proclamation it shall be unlawful for any such citizen or person 
to make any charter of any such vessel, or comply with or perform any of the rates, 
terms, or conditions of any charter thereof, or to operate any such vessel under any 
charter without first obtaining the approval thereof by the President. 

Whenever any such charter is approved it shall be unlawful, without the approval 
of the President first obtained, to make any alterations in such charter or additions 
thereto or deletions therefrom, or to make or receive any payment or do any act with 
respect to such vessel, except in accordance with such charter." 

And whereas, section 2 of said act provides as follows: 

"Sec. 2. That the President may exercise the power and authority hereby vested in 
him through such agency or agencies as he shall determine from time to time." 

And whereas, the necessities of the war require that the control now exercised over 
shipping by the United States Shipping Board be made more effective; 

Now, therefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States of America, 
acting under authority conferred in section 5 of said Act, to proclaim that hereafter 
vessels of the United States, being full power-driven vessels of 250 tons gross burden 
or over, or sailing vessels with or without auxiliary power of 50 tons gross burden or 
over, excepting vessels plying exclusively on the inland rivers and canals of the United 
States, vessels operating in the Great Lakes or other inland waters, and vessels oper- 
ating exclusively in the coastwise trade of the United States, shall not hereafter be 
chartered unless the instrument in which such charter is embodied, and the rates, 
terms, and conditions thereof are first approved by the President. 

Under authority conferred in section 8 of said Act, I do further proclaim that the 
provisions of said section 5, and cf this proclamtion, shall be, and they are hereby, 
extended to any vessel of foieign nationality under charter to a citizen of the United 
States or other person subject to the jurisdiction thereof. 

Under authority conferred in section 10 of said Act, I do further proclaim that here- 
after no citizen of the United States or other person subject to the jurisdiction thereof 

♦Published as Panama Canal Circular No. 600-57 in The Panama Canal Record of August 28, 
1918. 



22 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



shall charter any vessel of foreign nationality unless the instrument in which such 
charter is embodied and the rates, terms, and conditions thereof are first approved by 
the President. 

I do hereby designate the United States Shipping Board as the agency through 
which shall be exercised all power and authority conferred upon the President in 
sections 5, 8, and 10 cf said Act with respect to the classes or descriptions of vessels 
and the trades specified in this proclamation. Such power and authority may be 
exercised by said United States Shipping Board through such agents or agencies as 
it may create or designate. 

Nothing contained in this proclamation shall be deemed to withdraw from the 
United States Shipping Board or the War Trade Board any authority now exercised, 
directly or indirectly, over foreign or American vessels, by virtue of powers conferred 
under Title VII of an Act entitled "An Act to punish acts of interference with the 
foreign relations, the neutrality, and the foreign commerce of the United States, to 
punish espionage, and better to enforce the criminal laws of the United States, and 
for other purposes," approved June 15, 1917. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United 
States to be affixed. 

Done in the District of Columbia this 29th day of July, in the year of our Lord 
one thousand nine hundred and eighteen and of the independence of the United States 
of America the one hundred and forty-third. 

[seal] WOODROW WILSON. 

By the President: 

Frank L. Polk, 

Acting Secretary of State. 



You are hereby noti 
sketches of the Panama 
public utilities located 
stations, coaling plants 
of shipping at the termi 
lishing or reproducing 
be subjected to fine and 



Notice to the Public. 

Red that anyone found taking photographs or making plans or 
Canal, or any of its adjuncts, appendants, appurtenances, or other 
in the Canal Zone, including locks. docks, p^ers, shops, wireless 
, d?y docks, etc., or of VSS33LS in transit through the Canal, or 
nal ports, or of temporary or permanent works of defense, or pub- 
the sams without permission from the proper authorities, may 
imprisonment under the terms of the Espionage Act. 

By Order of the Governor. 



CANAL WORK IN JULY. 

The report of the Governor to the Secretary of War of Canal 
operations in July, 1918, is printed, in part, below: 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 23, 1918. 
The honorable, the Secretary of War, 
Washington, D. C. 
Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of The Panama Canal for the 
month of July, 1918: 

Business transacted at the Atlantic and Pacific ends of the Canal, respectively, 
for the month of July, is presented in the following tabulation: 



Item. 



Water sold to ships gallons. . 

Vessels dry docked 

Passengers arriving: 

First cabin 

Other than first cabin 



Total 

Passengers departing: 



First cabin. 

Other than first cabin. 



Total 

Total movement of passengers 

Services to American seamen: 

Seamen shipped 

Seamen discharged 

Seamen deceased 

' Seamen deserted 

Seamen destitute 

Seamen's identification certificates issued. 

Seamen '8 wages received 

Seamen's wages disbursed 

Balance on hand, August 1, 1018 



Cristobal. 



5,410,762 
17 



785 
2,461 



3,246 



1,091 
2,279 



3,370 
6,616 



233 
19sl 



11 

5 
1 

$3,732.69 
S3 ,948.96 



$792.96 



Balboa. 



2,600,400 
11 



1,657 
3,394 



5,051 



928 
2,834 



3,762 
8,813 



$684.54 
$526.42 



$379.03 



Total. 



8,011,162 
28 



2,442 

5,f>55 



8,297 



2,019 
5,113 



7,132 
15,429 



252 
254 



12 

5 

1 

S4.317.23 

$4,475.38 



11,171.99 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



23 



Item. 

Commissary sales to commercial vessels: 

Ice 

Wholesale groceries 

Wholesale cold storage 

Laundry 

Miscellaneous 

Total 

Commissary sales to Government and Panama Railroad ships 

Ice 

Wholesale groceries 

Wholesale cold storage 

Laundry 

Miscellaneous 

Total 

Grand total of commissary sales 



Cristobal. 



Balboa. 



Total. 



SI, 299. 67 

11,417.94 

22,825.42 

1,788.31 

1,444.97 



38.77C.31 

SI 83. 75 

7,671.64 

23,502.04 

188 52 

275.18 



31.821.13 



70,597.44 



S525.65 

4,628.58 

13,759.08 

280.97 

1,289.14 



20,483.42 

S422 22 

7;284^73 

14,405.39 

219.05 

546.01 



22,877.40 



43,360.82 



81, 825. 32 
16,046.52 
36,584.50 
2,069.28 
2,734.11 



59,259.73 

8605.97 

14,956.37 

37,907.43 

407.57 

821.19 



54,698 53 



113,958.26 



GATUN HYDROELECTRIC STATION', GATUN SUBSTATION, CRISTOBAL SUBSTATION, 
ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC LOCKS. 

At the Gatun hydroelectric station, work was continued throughout the month 
on the installation of unit No. 4, panel boards, switches, and upper busses for the 
exciter set were installed and connections made. Installation of the main busses was 
continued. Soapstone slabs on feeders 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, and 9 were grouted in place. 
Erection of the oil circuit breaker operating mechanism was started, and erection 
of the steel for main control switchboard completed up to the rheostat floor. Con- 
crete was poured for the oil circuit breaker for generator No. 2, and all fittings and 
devices plac< d in compartment for generator No. 1. The armature for No. 4 unit was 
placed in position and coils installed; field coils were assembled and connected; 
upper bearings leveled and fie Id spider put in place. The No. 1 oil pressure pump was 
installed and temporarily wired. Connections between the old and new oil pressure 
systems was made permanent, and the new pumps tested at different pressures. 
Building construction at this station was brought to 99 per cent completion with the 
pouring of cement for ere spiral casting and the two remaining switch cabinets. 

The ■ .tun hydro* lectri< station for the month was 4,552,600-K. W. 

H. on a computed watt r < ons umption of 3,174.095,000 cubic feet; the ratio between 
water usfed for power and that for 1 clc ges, ' 448,910,000 cubic feet, being 2.2 to 1. 
ft at ( '..'.' un : ggi ( gated 762 970,000 cubic feet, a rate of 285 c. f. s. The 
estimated rainfall over the Gatun Lake area was 7.85 inches, or 28 per cent below 
the 8-year mean. The elevation of the lake on July 31 was 85. 14 feet. 

The piping for cooling water for transformers at Gatun substation was practically 
completed, with t he except ion of that fe>r transformer No. 2, 8,400 KVA unit. Conduit 
was installed for the two 1,500 KVA 6,600-2,200 volt transformers and for all but 
two of the 2,300 volt feeders. All conduit runs were completed for the two sub- 
station power transformers. Erection of the H-3 oil circuit breakers on both the 
tie lines and power transformers was begun, and that for transformer No. 1 com- 
pleted. The 2,200-vplt bus installation was made as far as conditions permitted, 
the sectionalizing switches being installed. 

No work was dime on the 11,000-volt improvements at Cristobal substation 
during the month; it being necessary to utilize the working force at other points. 

Transmission line — One interruption to the transmission line service occurred 
during the month. There wete two failures on the ieile line, neither of which caused 
any interruption to service. Some damaged towers stored at Balboa yards were put 
in serviceable condition. The tower at mile post 31-10 was leveled and placed in 
first -i lass condition. The lines over Gamboa bridge were removed once during the 
month. 

Mir afl ores steam plant — The net output of this plant for the month was minus 
65,100 K. \V. 11. which was used for excitation and operation of generators as syn- 
chronous condensers to improve the power factor of the system. The total amount 
of fuel oil used was 3,211.24 barrels, as compared with 3,126.54 barrels last month. 
^ Total power on! put — The total net output of both generating stations was 4,457,490 
K. \Y. H. ; and the total amount of power distributed to feeders by substations and 
generating plants was 3.775,019 K. YV. H. Total losses in transmission and trans- 
formation totaled 687,471 K. YY. H., representing an energy loss of 15 per cent. 



24 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



DREDGING DIVISION. 
Dredging excavation for the month was as follows: 



Location. 



Earth 
Cu. yds. 



Pacific entrance channel 

Inner harbor at Balboa. . . 
Gaillard Cut: 

Paraiso P. I. impr. work. 

West Culebra Slide 

East Buena Vista Slide.. 

West Contractor's Slide. 

Cucaracha Slide 



_ Total from Gaillard Cut . . 

Atlantic entrance channel 

Gatun Lake Section 

Auxiliary works, Atlantic terminals! 
Chagres River gravel beds 



Grand total'ocean'to ocean. 



39,900 
38,400, 

3,500 
4,000 
2,300 
800 
3,000 



13,600 



10,300 

121,800 

6,755 



230,755 



Rock 
Cu. yds. 



4,100 



20,900 
4,500 
3,600 
800 
3,400 



33,200 



IS, 900 
52,800 



109,000 



Total 
Cu. yds. 



44,000 
38,400 

24,400 
8,500 
5,900 
1,600 
6,400 



46,800 



29,200 

174,600 

6,755 



339,755 



Classified as: 



Maint. 
Cu. yds. 



40,900 
14,400 

24,400 
8,500 
5,900 
1,600 
6,400 



46,800 



102,100 



Constr'n. 
Cu. yds. 



3,100 
24,000 



29,200 



56,300 



Auxiliary 
Cu. yds. 



174,600 
6,755 



181,355 



un August 1, 909,983 cubic yards remained to be excavated, distribution as 


follows: 


Location. 


Earth. 


Rock. 


Total. 


Gaillard Cut. . . 




25,000 

16,100 

106,500 


25,000 

20,800 

375,100 


Gatun Lake. . 


4,700 
268,600 


Pacific entrance 




Total. Canal prism 


273,300 


147.600 

2,073 

181,850 


420,900 

2,073 

487,010 


Cristobal Coaling Station 


Balboa, Inner Harbor. . 


305,160 




Total, Cristobal Coaling Station and Balboa Inner Harbor 


305,160 


183,923 


489,083 




Grand total 


578,460 


331,523 


909,983 



Culebra and Cucaracha slides showed no unusual movements, and the normal 
channel was maintained throughout the month. 

The hydraulic graders No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3 were engaged in ditching and grading 
the entire month; No. J at Cucaracha slide area and at West Culebra slide; No. 2 
at West Contractor's slide and East Culebra slide; No. 3 at East Culebra slide. 

No material was placed on sanitary fills during the month. Approximately 5,080 
cubic yards cf earth was placed on the levee at San Juan dyke. The usual force 
maintained the Mindi dykes and groins throughout the month. 

No dredging was done in the Canal prism on the Atlantic entrance during the 
month. The dredge Paraiso excavated 10,300 cubic yards of earth and 18,900 
cubic yards of rock along the west prism line in the Gatun Lake section north of 
Gamboa. A total of 46,800 cubic yards of earth and rock was excavated from Gail- 
lard Cut. All material from the Gatun Lake area and Gaillard Cut was dumped in 
Gatun Lake north of Gamboa. No drdeging was done in Miraflores Lake. At the 
Pacific entrance the dredge Corozal excavated 11,800 cubic vards of earth and rock, 
and the dredge Marmot removed 32,200 cubic yards of earth and rock in connection 
with the Miraflores P. I. improvement plan. The spoil from both the Corozal and 
Marmot was dumped at sea, west of the channel. Dredge No. 84 removed 38,400 
cubic yards cf earth from Balboa inner harbor; this spoil was placed on Corozal road 
fills. Dredges No. 83 and No. 86 and the Cascadas excavated a total of 174,600 
cubic yards of earth and rock from Cristobal harbor, Atlantic terminals. Of this 
spoil 57,400 yards were dumped on East breakwater extension, from the east end 
of the present breakwater to Margarita Point; and 117,200 yards were dumped on 
Telfor's Island west of the coaling station. 

Mining was continued at Paraiso and Miraflores; the drill barge Teredo was en- 
gaged throughout the month blasting in the Canal prism at Miraflores, completing 
314 holes, equal to 3,345 linear feet. A drill gang with well and tripod drills at Paraiso 
completed 342 holes, equal to 15,531 linear'feet. A total of 24,881 pounds of dyna- 
mite was used in this work at Miraflores and Paraiso during the month. 



TERMINAL CONSTRUCTION. 



The following tabulation shows the progress for the month with percentage of 
completion of Pier No. 6, Cristobal. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



25 



Item. 



Forms placed square feet . . 

Reinforcing placed pounds. . 

Concrete poured cubic yards. . 

Steel struts erected each . . 

Steel struts concreted each . . 



Accom- 
plished 
during 
month. 



51 ,441 

549,724 

1,957 



Total in 

place. 
July 31. 



Percent- 
age of 
completion 



244,700 

2,783,454 

12,072 

90 



39.5 
46.7 
41 s 
95 3 
87.0 



SHOPS, FOUNDRY, AND DRY DOCK WORK. 

The Mechanical Division had 724 uncompleted jobs on hand at Balboa shops, 
July 1 ; 746 additional were authorized, and 798 completed during the month, leaving 
675 uncompleted, August 1. At the Cristobal shops 282 individual and company 
job orders were issued during the month. 

Foundry output for the month was as follows: Iron, 116,988 pounds; steel, 63,761 
pounds; brass, 10,703 pounds. 

It was necessary to requisition the following employees during the month: Twelve 
machinists, 4 boiler makers. 3 cabinetmakers, 4 car inspectors. 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. 

Southern District — Of the Ancon hospital structures, the boiler house was completed 
during the month ; and but a few days of miscellaneous work on the nurses' quarters 
remain to be done before turning them over to the Health Department. Passage- 
way No. 5 was 95 per cent completed. The plaster work on ward group No. 7 was 
continued on all floors; excavation and concrete footings for the porch, stairway, mid- 
section, were completed. The building as a whole is 54 per cent completed. Exca- 
vation for the porte-cochere in the rear of midsection, ward group No. 8 was com- 
pleted; and with the other work performed during the month, this building was 32 
per cent completed. 

Work on the Tivoli hotel kitchen, consisting of the laying of tile floor, plastering 
and plumbing, brought this building to 98 per cent completion. Excavation was 
completed for the Pedro Miguel hotel, placing of the roof 75 per cent completed and 
the plumbing 50 per cent completed. This brought the building to 60 per cent com- 
pletion at the end of the month. Two sheds for the playgrounds, one at Balboa and 
one at Ancon, were completed during the month. Work was started on the installa- 
tion of an oil handling equipment for the oil house at Balboa and brought to 80 per 
cent completion. The house of the Resident Engineer of the Dredging Division 
was moved from Paraiso to Pedro Miguel. Miscellaneous repairs of the clubhouses 
at Ancon, Balboa, Paraiso, and Pedro Miguel were made during the month. 

Northern District — The Gatun dispensary was completed and turned over to the 
Health Department. The Mount Hope oil tank was completed, with the exception 
of construction of its steel roof, which work is to be performed by the Mechanical 
Division. During the month 662 cubic yards of concrete were placed in the roof and 
floor slabs of the Mount Hope ice and cold storage plant. Form work on the plant 
is 55 per cent completed; this includes roof over tanks, roof over loading platform, 
and foundation walls of compressor and transformer rooms. As a whole the building 
was 80 per cent completed July 31. The slaughterhouse at Cristobal was brought to 
20 per cent completion; excavation was 80 per cent completed, and forms 10 per 
cent; 453 yards of concrete were placed in footings, floor slab, and foundation walls 

MUNICIPAL DIVISION. 

In connection with road construction, Ancon hospital grounds, 1,777 square yards 
of concrete road base were laid; 1,057 linear feet of curb and gutter constructed: 
2,202 square yards of ashpaltic concrete laid; and five manholes and catch basins 
constructed. Grading work at the hospital grounds was continued, 967 cubic yards 
being excavated, 684 cubic yards back-filled, 5,070 square yards graded, 3,085 square 
yards of grass planted, 119 square yards of sidewalk constructed, and 220 linear feet 
of pipe laid. The construction of concrete walks in Ancon and Balboa Heights was 
continued throughout the month; 1,775 square yards of concrete walk being laid. 
356 linear feet of guard rail installed, 4,938 square yards graded, and 717 square 
j'ards of grass planted, together with the construction of necessary connecting stops, 
drains, etc. In connection with the drainage of Corozal Farm, 3,795 linear feet of 
concrete ditch were constructed. At the Mount Hope ice and cold storage plant, 530 
cubic yards were excavated and back-filled, and 735 feet of 24-inch concrete pipe laid. 
Work was continued on the resurfacing of Main Street, Gatun; 3,705 square yards 
of road, 3,203 linear feet of curb and gutter, and 214 square yards of sidewalk were 
concreted. In connection with the changing of oil lines at Mount Hope for the Supply 
Department, 6,858 linear feet of 10-inch oil line was placed, one standpipe installed, 
and a small amount of concrete walk constructed. Two thousand five hundred square 



26 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



yards were graded and 22,500 square feet of grass planted on the fill at Colon Radio 
Station. 

A total of 162,158,751. gallons of water were pumped at the four stations, Mount 
Hope, Agua Clara, Frijoles, and Monte Lirio, during the month: and 592,891,000 
gallons at the eight stations in the southern district. A total of 131,013,787 gallors 
was supplied the cities of Colon and Panama, and to ships during the month. At 
the three filtration plants 440,855,000 gallons were filtered for domestic purposes. 

WORKING FORCE. 

Statemei t < f the working force effective July 24, representing the second half- 
month, follows: 



Department or Division. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Total. 


Operation and Maintenance: 

Office 


33 
214 

68 
184 
127 
129 
634 

91 

36 


53 

1,869 

1,379 

345 

512 

1,182 

1,552 

302 

303 










1 447 




5'9 








1 311 




2 186 




393 




339 






Total 


1,516 

104 
21 

197 
27 


7,497 

1 ,718 
417 

1,496 
618 


9,013 
1 822 


Supply: 




438 




1 693 




1145 






Total 


349 

207 
208 
409 

129 
138 
66 


4,249 

12 
902 
125 

1,151 

251 

1,386 


4,598 




219 


Health 


1,170 




534 


Panama Railroad — 


1,280 




389 




1,452 








333 


2,788 


3 121 








3,022 


15,633 


18,655 







The total gold force is a decrease of 86 from the 3,108 employed June 19; the silver 
force is a decrease of 524 from the 16,157 shown on that date. 

QUARTERS. 

The following statement gives the occupation of Canal quarters, July 31 : 



Occupants. 


Men. 


Women. 


Children. 


Total. 




2,964 

229 

5,848 


2,046 

32 

2,030 


2,212 

64 

3,368 


7,222 
325 






11,246 








Total 


9,041 


4,108 


5,644 


18,793 



PUBLIC HEALTH. 

Admissicns to hospitals and quarters for the month totaled 779 employees, as 
compared with 1,215 the preceding month. There were 17 deaths and 68 births 
among employees during July. 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

The cash balance in Canal appropriations, July 31, exclusive of fortifications, was 
$18,036,633.51; the balance in fortifications was $7,524,758.83. Payments from 
appropriations by the Disbursing Clerk, Washington, amounted to $914,546.77, 
and by the paymaster on the Isthmus, $1,211,862.44. Payment to the Panama 
Railroad Company for commissary books amounted to $249,440.97. Total Panama 
( anal collections on the Isthmus amounted to $1,757,305.31 ; and collections by the 
Disbursing Clerk, Washington, to $6,854.54. Requisitions for purchase of material 
in the United States totaled $388,247.35. Receipts from the Canal Zone and mis- 
cellaneous funds were $130,571.68, and disbursements from the same source. 
$156,308.23. 

Respecl fully, 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



27 



Rates of Pay, Gold Roll. 

The Panama Canal, Executive Office, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 29, 191. \ 
ClR< '■ i.ak No. 669-21 : 

The following rates of pay are established effective July 1, 1918, superseding rates 
heretofore published for these ratings. Ratings not covered in this circular are not 
affected. 



Designation or hating. 



Rate. 



Hour. 26-day. \ 28-day. Month 



Remarks. 



Anglesmitb (special) 

Apprentice: 

1st year 

2d year 

3d year 

4th year 

Battery repairman. . 



Boatbuilder, cabinetmaker, caulker (wood', fleet 
carpenter, leaning mill hand, ship joiner. ship- 
wright. 



Boiler maker, blacksmith, machinist, molder, pipe- 
fitter, plumber (ship), shipfitter, shipsmitb, wire- 
man, ironworker. 



$1.03 



' 'able- ;'icer, electric. 



• hipper and calker, riveter 



1 ruin man, shop 

Electrician 

Electroplate! 

leer, steam 



Derrick barge and 50-ton dry dock crane. 
' 'il pump. 



Cristobal refrigerating plant; power plant; en- 
gineer and machinist. 



$179.00 
168.00 
156.00 

193.00 
183.00 
171.00 
160.00 
150.00 
139.00 

189.00 
179 00 
16S.00 
156 00 
146.00 
135.00 

189.00 
179.00 

168.00 



131.00 
119.00 
97.00 

189.00 
179.00 
168.00 



183.00 
173 00 
162 00 

150 00 
139.00 
129.00 



$193 00 
181.00 
168 00 

208.00 

197.00 
184.00 
172 00 
161 00 
150 00 

204.00 
193.00 
181.00 
168.00 
157 00 
146.00 

204 00 
193.00 

181.00 



141.00 
128.00 
105.00 

204.00 
193.00 
181.00 



197.00 
186.00 
174.00 
161 00 
150 00 
139.00 



189 00 
179 00 
168 00 



204 oo 

193.00 
1S1 00 



$207.00 
162 00 
150.00 
139.00 



"Machinist, fleet," and 
"machinist, automobile 
repairer," are included 
in this class. 



Coaling plants only. 



These rate:- apply toan] 
equipment run by 
steam engines, includ- 
ing locomotive cranes, 
gantry crane, ditcher, 
hoist, piledriver, track- 
s'!] i fte r. compress) re, 
etc. 



Five cents more than 
first class boiler maker 
when working at flange 
fire; 5 cents more than 
regular flange turner 
rate when working 
from a furnac 
bending slabs. 



28 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 





Rate. 




Designation or rating. 


Hour. 


26-day. 


28-day. 


Month. 


Kejiuiks. 


Forgers: 


$1.11 

1.06 

1 50 


$189.00 
179 00 

168 00 


$204.00 

193 00 
181.00 


$214 00 
204.00 

204.00 












i 

Helper 


60 
.57 
.54 
.51 




Inspector: 
















$0.91 

.86 


$189.00 
179.00 
168.00 


$204.00 
193.00 
181.00 




Scale 






.86 
.75 
.96 

.91 

.86 

.94 


179.00 
168 00 
156 00 

189.00 
179 00 


193.00 
181 00 
168.00 

204.00 
193.00 














Three cents more than 




194 00 
189.00 
179 00 


209 00 
204.00 
193 00 




first class machinist 
and boiler maker rate. 










.96 

.91 
.86 

.75 
.70 
.65 


Five cents over the slop- 




189.00 
179 00 
168.00 
156.00 
146.00 
135 00 


204.00 
193.00 
181 00 
168 00 
157.00 
146 00 

244.00 
204.00 
193.00 
181.00 
168.00 
157.00 
146.00 
214.00 

214 00 
214.00 
204.00 
204.00 
193 00 
181 00 
181.00 
168.00 
157 00 

184 00 
172.00 
161 00 
150.00 

170.00 
159.00 

147.00 
134 00 
123 00 




fitter rate. 
These rates may be ap- 


Coaling plants — 


plied to operators ol 
electric engines, evcept 
as otherwise specified. 
Operator and machin- 
ist, and operator and 
wireman take the first 
















Leadma'n at Balboa. 


Lock — 




















189.00 
189.00 
179.00 
168.00 
168.00 
156.00 
146.00 

171.00 
160 00 
150.00 
139 00 

156.00 
148.00 
137 00 
125.00 
114.00 


The 26-day rate for tow- 


Gamboa sand crane, Gamboa pump plant, floor 
operator, switchboard operator. 




ing operator use 1 as 
an entrance rare or 
until operator is quali- 
fied 


fainter 


.80 
.75 

.70 

.65 

.90 

1.01 

.76 
.71 

.60 
.55 

.94 

.89 

.78 
.73 

.lis 

























THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



29 



Designation or rating. 



Rate. 



Hour. 26-day. 28-day. Month 



Remarks. 



Signal maintained 



5179 00 
168.00 
156.00 



$103.00 
1S1.00 
168.00 



Typewriter and adding machine repairman. 
Welder, electric and acetylene 



8201.00 
179.00 



A Leadingman rate 16 cents in excess of the first class rate of a trade is authorized for the Mechanical Division and 
for Electrical Division employees on ship work. 

The hourly rates will be increased by 5 per cent in the case of employees of the Mechanical Division working on 
night shifts whose pay is based on Navy Yard rates. This does not apply to men on day shifts working overtime, nor 
to employees whose compensation is not based on Navy Yard rates. 

Chester Harding, 

. Governor. 



Deceased Employees. 
The estates of the following deceased employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad 
Company are now in process of settlement by the office of the Acting Administrator of Estates, and any 
claims against these estates, or any information which might lead to the recovery of heirs, or to the re- 
covery of property, bank deposits, postal savings or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys 
Hue them, should be presented at his office at Balboa Heights at once in order that the estates may be 
settled as soon as possible. All claims should be itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or other 
public officer having a seal, and submitted in duplicate. These names will be published but once: 



Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by — 


Date of 
death. 


Anselmo Ampuero. . . . 
Walter Gale 


2215 

136204 
129431 
1.56164 

33445 
114429 

23724 
128315 

90746 


Chile (nat. U.S.) 

Jamaica 

Barbados 

Barbados 

Jamaica 

Montserrat 

Jamaica 

Antigua 

Fortune Island. . 


Pedro Miguel. . . 

Panama 

Panama 

Colon 


Dredging Division. . . 
Dredging Division. . . 

Panama Railroad. . .. 
Dredging Division. . . 
Panama Railroad. . . . 
Dredging Division. . . 
Dredging Division. . . 
Panama Railroad . . . 


August 2, 1918. 
August 2, 1918. 


Ernest Urazette 

Benjamin Jones 

Septimus Hamilton. . . 


August 21. 1918. 
July 24, 191S. 


Colon 

Camp Bierd 

Cristobal 

Pedro Miguel . . 
Camp Bierd 


August 2, 191S. 
August 25, 1918. 


William McCray 


August 2, 1918. 
August 2, 1918. 




August 5, 1918. 



Official Circulars. 



Building Division Work at Coco Solo. 

The Panama Canal. 
Dept. of Operation and Maintenance, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 29, 1918. 
All concerned — Effective September 1, 1918, 
all Building Division work at Coco Solo will be 
placed under the supervision of the Superintend- 
ent of Construction, Mr. J. B. Fields. 

H. Rowe. 
Approved: Resident Engineer. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Use of sugar in hotels and restaurants will be 
limited to a total of two pounds of white granu- 
lated, powdered, and loaf for each 90 meals ?erved 
For the present no restrictions will be placed on 
the sale of South or Central American brown 
sugars. 

The Chief Quartermaster will issue the neces- 
sary detail instructions to carry out the pro- 
visions of the above order. 

Chester Harding, Governor. 



Acting Chief Hydrographer. 

The Panama Canal, 
Dept. of Operation and Maintenance, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 28, 1918. 
All concerned— Effective September 2. 1918, 
and during the absence of the Chief Hydrog- 
rapher on leave, Mr. George Johnson will act 
as Chief Hydrographer, Section of Hydrography 
and Meteorology. 

W. J. Douglas. 
Approved: Engineer of Maintenance. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Sugar Allotment. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 30, 1918. 
To all concerned — Effective September 1, sales 
of white granulated, powdered, and loaf sugar 
will be limited to a total of two pounds per month 
for each gold employee and each member of his 
family. This regulation will also apply to all 
patrons of the commissaries other than employees. 



The Panama Canal, 

Supply Department, 
Cristobal, C. Z., August 29, 1918. 
Bulletin No. 906: 

To commissary managers — Effective September 
1, sales of States granulated sugar, powdered, and 
loaf sugar will be limited to a total of 2 pounds per 
month for each gold employee and member of his 
family. 

In order to make this plan effective, it is di- 
rected that a card record be made up as calls are 
received for sugar, showing employee's name and 
house number, metal check number or authority 
to purchase and names and relationship of mem- 
bers of family, residing with employee. 

This record should be kept in your retail gro- 
cery section and it should be referred to by your 
order room forces before sugar is put up for de- 
livery- 
Card record must show date of purchase, quan- 
tity, and saleman's initials. 

Each sale of States' sugar is to be recorded and 
no sale made in excess of quantity allowed as 
shown on ration card. 

Solicitors may get the necessary data from 
customers who do not come to the commissary 
to make their purchases. 

Bachelors' messes should be recorded the same 
as are families with a 2-pound allowance for each 
member. 



30 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Where the allowance or quantity purchased is 
not a multiple of five, sugar should be resacked. 

Allowance will not be considered cumulative; 
unpurchased balances can not be carried over to 
the following month. 

For the present no limit will bp placed on sales 
of yellow sugar. 

Sample of ration card is attached. 

There is every indication that whole-hearted 
support will be given to this plan to conserve 
States' sugar. It is directed, however, that im- 
mediate report be made to this office of anv at- 
tempt to defeat these requirements of the Food 
Administration. 

It is also desired that you check up all allow- 
ance claims from the district quartermaster's 
records as soon after October 1 as possible, ad- 
vising this office of any discrepancies. 

Roy R. Watson, 
Acting General Manager. 



SUGAR RATION CARD. 

Ancon Commissary September 10, 191S. 

John Smith, house 572, metal check 4444. 
Mary Smith, wife. 
Henry Smith, son. 
Mrs. A. R. Smith, mother. 
Allowance, 8 pounds. 

September 10 4 pounds — D. A. 

September 25 4 pounds — R. G. 

October S 6 pounds — D. A. 

November 1 6 pounds — R. G. 

November 23 2 pounds — R. G. 



Colon-Fort Randolph Transportation. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Auditor, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 28, 1918. 
Circular R. A. 591: 

To all concerned — Effective September 1, 1918, 
when supplement No. 1 of time table No. 27 
goes into effect, the following forms of transpor- 
tation will be accepted on the Colon-Fort Ran- 
dolph service trains: 

1. Annuel card pisses — Conductors will make 
a record of all annual card passes honored on these 
trains on the bad s of their train reports separ- 
ating them by serial numbers "Army," "Navy," 
"Panama Canal," "Panama Railroad,'" etc. 

2. Official business passes — Conductors will 
honor all passes issued by the Army, Navy, 
Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad for trans- 
portation of an official character. These passes 
must be countersigned by sou.eone authorized to 
countersign passes, and must show an expira- 
tion date alter which they will not be accepted. 
Passes issued for transportation between Colon 
and Fort Randolph only, in either direction, will 
be lifted by tiie conductors and punched and sent 
to this office with their reports. Passes issued for 
transportation from Fort Randolph or inter- 
mediate stops to any point on the main line of the 
Panama Railroad will be punched by the con- 
ductors on the Fort Randolph-Colon" train, but 
handed back to the passenger. The conductors 
on the main fine will lift them and turn them in to 
this office. Passes issued for transportation from 
points on the main line to points on the Colon- 
Fort Randolph line will be punched by the main 
line conductors and handed back to the passen- 
gers to be lifted by the conductors on the Colon- 
Fort Randolph trains. 

3. Official tickets, U.S. Army and U.S. Narv — 
These are new tickets in strips of 10, unnumbered, 
and will be used by the Army and Navy for one- 
passenger transportation between Colon and 
Fort Randolph in either direction, only, and are 
issued to eliminate the necessity of writing official 
business passes. They will not be validated by 
the railroad agents, and are good until used. 

4. 120-trip tickets — One hundred and twenty- 
trip tickets will only be accepted en these trains 
when the books specify inside the front cover that 
they have been issued for transportation over 
this route. 

5. Army and Navy guards, policemen, and fire- 
men — Army and Navy train guards, policemen, 



and firemen on duty and in proper uniform will 
not be required to furnish any forms of transpor- 
tation, but conductors will make a record of the 
number of Army and Navy guards thus carried, 
in accordance with bulletin recently issued for. 
reporting Army and Navy guards on the main 
line trains. Conductors will also make a record 
of the badge numbers of policemen and firemen 
traveling on these trains. 

6. Panama Railroad tickets — Regular one-way 
and round-trip tickets are on sale in the Colon 
and Mount Hope ticket offices and by the Post 
Exchange Officer at Fort Randolph, Supply 
Officer, Submarine Base, Coco Solo, and the 
Supply Officer, Aero Squadron, France Field, 
good between Colon and Fort Randolph or any" 
intermediate stops, at the rate of 10 cents for 
the one-way ticket and 20 cents for the round trip. ■' 
These tickets are validated when sold. The one- 
way ticket is good on date of sale only. The going 
portion of the round trip ticket is good on date 
of sale only, but the return portion is good for 10 
days. 

7. Commutation books — Commutation books 
containing 11 single-trip tickets good between' 
Colon and Fort Randolph or any intermediate 
stops in either direction and good until used, will 
be placed on sale at the Colon and Mount Hope 
ticket offices and by the Post Exchange Officer at 
Fort Randolph, Supply Officer, Submarine Base, ' 
Coco Solo, and the Supply Officer, Aero Squadron, . 
France Field. These books will be sold at SI each. 
The books will be validated on the front cover 
when sold, and the purchaser should write his 
name in the space provided for that purpose as a 
means of identification. 

8. ,1/ ileage books — Whenever m ileage books are 
presented for transportation on these trains 
between Colon and Fort Randolph or any inter- 
mediate stops, regardless of distance, the con- 
ductors will detach six miles for each passenger. 

9. Cash fares — It is expected that all passen- 
gers intending to ride on these trains will provide . 

'Ives with one of the above formsof trans- 
portation before boarding the train. AM passen> 
gers who board the trains without providing them- 
selves with tickets or passes will be charged a'' 
cash fare of 1 5 cents one way, any distance. Con- 
ductors will issue the usual cash f;>re receipts, 
re 1 I the money to the Deputy Collector, Cris- 
tob and n al e a record on their reports of all 
cash fare receipts issued. 

10. ( omplimenlary passes and 24-trip tickets — 
No complimentary passes or employees' 24- 
trip t.ckets will be accepted on these trains nor 
any other forms of transportation not named 
above. 

11. Children under 12 years will be permitted 
to ride free. 

This cancels Circular R. A. 5S1, issued June 
28, 1918. 



Approved: 

A. R. Morrell, 

Major, Q. M. Corps, 
Act j. Dcpt. Quartermaster 
Approved: 
S. W. Heald, 

Superintendent. 



II. A. A. Smith, 

A uditor. 



Electrical Division. 

The Panama Canal, 
Electrical Division, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 29, 1918. 
To a I concerned — -During the absence of J. R. 
Strauss on leave, the duties of his office will be 
taken care of by F. Denney. 

During the absence of L. A. Schandleron leave, 
G. A. Wicks will perform the duties of general 
foreman of Northern district vice A. C. Greene, 
resigned. 

C. L. Bleakley, 
Approved: Supervisor of Telephones. ,| 

W. L. Hersh, 
Electrical Engineer. 



U1K PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



3] 



Chagres River Launch Service. 

Panama Railroad Company, 

Office of Auditor, 
Balboa Heights.'c. Z., August 30, 1918. 
Circular R. A. 592: 

To all concerned — Effective September 1. em- 
ployees not on official bn-i'n^s, employees' fami- 
lies, and all nonemployees, using the plat;; 
launches on the Chagres River, will 
a fare nf 40 cents per passenger hetwi boa 

and Limon and ; - points in i 

direction any distance. Children under 10 
free. 

These fares will be col'ected on the launi ties 
and a cash I issued to each pas 

tive the same d il these 

hes on official business must h 

rhe o ial business p i — s 
of The Panama Canal an ima Railroad 

may be used for this purpose but must not be 
issued in connection with railroad transportation; 
t ( l#i a i ■ oss must be issu ;d in eai i 
for lau on between Gamboa and 

Limoa and intermediate stops. 

II. A. A. Smith, 
Approved: Auditor. 

R. K. Morris, 
Chit) Q* • (< "master. 



Kindling Wood. 

The Panama Canal, 
sup1»] v ! iepartmknt, 
Balboa Heights. C. Z., August 24, 1918. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 
On account of a threatening shortage of scrap 
- for kindling requirements, it is re u 
that prompt notice be given to the General 
Balboa, of. all available quantities, 
who will give disposition Tor sai le. 

A price of S ! ; '> per car, including cost of load- 
ablished for all lumber delivered 
• rict quartermasti rs. 
District quartermasters will arrange for re- 
covery of less than carload lots. 

R. K. Morris, 
Approved : Chief Quartermaster. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Fuel Oil. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Balhoa Heights. C. Z., August 27, 1918. 
All concerned — Effective September 1, 1»>1S. 
the following prices will obtain covering s; 
fuel oil to individuals and companies the same 
prices applying to U. S. Army and Navy ( 

At Kalboa barrel . . S2 . 50 

At Custobal barrel. . 3.00 

R. K. Morris, 
Approved: Chief Quartermaster. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Misdirected Letters. 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 26, 1918. 
The following insufficiently addressed letters 
and papers have been received in the offii e of the 
Director of Posts, and may be obtained upon 
request of the addressees. Benuerts may be 
made by telephone calling No. 182, Balboa: 



AftowsKi, A. S. 
Alhvork, Roland 
Ashby. Cecil 

1,. T. 
Burnta, Miss Julia 

ez, Lucila 
Dutcher, William 
Forties, Arnold 



Mishaan, Samuel (Box 
36) 

11, M. 
Niesel, Miss M. Math- 
ilda 
Poliski, John 
Reardon, William (3) 
Schoen. D. E. ( Box 259) 



Hoss ick, Mrs. Adelaide Smith, Fred 



Ladd, C. W 
Leitch, Miss Elizabeth 
l.ord. Geo. E. 
McNeal, Mrs. Alex 
Maxwell, J. W 



Thomas, George (Box 

Thomson, B. R. 
rtavis, Mrs. E. (Box 
156) 



Weckbaugh, Jas. V, 



Additions to Commissary Stock. 

Buttons, pearl, line 16, doz SO. 11 

rl, line 14, doz 08 

Embroideries, assorted, yd 20 

i, assorted, yd 25 

i I oideries, assorted, yd 30 

I lannel, baby, cream, 2, ", yd 1 .10 

Ha 3, str w, ''■'■> lagascar, ea 1 . 70 

Fats, straw, Madagascar, ea 1 .05 

Hats, straw, children's, ea 1 .35 

Hats, straw, children's, ea 2.35 

Hats, straw, children's, white brim, ea... . 1 .50 

' I raw, chil Fen's, ea 1.15 

Hats, white, pique, ea 47 

Fats, straw, children's, ea 50 

Ribbon, No. 22, yd 26 

Ribbon, Mo. 22, yd 26 

«, No. 70, yd 71 

Stationery: 

Books, blank, ea 1.10 

Rooks, blank, ea 1.25 

Extra idlers for books, S. N. 14753,ea. .08 
Extra fillers forbooks, S.N. 14755, ea. .10 

Tonic, hair, Panderine, bot 41 

Automobile accessories: 

Bulbs, Tungsten, for tail lights and 
speedometers, 6 volts, 2 candlepower, 

ea 20 

Compound, carborundum valve grind- 
ing, tin 41 

Fishing tackle: 

>rgers, No. 1 , ea 12 

I looks, treble eyed, ea 08 

Hooks, treble eyed, ea 06 

Lines, linen, trolling, braided, 50-yd., 

ool "8 

Lines, celebrated, 100-yd., No. 15, spool 1.65 

Sinkers, swivel, No. 3, ea 08 

Sinkers, casting. 1/0, ea 08 

Sinkers, casting, 2/0, ea 06 

Sinkers, casting, 3/0, ea 13 

Hooks, screw, ea 07 



Canal Record to Canal Service Men. 

American citizens who have served on The Panama Canal and are 
now in the military service of the United States will be sent a copy of 
The Panama Canal Record each week if they make application for 
this privilege. 

COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Alterations to Clothing. 

Effective at once, the tailoring establishment will arrange to handle alterations to 
clot lies at the rate of 50 cents per hour for the time consumed plus cost of any materials 
used. 

Work received at Gatun and Cristobal commissaries will be handled at Cristobal 
commissary; all other work will be sent to Ancon laundry for tailoring. 



32 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

WHEATLESS RECIPES. 



Indian Pudding with Apples. 

\ cup corn meal 1 egg 

| teaspoon salt \ cup molasses 

1 cup cold water 4 apples 

2 cups boiling water \ teaspoon nutmeg. 
2 cups milk 

Mix corn meal, salt, and cold water, pour into boiling water and boil 15 minutes. 
Remove from the fire and add milk, beaten egg, molasses, and apples, which have 
been washed, pared, and sliced. Pour into a greased baking dish, sprinkle cinnamon 
over the top and bake 1 hour in a moderate oven. 

Jellied Peaches with Rice. 

1 quart can peaches Hot juice fruit from the canned 

2 tablespoons fat peaches 

\ cup brown sugar 2 tablespoons gelatin 

1 cup cooked rice \ cup cold water. 

Drain and slice peaches and line a mold or serving dish with the slices. Melt the 
fat, add sugar, and stir over a very low fire until the sugar is melted. Heat the juice 
from peaches and add sugar mixture, cook over hot water until thoroughly mixed, 
pour into gelatin which has been softened in the cold water, add rice, pour into mold 
or serving dish and chill. If desired, fresh peaches may be used instead of canned 
peaches, in which case add juice of 1 lemon with the rice. 

Date Nut Pudding. 

1 cup chopped dates \ cup sugar 

1 cup chopped nuts 1 teaspoon baking powder 

2 egg yolks 2 stiffly beaten egg whites. 

Mix sugar and baking powder and add to egg yolks; then add nuts and dates and 
fold in stiffly beaten egg whites. Spread in a shallow greased pan and bake in a slow 
oven 45 minutes. Serve with whipped cream or ice cream. 



MEATLESS RECIPES. 



Tomato Croquettes with Pepper Sauce. 

2 cups mashed potatoes or cooked rice 1 teaspoon salt 
\ cup stewed tomatoes \ teaspoon pepper 

1 tablespoon chopped onion \\ cups fine crumbs 

1 cup coarse crumbs 1 egg. 

Mix potatoes or rice with tomatoes, coarse crumbs, onion, pepper, and salt. Beat 
the egg with 2 tablespoons cold water. Shape the mixture into croquettes, roll first 
in crumbs, then in egg, and again in crumbs, fry in deep fat and drain on brown 
paper. Serve with pepper sauce. 

Pepper Sauce. 

2 finely chopped hot peppers \ teaspoon paprika 

3 tablespoons flour \ cup cold water 

1 teaspoon salt 1^ cups rice or vegetable stock or 
Juice of 5 lemon water. 

Cover peppers with boiling water and allow to stand 5 minutes; drain, remove 
seeds and chop. Heat the stock or water. Mix flour, salt, and paprika, and slowly 
add cold water to make a smooth mixture. Add this slowly to the heated stock, 
6tirring constantly. Bring to boiling point, add peppers and lemon and serve. 

Baked Bean Fritters. 

-| cup flour i cup milk 

2 teaspoons baking powder 1 egg yolk 

1 teaspoon salt \ cup cold baked beans, mashed 

1 cup dry bread crumbs 1 stiffly beaten egg white. 

Mix flour, baking powder and salt, add bread crumbs and mix thoroughly. Add 

milk, egg yolk and the mashed beans, stirring constantly. Fold in the stiffly beaten 

egg white. Cook like pancakes on a hot greased griddle, turning until a golden brown 

on both sides. A piece of bacon or pork rind may be used for greasing the gi iddle. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year: foreign, $1.50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter February 0, 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., September u, 1918. No. 4. 



PROCLAMATION. 



Entrance or Departure of Persons During Hostilities. 

The Panama Canal, Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 4, 191 8. 
Circular No. 601-79: 

The Proclamation of the President quoted below is published for 
the information of all concerned. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 

Whereas by Act of Congress approved the 22d day of May, 1918, entitled "An 
Act to prevent in time of war departure from and entry into the United States con- 
trary to the public safety," it is provided as follows: 1 

* * * * * * + 

And Whereas other provisions relating to departure from and entry into the United 
States are contained in section 3, subsection (b), of the Trading-with-the-Enemy Act, 
approved October 6, 1917, and in section 4067 of the Revised Statutes, as amended 
by the Act of April 16, 191S, and sections 4068, 4069, and 4070 of the Revised Statutes, 
and in the regulations prescribed in the President's proclamations of April 6 1917 - 
November 16, 1917; December 11, 1917; and April 19, 1918; 

And Whereas the Act of May 20, 1918. authorizes me to coordinate and consolidate 
executive agencies and bureaus in the interest of economy and more efficient concen- 
tration of the Government; 

Now, Therefore, I, Wood row Wilson, President of the United States of 
America, acting under and by virtue of the aforesaid authority vested in me, do 
hereby find and publicly proclaim and declare that the public safety requires that 
restrictions and prohibitions in addition to those provided otherwise than by the Act 
of May 22, 1918, above mentioned, shall be imposed upon the departure of persons 
from and their entry into the United States; and I make the following orders there- 
under: 

1. No citizen of the United States shall receive a passport entitling him to leave or 
enter the United States, unless it shall affirmatively appear that there are adequate 
reasons for such departure or entry and that such departure ot entry is not prejudicial 
to the interests of the United States. 

2. No alien shal! receive permission to depart from or enter the United States unless 
it shall affirmatively appear that there is reasonable necessity for such departure or 
entry and that such departure or entry is not prejudicial to the interests of the United 
States. 

3. The provisions of this proclamation and the rules and regulations promulgated 
in pursuance hereof, shall not be held to suspend or supersede in any respect, except 
as herein expressly provided, the President's proclamations of April 6, 1917, No- 
vember 16, 1917, December 11, 1917, and April 19, 1918, above referred to;' nor 
shall anything contained herein be construed to suspend or supersede any rules or 
regulations issued under the Chinese-exclusion law or the immigration laws except 
as herein expressly provided; but the provisions hereof shall, subject to the provisos 
above mentioned, be regarded as additional to such rules and regulations. Com- 
pliance with this proclamation and the rules and regulations promulgated in pur- 
suance hereof shall not exempt any individual from the duty of complying with any 
statute, proclamation, order, rule, or regulations not referred to herein. 

4. I hereby designate the Secretary of State as the official who shall grant, or in 
whose name shall be granted, permission to aliens to depart from or enter the United 
States; I reaffirm sections 25, 26, and 27 of the Executive Order of October 12, 1917, 

■ Published as Panama Canal Circular No. 600-49. 



34 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

vesting in the Secretary of State the administration of the provisions of section 3, 
subsection (b), of the Trading with Enemy Act; I transfer to the Secretary' of State 
the executive administration of Regulations 9 and 10 of the President's proclamation 
of April 6, 1917; of Regulation 15 of the President's proclamation of November 16, 
1917. and of Regulations 1 and 2 of the President's proclamation of December 1, 1917, 
and the executive administration of the aforesaid regulations as extended by the 
President's proclamation of April 19, 1918, said executive administration heretofore 
having been delegated to the Attorney General under dates of April 6, 191 7; Novem- 
ber 16, 1917; December 11, 1917; and April 19, 1918. The Rules and Regulations 
made by the Secretary of the Treasury, as authorized by Title II, section 1, of the 
Espionage Act approved June 15, 1917, and by the Executive Order of December 3, 
1917, shall be superseded by this proclamation and the rules and regulations pro- 
mulgated in pursuance hereof* in so far as they are inconsistent therewith. 

I hereby direct all departments cf the Government to co-operate with the Secretary 
of State in the execution of his duties under this proclamation and the rules and 
regulations promulgated in pursuance hereof. They shall upon his request make 
available to him for that purpose the services of their respective officials and agents. 
The Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of War, the Attorney General, the 
Secretary of the Navy, the Secretary of Commerce, and the Secretary of Labor shall, 
at the request of the Secretary of State, each appoint a representative to render to 
the Secretary of State, or his representative, such assistance and advice as he may 
desire respecting the administration of this proclamation and of the rules and regu- 
lations aforesaid. 

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the 
United States to be affixed. 

Done in the District of Columbia, this 8th day of August, in the year of our Lord 
one thousand nine hundred and eighteen, and of the independence of the United 
States the one hundred and forty-third. 

WOODROW WILSON. 

By the President: 

Robert Lansing, 

Secretary of State. 



PROCLAMATION. 



Terms of the Shipping Act as Amended by Act of July 15, 1918, Declared to 

Be in Force. 

By the President of the United States of America — A Proclamation: 

Whereas, an Act of Congress, entitled "Shipping Act, 1916," approved September 
7, 1916, as amended by an Act of Congress entitled "An Act To amend the Act 
approved September seventh, nineteen hundred and sixteen, entitled, 'An Act to 
establish a United States Shipping Board for the purpose of encouraging, developing, 
and creating a naval auxiliary and naval reserve and a merchant marine to meet 
the requirements of the commerce of the United States with its Territories and pos- 
sessions and with foreign countries; to regulate carriers by water in the foreign and 
interstate commerce of the United States; and for other purposes,' approved July 
15, 1918, contains the following provisions: 

"Sec. 37. That when the United States is at war or during any national emergency, 
the existence of which is declared by proclamation of the President, it shall be unlaw- 
ful, without first obtaining the approval of the board: 

"(c) To transfer or to place under any foreign registry or flag any vessel owned in 
whole or in part by any person a citizen of the United States or by a corporation 
organized under the laws of the United States, or of any State, Territory, District, 
of possession thereof; or 

"(6) To sell, mortgage, lease, charter, deliver, or in any manner transfer, or agree 
to sell, mortgage, lease, charter, deliver, or in any manner transfer, to any person not 
a citizen of the United States, (1) any such vessel or any interest therein, or (2) any 
vessel documented under the laws of the United States, or any interest therein, or (3) 
any shipyard, dry dock, ship-building or ship-repairing plant or facilities, or any 
interest therein; or 

"(c) To enter into any contract, agreement, or understanding to construct a vessel 
within the United States for or to be delivered to any person not a citizen of the 
United States, without expressly stipulating that such construction shall not begin 
until after the war or emergency proclaimed by the President has ended ; or 

•Will be published in The Panama Canal Record, September 18. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 35 

"(d) To make any agreement or effect any understanding whereby there is vested 
in or for the benefit of any person not a citizen of the United States, the controlling 
interest or a majority of the voting power in a corporation which is organized under 
the laws of the United States, or of any State, Territory, District, or possession thereof, 
and which owns any vessel, shipyard, dry dock, or shipbuilding or ship-repairing 
plant or facilities; or 

"(e) To cause or procure any vessel constructed in whole or in part within the 
United States, which has never cleared for any foreign port, to depart from a port 
of the United States before it has been documented under the laws of the United 
States." 

And Whereas the destruction of maritime tonnage during the present war has 
rendered it imperative that the American merchant marine be retained under Ameri- 
can control, and free from alien influence, 

Now, Therefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States, acting 
under authority conferred in me by said Act, do hereby proclaim that a state of war 
and a national emergency within the meaning of said Act do now exist, and I do 
hereby enjoin all persons from doing any of the things in said Act declared to be 
unlawful. 

For the purposes of said Act of Congress, the national emergency herein pro- 
claimed shall be deemed to continue until its termination has been evidenced by a 
Proclamation of the President. 

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the 
United States to be affixed. 

Done in the District of Columbia this 7th day of August, in the year of our Lord 
one thousand nine hundred and eighteen and of the Independence of the 
[seal] United States of America the one hundred and forty-third. 

WOODROW WILSON 
By the President: 

Frank L. Polk, 

Acting Secretary of State. 

[No. 1471.] 



Save Gasoline. 

The Panama Canal, Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 6, 1918. 
To all employees of The Panama Canal and Panama Railroad Com- 
pany — In order to meet the demand for gasoline created by the exten- 
sive military movements in France, and conserve the supply available 
for war purposes, the United States Fuel Administration has requested 
the public to cease the use of motorcycles, motor boats, and automo- 
biles for pleasure purposes on Sundays until further notice. 

Employees of The Panama Canal and Panama Railroad Company 
are requested to comply with the above, and reduce to the minimum 
the consumption of gasoline for pleasure purposes wherever possible. 
A cheerful compliance with this regulation is not only a patriotic duty, 
but will avoid the issuance of a mandatory order in the future. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor, The Panama Canal. 
President, Panama Railroad Company. 

Employees Visiting United States. 

The attention of employees visiting the United States is called to 
the fact that under the Selective Service regulations, all males within 
the registration ages who have not registered by reason of absence 
without the territorial limits of the United States, must register with 
their local board within 5 days after reaching the first United States 
port. If desired, employees may register with the American consular 
officers in Panama or Colon. If they do, they then become subject 
to all the rules and regulations in the Selective Service regulations. 



36 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Persons residing on the Isthmus who are called for military service 
may be given a physical examination here by securing a certificate of 
residence abroad from the American consular officers in Panama or 
Colon, who will forward same to the local board and designate two 
Panama Canal physicians who, after approval by the local board, will 
make the required physical examination. 

Persons who are allowed 5 days after reaching the United States to 
register are not permitted to enlist prior to registering. Whether or 
not they may enlist after registering depends upon their classification 
and the rules governing enlistment in the Army and Navy at the time 
they desire to enlist. At the present time all enlistments in the Army 
have been suspended; and no person in the draft ages can be enlisted 
without securing special permission from the Adjutant General, 
Washington, D. C. 

Under the new law, males who have attained their 18th but not their 
46th birthday will be required to register in the United States on Sep- 
tember 12, and it is probable that the same regulations cited above 
will apply to those who come within the age limits on the Isthmus. 

Teachers Examinations, Colored Schools. 

The Panama Canal, Division of Schools, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 9, 1918. 
An examination for colored teachers who may wish to be considered 
for employment, will be held in the board room, Administration 
Building, Balboa Heights, on Friday and Saturday, September 20 
and 21. 

The examination will cover arithmetic, spelling, grammar, and 
composition, United States history, hygiene, geography, penman- 
ship, and reading (oral and written). All writing materials will be 
furnished for the examination. 

The time of the morning sessions will be from 8 to 12 o'clock and the 
afternoon sessions from 1 until 4. 

Those who wish to take this examination should submit their 
credentials to the office of the Superintendent of Schools, Balboa 
Heights, C. Z. 

A. R. Lang, 
Superintendent of Schools. 

Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at 
Canal post offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not 
posted, persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, 
Balboa Heights (telephone 286): 

Inspector of mechanical or electrical equipment (male); S2, 700 a year; No. 331-amended.f 

Inspector of structural steel (male); $2,400 a year; No. 231-amended.t 

Photographer, grade I (male); SI, 200 to S2.000 a year; grade II (male and female): $720 to $1,200 
a year; No. 511; September 24, 1918.* 

Electrician (male); $840 to $1,200 a year; No. 231 -amended. t 

Elevator conductor (male) ; $720 to $900 a year; No. 231 -amended. t 

General mechanic (male) ; $720 to $900 a year; No. 231-amended.t 

Steam engineer (male); first and second class, $1,000 to $1,200 a year; third class, $600 to S1.000 
a year; No. 231-amended.t 

Tabulating mechanician (male); SI, 200 to $1,400 a year; No. 512; Novembei 6, 1918.* 

Assistant clinical psychiatrist and psychotherapist (male); $1,200 a year; No. 523; September 
24, 1918.* 

Assistant superintendent of seed warehouse (male); Sl,200ayear; No. 513; September 24, 1918.* 

♦Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications 
and they must be in the hpnds of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business 
on that date. 

tNonassembled. Applications will be received at any time, until further notice. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 37 

Reduced Rates to Colombian Ports. 

The Terminal Shipping Agency, agent for The Colombian Maritime 
Company, Ltd., advise that it will accord to all Panama Canal and 
Panama Railroad Company employees, upon presentation of request 
for reduced rate from the Executive Office, a discount of 331 per cent 
from established tariff rates to the Colombian ports of Buenaventura 
and Tumaco, at present the principal ports of call. Information 
relative to sailings may be had upon application. 



More Magazines Needed for Soldiers. 

The following information received from the Third Assistant Post- 
master General is quoted for your information and guidance: 

"Although there has been a gratifying and patriotic response on the 
part of the public to the opportunity accorded it to supply our soldiers 
and sailors with suitable and interesting reading matter under the 
arrangement provided for by Departmental Order No. 1277, whereby 
unwrapped, unaddressed copies of magazines bearing the notice to 
reader prescribed in that order are accepted for mailing at the postage 
rate of 1 cent each and placed in the hands of soldiers and sailors, 
reports received by this office indicate that additional magazines could 
be used to advantage at the various camps throughout the country. 
The reports indicate that the magazines are heartily appreciated and 
serve to promote the welfare and contentment of the soldiers and 
sailors. 

"It is believed that if postmasters will bring this matter to the 
attention of their patrons the latter will gladly respond and so increase 
the number of magazines mailed under the arrangement referred to 
that the need for reading matter of this kind may be fully met. It 
should be borne in mind that the magazines should be of current or 
comparatively recent issues and devoted to literature or contain 
articles of general interest. Old magazines and those of local or 
restricted interest are of no value and are not desired." 

Please give the foregoing all the publicity possible. 

C. H. Calhoun, 
Director of Posts. 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., 

September 3, 1918. 

High School Entrance Examinations. 

High school entrance examinations will be held at the Balboa and 
Cristobal high schools on Wednesday and Thursday, September 25 
and 26, at 9.15 a. m. All those wishing to take the examinations should 
advise the Superintendent of Schools on or before September 16. 
This examination will also offer an opportunity for any eighth grade 
pupils of the Canal Zone schools who are conditioned in any subject 
to remove that condition. 

A. R. Lang, 
Superintendent of Schools. 



Deceased Employees. 

The estates of the following deceased employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad 
Company are now in proces-s of settlement, and any claims against these estates, or any information 
which might lead to the recovery of heirs, or to the recovery of property, bank deposits, postal sayings 
or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys due them, should be presented at the office of 
the Administrator of Estates at once in order that the estates may be settled as soon as possible. All 



38 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



claims should be itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or other public officer having a seal, and 
submitted in duplicate. These names will be published but once: 



Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by — 


Date of 
death. 




136299 
33067 

120703 
34277 
85487 
72671 
59684 


Chile 


Panama 

Panama 

Panama 

Colon 

New Gatun 

Panama 

Ancon 


Dredging Division. . . 
Building Division 

Panama Railroad. . . . 

Buildinsc Div 

Mun. Ens. Div 


August 9, 1918. 


Edwin Moore Hines.. . 

William Innes 

Robert W. Small 

Gabriel Tonal 

Stanford Smith 

James At well 


Jamaica 

Trinidad 

Guadeloupe 

Jamaica 

Barbados 


August 31, 1918. 
August 31, 1918. 
August 25, 1918. 
Angus! 24, 1918. 
August 1.5, 1918. 
Julv 25, 1918. 



Certificates for Employees Sick in Quarters. 

At the suggestion of district physicians, the following extract from 
the rules governing the issuance of sick certificates to employees sick 
in quarters is republished: 

A daily register is kept of all employees who are confined to their quarters because 
of illness and are, therefore, under the professional care of a physician of the Health 
Department. 

The greatest care and accuracy are exercised in keeping this register 'of employees 
sick in quarters, and sick certificates will be issued only in accordance with the reading 
of the register, and in order that the names of sick employees may be entered on the 
register to cover full time of sickness they must be seen on each day of illness by a 
physician. 

An employee visiting the dispensary, obtaining treatment, and then absenting 
himself from his duties without being specifically instructed to do so by the attending 
physician, will not be given a certificate covering loss of time. 

An employee who becomes sick in quarters and is unable on account of his illness 
to report to the dispensary will notify a physician of his condition and if, in the 
opinion of the physician visiting him, he is too ill to perform his duties, his name will 
be entered in the sick register as "sick in quarters" from the hour of notification by 
him to the attending physician. The sick certificate will, therefore, cover the time 
of illness from the hour of receipt of notification by the attending physician, to the 
time of discharge for return to duty, or transfer to hospital. 

France Field. 

The War Department, under date of July 15, 1918, named the new 
Army Aviation Field at Coco Walk, Canal Zone, "France Field" in 
honor of the late First Lieut. Howard J. France, who lost his life 
near that place in attempting to escape from a burning jhvdroplane 
on April 24, 1918. 



Official Circulars. 



Act of Congress — Entrance or Departure ol 
Persons during Hostilities. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., June 15, 1918. 
Circular No. 600-49: 

The Act of Congress quoted below is published 
for the information of all concerned. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 

AN ACT To prevent in time of war departure 
from or entry into the United States con- 
trary to the public safety. 
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives of the United States of America in 
Congress assembled. That when the United States 
is at war, if the President shall find that the public 
safety requires that restrictions and prohibitions 
in addition to those provided otherwise than 
by this Act be imposed upon the departure of 
persons from and their entry into the United 
States, and shall make public proclamation 
thereof, it shall, until otherwise ordered by the 
President or Congress, be unlawful — 



(a) For any alien to depart from or enter or 
attempt to depart from or enter the United 
States except under such reasonable rules, regu- 
lations, and orders, and subject to such limita- 
tions and exceptions as the President shall pre- 
scribe; 

(6) For any person to transport or attempt to 
transport from or into the United States another 
person with knowledge or reasonable cause to 
believe that the departure or entry of such other 
person is forbidden by this Act; 

(c) For any person knowingly to make any false 
statement in an application for permission to 
depart, or enter the United States with intent to 
induce or secure the granting of such permission 
either for himself or for another; 

! d) For any person knowingly to furnish or 
attempt to furnish or assist in furnishing to 
another a permit or evidence of permission to 
depart or enter not issued and designed for such 
other person's use; 

(d) For any person knowingly to use or attempt 
to use any permit or evidence of permission to 
depart or enter not issued and designed for hia 
use; 

(/) For any person to forge, counterfeit, muti- 
late, or alter, or cause or procure to be forged, 
counterfeited, mutilated, or altered, any permit 
or evidence of permission to depart from or enter 
the United States: 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



39 



(g) For any person knowingly to use or attempt 
to use or furnish to another for use any false, 
forged, counterfeited, mutilated, or altered permit 
or evidence of permission, or any permit or evi- 
dence of permission which, though originally 
valid, has become or been made void or invalid. 

Sec. 2. That after such proclamation as is 
provided for by the preceding section has been 
made and published and wuile said proclamation 
is in force, it shall, except as otherwise provided 
by the President, and subject to sucn limitations 
and exception? as the President may authorize 
and prescribe, be unlawful for any citizen of the 
United States to depart from or enter or attempt 
to depart from or enter the United States unless 
he bears a valid passport. 

Sec. 3. That any person who shall willfully 
violate any of the provisions of this Act, or of 
any order or proclamation of the President pro- 
mulgated, or of any permit, rule, or regulation 
issued thereunder, shall, upon conviction, be 
fined not more than S 10,090. or. if a natural 
person, imprisoned for not more than twenty 
years, or both; and the officer, director, or agent 
of any corporation who knowingly participates 
in such violation shall be punished by like fine 
or imprisonment, or botn; and any vehicle or 
any vessel, toiethe. witn its or her appurtenances, 
equipment, tackle, apparel, and furniture, con- 
cerned in any such violation, snail be forfeited 
to the Uniteu States. 

Sec. 4. That the term "United States" as 
used in this Act include the Canal Zone and all 
territory and waters, continental or insular, 
subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. 

The word "person" as used herein shad be 
deemed to mean any individual, partnership, 
association, company, or other unincorporated 
body of individuals, or corporation, or body 
politic. 

Approved, May 22. 1918. 

Acting Auditor. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 3. 1918. 
Memorandum to all concerned — Effective at 
once and during the absence of Mr. H. A. A. 
Smith. Auditor. The Panama Canal, on sick 
leave, Mr. J. H. Helmer will act as Auditor of 
The Panama Canal. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Rates of Pay— Building Trades. 
The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 29, 1918. 
Circular No. 669-22: 

rates of pay, gold roll. 
The following rates of pay are established for 
the building trades, effective July 1, 1918, 
superseding rates heretofore published for these 
ratings. Rates not covered in this circular are 
not affected. 

Carpenter, house (per hour), 85. 80, 75, 70, 
65 cents. 

Painter (per hour). 80. 75. 70, 65 cents. 
Plasters, bricklayer, tilesetter (per hour), SI, 
95, 00, 85, 80 cents. 

Plumber (per hour), 96, 91. 86, 81, 76 cents. 
Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Wire Chief. 

The Panama Canal. 
Electrical Division, 
Balboa FIeights, C. Z„ September 4. 1918. 
To all concerned — Effective September 3. 1918, 
J. H. Briggs will assume the duties of wire chief 
vice H. J. Linde, resigned. The above for the 
information of all concerned. 

C. W. Bleakley, 
Approved: Supervisor of Telephones. 

W. L. Hersh, 

Electrical Engineer. 



Sugar. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department. 
Cristobal. C. Z., September 4, 1918. 
Bulletin No. 906-1 : 

To all concerned — Each commissary manager 
should make sales of white graunulated sugar only 
to employees residing in the district which he 
serves. 

Customers entitled to commissary privileges 
residing in Panama must make their purchases 
from Ancon commissary. 
No sales to post exchanges. 
No sales to Army organizations. 
Sales to clubhouses not to exceed 2 pounds to 
every 90 services of coffee. 

Sales to tugs and dredges to be on a basis of 

? pounds to each gold employee subsisted thereon. 

Servants are not, of course, to be considered 

as part of a family, when computing ration 

allowance. 

Roy R. Watson, 
Approved: Acting General Manager. 

R. K. Morris, 

Chief Quartermaster. 



Sugar. 

The Panama Canal. 
Supply Department. 
Cristobal. C. Z.. August 31, 1918. 
Bulletin No. 906 (Corrected): 

To all concerned — Effective September 1, sales 
of States granulated sugar, powdered, and loaf 
sugar will be limited to a total of 2 pounds per 
month for each gold employee and member of his 
family. 

Commissary managers will keep a card record 
of orders received for sugar, showing employee's 
name and house number, metal check num- 
ber or authority to purchase and names and 
relationship of members of family residing with 
employee. The sample ration card distributed 
with original bulletin should be used. 

This record should be kept in your retail grocery 
section and it should be referred to by your order 
room forces before sugar is put up for delivery. 

Card record must show date of purchase 
quantity, and salesman's initials. 

Each sale of States sugar is to be recorded and 
no sale made in excess of quantity allowed aa 
shown on ration card. 

Solicitors may get the necessary data from 
customers who do not come to the commissary 
to make their purchases. 

Bachelors' messes should be recorded the same 
as are families with a 2-pound allowance for each 
member. 

Where the allowance or quantity purchased is 

not a multiple of five, sugar should be resacked. 

Allowance will not be considered cumulative; 

unpurchased balances can not be carried over to 

the following month. 

For the present no limit will be placed on sales 
of yellow sugar. 

There is every indication that a whole-hearted 
support will be given to this plan to conserve 
States sugar. It is directed, ho.vever. that im- 
mediate report be made to this office of any 
attempt to defeat these requirements of the Food 
Administration. . 

It is also desired that all allowance claims be 
checked up from the District Quartermaster's 
office records as soon after October 1, if possible, 
advising this office of any discrepancies. 

Commissary managers will arrange to check 
their cards against those of nearby commissaries 
and Army post commissaries to prevent pur- 
chasers from receiving allotments from more than 

one store. 

Roy R. Watson, 

Approved: ActingGeneral Manager. 

K. K. Morris. 

Chief Quartermaster. 



40 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Smallpox. 

The Panama Canal, 
Health Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 6, 1918. 
Circular No. 150: 

Heads of departments — In order to prevent the 
possibility ot the introduction of smallpox on the 
Canal Zone, it is requested that department 
heads notify each of their employees that it is 
essential that they and each member of their 
family and their servants be vaccinated, and that 
they should arrange to consult their district 
physician at once so that the entire population 
of the Isthmus may be made immune against 
smallpox. 

Attention is called to the fact that vaccination 
prevents the spread of smallpox. 

Robert L. Loughran, 
Acting Chief Health Officer. 



Commissary Sales Preference after 4 p. m. 

The Panama Canal, 

Supply Department, 
Cristobal, C. Z. ( September 10, 1918. 
Bulletin No. 907: 

Effective Saturday, September 14, please direct 
your salesmen to give preference in service, after 
4 p. m., to men and women who are actually 
employed by The Panama Canal or Panama 
Railroad. Nonemployed women and children 
who may come after the hour mentioned should 
be informed that they will oblige you by waiting 
until those who have come from work and have 
had no previous opportunity to make their pur- 
chases, can be accommodated. Women employees 
may make themselves known by their identifica- 
tion cards. This rule should be enforced without 
favor. 

Notice will be published in this issue of The 
Panama Canal Record and you will also post 
signs to this effect. 

Roy R. Watson, 
Acting General Manager. 



Additions to Commissary Stock. 

Plates, baby, Hold Fast, ea SO. 45 

Caps, bathing, assorted colors, ea 48 

Hose, silk, holeproof, men's, green, pr 67 

Hose, silk, holeproof, men's, brown pr 67 

Hose, silk, holeproof, men's, navy, pr 67 

Books, blank, ea 48 

Books, blank, ea 50 

Books, blank, ea 85 

Buttons, pearl, ea 02 

Canvas, No. 8, 60". yd 1 .30 

Cream, cold, face, Mavis, jar 45 

Dress goods: 

Voile, Columbus, 36", yd 45 

Voile, Toledo, 36", yd 45 

Voile, Aberdeen, 36", yd 45 

Elastic, 1", yd 05 

Fillers, extra for books, S. N. 14805, ea. . . .08 
Fillers, extra, for books, S. N. 14806, ea. . .08 
Fillers, extra, for books, S. N. 14807, ea. . . 10 

Hats, 8traw, men's, ea 2 . 60 

Hats, straw, men's, ea 3.25 

Hooks and eyes, doz 03 

Laces, all-over, yd 76 



Laces, all-over, yd ; $0 . 69 

Laces, filet, yd 22 

Laces, filet, yd 3i 

Laces, filet, yd 07 

Laces, silk and cotton, yd 17 

Laces, filet, yd IS 

Laces, filet, yd 10 

Linen, bleached, pillow case, 45", yd 1.15 

Powder, face, Mavis, box 45 

Powder, face. Mavis, box 23 

Ribbon, silk, No. 5, yd 10 

Ribbon, silk. No. 12, vd 21 

Ribbon, silk, No. 3, yd 09 

Ribbon, silk, No. 250, yd 47 

Ribbon, silk, No. 250, yd 50 

Ribbon, silk, No. 300, yd 81 

Ribbon, silk. No. 300, yd 59 

Ribbon, silk. No. 300, yd 47 

Ribbon, silk, No. 200, yd 44 

Ribbon, silk. No. 250, yd 50 

Ribbon, taffeta, width No. 100, yd 33 

Sheeting, linen, 72", yd 1 .90 

Suitings, duck, white linen, yd 1 . 20 

Thimbles, silver plated, ea 02 

Automobile and motorcycle accessories: 

Tires, auto., 30" x 3J", ea 18.25 

Tires, motorcycle, 26" x 2\" , ea 10.80 

Tubes, inner, 30" x i\", ea 2 . 55 

Tubes, motorcycle, 28" x 3", ea 2.65 

Tubes, motorcycle. 26" x 2i". ea 2.00 

Pans, drip, aluminum, ea 1 .85 

Pans, biscuit, aluminum, ea 72 

Pans, jelly cake, ea 92 

Platters, oval, Minton, No. 4807, 18", ea. 7.30 
Dishes, vegetable, Minton, No. 1935, 10", 

ea 14.20 

Strainers, soup, aluminum, ea 64 

Tires, bicycle, 26" x If", ea 2. 45 

Women's Oxfords, white canvas, military 

heel, pr 2.30 



Stages of the Chagres and the Lakes. 

The maxim um elevations of the Chagres River, 
G?tun Lake and Miraflores Lake, in feet above 
mean sealevel, during the two weeks ending at 
midnight of Saturday, September 7, were as fol- 
lows: 



Date 



Chagres Riveij Gatun Lake 
Gara- 



. Alha- 
^'g' a juela 



boa 



Gatun 



Sun., Aug. 25 128 90 

Mon., Aug. 26 133 80 

Ties., Aug. 27 12S.65 

Wed., Aug. 28 ,129 301 

Thurs., Aug. 29.... 128.80 

Fri., Aug. 30 128.15 

Sat., Aug. 31 135 10] 

Sun., Sept. 1 133.05 



Mon., Sept. 2 
Tues., Sept. 3 
Wed., Sent. 4 . 
Thjrs.. Sept, 5 . 
Fri., Sept. .... 
Sat., Sept. 7. ... 



Height of low water 126.0 91.0 
to nearest foot. 



134.00 
131.251 

129 60: 
132.50 
132 20 
132 9U 



94.181 
97 . 60 
93 . 55 
94 39 1 
94 02 
93.27J 
9S.55; 
97.05 
97.95 
96.62 
94.94 
96 65 
96.50 
97.00 



85.20 
S5.30 
85.20 
85.26 
85.20 
85.06 
85.18 
85.33 
85.31 
85.37 
85. 26 1 
85 31 
85.33 
85.25 



85.1 

85.22 

85 19 

85 28 

85.17 

85.06 

85.10 

8o.2o 

85.25 

85 

85. 2C 

85 

S5 24 

85.26 



Mira- 
flores 
Lake. 



53.97 
53.90 
53.89 
53.90 
53.88 
53.87 
54.10 
54.20 
54.25 
54.16 
54.30 
54.13 
54.40 
54.05 



Announcement. 

The Fourth Liberty Loan campaign will commence Saturday, Sep- 
tember 28, and close Saturday, October 19. 



Canal Record to Canal Service Men. 
American citizens who have served on the Panama Canal and are 
now in the military service of the United States will be sent a copy of 
The Panama Canal Record each week if they make application for 
this privilege. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 41 

COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Early Shopping. 

Several times previously, commissary customers not actually on the pay rolls 
of The Panama Canal or Panama Railroad Company, have been requested through 
these columns to make their purchases in so far as possible before 4 p. m., in order 
that employed men and women returning from work should not be inconvenienced 
by having to wait while persons who have had ample opportunity during the course 
of the day to buy are being served. The number of sales to nonemployed women 
and children, after the hour mentioned, however, is increasing rather than 
diminishing and has in fact grown to such an extent as to make necessary the 
enforcement of a rule whereby employees shall be given preference of service after 
4 p. m. Beginning Saturday, September 14, this ruling will be put into effect. 
Nonemployed patrons, who arrive after that hour, will oblige by waiting until 
employees have received attention. Women employees may make themselves known 
by presenting their identification cards. 



Sauerkraut. 

Another shipment of sauerkraut, manufactured in the industrial laboratory, will 
be distributed to the line stores the first of next week. 



Prunes. 

In 1917 the United States Army used 30,000,000 pounds of prunes for it has been 
proven that the prune has food value, fruit value, tonic' value, and value as a con- 
fection and has the approval of the food experts. 



Roses. 

Favorable comment has been heard from customers and good sales have been 
enjoyed recently on roses from Corozal farms. They come in a number of attractive 
varieties and are sold for 75 cents a dozen. 



Mustard Pickles, 15 Cents. 

The quantity of mustard pickles bottled by the industrial laboratory the past season 
is in excess of the ordinary demand for this product. Accordingly, to stimulate 
sales the price has been reduced from 20 cents to 15 cents the jar. 



Women's High Shoes. 

At a recent meeting, in Washington, of prominent shoe manufacturers with the 
War Industries Board, it was practically conceded that the extra high ladies' boot 
must go. Beginning October 12, when the manufacture of spring styles is begun, it 
is understood that the maximum height of women's shoes will be 8 inches. 



Silk and Percale Shirts. 

Confirmation of a recent item in these columns relative to an advance in the price 
of shirts in the United States markets is furnished by a statement in a prominent 
Canadian dry goods journal to the effect that anticipated spring prices on silk and 
percales will be 100 per cent higher than those now in effect. 



Fruits and Vegetables. 

The volume of fruits and vegetables being moved from Costa Rica, now that the 
crops are coming in, is so great that the Commissary Division is unable to transport 
all by the boat regularly chartered for that purpose and it has become necessary to 
send cargo also by a schooner formerly used for this purpose. 



Collars. 

Collar prices have again advanced. The Troy manufacturers have notified the 
trade of another increase both on starched and soft collars, it being stated that the 
price of raw materials and present labor situation makes this step compulsory. Under 
the new arrangement collars will be retailed in the United States for just twice their 
cost to the consumer prior to August 1, 1914. The commissaries, however, will make 
no readjustment of prices as their stocks have been liberally protected against a 
general advance of this nature. 



42 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

"Work Clothes." 

A recent issue of a trade publication, in the United States, asserts that "work 
clothes" are next in importance to "righting clothes," and that a demand for this 
class of garments far greater than any hitherto anticipated has taxed the capacity of 
the manufacturers to the utmost. 

In this field as well as every other the shortage of material is keenly felt and prices 
in some instances have more than doubled. The Commissiry Division through 
fortunate purchases, made before the outbreak of war and in anticipation of the 
present shortage, is well supplied on work clothes of every kind, prices being consider- 
ably lower than those now obtaining in the United States. 

Tripe. 

One of the popular products of the Panama Canal abattoir is tripe, both plain and 
honeycomb. Tripe, as not everyone knows, is the fatty lining of the stomach of 
several food animals prepared by thorough cleansing and boiling. It is easily 
digested and of agreeable flavor. That turned out by -the abattoir is exclusively 
beef tripe. Although it is generally considered that the "honeycomb" product is 
the best, this is largely a matter of individual opinion. The price of honeycomb, 
however, is 10 cents per pound while that of plain tripe is but 5 cents per pound. 
Its nutritiousqualities, together with agreeable flavor and reasonable price, have com- 
bined to make it one of the most popular products of the Commissary Division. 
It is believed also that sales would be even larger were more people to sample it for 
it is true that a good many persons do not buy it and will not eat it because of an 
unreasonable prejudice against its appearance and origin. 



War Books. 

Despite the fact that critics fail to find literary merit in it, "Over the Top" con- 
tinues to enjoy an almost undiminished measure of popularity. Believing that because 
of its widespread distribution and publication in newspapers in serial form, the local 
demand would not be particularly heavy, the Commissary Division requisitioned 
only a small number, but retail store managers report that customers continue to 
inquire for it, and it is a fact that on the lists kept in commissaries of titles out of 
stock or not carried, called for by patrons, "Over the Top" appears oftenest with 
the single exception of "My Four Years in Germany." Many who have read "Over 
the Top" and do not possess it will wish to have this book for their own because of its 
permanent value in any library treating of the great war. It will be put on sale 
Saturday, September 14, at the low price of 60 cents. 

"My Four Years in Germany" will be sold at the same time for 65 cents. Neither 
of these books formerly could be purchased for less than SI. 50; in fact, for Ambas- 
sador Gerard's books, when first published, $2 and more was asked locally. Only 
200 of each title have been received, as it was not known when the order was placed 
that they could be bought in editions to sell at popular prices. 

MEATLESS RECIPES. 



Baked Bean Croquettes with Horseradish Sauce. 

2 cups cold baked beans 1 teaspoon salt 

1 teaspoon finely chopped onion \ teaspoon pepper 

2 tablespoons tomato catsup or Chili 1 egg 

sauce H cups fine crumbs. 

Mash the beans, add onion, catsup or Chili sauce, salt and pepper. Mix thoroughly 
and if beans are very dry, moisten with a little vinegar. Beat egg with 2 tablespoons 
of cold water. Shape the mixture into croquettes, roll first in crumbs, then in egg 
and again in crumbs. Fry in deep fat and drain on heavy paper. Serve with horse- 
radish sauce. 

Horseradish Sauce. 

3 tablespoons flour \\ cups water 

1 teaspoon salt \ cup grated horseradish. 

\ cup weak vinegar 
Mix flour, salt and vinegar to a smooth consistency. Heat the water and slowly 
add the flour mixture, stirring constantly until it reaches the boiling point. Add 
horseradish and serve. 

Postal Address of The Panama Canal. 

The postal address is, "The Panama Canal. Balboa Heights. Canal Zone," or "The Panama Canal. 
Washington, p. C." 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, SI. 50; address 

Tiic Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1018, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal. C Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 




Volume XII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 18, 191 8. No. 5. 

EXECUTIVE ORDER. 

Entrance or Departure of Persons During Hostilities. 

The Panama Canal, Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 4, 1918. 
Circular No. 601 -SO: 

The Executive Order quoted below is published for the information 
of all concerned. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Rules and Regulations Governing the Issuance of Permits to Enter and Leave the United 

States. 

Supplemental to the Presidential Proclamation of August 8, 191S, and by virtue 
of the authority set forth therein. I hereby prescribe the following rules and regula- 
tions governing departure front and entry into the United States. 

Section 1. The present system of controlling entry into and departure from the 
United States by alien enemies and oilier persons, as administered by the Department 
of State, the Department of the Tn asury, the Department of Justice, the Department 
of Commerce, and the Departmeni of Labor, is hereby confirmed and established by 
virtue ^f the authority vested in me as aforesaid and shall continue in full force and 
effect in the continental United States as defined herein until 6 o'clock in the forenoon 
of September 15, 1°18, and in i\ e outlying possessions of the United States until 
such time or times as the Secretary of State shall designate; when the following rules 
and regulations shall become operative and shall supersede all rules, regulations, and 
orders of the present system inconsistent with them; but the Secretary of State may 
direct at any time subsequent to the date thereof that seamen be kept on their vessels. 
(See sec. 10 (c ;, infra.) The Secretary of State is hereby authorized, in his discretion, 
to prescribe exceptions to these rules and regulations governing the entry into and 
departure from the United States of citizens and subjects of the nations associated 
witli the United States in the prosecution of the war. 

Title I. — Definitions. 

Sec. 2. The term "United States" as defined in the Act of May 22, 1918, and as 
used herein includes t: e Canal Zone and all territory and waters., continental and 
insular, subject to tie jurisdiction of the United States. 

Sec. 3. The term "continental United States" as used herein includes the territory 
of the several Suites of the United States and Alaska. 

Sec. 4. Tne term "departure from tie United States" as used herein includes, in 
addition to any entry whatever upon f< reign territory or waters, any trip or journey 
on or over (1) the Great Lakes or their connecting waters, (2) any rivers or other 
waters coinciding with or covering the boundary of the United States, or (3) tidal 
waters beyond the shore line of the United States, s.id shore line being hereby defined 
as the line of seaeoast and the shores ol all waters of the United States and its territorial 
possessions connected with the high seas and navigable by ocean-going vessels pro- 
vided, however, That no trip or journey upon a public ferry having both termini in 
the United States and not touching foreign territory or waters shall be deemed a depar- 
ture from the United States. 

Sec. 5. The term "passport" as used herein includes any document in the nature 
of a passport issued by the United States or by a foreign Government, which shows the 
identity and nationality of the individual for whose use it was issued and bears his 
signed and certified photograph. 

Sec. 6. The granting of a "permit" or "permission" to leave or enter the United 
States, as the terms are used herein, shall be construed to include the granting of a 
license under section 3 (b) of the "Trading- with-the-Enemy Act" whenever such li- 



44 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

cense is essential to the lawful transportation of the person to whom the permit is 
granted. Wherever it is provided explicitly or by implication that any person may 
depart from or enter the United States without a permit or permission under these 
regulations, such provision of itself shall be construed as a license under said section 3 
(b) authorizing the transportation of such persons within the limits covered by the 
provision. 

Sec. 7. The term "seaman" as used herein includes, in addition to the persons 
ordinarily described thereby, sea-going fishermen and all owners, masters, officers, 
and members of crews and other persons employed on vessels which for purposes of 
business or pleasure cruise on tidal waters beyond the shore line or on the Great 
Lakes. 

Sec. 8. The term "hostile aliens" includes (a) all persons who are alien enemies 
as now or hereafter defined by statute, or by proclamation of the President; and 
(b) all subjects or citizens of enemy or ally of enemy nations. 

Title 2.— Limitations upon andExceptions to the Application of the Act of May 22, 1918. 

Sec. 9. The following general limitations upon and exceptions to the application 
of the Act of May 22, 1918, are authorized and prescribed: 

(a) No passports or permits to depart from or enter the United States shall be 
required of persons other than hostile aliens traveling between ports of the continental 
United States on vessels making no intermediate calls at foreign or non-continental 
ports. Hostile aliens must obtain permits for all departures from, and entries, into the 
United States. 

(b) No passports or permits to depart from or enter the United States shall be 
required of persons other than hostile aliens traveling between points in the contin- 
ental United States and points in Canada or Bermuda, or passing through Canada 
on atrip between two points in the continental United States, except as provided and 
required by Title 3 of these regulations. This exception is not applicable to persons 
going from the continental United States via Canada to other places outside of the 
continental United States. Persons other than hostile aliens starting from Newfound- 
land for the United States shall not be required to obtain visas or verifications from 
the American consul in Newfoundland. (As to hostile aliens, see 9 (a), supra.) 

(c) No passports or permits to depart from or enter the United States shall be 
required of persons in or attached to the military or naval forces of the United States 
or of any nation associated with the United States in the prosecution of the war, 
provided, that such persons when in or attached to the military or naval forces of a 
nation so associated with the United States shall be identified and vouched for to the 
Secretary of State by a duly authorized representative of such nation, and provided 
further, that when persons in or attached to such military or naval forces travel 
separately or otherwise than in regular commands they shall bear certificates issued 
by the War or Navy Department of the United States or by a duly authorized repre- 
sentative of an associated nation, adequately establishing the identity of the bearers 
and their connection with the military or naval forces aforesaid. Nothing herein 
shall be construed to prevent a citizen of the United States, if a member of or attached 
to the military or naval forces of any country, from entering or leaving the United 
States provided he bears a valid passport in lieu of the certificate of identification 
above described. All such departures shall, however, be subject to the requirements 
of Title 3 of these regulations. The limitations and exceptions aforesaid are subject 
to the provisions of section 38 hereof." 

******* 

Sec. 10. * * * (c) Aliens who are seamen on vessels arriving at ports 
of the United States and who desire to land in the country shall apply to an immi- 
grant inspector. They shall submit to such immigrant inspector satisfactory evi- 
dence of their nationality and furnish such photographs and execute such fornis and 
applications as the immigrant inspector shall require. The immigrant inspector 
may thereupon issue identity cards authorizing such seamen to land in the United 
States, unless the Secretary of State directs that they be kept on their vessels. 

(d) Alien seamen desiring to sail from the United States shall submit satisfactory 
evidence of nationality to the United States customs inspectors stationed at the port 
of departure. If such applicants have landed in the United States since the date on 
which these regulations became effective at their port of arrival they shall further 
submit the identity cards issued by the immigrant inspector permitting them to land 
in the country. Said identity cards shall be stamped by the customs officials, if 
permission is given the applicants to depart, and such cards so stamped shall be the 
evidence of such permission. In case an applicant for permission to sail under this 
paragraph has not entered the United States since these regulations became effective, 
he shall apply to a collector of customs for an identity card and permission to sail. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 45 

In making such application he shall submit satisfactory evidence of his nationality 
and furnish such photographs and execute such forms and applications as the collector 
of customs shall require. 

(e) Identity cards issued to alien seamen as provided by the foregoing paragraphs 
(c) and yd) shall be retained by the seamen to .vhom the} are issued and used by the 
holders from time to time as they land in and sail fiom iiie United States. An alien 
seaman bearing such cards shall have the same validated for landing or sailing by the 
immigration or customs authorities, respectively, on each occasion when he applies for 
permission to land at or sail from a United States port. 

(/) Aliens passing through the United States en route between two foreign points 
and not remaining in the United Slates more than 30 Jays shall make application for 
permission to depart through the immigration official acting as control officer at the 
point where they enter the United States. Such permission, if granted, will be given 
by the official acting as control officer at the designated point of depart uie. Nothing 
herein shall be construed as requiring a permit for departure from a transient alien 
in case such permit would not have been necessary if the journey to his final destina- 
tion had commenced in the United States. A transient will be required to depart from 
the United States at the earliest date practicable. He shall submit to the immigrant 
inspector his itineraiy to the port of departure, which shall be by the most direct route 
reasonably available, and upon obtaining approval of the same he shall proceed im- 
mediately to the port of departure. I 'pou ai rival at said port he shall report forthwith 
to the customs officers. For all deviations and delays special permission must be 
obtained from the Secretary of State. 

(g) No permits to depart from or enter the United States shall be required of 
officials or representatives of foreign countries duly accredited to the United States 
or a friendly country provided that such persons bear valid passports and provided 
further that the Department of State is notified in advance of their intended entry or 
departure and consents thereto. Such officials, however, when desiring to enter the 
United States shall have their passports visaed by a diplomatic or consular officer of the 
United States in the country from which they come and in the country from which 
they embark for or enter the United States; and such officials desiring to depart from 
the United States shall have their passports visaed by the Department of State." 

Nothing in the foregoing paragraphs (a) to (g), inclusive, shall be construed to 
prevent the entry or departure of an alien at the Mexican or Canadian border, of an 
alien seaman at a United States port, or of a transient alien at any point, provided 
he bears a valid permit for such entry or departure issued in accordance with Title 
6 or Title 7 hereof. 

Sec. 11. The following limitations upon and exceptions to the application of sec- 
tion 2 of the Act of May 22, 191S, are authorized and prescribed: 

(u) Citizens of the United States traveling between United States ports not within 
the continental United States, or between such ports and ports within the continental 
.United States, on vessels making no intermediate calls at foreign ports other than 
those of Canada or Bermuda, shall not be required to bear passports provided that 
they have received from the immigrant inspector at the port of departure United 
States citizens' identity cards. Applicants for such cards shall supply such photo- 
graphs and execute such forms and applications as the immigrant inspectors require. 
Wher. applications for such cards are made in dependencies of the United States 
where no immigrant inspectors are stationed they shall be made to the governors 
of such dependencies or their representatives duly appointed for the purpose: pro- 
vided, that employees of The Panama Canal and the Panama Railroad Company, and 
members of their families, civilian employees of the United States and members of 
their tamilies, and the families of members of the Army and Navy, traveling between 
the continental United States and the Panama Canal Zone, may carry identity cer- 
tificates issued by The Panama Canal in lieu of passports or identity cards issued by 
immigration officials. 

******* 

(c) Citizens of the United States who are seamen upon vessels entering or leaving 
ports of the United States shall not be required to bear passports provided that they 
bear seamen's certificates of American citizenship issued by collectors of the ports 
of the United States as provided for in section 4588 of the Revised Statutes. Citizens 
applying for such certificates shall supply such photographs and execute such forms 
and applications as the collectors shall require. No identity card other than a pass- 
port or a seamen's certificate shall be issued to a seaman who is a citizen of the 
.United States. 

Nothing in the foregoing paragraphs (a), (b), and (c) shall be construed to prevent 
the use of a valid passport by any seaman or other citizen referred to in said para- 
graphs in lieu of a seamen's certificate or identity card as described therein. 



46 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Title 3. — General regulations — Persons liable to military service. 
Sec. 12. No person registered or enrolled or subject to registry or enrollment for 
military service in the United States shall depart from the United States without the 
previous consent of the Secretary of War or such person or persons as he may appoint 
to give such consent. The Secretary of State shall issue no passport or permit entitling 
such person to depart without securing satisfactory evidence of such consent. Refer- 
ence should be had to Section 156, Selective Service Regulations, and amendments 
thereto. 

Title 4. — American citizens — Departure and entry. 

ISSUE OF PASSPORTS. 
Sec. 13. The "Rules governing the granting and issuing of passports in the 
United States" as established on January 24, 1917, are continued in force without 
change. 

VERIFICATION OF PASSPORTS IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 

Sec 14. Passports are not valid for return to the United States unless verified in 
the country from which the holder starts on his journey to the United States and 
further verified in the foreign country from which he embarks for or enters the United 
States. No fee snail be collected by diplomatic or consular officers of the United 
States for or in connection with such verification. 

******* 

ALIENS' PERMITS TO DEPART AND ENTER.' 

Title 5. — Permit Agents. 

Sec. 15. The officials designated ir the appendix hereto are hereby appointed Per- 
mit Agents for the purpose of receiving from aliens applications for permits to depart 
from the United States.' No Permit Agents have been designated in Tutuila, Manua, 
Guam, or Wake Island, as it is believed that travel from these points will not neces- 
sitate such appointments. For the time being persons desiring to leave any of these 
insular possessions may do so without securing permission hereunder. 

Sec. 16. Representatives of the Bureau of Immigration of the Department of 
Labor, stationed in Canada or on the Canadian border, and all diplomatic and 
consular officers of the United States in foreign countries are hereby appointed Permit 
Agents for the purpose of receiving from aliens applications for permits to enter the 
United States. 

Sec. 17. The Secretary of Slate is authorized to designate and appoint additional 
Permit Agents from time to time as he may deem advisable, and to revoke their 
appointments or the appointments of any Permit Agent aforementioned. All Permit 
Agents hereby or hereafter appointed are hereby authorized to administer any oath 
or affirmation required in these rules and regulations or in any amendment hereof or 
addition hereto. All persons empowered to issue special permits referred to in 
sections 10 and 11 hereof are hereby authorized to administer to applicants any oaths 
or affii niations deemed necessary in connection with their applications. 

Title 6. — Permits to Depart. 

Sec. 18. Except in cases for which special regulations are hereinbefore provided, 
any alien desiring to depart from the United States shall apply for a permit to the 
Permit Agent located nearest to the last residence of the applicant. Any Permit 
Agent is authorized to receive an application to depart if it appears that the appli- 
cant would be caused unreasonable hardship or delay if required to apply to the 
Permit Agent nearest his last residence. 

Sec. 19. Each applicant shall submit to the Permit Agent, for transmission to 
Washington if required, a passport issued for his use by the Government. to which he 
owes allegiance or by a duly authorized diplomatic or consular officer thereof, or of 
the country representing in the United States the interests of his country. Such 
passports must have been issued, renewed or visaed by a duly authorized representa- 
tive of said Government, or of the country representing its interests in the United 
States, within 10 days prior to the time of the application. Aliens who, by reason 
of doubtful nationality, lack of nationality, or any other cause, are unable to secure 
passports may be granted permission to depart in the discretion of the Secretary of 
State. 

Sec. 20. If the application is made to a Permit Agent located east of the Mississippi 
River, the application shall be made at least 14 and not more than 28 days before the 
date set for departure. If the Permit Agent is located west of the Mississippi River, 

1 Titles 5, 6, and 7 not inc uded in Panama Canal Circular No. 6(11-80. 

• Panama Canal Zone. — Gc vernor of the Panama Canal, and such agents and assistants as he shall 
designate. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 47 

the application shall be made at least 18 days and not more than 28 days before the 
date set for departure. In special cases additional time will be required for adequate 
investigation. 

Sec. 21. Applications for permission to depart from the United States shall be 
made upon forms provided for the pin pose by the Permit Agents and shall be executed 
by applicants according to the instructions printed thereon. Substantial copies of 
such forms and instructions are contained in the Appendix to these regulations. 

Sec. 22. Applications shall be executed in triplicate. All copies shall be personally 
signed and sworn to by the applicant before the Permit Agent. The Permit Agent 
shall fill in the name of the applicant on the left-hand margin of the application, and 
also the blanks for applicant's description. The remainder of the application need 
not be filled out by or in the presence of the Permit Agent. If the applicant has 
conscientious scruples against taking an oath, he may make affirmation to the truth 
of his statements and answers in the application. 

Sec. 23. Each application shall be accompanied by four unmounted photographs 
of the applicant, not smaller than 2" x 2" nor larger than 3" x 3" in size, on thin paper 
with a light background. If the applicant is able to write, he shall sign all four 
photographs across the front thereof so as not to obscure the features. 

Sec. 24. A married woman accompanying her husband, or a child or children under 
14 years of age accompanying either parent, may be included in the permit granted 
to the husband or parent and in such case will not be required to make a separate 
application. Photographs of persons so included in a husband's or parent's applica- 
tion must be furnished. Group photographs may be used in such cases. 

Sec. 25. Every applicant shall furnish to the Permit Agent, in addition to any 
particulars required to be inserted in answer to the printed questions on the applica- 
tion blank, any information which may reasonably be required for the purpose of 
passing upon his application or for ascertaining the correctness of the particulars 
stated thereon or otherwise. 

Sec. 26. Upon complying with these regulations, an applicant shall receive from 
the Permit Agent a card showing that the application for permission to depart has 
been filed. This card is not a permit to depart from the United States but is merely 
a receipt for the application, and for the passport if that has been retained. 

Sec. 27. Within 7 days prior to the proposed date of departure from the United 
States, the applicant shall again appear before the Permit Agent who received his 
application. At this time, or as soon thereafter as his case is decided, he shall receive 
back his passport and, if permission to depart from the United States is granted, the 
Permit Agent shall affix applicant's photograph to the receipt card pteviously issued 
and shall note thereon the fact that such permission has been given. The card 
then becomes a provisional permit to depart from the United Stares and must be 
preserved carefully for presentation to the proper officials at the point of departure. 
Such provisional permit is subject to revocation at any time without notice. 

Sec. 28. An applicant desiring to leave the place where he makes application for 
permission to depart before receiving notice of the final action may arrange with the 
Permit Agent at the time of application that the provisional permit to depart, if 
granted, shall be given through a Permit Agent at some other point. The application 
receipt card, in such case, shall contain a note to the effect that final action is to be 
taken by another designated Permit Agent. In such case, the applicant shall apply 
to the Permit Agent thus designated for notice of decision. 

Sec. 29. A similar request for a change of Permit Agent may be made subsequently 
to the filing of the application. A request so made may be received by any Permit 
Agent but will not be granted without express authorization from the Secretary of 
State; 

Sec. 30. Permits to depart from the United States will be granted to applicants by 
or under the authority of the Secretary of State when it shall appear that there is 
reasonable necessity for such departuie, and when upon investigation, such departure 
is deemed to be not prejudicial to the interests of the United States. 
Title 7. — Permits to Enter. 

Sec. 31. Subject to the exceptions and limitations hereinbefore set forth no alien 
shall be allowed to enter the United States unless he bears a passport duly visaed in 
accordance with the terms of the Joint Order of the Department of State and the 
Department of Labor issued July 26, 1917. Said Joint Order and the amendments 
thereto and instructions issued thereunder are hereby confirmed and made part hereof 
by reference, so far as their provisions are not inconsistent with these rules and regu- 
lations or with the President's Proclamation of August 8, 1918. A copy of said Joint 
Order is inserted in the Appendix to these regulations • 

• Not published. Prescribed regulations for visa of passports and declarations by aliens before 
American consular officials. 



48 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Sec. 32. In accordance with the provisions of the Presidential Proclamation of 
August 8, 1918. a visa will be granted only when it shall appear that there is reasonable 
necessity for entering the United States and when upon investigation such entry is 
deemed to be not prejudicial to the interests of the United States. 

Sec. 33. As a restriction additional to those provided by said Joint Order, hostile 
aliens shall not enter the United States from Canada unless they either secure visas 
in the manner prescribed by the Joint Order, or secure permits in the manner pre- 
scribed by Title 2, Section 10, paragraph (b), of these regulations. 

Sec. 34. An alien's passport duly visaed together with a copy of the declaration 
required bv said Joint Order shall constitute a permit to enter the United States within 
the meaning of the Act cf May 22, 1918. 

Sec. 35. Diplomatic and consular officers of the United States are authorized to 
collect the following fees: 

For visaing each foreign passport (not including passports of officials) $1 .00 

For preparing visa declaration and administering oath 1 .00 

For certifying to a copy of a visa declaration previously taken 1 .00 

Title 8. — Control at p<,int of eiitry and departure. 

Sec. 36. Tie actual control of persons departing from the United States at all 
seaboard and lake ports shall beexeicised by t» e representatives of the customs service 
of tii- Department of the Tieasury, who shall act as control officers for this purpose. 
The actual control of persons departing from the United States by land and of all 
persons entering the United States shall be exercised by the representatives of the 
Bureau of Immigration of the Department cf Laboi, who shall act as control officers 
for this purpose. The Secietary of State may from time to time designate other per- 
sons to act as control officers at any place. In all cases where passports or/and per- 
mits to enter or depart are required under these regulations each traveler before 
entering or departing from the United States shall present his passport o/and permit 
to the Control Officer at the point of entry or departure. He shall also answer such 
questions and undergo suc'i examination as the Control Officer sh.il direct. If, as> 
the result of such questioning and examinations, the Control Officer decides that the 
entry or departure of the holder of the passport or permit would be prejudicial to 
the interests of the United States, such person shall not be allowed to enter or 
depart. Under such circumstances the Control Officer shall immediately notify the 
Secretary of State by telegraph of his decision and shall as soon as practicable, and 
in no case later than two days after such decision, forward to the Secretary of State 
a full report giving the reasons for detention and a full transcript of any testimony 
or information bearing on such decision. 

Sec. 37. If the Control Officer shall be satisfied that the permit and passport are 
valid and regular and have been properly visaed, and that the holder presenting them 
is the person described therein, that neither of them has been altered or tampered with, 
and that the holder's departure or entry is not prejudicial to the interests of the 
United States, he shall allow the holder to depart from or enter the United States. 

Sec. 38. In addition to the control as above set forth of persons generally required 
to secure permission to depart from or enter the United States, control may be exer- 
cised over individuals belonging to classes cf persons generally allowed to depart or 
enter without permits or passports. A Control Officer may temporarily prevent the 
departure or entry of any such individual, in case he considers such departure or 
entry prejudicial to the interests of the United States. Such action shall be immedi- 
ately reported to the Secretary of State with a full statement of the reasons therefor. 
An individual so prevented from departing or entering shall not be entitled to the 
benefit of any of the limitations or exceptions contained in section 9 hereof and his 
departure or entry is forbidden unless, if an alien, he obtains permission from the 
Secretary of State, or, if a United States citizen, he obtains a valid passport. 
Title 9. — Additional regulations. 

Sec. 39. The Secretary of State is authorized to make regulations on the subject 
of departure fronr and entry into the United States additional to these rules and 
regulations and not inconsistent with them. 

WOODROW WILSON. 

The White House, 

August 8, 1918. 

Canal Record 10 canal Service Men. 
American citizens who have served on the Panama Canal and are 
now in the military service of the United States will be sent a copy o^ 
The Panama Canal Record each week if they make application for 
this privilege. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 49 

Notice to Mariners— Time Bail Service. 

The Panama Canal, Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 12, 1918. 

Circular No. 643-44: 

1. Under the direction of the Naval Radio Service, a time ball is 
dropped at 1 p. m., daily, 75th meridian time, from the mast over the 
center of the signal station on Sosa Hill. 

2. It should be particularly noted that the time of dropping the time 
ball is I p. m. ; and not 12 o'clock noon, as originally contemplated and 
as announced in certain publications. 

3. The lag in the time of dropping the time ball is one-half of a 
second; i. e., visible movement of the ball in descent from its hoist 
can not be detected, if tin.- ball drops on time, until one-half second 
subseauent to 1 p. m. (75th meridian time). 

4. The actual time of the dropping of the ball on each occasion will 
be published in the succeeding issues of all local daily newspapers. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Method cf Applying for Seamen's Insurance. 

COMPULSORY INSURANCE— PROVISIONAL APPLICATION. 
Owners of all American merchant vessels engaged in the trades defined in the _ current 
"Notice to Vessel Owners" are cautioned to file provisional application for insuring 
their complements BEFORE tie departure of the vessel (either direct with the 
Bureau of War Risk Insurance at Washington, D. C, or with the Collector of Cus- 
toms at the home port of the vessel) to avoid penalty. 

PROVISIONAL FOR ROUND TRIP. 

It is recommended when submitting provisional application to signify that this 
insurance is desired for a round trip by amending the application to read "and return." 
This will obviate the necessity of filing a second provisional application for the return 
trip. 

FINAL APPLICATION. 
A separate and distinct final application, properly completed, furnishing all of the 
information therein requested is required in connection with each outward and each 
return voyage and should be forwarded as soon as the required information is ascer- 
tainable (either direct to the Bureau of War Risk Insurance. Washington, D. C, or 
through the Collector of Customs) accompanied by certified check drawn to the 
order of the Treasurer of the United States for the proper premium. 
CHANGES IN COMPLEMENT. 

When changes in the complement occur during a voyage a supplementary appli- 
cation should "be filed in the following manner, at each and every port where these 
changes take place. 

First list the master, officers, and crew whose insurance is to be canceled; there- 
after follow this list by a statement mentioning the port where these oersons left 
and explain whether they were disc' arged or deserted and that they are replaced 
by persons listed below. Tl en list the master, officers, and crew taken on to replace 
those who left and/or to increase the comj lement. 

Persons whose earnings and/ or positions have been changed should be considered, 
for the purpose of completing this application, as being discharged and re-engaged 
at the port where the change occurred. 

In cases where the insurance is increased check for the additional premium due 
therefor should accompany the supplementary application. 

METHOD OF SIGNING APPLICATION. 
N. B. All applications must be signed in ink in the name of the individual, firm, 
association, or corporation owning the vessel by a duly authorized agent who must 
indicate his position as well, as typewritten, rubber stamped, or similar signatures 
will not be acceptable. 

DEPARTURE FROM FOREIGN PORTS. 
When a vessel departs from a foreign port a statement of the master, officers, and 
crew, their positions and earnings must be filed with the American Consul at the 
port of departure on the blank designated for such purpose. 



50 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

ORDERS FOR PAYMENT OF COMPENSATION. 

"Orders for Payment of Compensation" for each person in the complement of the 
vessel involved should accompany final application, except in such cases where 
"Orders for Payment of Compensation" have been filed previously with the bureau, 
when it will be unnecessary to forward additional blanks unless change of beneficiary 
is desired. 

AMOUNT OF INSURANCE TO BE ALLOTTED TO COMPLEMENT. 

The insurance in respect to each person is limited to an amount equivalent to one 
year's earnings; i. e., twelve times the monthly earnings as fixed in the articles for 
the voyage, but in no case to be more than $5,000 or less than $1,500. Requests 
for additional insurance can not be entertained. 

APPLICATION FOR TIME POLICIES. 

Applications may be made and policies issued for 90 days, insuring the masters, 
officers, and crews of American merchant vessels if and while trading in the western 
hemisphere (North and South America) and for 30 days when trading between the 
British Isles (England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales) and France at a flat rate for the 
period involved. When applying for time policies revise that portion of the pro- 
visional (4a) and final (5a) applications reading as follows: 

"Application is (provisionally) made for insurance on the Bureau's form of policy 

of the master, officers, and crew of the American S called the 

dm ing a voyage at and from 

to sailing about , 191 . . ." 

to read as follows: 

"Application is (provisionally) made for insurance on the Bureau's form of policy 

of the master, officers, and crew of the American S 

called the : while trading between 

and from midnight of 191 . . .., to 

midnight of , 191 ..." 

Final application in connection with time policies should list the master, officers, 
and crew signed on the vessel at the inception of the insurance, and supplementary 
application should be forwarded at each "stopping port" if any changes in the com- 
plement occur. 

OPTIONAL INSURANCE. 

The insuring of complements of American merchant vessels is, as stated before, 
compulsory when and if said vessels are trading in the zone prescribed, but its optional 
as to all other voyages. 

Seaman's War Risk Insurance is issued in the Canal Zone through the Division 
of Civil Affairs, Bureau of Customs, and all applications from vessels about to leave 
the Canal Zone should be filed with the Chief Customs Inspector at the port of 
departure. 

C. H. Calhoun, 

Chief, Division of Civil Affairs. 



Teachers Examinations, Colored Schools. 

The Panama Canal, Division of Schools, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 9, 1918. 
An examination for colored teachers who may wish to be considered 
for employment, will be held in the board room, Administration 
Building, Balboa Heights, on Friday and Saturday, September 20 
and 21. 

The examination will cover arithmetic, spelling, grammar, and 
composition, United States history, hygiene, geography, penman- 
ship, and reading (oral and written). All writing materials will be 
furnished for the examination. 

The time of the morning sessions will be from 8 to 12 o'clock and the 
afternoon sessions from 1 until 4. 

Those who wish to take this examination should submit their 
credentials to the office of the Superintendent of Schools, Balboa 
Heights, C. Z. 

A. R. Lang, 
Superintendent of Schools. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



51 



Joint Commission. 



Decision of the Umpire. 

In the matter of the claim of Narciso 
Garay, attorney-in-fact for the Hurtado 
family, and Special Attorney for Josefina 
Muller and Arturo Midler, for the reserva- 
tion of properly rights in the Canal Zone. 

Decision of the Umpire, Judgment 
No. 398, docket No. 296. 

The above-entitled claim came on for 
hearing before the Joint Commission on 
January 27, 1915. At the conclusion of 
the trial the members of the Commission 
were unable to reach an agreement either 
as to the liability or the value, and the 
case was certified to the Umpire under 
the provisions of Articles VI and XV of 
the Canal Treaty. 

The claim is composed of two parts: 
One ($75,000) for seventy-five hectares 
of land which is not located, and the 
other (S1000C0) for the reservation, 
made in a public deed, of the additional 
value which these lands might have in 
case part of them should be used for the 
purpose of supplying the City of Panama 
with water. 

With regard to the second part, the 
facts as they are disclosed by the record 
are as follows: 

The Hurtado brothers transferred to 
the Compania Universal del Canal 
Interoceanico, by put lie deed dated 
December 22, 1882, a strip of land run- 
ning the entire length of the property 
known as "Barrero, Chupadero y Com- 
pania" along the line of the French Canal, 
and received in payment $7,550 pesos, 
Colombian silver, plus $5,000 pesos of 
the same silver for consequent ial damages 
resulting to the remainder of the tract 
from being cut in two by this strip. It 
was staled in that deed that the price 
received did not include the increased 
value of those lands should an aqueduct 
for t be City of Panama be constructed 
on them, in which case the increase in 
value would be determined by arbitra- 
tors appointed for that purpose. 



With regard to the other part the facts 
are: 

The Hurtado brothers later sold to the 
Compania Universal de] Canal Inter- 
oceanico by public deed dated Decem- 
ber 31, 1883, all the remaining portion 
of the lands of Barrero, Chupadero y 
Compania, for $54,000 Colombian silver, 
and in that deed there was included a 



El Arbitro de 1» Comision Mixta de 
Tierras Estados Unidos de Ameri- 
ca — Republica de Panama, Pan- 
ama. 

Reclamation de Von Narciso Garay, en 
su ca: deter de Apoderado de la familia 
Hurtado y de Arturo y Josefina Muller, 
por rcserva de derechos sobre tierras en- 
davadas en la Zona del Canal. 

Decision del Arbitro, fallo No. 398, 
expediente No. 296. 

Esta reclamacion se vio ante la Com- 
ision Mixta en vista publica que co- 
menzo el 27 de Enero de 1915. A su 
conclusion los miembros de la Comisi6n 
no lograron ponerse de acuerdo ni acerca 
del derccho del reclamante, ni acerca del 
valor de la cosa reclamada, y fue cer- 
tificada al Arbitro en virtud de lo dis- 
puesto en los Artfculos VI y XV del 
Tratado del Canal. 

La reclamacion comprende dos partes: 
Una (de $75,000) pot la reserva al derecho 
dedominiosobre setentay cinco hectareas 
de tierra, no localizada; y otra (de 
$100,000) por una salvedad hecha en 
escritura publica respecto al posible 
aumento de valor de tierras vendidas, 
caso de que parte de ellas fuesen dedi- 
cadas a las obras de abastecimiento de 
aguas para la ciudad de Panama. 

Con respecto a esta segunda parte, los 
hechos, segun se desprende de las pruebas 
existentes en el expediente de la reclama- 
cion, son, en sintesis, como sigue: 

Los hermanos Hurtado transpasaron 
a la Compania Universal del Canal 
Interoceanico, por escritura publica de 
22 de Diciembre de 1882, una faja de 
tierra a todo lo largo de la propiedad 
denominada "Barrero, Chupadero y 
Compania" por la parte por donde debia 
const ruirse el Canal frances, recibiendo 
en pago $7,550 pesos plata colombiana, 
mas $5,000 pesos en igual moneda, en 
concepto de indemnizacion de dahos y 
perjuicios, per el hecho de que la faja de 
tierra de referenda ocupaba el centro de 
la propiedad, dividiendola, por con- 
siguiente, en dos partes. 

En la escritura se hacia constar que en 
el precio recibido no se incluia el aumento 
de valor que dichas tierras pudieran 
esperimentar si en ellas se construia un 
acueducto para el abastecimiento de 
aguas de Panama, en cuyo caso, el 
aumento de valor deberia ser estipulado 
por arbitros nombrados al efecto. 

Con respecto a la otra parte los hechos 
son: 

Los hermanos Hurtado vendieron 
despues, a la Compania Universal del 
Canal Interoceanico, tambien, todo el 
resto de la propiedad "Barrero, Chupa- 
dero y Compania" por $54,000 pesos, 
plata colombiana, por escritura publica 
de 31 de Diciembre de 1883, y en dicha 



52 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



clause stating that the vendors reserved 
the right to 25 hectares of land in each 
one of the sections of "Pedro Miguel," 
"Paraiso," and "Culebra," with the 
understanding that if the Canal Company 
should require the lands chosen by the 
vendors, before the vendors had made 
use of them, they would return them to 
the Company, reserving the right to 
chooee another equal area of land which 
night not be necessary for canal pur- 
poses. In the same deed there was re- 
served the additional value which these 
lands might have in case an aqueduct 
were built on them, as above stated. 



Of the 75 hectares, the Hurtado family 
claims 69, and Arturo and Josefina Mid- 
ler the remaining 6. 

In March, 1901, the possession of the 
old Canal Company was transferred to 
the new Canal Company, and no at- 
tempt was made by the claimants to 
designate and choose the lands referred 
to in the deeds. The possession of the 
French Canal Company was trans- 
ferred to the United States in May, 1904, 
after all existing rights and obligations 
between that company and private indi- 
viduals had been settled. 



The claimants have allowed 22 years to 
elapse without making any attempt to 
claim their rights. 

This claim as filed before the Joint 
Commission, does not state the location 
of the 75 hectares, nor does the claim 
show that before the dominion of the 
Canal Zone passed to the Government of 
the United States that anyone had ever 
sought permission, from either the Gov- 
ernment of Colombia, or the Govern- 
ment of Panama, to begin construction 
on the waterworks system for supplying 
the City of Panama with water. 

The Hurtado brothers in the clause 
above mentioned, agreed to relinquish 
their rights to the 75 hectares in case 
they should become necessary for canal 
purposes, but reserved the right to select 
75 hectares at some place not needed for 
the Canal. The entire Canal Zone is 
considered necessary by the Government 
of the United States for the maintenance 
and protection of the Canal. 

With regard to the rights and obliga- 
tions existing prior to the signing of the 
Canal Treaty, the Hurtado family should 



escritura se incluyo una clausula haciendo 
constar que los vendedores se reservaban 
el dominio a venteicinco hect areas de 
tierra en cada una de las secciones de 
"Pedro Miguel," "Paraiso," y "Cule- 
bra," que serian escogidas por los mismos, 
en la inteligencia de que si todas dicha9 
tierras llegaran a ser necesarias a la 
Compania del Canal, antes de hacer uso 
de las mismas, pasarian a ser propiedad 
de la Compania, y in su lugar los vendedo- 
res elegirian otras tantas hectaieas de 
tierra en donde la Compania no las ne- 
cesitara pat a el canal. 

En la misma escritura se reservan 
nuevamente los derechos sobre el au- 
mento de valor que los terrenos utili- 
zables para las obras de traida de aguas 
a la ciudad de Panama, pudieran es- 
perimentar. 

De las setenta y cinco hectareas, la 
familia Hurtado reclama sesentay nueve, 
y las seis restantes Arturo y Josefina 
Midler. 

En Marzo de 1901 se verifico la trans- 
ferencia de las propiedades de la Com- 
pania antigua del Canal a la nuevamente 
constituida. Los reclamantes no dieron 
ningun paso para poner en claro sus 
reservas anteriores, escogiendo las tier- 
ras a que hacian referencia la escrituras. 

En Mayo de 1904 los Estados Unidos 
adqpirieron por medio de documento 
publico firmado en Panama, los derechos 
de la Compania Francesa del Canal, 
luego que esta, previo avisos reglamen- 
tarios, habia resuelto toda cuestion de 
derecho pendiente entre ella y los par- 
tic ulares. 

Los reclamantes han dejado pasar 
veinte y dos anos sin pretender hacer 
efectivos sus mencionados derechos. 

AI entablar la reclamacion ante la 
Comision Mixta no existe constancia 
de la designation precisa del emplaza- 
miertto de las setenta y cinco hectareas, 
y no consta que se haya solicitado ante 
los Gobiernos de Colombia, ni de Pana- 
ma concesion alguna para emprender las 
obras de aprovisionamiento de aguas para 
la ciudad de Panama antes de que la 
Zona del Canal entrara a ser del dominio 
del Gobierno de los Estados Unidos. 

Los hermanos Hurtado en la clausula 
de la escritura citada se comprometieron 
a ceder las setenta y cinco hectareas 
siempre que fuesen necesarias para la 
Compania del Canal, a reserva del 
derecho de elegir otras en terreno que no 
fuera necesario para dicha obra. 

Toda la Zona del Canal esta consider- 
ada por el Gobierno de los Estados Uni- 
dos como necesaria a la conservation y 
defensa del mismo. 

Se trata de derechos y obligaciones 
contraidos con anterioridad a la firma 
del Tratado del Canal. La familia 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



53 



have dearly asserted their claims against 
the French Canal Company before its 
possessions were transferred to the Gov- 
ernment of the United States. This 
claim has nothing to do with the expro- 
priation of private lands by the Govern- 
ment of the United States for canal pur- 
poses. Moreover, the reservations in 
the clauses mentioned, on which the 
claim is based, are so ambiguous, in- 
definite, and defective that without the 
least prejudice to any rights which the 
claimants may have, the Umpire finds 
that the decision of this case does not 
come within his authority, based as il K 
on Articles VI and XV of the Canal 
Treaty, and, therefore, the matter should 
be presented before a compet< at tri- 
bunal such as the Court of Claims at 
Washington. In his opinion, the under- 
signed is without jurisdiction to decide 
this case. 



Done in Spanish and in English in the 
National Palace, Panama, on the 14th 
day of September, 1918. 

(Sgd.) Manuel Walls y Merino, 

Umpire. 



In the matter of the claim ojLeonor Pou 
de Papi.for 1 hectare of land (not located) 
on the Chorrera Road, Municipal District 
of Corgona, now inundated. Amount 
claimed, $2,500. 

Decision of the Umpire, Rule of Dis- 
missal No. 399. docket No. 3089. 

It appears from the testimony of the 
claimant taken before the Joint Com- 
mission that she was never on the prop- 
erty which she claims, and that she never 
saw it. She lias been unable to produce 
titles to prove her ownership prior to 
the signing of the Canal Treaty, and she 
has also been unable to present maps to 
locate the property. The witnesses who 
could have testified in support of her 
possession in good faith, are dead, and 
the mental faculties of the only one alive 
are such as would deprive his testimony 
of any legal value. 

The claim then is based solely upon the 
statement of the claimant, and the award 
of the former Umpire who decided in 
favor of the claimants in a case in which 
the circumstances were identically the 
same. 

The Joint Commission after hearing 
and considering this claim, have been 
unable to agree both as to the liability 
and the value. 

The undersigned Umpire under no 
consideration wishes to question the good 
faith of the claimant. However, im- 
mediately upon assuming charge of his 
duties he staled that the action of his 



Ilurtado debio poner en claro sus dere- 
chos ante la Compania Francesa del 
Canal, antes que esta traspasara los 
suyes al Gobierno de los Esu.do^ Unidos. 
.No se trata pues, de la expropiaci6n de 
tierras de particulares Ilevada a cabo por 
el Gobierno Americano, para la termina- 
cion de las obras del Canal. Aparte de 
esto, las reservas de las clausulas men- 
cionadas, en que se basa la reclamacion, 
adolecen de tantas ambigiiedades, negli- 
gencias y otros defectos, que, sin pre- 
juzgar en lo mas mini mo el derecho que 
pueda asistir a los reclamantes, el 
Arbitro que subscribe entiende que la 
decision de este caso no entra en sus 
atribuciones, basadns, como estan, en los 
Articulos VI y XV del Tratado del 
Canal, y debe ser presentada ante Tri- 
bunal competente, que podria ser el de 
Reclamaciones de Washington (Court cf 
Claims) que tiene jurisdiction para estos 
asuntos. En sti vista se abstier.e de 
dictar fallo sobre la misma. 

Dado en espanol y en ingles en el 
Palacio Nacional de Panama a Ins 14 
dias del mes de Septiembre de 1918. • 

(Fdo) Manuel Walls y Merino 

Arbitro. 



Reclamacion de Lanor Pou Viuda de 
Papi por una hecldrea de tierra {no 
localizada) del camino de la Chor-era, 
distrito municipal de Gorgona, inundada. 
en la acta ilidad, por la suma de $2,500. 

Decision del Arbitro, fallo No. 399, 
expediente No. 3089. 

Del testimonio de la reclamante ante 
la Comision Mixta se desprende que ella 
no ha estado jamas en fa propiedad 
rerhtmada, ni la vio nunca. No ha 
podido presentar titulos de propiedad 
que justifiquen sit derecho con anteriori- 
dad a la firma del Tratado del Canal. 
No ha podido presentar pianos que lo- 
calicen la propiedad reclamada. Eos 
testigos que podian apoyar su reclama- 
cion, basada en la posesion de buena fe, 
han muerto, y el unico vivo no tiene sus 
facultadcs mcntales en condiciones de 
dar valor a su testimonio. 

La reclamacion se basa pues en las 
manifestaciones de la reclamante, y en el 
veridicto del Arbitro anterior que, en una 
reclamacion en circunstancias identicas 
a la presente, fallo en favor de los re- 
clamantes. 

La Comision Mixta al estudiar y oir 
la presente reclamacion no ha podido 
ponerse de acuerdo ni respecto al derecho 
de la reclamante, ni al valor de la cosa 
reclamada. 

El Arbitro que subscribe no desea bajo 
ningiin concepto poner en tela de juicio 
la buena fe que pueda asistir a la recla- 
mante. Pero tiene declarado desde el 
momento en que se hizo cargo de este 



54 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



predecessor would not be binding upon 
him in his decisions, and he is disposed to 
maintain this principle. While in the 
present case he believes that the claim- 
ant has acted in good faith, nevertheless, 
to one who has the most rudimentary 
knowledge of law this claim would appear 
without foundation from that stand- 
point. 



With regard to the amount involved, 
1 hectare of land and $2,500 is a small 
consideration; but the principle of law 
involved is all important. It is impossi- 
ble to render an award, no matter how 
small the amount, based solely upon the 
statement of a claimant, if that award 
will establish a precedent. 

I repeat that I do not doubt the honor- 
able intentions which have prompted the 
claimant, but I find myself confronted 
with what is to me the painful duty' of 
dismissing this claim. 

Done in English and Spanish in the 
National Palace, Panama, on the 14th 
day cf September, 1918. 

(Sgd.) Manuel Walls y Merino, 

Umpire. 



In the matter cf the claim cf Jose H. 
Stilson and Pablo Morales, for improve- 
ments located on lands cf Rio Indio and 
Mindi near Mount Hope. Amount 
claimed, $2,185. 

Decision cf the Umpire. Award No. 
184, docket No. 2689. 

The above-entitled claim came on 
regularly for hearing before the Joint 
Commission on January 29, 1917. 
Jose H. Stilson and Pablo Morales, legal 
co-owners of a banana finca, guinea-grass 
pastures, rubber, aguacate, and mango 
trees (improvements located on 15 
hectares of the lands of Rio Indio and 
Mindi near Mount Hope, titles to which 
lands date from September 7, 1895) 
testified that they had cultivated this 
finca from the time they acquired it until 
the spring of 1912, when they abandoned 
it "For the simple reason that it was 
stated that the Isthmian Canal Commis- 
sion was taking over all property, and it 
was useless for us to continue there." 
(Testimony of Mr. Stilson, page 20 of 
the transcript). 

Testimony was introduced by the 
claimants to prove that the prices paid 
by the French Canal Company in the 
expropriation of banana fincas, justified 
them in claiming $2,185 for damages 
sustained on account of the occupation 
of the Canal Zone by the Government 
of the United States. 



Arbitraje que en sus fallos no se atendrfa 
a lo hecho por su predecesor, y esta 
dispuesto a mantener ese principio. 

Mientras en el caso presente, cree, 
que no puede dudarse de la buena fe 
de la reclamante, no cabe duda que bajo 
el punto de vista del derecho esta re- 
clamation adolece de los requisitos que, 
a los ojos de quien posea los mas rudi- 
mentaiios conocimientos dc las leyes, la 
hacen imprcsperable. 

Por su monto; una hectarea de tierra, 
y dos mil quinientos dollars ($2,500) no 
tiene import ancia; pero lo tiene el 
principio de derecho que envuelve. No es 
posible dictar un fallo por insignificante 
que sea la cosa reclamada, si ese fallo 
la de sentar precedente juridico. basado 
solamente en la palabra de un reclamante. 

Insislo en que no prejuzgo los honrados 
sentimientos que han podido animar a 
la reclamante, pero me veo en el para 
mi, personalmente, penoso deber, de 
declarar invalida la presente reclamacion. 

Dado en espanol y en ingles en el 
Palacio Nacional de Panama a los 
catorce dias del mes de Septiembre de 
1918. 

(Fdo) Manuel Walls y Merino, 

A rbitro. 



Reclamacion de Jose H. S'.ilson y 
Pablo Morales por mejoras en lierras de 
Rio Indio y Mindi cerca de Mount Hope 
por la suma dc $2,185. 

Decision del Arbitro, fallo No. 184, 
expedience No. 2689. 

Jose H. Stilson y Pablo Morales, co- 
propietarios legales de la mejoras de una 
finca de bananas, hierba guinea, y 
arboles de caucho, aguacates, y mangos, 
de quince hectareas de extension, situada 
en tieiras de Rio Indio y Mindi, cerca de 
Mount Hope, cuyas titulos datan de 
escritura publica de 7 de Septiembre de 
1895, probarcn ante la Comision Mixta, 
en la audiencia publica de esta reclama- 
cion, comonzada el 29 de Enero de 1917, 
haberse dedicado el cu'.tivo y explotacion 
de dicha finca, desdc que la adquirieron, 
hasta la primavera del aho 1912, en que 
"por scr publico que la Comision del 
Canal Istmico estaba tomando todas las 
propiedades. no tenia objeto continuar 
alii." (Declaration del sefior Stilson, 
pagina 20 del expediente.) 

Han presentado pruebas al efecto de 
justificar por medio de los precios abon- 
ados por la Compania Francesa del 
Canal, en la expropiacion de fincas 
bananeras, que el valor por ellos deman- 
dado en concepto de perjuitios y con- 
sistentes en dos mil ciento ochenta cinco 
dollars ($2,185) se ajusta a los valores 
mencionados. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



55 



One of the members of the Joint Com- 
mission on the part of the United States 
denied the right of the claimants to any 
compensation whatsoever on the ground 
that they had abandoned the finca before 
it was physically taken over by the 
American Government. The other 
American member refused to join in the 
opinion of his colleague and failed to file 
an opinion of his own. The Panamanian 
members considered that the claim is a 
just one, and estimated the value of the 
improvements in SI, 283. 

The Commission as now constituted, 
has requested me to decide this case 
notwithstanding the fact that the opin- 
ions of the members cf the Commission 
are not complete, and complying with 
this request, I will do so, even though the 
case lacks one of the requisites which I 
have always insisted upon since my 
appointment as Umpire. 

Considering that the United States 
maintains the principle that Article VI 
of the Treaty is applicable to every 
expropriation of public and private lands 
within the Canal Zone, the American 
Government acquired dominion of these 
lands under the Treaty of 1903 and net 
under the depopulation order of 1912, 
and 



Considering that the existence of the 
improvements on the lands in question, 
and the rights of the claimants acquired 
in 1895, to these improvements, have 
been proven conclusively by the oral and 
documentary evidence introduced at the 
trial before the Joint Commission and 
contained in the record; 

Inasmuch as the claimants have been 
actually deprived of their improvements 
as a result of the occupation of the 
Canal Zone by the Government of 
the United States as provided by the 
Treaty of 1903, they are entitled in 
equity and justice to compensation for 
the value of these improvements, which 
I find to be the sum of $1,283, or the 
same figure at which the Panamanian 
members arrived in their estimate of tiie 
damages sustained by these claimants. 



De los miembros dc la Comision Mixta 
al tiempo de verse esta reclamacion, 
los de los Estados Unidos, uno niega todo 
derecho a los reclamantes por no haber 
continuado explotando las tietras hasta 
que hubieran sido expulsados de ellas. 
LI otro se obstuvo tanto de ad'.'h irsc a la 
opinion de su cempanero, como de emitir 
la cuya propia. 

Los miembros panamenos consideran 
justa la reclamation, y avaluan los per- 
juicios en mil dos cientos ochenta tres 
dollars ($1,283). 

Los miembros que componen la 
Comision Mixta en la actualidad. me han 
solicitado me hiciera cargo de este caso, 
a pesar de no estar completas las opin- 
iones, y accediendo a eilo he decidido 
haceilo atin faltando un requisito que 
he requirido desde que me l.ice cargo de 
este arbitrage. 

Considerando que los Estados Unidos 
para mantener el princrpio de que el 
Ani'ilo VI del Tratado de 18 de No- 
viembre de 1903, es aplicable a toda 
expropiacion, se basan el h'echo de que el 
Gobierno Americano adquirio los dcre- 
chos sobre todos los terrenos publicos y 
privados de la Zona del Canal, para los 
usos y defensa del mismo, por el Tratado 
de 1903, y no por la 6rden de depopula- 
tion de 5 de Deciembre (\^ 1912; 

Considerando el derecho do los re- 
clamantes al cultivo de las tierras de 
referenda, derecho puesto en practica 
desde 1895, producto del cued han sido 
las mcjoras acerca de cuya. existencia no 
deja lugar a duda la prueba documen- 
tal y testifical por los mismos aportada 
ante la Comision Mixta y contenida en 
la expediente; 

Resulta que los reclamantes han sido 
de hecho privados de las mejoras en 
cuestion a consequencia de !i ocupaci6n 
de la. Zona del Canal por los Estados 
Unidos de conformidad con el Tratado 
de 1903, lo que les hace, en equidad y en 
derecho acreedores a una recompensa que 
avaluo, de conformidad eon la opinion 
de los miembros de la Comision por 
parte de Panama, en mil dos cientos 
ochenta tres dollars, oro ($1,283) enten- 
diendose que esta compensaci6n debera 
dividirse en partes igualcs eutre los recla- 
mantes. 



Therefore, an award is hereby made against the United States of America in the 
sum of $1,283, United States currency, which sum is ordered to be paid to Jose H. 
Stilson and Pablo Morale's in equal snares, the same to be compensation in full for 
all right, title, and interest which the said Jose H. Stilson and Pablo Moral's may 
possessor may have possessed in and to the improvements located on the lands of 
Rio Indio and Mindi near Mount Hope, covered by their claim, docket No. 2689, 
including all damages sustained by them on account of the expropriation of this 
property by the United States of America. 



56 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

This award shall be paid on or before the 14th day of October, 1918 and if 
payment or tender of payment is not made on or before that date, said award 
shall thereafter bear interest at the rate of 6 per centum per annum until paid. 



Done in English and Spanish in the Dado en espafiol y en ingles en el 

National Palace, Panama, on the 14th Palacio Nacional de Panama i lose.. torce 
day of September, 1918. dia» del mes de Septiembre de 1918. 

(Sigue la orden de pago en favor de 
los reclamantes.) 
(Sgd.) Manuel Walls y Merino, (Fdo) Manuel Walls y Merino, 

Umpire. Arbitro. 



Givil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announa d by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at Canal 
post offices and clubhouses.- In cases where such announcements are not posted, 
persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, Balboa 
Heights (telephone 286) : 

Dictaphone operator (male and lemale); $1,000 to St. 600 a year; Application form 30 t; October 
20, 1918. 

inspector ol telephone equipmenc (male); Sl,800ayear; application form 1312. f 

Inspector of telegraph equipment (male); Sl.SOOayear; application torm 1312. t 

Inspector of radio cquipii ent (male); $1,800 a year; application form 1312. t 

Inspector of vehicles (male), Sl,5uu a year; application form. 1312. f 

Inspector ol neld glasses (male;; 51,500 a year; application form 1312. t 

Minor stenographer and typewriter (male and female.' ; $900 to $1,000 a year; application form 304; 
October lo, 1918. 

Mechanical engineer in experimental work (male); $0.40 per diem; October 8, 1918; application 
form 2118.* 

Special i eld agent in entomology (male); $1,200 to $2,000 a year; No. 2113-arrendment. "The 
maximum age limit has been changed from 45 to 55 years." (Original announcement No. 21 13. )t 

Laboratory attendant (male); $/20ayear, No. 538; application form No. 1312; October 1, 1918.* 

Draltsiuan (male and female); 3 >.0-l to $/.01 pr>r diem; No. 316 amended; application form No. 
1312. t 

Agriculturist for reclamation projects (rrale); $1,800 to $2,400 a year; No. 526; application form 
2118.1 

Vineyard superintendent (male); $1,440 to SI, 800 a year; No. 524; application form 2118; Oc- 
tober 1, 1918.* 

Laboratory aid in agricultural technology (male and female); $720 to $1,080 a year; No. 525; 
application fori'. 1312; October 6, 1918. 

Mechanical draftsman, patent office (male and female;; $1,000 a year; No. 529; application form 
1312; September 21, 1918.* 

Chief, Smith-Sears Division (male); $5,000 a year; No. 533; Application form 2118; October 1, 
1918.* 

Superintendent for cooperation (male;; $3,000 to $4,000 a year; No. 533; application form 2118; 
October J, 1918.* 

Superintendent for case work (malo); $3,000 to $4,000 a year; No. 533; application form 2118; 
October 1, 1918.* 

Superintendent of records and returns (male); $3,000 to $4,000 a year; No. 533; application form 
2118; October 1, 1918.* 

Superintendent for vocational advisement and training (male); $3,000 to S4.000 a year; No. 533; 
application form 2118; October 1, 1918.* 

Superintendent for employment; survey and placement officer (maler, $3,000 to $1,000 a year; No. 
533; application form 2118; October 1, 1918.* 

District vocational officer (male:; $3,000 to $4,000 a vear; No. 533; application form 2118; Oc- 
tober 1, 1918.* 

Medical officer for the district vocational office (male); $2 500 to $3,500 a year; No. 533; applica- 
tion form 2118; October 1, 1918.* 

Supervisor for advisement and training in district vocational offices (male) ; $2,500 to 53,500 a year; 
No. 533; application form 2118; October 1. 1918.* 

Vocational adviser in hospitals (:..ale); $3,000 to $4,000 a year; No. 533; application form 2118; 
October 1, 1918.* 

Special agent for safety and hygiene (male); $2,500 to $3,500 a year; No. 533; application form 
2118; October 1, 1918.* 

Special agent lor agricultural rehabilitation courses (male); $2,500 to $3,500 a year; No. 533; 
application form 2U8; October 1, 1918.* 

Special agent for research in trade and industrial rehabilitation courses (male;; $2,500 to 53,500 
a year; No. 533; application for/.. 2118; October 1, 1918. * 

Clerk (male and female); $1 ,000 to 31,200 a year; No. 548; application form 304; September 12, 
1918, and October (>, 1918. 

Special agent lor research in trade and industrial education (male); $2,500 to S3, 500 a year; No. 
530; application form 2118; October 1, 1918.* 

Special -agent for research in trade and industrial education (male); $2,500 to $3,500 a year; No. 
530-amend nent. "The maximum age limit has been changed from 55 to 60 years," October 1, 1918.* 

Special agent for agricultural courses (male); $2,500 to $3,500 a year; No. 530; application form 
2118; October 1, 1918.* 

Special agent for agricultural courses (male); $2,500 to $3,500 a year; No. 530-amendment. "The 
maximum age limit has been changed from 55 to 60 years;" October 1, 1918.* 

Special agent for research in home economics (female); $2,500 to $3,000 a year; No. 530: applica- 
tion form 2118; October 1, 1918.* 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



57 



Special agent for research in home economics (female); $2,500 to S3, 000 a year; No. 530-amend- 
mcnt. "The maximum age limit has been changed from 55 to 60 years;" October 1, 1918.* 

Special agent for research in industry for girls and women (female); §2,500 to S3, 000 a year; No. 
530; application form 2118; October 1, 1918.* 

Special agent for research in industry for girls and women (female); $2,500 to $3,000 a year; No. 
530-amendment. "The maximum age limit has been changed from 55 to 60 years;" October 1, 1918.* 

File clerk (male and female); S1.000 to $1,200 a year; No. 531; application form 1312; October 
20. 1918. 

Preparator in nomatology (male and female); $660 to $1,000 a year; No. 532; application form 304; 
October 6, 1918. 

Inspector of safety appliances (male); No. 502 amendment. "The maximum age limit has been 
changed from 50 to 60 years;" October 2-3, 1918. 

Inspector of hours of service (male); No. 502-amendment. "The maximum age limit has been 
changed from 50 to 60 years;" October 2-3, 1918. 

Assistant chemist in forest products (male and female); $1,200 to $1,800 a year; No. 206-amend- 
roent.t 

Master computer (male and female); $1,800 to S2.400 a year; No. 430-amendment.t 

Computer (male and female); $900 to $1,800 a year; No. 430- amendment. t 

Machinist (male); $1,200 to $1,800 a year; No. 1805-amendment. "This announcement cancels 
announcement No. 410 ot the .machinist's examination issued June, 1918;" application form 1800. f 

Toolmaker (male); $1,200 to $1,800 a year; No. 1805-amendment. "This announcement cancels 
announcement No. 410 of the machinist's examination issued June, 1918." application form 1800. t 

Shop apprentice (male); S480 to S600 a year; No. 512; application form 1312; October 1, 1918.* 



♦Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business 
on that date. 

fNonassemblcd. Applications will be received at any time, until further notice. 



Deceased Employees. 

The estates of tne following deceased employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama Raihoad 
Company are now in process of settlement, and any claims against these estates, or any information 
whicn might lead to the recovery of heirs, or to the recovery of property, bank deposits, postal savings 
or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys due them, should be presented at the office of 
the Administrator of Estates at once in order that the estates may be settled as soon as possible. All 
claims should oe itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or ocher public orhcer naving a seal, and 
submitted in duplicate. These names will be published but once: 



Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by — 


Date of 
death. 


William Alleyne 


171541 

1194:26 

74168 

1 15307 

l.")41S4 
8<W23 


Barbados 

Martinique .... 

Jamaica 

Jamaica 

Jamaica 


Gatun 

Panama 


Building Division.. . . 
Commissary Division 

Sanitary Dcpt 

Panama Railroad. . . . 
Panama Railroad. . . . 
Panama Railroad. . . . 


September 8, 1918. 
September 12, 1918. 




September 9, 1918. 


Walter Parkins 

George Shaw 

James Taylor 


('.■Ion 

Colon 

La Boca 


September S, 1918. 
September b, 1918. 
September •>, I91S. 



Official Circulars. 



Speeders. 
Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Superintendent, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 10, 1918. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

\ our attention is invited to my circular of 
Mar.-h 3, 1917, No. 589, reading as follows: 

"Owing to the large number of accidents to 
speeders on the main line of the Panama Rail- 
road Com pa:. \ it is evident that speeder operators 
are not complying strictly with the rules covering 
the operation of such cars. Extreme care should 
be used in operating these ca r s over the main 
line and movements must only be made when of a 
business nature. The practice of using speeders 
for pleasure and for other than business reasons 
must be discontinued immediately " 

Several accident- occurred to speeders recently 
on the main line on accoirit of being hit by regu- 
lar passenger trains, which would indicate that 
the employees operating the speeders are not 
exercising reasonable care in avoiding collisions, 
with resulting damage to property and possible 
loss of life; and unless better judgment is used 
in future it will be necessary that the privilege 
ol operating speeders on the main line of the 
Panama Railroad be withdrawn. 

S. \V. Heald. 

Approved : Superintendent. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Postal Address of The Panama Canal. 

The postal address is, "The Panama Canal, 
Balboa Heights, Canal Zone," or "The Panama 
Canal, Wasnington, D. C." 



Additions to Enemy Trading List. 
The Panama Canal, 
Executive Department, 
Division of Civil Affairs, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 7, 1918. 
To all concerned — The following additions have 
been made by the War Trade Beard, effective 
September 6, 1918: 

ADDITIONS. 

ECUADOR. 

Riera, Martin Guayaquil. 

Sierra, Jose Guayaquil. 

GUATEMALA. 

"Esmeraldas" plantacion (finca Costa Cuca. 
"Esmeraldas," Enrique Her- 
mann). 

Frank, Victor, and Company. . . Champerico. 
HONDURAS. 

Abarca R., Justo Amapala. 

MEXICO. 

Astrain, Valerio and Company. Pachuca. 

Bcrens, Alfredo Puebla. 

Boletin dc Guerra Mexico City. 

Boletin de Informacion Guadalajara. 

Botica del Zocalo (Rafael Diaz Orizaba. 

&Co.. 

Brun, E. & Co Colima. 

Caamano, Nicolas (La Prensa Orizaba. 

del Diu). 
Candado de Oro, el (Richard Orizaba. 

Hermanosl. 

Casam and Trimo Vera Cruz. 

Colli mon, Eduardo Guadalajara. 

Conti, Diaz (of Gugenheim and Mexico City. 

Bnlaresque) 

Dcgener, Adolfo ' Vera Crnz. 

Diaz, Conti (of Gugenheim and Mexico City. 

Bolaresquc). 



58 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Diez (or Diaz), Rafael & Co. Orizaba. Salvador. 

(Botica del Zocalo) Meyer, Marcello San Miguel. 

Giron, Miguel Tapachula. VBNBiCEUA. 

Goebel, Andres Mexico Cjty. Paz, Carlos Valencia. 

Hambergo Bremense, of Ham- Mexico City. Vargas, Kduardo Maracaibo. 

burg. . REMOVALS 

Illustration. La (Restoy Andres) Tampico. colombiv 

Iwerson, Emilio Mexico City or Ch.hua- ^ ^^ • ^^^ and Cu . 

Keller, Emil Chihuahua. Ugem. 

Kulhmann, Gustavo Coiima. ' - . 

Meenen, Gerard Mexico City. Talledo, Pedro Lima.. 

Mendez, Augustin Guadalajara. C. H. Calhoun. 

Cia Mercentil Occidental Guadalajara. Chief, Division of Civil Affairs. 

National Prussian of Stettin.. . . Mexico City. , 

Las N o v e d a d e s de Francia Orizaba. Adiitions to Commissary Stock. 

Pe ( te1s e on e, ; d WiUe InOS, .• Guadalajara. Tobacco. Climax plug. 13-oz. plug $0.63 

K del Dia, La (Caamano. Orizaba. Buttons, ^.kha^colo^doz . . . . . . . . . . .14 

Buttons, black, line 30. doz 11 



Nicolas). 



Restoy Andrea (La niustraraon) Tampico. Buttons, black line 45. doz 42 

Richard. Hermanon (El Can- Orizaba. Curtain, Lero. H. S. etambie. vd 24 

Riff Kndo Mexico City and Man- Haridke rchMs white, 19" x 19". ea 14 

iuuer, i euiduuu zanillo Hats, felt, dark gray, ea 4.70 

r, . T. , ■ A/f„'„,,r,;iln Ties, silk, Windsor, ea 44 

Rue as, Fredenco S™ °' Men's tan glazed kid blucher Oxfords, pr. 8 . 20 

Ruelas. Ricardo Manza: mUo. d k;d b , acher 0xford 7 55 

Schrempel, Juan Mex cni City or Guada- Men>? ^^ kid bluchCTB< pr g 80 

Schweikhardt, Carlos Guadalajara. JJenjs tony red calf Oxfords, pr 7. 90 

□Liiweuuiiu it, v.* lU o. q D itijin Men s tonv recl calf bals, pr 9 . 45 

Bieber. Ueraoate M„£°> ir , Mens patent leather Oxfords, pr 7.55 

Volvre, Emiho. . Mex eo City. £ & <, N , 2 , f Qxford 7 90 

Zawadski, Conrado Mexico City. Mens white nubuct Oxfords, pr 8.20 

Panama. Women's black glazed kid Oxfords, mili- 

Leer, Albert Eocas del Toro. tary heel, pr 6 . 30 



COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Lettuce. 

The scarcity of lettuce in the commissaries at the present time is due to the fact 
that The Panama Canal plantations are shipping but little of this product and will be 
unable to deliver large quantities before October 1. Plenty of this salad has been 
planted and when shipments begin to arrive the commissaries will be well supplied. 

Lettuce is, cf course, sent down from the United States by every sailing but it does 
not hold up well; hence orders are placed so that the stock will be exhausted within 
a few days after arrival, in order to avoid heavy condemnations. Lettuce and ro- 
maine also are received occasionally from Costa Rica but their keeping qualities are 
not of the best. 



Honey Dew Melons. 

On one of the ships arrived this week were received 206 crates of honey dew melons. 

Bartlett Pears. 

The commissary purchasing agent has advised that he expects to make a shipment 
of New York Bartlett pears by a steamer due to arrive next week. 

Oatmeal Liberty Loaf. 

In order to provide variation, the Commissary Division began last Tuesday the 
making of an oatmeal Liberty loaf. A number of tests have been made and it is 
found that a nutritious and palatable loaf can be baked. Such bread may be dis- 
tinguished from the other loaves by the pink label placed inside the wrapper. 

Breakfast Food of Whole Wheat. 

A breakfast food of whole wheat made in biscuit form will not be obtainable in the 
line stores after the present stock is exhausted. Word has just been received from 
the commissary purchasing agent to the effect that the manufacturers are permitted 
this year to use only 70 pet cent of the wheat used during 1917, therefore, although 
the Panama Railroad commissary is a customer of long standing this firm has decided 
that for business reasons it will distiibute its product entirely at home and make 
no exports whatever until such time as war conditions enable it to secure a greater 
proportion of wheat. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, S1.00 per year; foreign, SI. 50; address 

The Panama (_ anal Record, Balboa Heights. Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter, February 6, 1918, at the Post office 

at Cristobal, C. Z, under the Ac! of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 25, 191 8. No. 6. 

Notice to Mariners— Establishment of San Jose Island Light, Pacific Side. 
The Panama Canal, Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 18, 1918. 
Circular No. 643-45. 

1. On or about September 26, 1918. San Jos6 Island Light will be 
established on the southwestern extremity of San Jos6 Island, Pearl 
Island Group, Republic of Panama. 

2. This light will be flashing, white, un watched; exhibited from a 
pyramidal, skeleton steel structure 15 feet high, painted white. 

Focal plane, 126 feet above high water. Visible 18 miles. 
Illuminant, acetylene gas, 1,000 candlepower. 
Arc of illumination from 40° 30' true to 334° 30' true. Light will 
be obscured to the north the remaining 66°. 

Characteristic: 5 seconds light; 7 seconds dark. 
Approximate position: Lat. 8° 12' 03" north. 
Long. 79° 07' 45" west. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 

Regulations Governing the Exportation of Dunnage. 

Washington, D. C, September 9, 1918. 

The War Trade Board announce the addition of Paragraph VI 
to the General Rules No. 1, Governing Granting Licenses for Bunker 
Fuel, Port. Sea, and Ship's Stores and Supplies. The paragraph 
reads as follows: 

No dunnage shall be allowed to proceed out of the United States or any of its 
territories or possessions on any vessel, except under license of the War Trade Board, 
either as ship's stores or as cargo. No applications for "hunkers" of any vessel shall 
be granted unless such dunnage as she may have aboard is so licensed. Vessejs will 
not be permitted to clear with dunnage unless properly covered either by export 
or bunker license. If declared as ship's stores, dunnage can not be discharged at 
any foreign port or transferred to any other vessel without special permission from 
the Bureau of Transportation of the War Trade Board. 

Steamship owners, agents, and masters and also shippers are reminded 
that this regulation has been operative for some time, but that hereto- 
fore it has not been incorporated in the Gcncrd Rules which were 
given publicity. 

Vance C. McCormick, 

Chairman. 

FOURTH LIBERTY LOAN 

Campaign begins Sept. 28-Ends Oct. 17 
OUR quota, $1,000,000 



60 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Reexport of Sugar. 

After a consultation with the Food Administration and other Gov- 
ernment Departments, the War Trade Board has removed the restric- 
tions on the granting of export licenses for the reexportation of sugar 
at the Panama Canal. 



School Examinations. 

The Panama Canal, Division of Schools, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 16, 1918. 
Pupils in grades 4 to 8, inclusive, who have studied during their 
summer vacation the subjects in which they failed in the previous 
school year, will be permitted to take examinations in such subjects 
commencing Wednesday, October 2. The principal of the school 
should be consulted on October 1 regarding the examinations to be 
taken. 

A. R. Lang, 

Superintendent of Schools. 

Occupants of Quarters. 

The following is a tabulation of occupants of Panama Canal and 
Panama Railroad quarters on August 31, 1918: 



Place. 


Gold. 


Europeans. 


W 


est Indians. 


Men 


Women 


Children 


Men 


Women 


Children 


Men 


Women Children 




963 

730 

14 

219 

11 

14 

23 

186 

783 


725 

532 

10 

153 

10 

8 

8 

140 

433 


887 
461 


59 


12 


14 


929 
159 
51 

(c) 633 

538 

(e) 129 

(g) 232 

855 

(i}2,154 


454 

12 

27 

345 

198 

79 

69 

452 

412 


814 
2 














151 

10 
6 
2 

164 
514 


3 
44 


3 
13 


10 
27 


566 
330 
140 
93 

472 




Culebra (d) 




5 
1 

84 


1 
1 


2 

5 




Cristobal (h) 










Totals 


2,943 


2,019 


2,195 


196 


30 


5S 


5,880 


2 048 


3,287 











(a) Includes Palo Seco and Quarantine station; (b), Miraflores and Red Tank; (c), 40 Panamans; (<f). Empire 
and Las Cascadas,- (e), 17 Panamans; (/), Summit and Gold Hill; (g), 28 Panamans; (A), Colon Beach and Colon 
Hospital; (£), 8 East Indians, 8 colored American citizens, and 300 Panamans. 



Civil Service Examinations. 



The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at 
Canal post offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not 
posted, persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, 
Balboa Heights (telephone 286); 
Fuel inspection engineer (male); $l,620ayear; applicati'on form 2118; October 15, 1918.* 
Junior aid (male and female); $540 to $720 a year; application form 1312. t 

Minor stenographer-typewriter (male and female); $1,000 a year; application form 304; No. 543- 
October 13, 1918. 

Minor stenographer (male and female); $1,000 a year; No. 543; application form 304; October 
13, 1918. 

Minor typewriter (male and female); $1,000 a year; No. 543; application form 304; October 
13, 1918. 

Mechanical engineer in experimental work (male); No. 545; $6.40 per diem; application form 
2118; October 8, 1918.* 

Surveyor and transitman (male); $125 to $200 per month; $100 to $125 per month; No. 544; 
application form No. 1312. t 

Assistant in marketing live stock and meats, grade 1 (male); $1,800 to $2,400 a year; No. 224- 
amended; "Applicants must have reached their twenty-fifth but not their fiftieth birthday on the 
date of making oath to the application. "t 

Metallurgical chemist (male and female); No. 1617-amended. Supplemental. t 

Assistant metallurgical chemist (male and female) ; No. 1617-amended; supplemental. t 

Powder and explosives chemist (male and female) ; No. 108-amended.t 

Assistant powder and explosives chemist (male and female); No. 108-amended.t 

Assistant editor (male and female) ; No. 503-amendment; $2,000 a year; September 24, 1918,* 

Electrician's helper (male); $720 a year; No. 558; application form 1312; October Id, 1918,* 

Hydfoetecttical engineer (male) j $2,000 a year; No. 541; application form 21 IB; October 8, 191S.* 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 61 

Clerk (male and female) ; $900 to $1,000 and §1,100 to $1,200 a year; No. 308-amended; applica- 
tion form 304; October 13, 1918. 

Guard (male); penitentiary service; $840 a year; No. 536; application form 304; October 6, 1918. 

Automobile mechanic (male); $1,200 to $1,320 a year; No. 550; application form 1800; October 
8, 1918.* 

Assistant inspector of materials, miscellaneous (male) ; $4.48 to S5. 44 per diem; No. 2252-amended; 
application form 1312. t 

Clerk qualified in modern language (male and female) ; Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
Department of Commerce. Washington, D. C; $900 and $1,200 a year entrance salaries; No. 261- 
amended; application forms 1312 and 1424; October 20. 21 ; November 24, 25, 1918. 

Assistant engineer of tests (male and female); Grade 1, $3.76 to $4.24 per diem; Grade 2, $4.48 to 
$4.96 per diem; application form 1312. f 

Expert in business administration (male and female); S2.000 to $3,000 a year; No. 107-amended. 
Supplemental: "Receipt of applications to close September 26, 1918;" September 26, 1918. f 

Scientific assistant in weed investigations (male); SI, 200 to $1,620 a year; application form 1312; 
No. 494-amendment; "Postponed from September 18 to October 2. 1918;" October 2, 1918. "The 
maximum age limit of 50 years, originally fixed for this examination, has been eliminated." 

Clerk qualified in accounting (male and female); SI. 000 to SI, 800 a year; Nos. 155 and 2147-amend- 
ment; supplemental. "Age limit has been reduced from 20 to 18 years. "t 

Clerk qualified in statistics (male and female); SI. 000 to SI, 800 a year; Nos. 155 and 2147-amend- 
ment; supplemental. "Age limit has been reduced from 20 to 18 years. "t 



*Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business 
on that date. 

tNonassembled. Applications will be received at any time, until further notice. 



Canal Record to Canal Service Men. 

American citizens who have served on the Panama Canal and are 
now in the military service of the United States will be sent a copy of 
The Panama Canal Record each week if they make application for 
this privilege. 



October Weather Probabilities. 

During the month of October, 1918, the following weather conditions may be 
expected at the Canal entrances. Predictions are based on the records at Colon and 
Balboa Heights for the past 11 and 12 years, respectively. 

Winds — Light, variable winds will prevail over the Atlantic coast with an average 
hourly velocity of about seven miles. The prevailing direction of the wind is usually 
from the southeast, although a considerable percentage of west and northwest winds 
may be expected during the month. A maximum velocity of from 30 to 38 miles an 
hour may be expected during the passage of local rain or thunder squalls. 

Over the Pacific coast and the interior, light northwest winds will prevail with an 
average hourly velocity of about six miles. Here, too, during occasional rain or 
thunder squalls, the maximum velocity of the wind may exceed 30 miles an hour, 
but these wind storms are invariably of short duration. 

Rain — The average October rainfall at the Atlantic entrance of the Canal is 14.63 
inches, and on the Pacific side 10.30 inches, these averages being for periods of 
48 and 21 years, respectively. About 25 days with rain may be expected on the 
Atlantic coast and 22 on the Pacific coast, while the average number of days with 
heavy rain (1 inch or more) has been six at the Atlantic entrance and three at the 
Pacific. Throughout the length of the Canal, the greatest part of the rainfall occurs 
during the daytime, the heaviest rainfall generally occurring between the hours of 
1 p. m. and 4 p. in. Ilowevci , at this season of the year, the percentage of daytime 
rainfall is higher over the interior and Pacific roast than over the Atlantic coast, and 
heavy rainfall may be expected on the Atlantic side during the early morning hours. 
Over both coasts the time of least rainfall is from 8 to 9 a. in. 

Fogs — No fogs are likely to occur at either Canal entrance, but night and early 
morning fogs will be numerous over the interior. About 25 nights with fog may be 
expected over the Gaillard Cut section of the Canal, but as all fogs lift or become 
dissipated before 8.30 a. m., they should not prove a hindrance to navigation. 

Temperature — The average sha.de air temperature will he about 79° Fahrenheit on 
both coasts. On the Atlantic coast the temperature is not lik< ly to rise above 90° F., 
or fall lower than 70° F., while on the Pacific side the maximum temperature may be 
as high as 94° F. and the minimum as low as 68° F. The mean daily range in tem- 
perature will be about 10° F. on the Atlantic coast and 14° F. on the Pacific coast. 

Barometric pressure — The average sealevel atmospheric pressure will be approxi- 
mately 29.85 inches over both coasts. The maximum pressure for the month is not 
likely to exceed 29.95 inches, or the minimum to be lower than 29.70 inches. 

Relative humidity — The humidity of the atmosphere should average about 87 per 
cent over both coasts. The daily range in humidity is greater on the Pacific coast 



62 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



than on the Atlantic side, the average nighttime humidity being higher and the 
midday humidity lower than on the Atlantic side. 

Storms — The Isthmus is seldom visited by violent or widespread atmospheric 
disturbances although rain, wind, or thunder storms of more or less limited extent 
are of common occurrence, and may be expected quite frequently during the month. 
Rough weather may be experienced occasionally to the northward of the Atlantic 
entrance, as this is the season of the West Indian hurricane. The path of these storms 
lies well to the northward of the Isthmus, but a rough sea accompanied by brisk 
winds may be expected outside the breakwaters, following the passage of one of 
these storms. Generally cloudy weather will continue over both coasts, and smooth 
seas are usually experienced at the Pacific entrance during the month of October. 

Tides — Tidal fluctuations on the Atlantic side do not affect navigation as the 
extreme tidal range at Colon is less than two feet. 

Panama (Balboa) tide predictions for the month are presented in the following 
table: 



Day of- 


Time and Height of High 
and Low Water. 


Day of- 


Time and Height of High 
and Low Water. 


Day of- 


Time and Height of 
and Low Water 


High 


W. 


Mo. 


W. 


Mo. 


W. 


Mo. 




Tu 


I 


1:02 7:13 
13.0 4.0 


1:26 7:3S 
13.0 3.6 


S 


12 


1:48 
4.0 


7:39 
13.5 


2:17 8:17 
3.6 13.0 


W 


23 


5:51 12:05 
17.7 -1.0 


6:24 
16.9 




W 


2 


1:56 8:08 
13.6 3.3 


2:17 8:25 
13.6 3.0 


s 


13 


2:41 
4.5 


8:28 
12.9 


3:14 9:13 
4.1 12.7 


Th 


24 


0:28 
0.4 


6:40 12:52 
16.8 0.0 


7:13 
16.1 


Th 


3 


2:39 8:51 
14.2 2.5 


2:58 9:03 
14.1 2.5 


M 


14 


3:46 
4.8 


9:34 
12.5 


4:22 10:24 
4.3 12.7 


F 


25 


1:18 

1.5 


7:30 
15.7 


1:43 
1.2 


8:04 
15.1 


F 


4 


3:15 9:21 
14.7 1.8 


3:35 9:42 
14.6 2.0 


Tu 


15 


5:00 
4.6 


10:54 
12.6 


5:33 11:40 
4.0 13.3 


S 


26 


2:14 
2.7 


8:21 
14.5 


2:38 
2.5 


8:58 
14.1 


S 


5 


3:50 10:05 
15.1 1.3 


4:10 10:15 
14.9 1.7 


W 


16 


6:12 
3.8 


12:13 
13.3 


6:49 
3.2 


s 


27 


3:15 
3.7 


9:21 
13.4 


3:40 
3:5 


10:01 
13.4 


S 


6 


4:23 10:38 
15.4 1.0 


4:44 10:50 
15.1 1.6 


Th 


17 


0:47 
14.4 


7:17 
2.6 


1:18 7:42 
14.4 2.2 


M 


28 


4:22 
4.3 


10:2S 
12.6 


4:46 
4.2 


11:11 
13.0 


M 


7 


4:54 11:10 
15.5 0.9 


5:17 11:22 
15.0 1.7 


F 


18 


1:43 
15.6 


8:13 
1.3 


2:13 8:35 
15.5 1.0 


Tu 


29 


5:31 
4.5 


11:41 
12.4 


5:52 
4.5 




Tu 


8 


5:25 11:43 
15.3 1.1 


5:49 11:55 
14.8 2.1 


S 


19 


2:34 
16.8 


9:04 
0.0 


3:05 9:24 
16.5 0.0 


W 


30 


0:18 
13.0 


6:35 12:48 
4.3 12.6 


6:53 
4.3 


W 


9 


5:55 12:16 
15.0 1.6 


6:22 

14.4 


s 


20 


3:23 
17.7 


9:50 
-1.1 


3:55 10:10 
17.2 -0.6 


Th 


31 


1:14 
13.4 


7:31 
3.8 


1:41 
13.1 


7:46 
4.0 


Th 


IO 


0:30 6:26 12:52 6:55 
2.6 14.6 2.2 14.0 


M 


21 


4:12 
18.1 


10:35 
-1.5 


4:45 10:55 
17.5 -0.7 














F 


1 1 


1:08 6:59 
3.3 14.1 


1:30 7:32 
2.9 13.5 


Tu 


nn 


5:02 
18.1 


11:19 
-1.5 


5:35 11:41 
17.3 -0.4 















The tides are placed in the order of their occurrence; the times of high and low tides are shown on 
the upper lines. The figures in boldfaced type are hours and elevations between noon and midnight; 
ante meridian figures are given in the ordinary ligiitfaced type. The time is Cosmopolitan Standard 
for the meridian 75° W. 

The elevations of the water are shown on the second line for each day; a comparison of consecutive 
heights will indicate whether it is hign or low water. Heights are reckoned from low mean seawater 
springs, which is 8.3 below mean sealevel and is the datum of soundings on the Coast and Geodetic 
Survey charts for this region. The deptn of water may accordingly be estimated by adding the tabu- 
lar height of the tide to the soundings, unless a minus (-) sign is before the height, in which case it 
is to be subtracted. The annual inequality or variation in tne mean s-alcvel is included in the 
predictions. 



Economy Expense Book. 

The Commissary Division is having published at The Panama Canal 
Press an Economy Expense Book, which will soon be placed on sale at 
all commissaiies atarcmarkabh low price. This book was arranged by 
Mr. D. G. Westman of the Accounting Department, in collaboration 
with some other employees, and not only embodies the best feat ares 
of expense books for family or personal use, but contains a special form 
of financial statement which will enable anyone to get an exact estimate 
of his net financial worth. The book is especially adapted to use in the 
Canal Zone and will be sold without profit in an endeavor to induce 
employees to keep account of their expenses, particularly in view of the 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 63 

necessity for war-time saving, which should continue after the war. 
The purpose of the book is well explained in the preface, printed below: 

You have probably tried over and over again to keep personal accounts. Perhaps 
even as you read this there is a suspicious bulge in your coat pocket indicating the 
presence of a handy account boon of some sort or other. If your experience is like 
thai of most of is you have kept your petsonal accounts by fits and staits, spasmodic 
periods of scrupulous and conscientious recording of expense, alternating with longer 
stretches ol no account at all. 

An overdrawn bank account <^r an embarrassing shortage of ready cash usually 
shocks us all into account-keeping. .Most of us do not keep it up long enough 
tiowevei . to gel the habit, and quickly relapse into no records at all. 

When we do keep records they usually mean nothing to us, being neither scientific- 
lily devised nor properly handled. We all have a sneaking suspicion that many, 
many items of expense are overlooked in our bookkeeping. Witness the troubles ol 
the voting wife trying to get her household accounts to balance. Usually "miscellane- 
ous" is the classification which enables her to "force" a balance. 

One of the most important things an individual can do is to save. Which is the 
more important to a corporation, its gross income or its net income. The former is 
subject to all sorts of deductions for expenses and costs. The latter is a clear gain — 
a profit. Similar!)- with an individual, the NET income is fai more imporatnt than 
the gross. 1 he total amount of a man's salary is unimportant, but that MARGIN 
of his salary which remains after paying operating expenses is his real gain. A man 
ivhose salary is $5,000 a year, and whose necessary operating expenses are $4,900 a 
is less net income than a man receiving $2,000 a year whose expenses are only 
$1,600. In the former case the net income is $100, in the latter case it is $400. The 
man with a $2,000 salary, therelore, is in reality making four times the net income of 
the other. 

All of us must think more of our net incomes and less of our gross incomes. In 
order that the net income nay be as. large as possible it is necessary that we keep 
records which shall be a guide in our fight to reduce operating expenses. To meet 
this need on the Isthmus this book has been designed, so that systematic record may 
be kept ol t lie income and expenses of the average family or individual. 

Simplicity has been our watchword, and no knowledge of bookkeeping or accounting 
is needed to make it profitable and useful for you. Only a few minutes of your time 
are required ear'-, day to keep this book up-to-date, and by so doing you may know 
at any moment just how you stand financially. 

Regularity is the one element essential to success in keeping this recoid. Make 
your entries each, day, and you will find that the few minutes so spent will be the 
ol bringing you success and happiness. To ''open the book" write the month 
ce provided at top of page headed "Expenditure Record." Next prepare a 
budgel covering the estimated expenditures that you will make during the month; 
insert these figures in various columns on the line marked "Budget this month." 
You can not give too careful thought to this budget; it is probably the first that you 
have tried to construct, and you are dangerously liable to forget some very important 
expenditures that you may have to make. However, for those who, Decause of hav- 
ing kept no accounts, have but a hazy idea of the expenditures which will be made 
undei i In- various headings, it might be well to postpone the construction of a budget 
until records have been kept for two or three months. 

The next line is for "over-runs." For example, if the budget allowance for last 
month on clothing was $1 2 and you spent $17, there would be an "over-rim" of $5. 
I his would have to be deducted from this month's budget figures. The next follow- 
ing line is for "under-run," which represents the amount of last month's budget 
that was not used. By adding the "under-runs" and deducting the "over-runs" 
from this month's budget the result will be the "available monthly budget." This 
)( ms the working basis for the present month. 

On the next blue line will be found the words "balance from last month," which will 
be used to show the amounl of cash items on hand a:id in bank carried over from the 
previous month. On the next blue line run your lingers until you come to an item 
for which any money has been spent, enter the amount under the proper heading. 
Skip the items for which no monr n spent. When all items have been covered 

add them up and put the total in the "disbursed" column. 1 he amounts written in 
the "disbursed" column should naturally be the sum of all the money that has beeD 
spent during the day. 

The total of all money received should be. entered the day it is received, in the 
"received" column. This, of course, would include salary, dividends, or income from 
any other source. The value of commissary books, if drawn by Pay Roll Deduction 



64 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



should be entered on the dates received, and salary entered for the following month 
should not include the value of such books deducted. Commissary coupons may then 
be treated as Cash. The balance of salary received during the following month should 
be entered, when received, for the full amount of the monthly salaiy exclusive of the 
Commissary Coupon deductions, and credit should then be taken in the proper column 
covering any other deductions of pay. When the month is finished add each column, 
placing at the bottom between the red lines the total money spent for each classi- 
fication. Thus we have at a glance the amount spent for groceries, insurance, etc., 
you see just what has been spent during the month for tobacco, moving pictures, 
coach fare, and so on. The total of all these figures should be the same as the total 
of the "disbursements" column. The difference between the "disbursements" 
column and the "receipts" column should equal your cash on hand or in the bank 

When you have completed your fast month's expenditure record as indicated above, 
turn to the first page headed "Yearly Summary," and opposite the proper month 
place in the columns the totals of the amounts found in the corresponding columns ol 
the expenditure record. 1 he summary pages will give you a complete statement from 
morth to month of income and expense, and these added together at the end of the 
12 months complete your year's record of receipts and expenditures. 

You will note that the difference between your receipts and expenditures represents 
only the cash that you have on hand or in the bank; it does not represent your nel 
worth. You will now turn to the first page headed "Financial Statement" and inserl 
in the proper column opposite each classification the value you possess of each 

The following will serve as a sample: 



ASSETS. 



Cash and commissary coupons on hand 

Cash on deposit in banks and post offices 

Liberty Loan Bonds and War Saving Stamps. 
Salary due for current month, gross amount. . 

Cash value, insurance policies 

Accumulative leave due 

Notes receivable 

Accounts receivable 

Automobile 

Other personal property at salable value 

Real estate 



Total. 



LIABILITIES. 



Taxes unpaid and other preferential liabilities. 
Pay roll deductions for the month: 

Coupon book 

Red Cross 

Hospital 

Liberty Loans 

Miscellaneous 

Balance due on Liberty Bonds 

Notes payable 

Miscellaneous items payable 

Net worth 



Net worth current month. . 
Net worth previous month. 
Net gain 



January February 



818.00 
300.00 

1,100.00 
150.00 
280.00 
275.00 
100.00 
10.00 
400.00 
200.00 

' 500.00 



$3,333.00 



$15.00 

30.00 

1.50 

3.00 

30.00 

.50 

120.00 

100.00 

5.00 

3,028.00 



S3, 333. 00 



$25.00 

300 00 

1,110.00 

150.00 

282.00 

295.00 

90.00 

3.00 

390.00 

200.00 

500.00 



$3,345.00 



$15.00 



25 00 
1.50 



30.00 

.25 

90.00 

100.00 

10.00 

3,073.25 



$3,345.00 



$3,073.25 

3,028.00 

45.25 



The first two items of your assets will, of course, equal the balance shown in your 
expenditure record. 

Very few people know their actual financial status, and if you faithfully carry out 
the foregoing instructions you will no doubt be agieeably surprised to find that your 
actual worth is more than your mental bookkeeping has revealed. Again such a 
record might be of much value to you at some future date, should you desire a loan 
from your banker. He could tell at a glance your personal habits, as revealed by the 
expenditure record and financial statement. Such a record covering a period of years 
would receive much more favorable consideration than your oral statement relative 
to vour estimated worth. 

It seems hardly necessary to comment on the vital benefits to be obtained from a 
correct system of personal accounts consistently maintained. It is likely that every 
one is heartily agreed on this point. Unfortunately most of us have that common 
failing of carelessness and neglect about the axioms of correct living. 

For example, we may know perfectly well that tobacco hurts us, and yet keep on 
smoking just the same. It requires no argument to convince us that a minimum 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



65 



•vcwnrnt Of daily exercise is absolutely necessary for health, and yet we keep on over- 
working and under-breathing just the same. 

Various methods might be used to remind you that your daily record should bt 
made; an ordinary dollar alarm clock set to go off at the proper time, or winding your 
watch, might be associated with the idea that you should next make your entries 
These suggestions need not be followed, but it is important that your records be made 
iaily, and for this reason it is advisable to associate it with one of your daily habits, 

Finally, it is well to bear in mind that if this book is properly handled according tc 
■:hc directions given, the system of accounts described should he simple to operate ard 
rich in results, and will unquestionably mean a considerable net gain in your personal 
Ticome. 



Official Circulars. 



Rates of Pay — Gold Roll. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 

Balboa Heights. C. Z., September 13, 1918. 
Circular No. 669-23: 

The following rates of pay are established effec- 
Jve May 1. 1918, for certain positions in the 
Mechanical Division, superseding rates hereto- 
•ore published for these ratings: 

Foreman, general, Car Department, $309. 

Foreman, general, Cristobal Shops, S325. 

Foreman, general, shiplitter and boilermaker, 
C325. 

Foreman, blacksmith. $265. 

Foreman, boiler shop, $265; Cristobal, $250. 

Forman, car shop, $262.50; Cristobal, S240. 

Foreman, erecting shop. $265. 

Foreman, instrument repair shop, $240. 

Foreman, machine shop, Cristobal, $2 75. 

Foreman, marine machinist, inside, $265; out- 
iile, $300; Cristobal, $275. 

Foreman, plant machinist, $265. 

Foreman, molder, $290. 

Foreman, molder, assistant, $240. 

Foreman, oxy-acetylene, $250. 

Foreman, paint shop, $250. 

Foreman, painter, Cristobal, $200. 

Foreman, planing mill, $240. 

Foreman, power plant. S240. 

Foreman, roundhouse, $265; Cristobal. 5240. 

Foreman, roundhouse, night, $2 10; Cristobal, 
It85. 

Foreman, shipfitter. S265. 

Foreman, shipwright and dockmaster, $325; 
Cristobal, $285. 

Foreman, toolroom, $240. 

Foreman, yard. $200; Cristobal, $185. 

Master machinist, $325. 

Road foreman of equipment and general fore- 
Tian of roundhouses. $290. 

\\ reckmaster and rigger, $240. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



for the use of corn bread should be purchased scpa 
rately from that sold for mixing with wheat flour. 
Chester Harding, Governor 



Wheatless Mondays — Wheat Conservation. 
The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 18, 1918. 

To all concerned— Effective at once, "Wheat- 
less Mondays." established by circular of March 
11, 1918, are discontinued. 

It is still necessary to conserve wheat, and no 
wheat bread will be offered for sale by the com- 
missaries unkss it contains 20 per cent of wheat 
substitute. Xo flour will be sold by the com- 
missaries unless the buyer purchases at the same 
time one pound of wheat flour substitute for 
every 4 pounds of wheat flour purchased. These 
ire the same as the regulations in force at the 
present time. Married people are requested and 
urged to mix at least 20 per cent of the substitute 
iereals into the wheat flour at home for all uses. 

The above regulations are for the purpose of 
saving wheat flour, but they are not intended to 
displace the large use of corn bread. We must use 
the mixture with wheat flour in addition to our 
normal consumption of corn bread. Corn meal 



Materials and Supplies. 

The Panama Canal, 

EXECUTrVE OFFrCE, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 16, 1918 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

The necessity for standardization as regards 
sizes, etc., of Panama Canal material require- 
ments and disposal of surplus and obsolete ma- 
terial now carried in stock, with the end in view 
of facilitating material stock protection by the 
Supply Department, and reduction to the lowest 
possible figure of the value of material carried in 
stock, in order that material appropriations may 
be available for the purchase of essential com- 
modities, is becoming more apparent. 

The General Storekeeper has compiled stock 
protection sheets indicating all items now carried 
in stock in the various commodity classes. In 
order to facilitate future stock protection of all 
material; disposition of such surplus and obso- 
lete items as exists; standardization, insofar as 
practicable of sizes, etc., of material to be carried 
in the future in the several commodity classes, 
and, to definitely establish the identity of all 
material now in stock as regards its relationship 
to future stock protection, the General Store- 
keeper will arrange to indicate on stock sheets by 
proper symbol, the following data: 

(a) General stock material protected on the 

basis of past consumption. 
(6) General stock material to be protected on 
the basis of maximum and minimum quan- 
tities established. 

(c) Special material to be ordered only as 
required. 

(d) Material not to be reordered. 

(e) Obsolete material or material no longer 
required; efforts to dispose of which to the 
best interests of the Government should be 
made. 

You will please designate competent repre- 
sentatives who will be subject to the call of the 
General Storekeeper in conjunction with whorr 
the desired data will be obtained. 

Chester Harding, Governor 



Board of Appraisal. 

The Panama Canal, 

Executive Office, 
Balboa Heichts. C. Z., September 18, 1918 
Circular No. 630-7: 

1. The duties of the Board of Appraisers 
covered by Circular No. 630 6 are hereby ex- 
tended to include not only appraisals for sale, bul 
also such other appraisals as may be necessary in 
connection with transfer of equipment between 
departments and divisions of The Panama Canal, 
and to other departments of the Government, and 
where values are placed on floating equipment, 
a representative of the Board of Local Inspectors, 
designated by the Chairman of that Board, shall 
art as a member of this Board, which will here- 
after be known as the Board of Appraisal. 

2. All previous instructions and circulars in 
conflict with the above are canceled. 

Chester Harding, Governor 



^6 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Exportation ol Panaman Coins Prohibited. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 24, 1918. 
All concerned — By decree No. 17 of August 30, 
1917, the President of the Republic of Panama 
prohibited the exportation of Panaman silver 
coins or of bar silver made therefrom excepting 
ovith the permission of the Secretary of Finance 
and Treasury. The operation on this decree is 
effective in the Canal Zone and failure to respect 
and obey it on the part of employees of The 
Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad Company 
Till result in their discharge from the service. 
Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Acting Superintendent. 

The Panama Canal, 
Dept. of Operation and Maintenance, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 21, 1918. 
To all concerned — Effective September 21, 
i918, Mr. W. E. Maxon will be in charge of work 
if the Municipal Division in the Southern Dis- 
trict as Acting Superintendent. 

R. C. Hardman, 
Acting Municipal Engineer. 



Acting Municipal Engineer. 

The Panama Canal, 
Dept. of Operation and Maintenance, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 20, 1918. 
To all concerned — Effective September 21, 
i918, Mr. R. C. Hardman will be in charge of the 
work of the Municipal Division as Acting Muni- 
cipal Engineer during the absence of Mr. D. E. 
Wright, Muncipal Engineer, on leave. 

W. J. Douglas, 
Approved: Engineer of Maintenance. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



District Quartermaster, Gatun. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 18, 1918. 
All concerned — Effective Monday, September 
i3, Mr. Stanley R. Ford is appointed District 
Quartermaster at Gatun. 

R. K. Morris, 
Chief Quartermaster. 



Acting District Quartermaster, Pedro Mi- 
guel. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 16, 1918. 
All concerned — Effective September 16th, Mr. 
C. Peters is appointed Acting District Quarter- 
master for the Pedro Miguel-Paraiso district, 
stationed at Pedro Miguel. 

R. K. Morris, 
Chief Quartermaster. 



Misdirected Letters. 

The following insufficiently addressed letters 
and papers have been received in the office of the 
Director of Posts, and may be obtained upon 
request of the addressees. Requests may be 
made by telephone calling No. 182, Balboa: 
Bertz, Steve (G 33) Harvy,Miss Louise 

Chase, Mrs. T. C. Ovalle, Nestor Kuth 

Clarke, Alvin Price, S. J. 

Cunningham.Edward R. Ray, E. T., M. D. 
Douglas, Mrs. Edith Reardon, William A. 
Ennis, Oscar L. Scott, Ethel L. 

Falconer, Edgar (Box Small, Mrs. Marllie 

103) Thomas, J. E. 

Gallo, James Witt, Rev. S. (2) 

Hamilton. Elisa S. T. de 



Trading With The Enemy. 

War Trade Board, Washington, D. C 
The following changes in the Enemy Tradirt> 
List will be made as of date of September f 
1918: 

ADDITIONS. 

AROENTINA. 

Abdala Yabo y H^rmano Buenos Aires. 

Balet. J. Roger (or Jorge) Buenos Aires. 

Barbieri. Alberto Ayacucho. 

Cohen. Mauss, Levy & Coin- Buenos Aires. 

pany. 

Dreher, Julio Buenos Aires 

Duek & Cohen, Calle Azcuena- Buenos Aires. 

ga 6 E5. 

Duec, Simon Buenos Aires. 

Gomez. Boglietti & Company. . Buenos Aires. 

Guilbert (or Guibert), David & Buenos Aires. 

Company. 

Herber, Gustav Buenos Aires 

Hugel, Walter Concordia. 

Jacobi & Marx Buenos Airea 

Jacobi, Sigismundo (of Jacobi Buenos Aires* 

& Marx). 

*Marx, Mauricio (of Jacobi & Buenos Airea. 
Marx. 

Mussi, Francisco Buenos Airea 

Mutz, Santiago Buenos Airea 

Pernas Hermanos Santa Cruz. 

La Refinadora de Buenos Airea 

Schopflocker & Sichel Buenos Airea 

Van Hulsteyn, Vocke <fc Com- Buenos Aires. 

pany. 

Vendrell, Delfin Buenos Airea 

Zeitune (or Sehune) & Asbani . Buenos Airea 

BOLIVIA. 

Compania Boliviana de Wol- La Paz. 
from. 

Montano, Venancio Cochabamba 

Monterde, Manuel Sucre. 

Pastor, Juan Manuel La Paz. 

Rabdil, Alejandro Oruro. 

Schuett & Company La Paz. 

Schultz, G La Paz. 

Schultz, Henrich (La Estrella) . La Paz. 

Vasquez, Juan Potosi. 

Voss, Juan, San Ignacio Velasco. 

BRAZIL. 

Alves, J. B Rio Janeiro. 

Estabelecimento Industrial Rio de Janeiro 
Montana (E. Spiller, Jr.). 

Loeser, Carlos Aracaju. 

Samuel, Maurick) Manaos. 

Schaitza, Oscar & Company.. . . Porta Alegre. 

Stuck, Otto Sao Paulo. 

Tavares, M., & Arruda Corumba. 

CUBA. 

Quintana & Company, 24 St. Habana. 
Isidro St. 

ECUADOR. 

Riera, Martin Guayaquil. 

Sierra, Jose Guayaquil. 

GUATEMALA. 

"Esmeraldas" Plantation (Fin- Costa Cuca 

ca "Esmeraldas") Enrique 

Hermann). 
Frank, Victor, & Company Champerico 

HONDURAS. 

Abarca, R., Justo Amapala. 

MEXICO. 

Astrain, Valerio & Company. . . Pachuca. 

Berens, Alfredo Puebla. 

Boletin de Guerra. Mexico City. 

Boletin de Information Guadalajara. 

Botica del Zocalo (Rafael Diaz Orizaba. 

& Company). 

Brun, E. & Company Colima. 

Caamano, Nicolas (La Pren3a Orizaba. 

del Dia). 

Candado de Oro, El (Richard Orizaba. 

Hermanos). 

Casam & Primo Vera Cruz. 

CollignoD, Eduardo Guadalajara. 

*To be distinguished from Mauricio Emilio Man •* 
the Molineros Harineros y Elevadores de Granos. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



67 



Conti, Diaz (of Gugenheim & Mexico City. 
Bolareaque.) 

Denener, Adolfo Vera Cruz. 

Diaz Conti (of Gugenheim & Mexico City. 

Bolarc 

Diez (or Diaz), Rafael & Com- Orizaba. 

pany (Botica del Zocaloj. 

Giron. Miguel Tapachula. 

Goebel, Andres Mexico City. 

Hainbcrgo-Brcmense of Ham- Mexico City. 

burg. 

Illustration, La (Restoy, An- Tampico. 

dres). 

Iwerson, Emilio Mexico City. 

Keller, Erail Chihuahua. 

Kulhmami, Gustavo Colima. 

Meenen, Gerard Mexico City. 

Mendez, Auzustin Guadalajara. 

Cia Mercantil Occidental, S. A. Guadalajara. 

National Prussian of Stettin Mexico City. 

Las Novedades de Francia (Me- Orizaba. 

nendez y Hnos). 

Peterson y Witte Guadalajara. 

Prensa del Dia, La (Caamano, Orizaba. 

.Nicolas). 

Restoy, Andres (La Illustrac- Tampico. 

ion). 

Richard Hermanos (EI Canda- Orizaba. 

do de Oro). 

Ritter, Fernando Mexico City. 

Ruelas, Frederico Manzanilla. 

Ruclas, Ricardo Manzanilla. 

Schrempel. Juan Mexico City. 

Schweikhardt, Carlos Guadalajara. 

Sieber, Clcmente Saltillo. 

Volvre, Emilio Mexico City. 

Zawadski, Conrado Mexico City. 

MOROCCO. 

Suarez de Lorenzana, Alberto Melilla. 
(March 15, 1918.) 

PANAMA. 

Leer, Albert Bocas del Toro. 

PARAGUAY. 

Boecker, Carl Asuncion. 

Reverchon, Carlos Villarioa. 

SALVADOR. 

Meyer, Marcello San Miguel. 

SPAIN. 

Sociedad Navarra de Industrias Pampeluna. 

Aicarate, Cecileo Lodosa. 

Spontjes, Enrique Lodosa. 

VKNEZUELA. 

Paz, Carlos Valencia. 

Vargas, Eduardo Maracaibo. 

REMOVALS. 

BRAZIL. 

Nogueira, Candido & Company Sao Paulo. 

COLOMBIA. 

Kine Universal Barranquilla and Car- 
tagena. 

HAITI. 

Auxila, Paul E Port au Prince. 

PERI'. 

Talledo, Pedro Lima. 



Examinations by Board of Local Inspectors. 

For chauffeurs' licenses — At the Pacific end of 
the Canal Zone applicants will obtain authority 
for examination from the office of the Board of 
Local Inspectors, room 237, Administration 
Building, Balboa Heights; hours are from 8 to 
12 in the morning, and from 1 to 4 in the after- 
noon. The examination will then be given on 
application to the lire station at Balboa every 
Wednesday and Saturday, between 1.30 and 
4.30 p. m. 

At the Atlantic end, applicants will apply on 
Friday at the office of the Captain of the Port 
of Cristobal, at any time during office hours. 
The necessary forms may be obtained there, 
without application to the office at Balboa 
Height-;, and the test will be given as soon as the 
application is submitted and approved. 

Applicants must provide themselves with 
automobiles for the test. 



For licenses as motor boat navigators — Written 
examination is conducted every other Wednes- 
day in room 304, Balboa Heights, beginning at 
8 a. m., and on the Friday immediately following 
at the office of the Captain of the Port of Cris- 
tobal, from 9 a. m. until 3 p. m. Applications 
for examination must be submitted at least a 
day previous to the examination; forms may be 
obtained from the office of the board. Balboa 
Heights, or from the Captains of the Ports, or 
from the main office of the Dredging Division 
at Paraiso. 

Demonstration tests will be given on Thursday, 
the day between the written examinations, as 
follows: At Cristobal, by arrangement with the 
Captain of the Port; at Balboa, at 2 p. m., on 
application to the Captain of the Port; and at 
Gamboa, at 8 a. m., by the deputy inspector. 
Applicants must provide themselves with boats 
for the test. 

For licenses as pilots, masters, males, and marine 
engineers — Written examination only, and only 
at Balboa Heights, room 304, on the same day 
(Wednesday) as the written examination there 
for motor boat navigators. Forms must be sub- 
mitted not later than the day preceding, and may 
be obtained from the same offices as the forms for 
motor boat navigators. The next date on which 
examinations for these licenses and for navigators 
of motor boats will be conducted at Balboa Heights 
is Wednesday, October 2, l'M.s. 

Geo. J. Vanderslice, Recorder. 



French Cottage for Sale. 

Sale of Building No. 1007, Cristobal:— Sealed 
bids will be received in the office of the Chief 
Quartermaster, The Panama Canal, Balboa 
Heights, Canal Zone, up to 10 a. m., October 4, 
and then opened, for the purchaseof an old French 
cottaie located in Cristobal, Canal Zone. Size 
of building over-all is 28 feet by 34 feet. This is 
a 2-rooni cottage with bath; front and side 
porches; three windows in each room, and two 
doors leading to front porch. Timber in building 
appears to be in good shape. Galvanized iron 
roofing is in good shape. Building will be shown 
to prospective purchasers upon applying at the 
office of the District Quartermaster, Cristobal. 
All bids must be accompanied by 20 per cent of 
the amount bid as a guarantee for the faithful 
performance of the contract. Terms of the con- 
tract are that the successful bidder will be 
required to remove the building at his own 
expense within 30 days from acceptance of bid, 
and clean up the premises. The Panama Canal 
reserves the right to reject any or all bids. 



Stages of the Chagres and the Lakes. 

The maximum elevations of the Chagres River, 
Gatun Lake and Miraflores Lake, in feet above 
mean sealevel, during the two weeks ending at 
midnight of Saturday, September 21, were as 

follows: 



Date 



Chagres River Gatun Lake 

Alha- G.im- 
juela I boa 



Sun., Sept. 8 132 SO 

Mon., Sept. 9 132.75 

Tues., Sept. 10 .... 129.85 

Wed., Sept. 11 132 00 

Thurs., Sept. 12 . . . 130 .40, 

Fri., Sept. 13 130 50 

Sat., Sept. 14 130 90 

Sun., Sept. 15 134.00 

Mon., Sept. 16 130.25 

Tues., Sept. 17.... 133.60, 

Wed., Sept. 18 130.30 

Thurs., Sept. 19 ... 129.35 

Fri., Sept. 20 128.801 

Sit. Sept. 21 | (') I 



Vigia 



D7.05 
96 SO 

95 10 

96 08 
95 09 
95.23; 
95 . 12 

97 SO 
95.6 i 
97.70 
95.76 
94.44 
H3.35 
93.59 



Height of low water 126.0 91.0 
to nearest foot. 



85 30 
85.20 
85.24 
85 11 
85 20 
85.15 
85 15 

85.27 
85.29 

85.27 
85.14 

85.20 
85.25 



Gatun 



Mira- 
flores 
Lake. 



85.28 54.15 

85.18 54.31 

85.19 54.30 
85 is 54.22 
85 11 54.30 
85.14 53.74 
85.11 53.90 
85.21 54.00 

54.00 

85.21 54.15 

85.21 54.07 

85.14 54.12 

85.15 54.00 
85.14 53.75 



Vigia phone out of order. 



68 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



August Rainfall for Three Years. 



Rainfall from August 1 to 31, 1918, Inclusive. 





INCHES. 


















""J 
























bO 


-p 


3 


Stations. 










a 


to 




1916 


1917 


1918 


> 
03 

a 
o 

"5 


03 


OS 
T3 
>> 

a 


Pacific section — 








1 




Balboa 


11.69 


6.27 


3.75 


7.62 20 


14 


Balboa Heights. 


10.53 


7.42 


3.84 


7.81 22 


14 


Miraflores 


10.52 


9.45 


5.70 


8.57 10 


14 


Pedro Miguel . 


9.78 


9.51 


4.41 


8.32 11 


IV 


Rio Grande . . . 


6.34 


10.28 


5.52 


9.40 14 


19 


Central section — 














Culebra 


5.05 


9.97 


4.91 


10.05 


27 


22 




6.62 


9.95 


6.81 


9.49 


13 


28 




5.66 


8.76 


5.18 


9.16 


15 


21 




12.22 


12.62 


8.59 


11.90 


36 


25 




12.81 


15.30 


11.36 


11.92 


8 


22 




10.98 


13.32 


9.17 


12.51 


20 


26 




11.60 
7.63 


15.71 
9.71 


10.25 
8.91 


12.67 
10.27 


10 

7 


21 




23 




10.37 


16.35 


5.81 


10.51 


11 


18 


Monte Lirio.. . 


10.50 


12.83 


11.82 


11.87 


11 


27 


Atlantic section — 














Gatun . . . 


5.97 


17.81 


17.9S 


14.34 


14 


27 


Brazos Brook 


6.42 


19.71 


19.20 


14.71 


13 


29 




8.34 


15.79 


18.85 


15.00 


18 


26 



Applications for Family Quarters. 

Applications of gold roll employees for family 
quarters were on file on August 31, 1918, as fol- 
lows: 



Stations. 



Ancon . . . 
Paraiso. . 

Empire . . 
Gatun . . . 
Cristobal . 

Total 



Number of 
applications. 



(21) 
(2) 



105 

14 

1 

2 

57 (22) 



179 (45) 



Note — The figures in parentheses show the 
number of applicants already occupying regular 
or nonhoi'sekeeping family quarters at stitions 
other than those at which applications are filed. 



Stations. 


a 

a . 
1-3 


o3 
"3 
Q 


o . 

"* 2 

o S 


Pacific section — 


Ins. 
1.34 
1 44 
1.07 
2.74 
.85 
.92 

1.12 
1.39 
1.25 
1.05 
2.36 
1.48 
1.65 
1.50 
2.00 
1.59 
1.74 

2.99 
2.31 
3.83 
5.19 


4 
1 
4 
1 
1 
2 

1 

2 
1 
26 
1 
13 
26 
26 
23 
28 
13 

3 
13 
26 

6 


Ins. 
3.03 




3.75 




3.84 




5 70 




4.41 




5.52 


Central section — 


4.91 




6 81 




5.18 




8.59 




11.36 




9.17 


*E1 Vigia 


10.25 




7.83 




8.91 




5.81 




11.82 


Atlantic section — 


17.93 




19.20 




18.85 




13.83 



♦Standard rain gauge — readings at 5 p. m. daily. 
Automatic rain gauge at unstarred stations — values, 
midnight to midnight. 
^Standard rain gauge— readings at 8 a. m. daily. 



Additions to Commissary Stock. 

Automobile accessories: 

Black-lac, qt., tin $1.30 

Carbon remover, pt., tin 75 

Cleaner, No. 1 , tin 38 

Jacks. Jiffy, auto., ea 3.05 

Baskets, clothes, No. 2, oval, ea 96 

Baskets, clothes, No. 3, oval, ea 1 00 

Brushes, nursing bottle, ea 05 

Brushes, water closet, ea 17 

Knives, pocket, ea 59 

Grates for New Perfection stoves, ea 33 

Blue, laundry, is pkg 08 

Candy, chiclets, Adam's, pkg 04 

Butter, peanut, 30-oz., jar 44 



COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Quarterly Inventory for Retail Commissaries. 

The regular quarterly inventory will be taken in all retail commissaries on Sep- 
tember 30. In order to accommodate customers the cold storage and grocery 
departments will oe checked first and opened for business not later than 10 a. m., 
October 1; the other sections will be opened as soon thereafter as possible. 

Men's Clothing. 

An item recently appeared in these columns relative to the anticipated marked 
advance in prices of men's clothing. It was then believed that while prices would go 
as high as $75 the suit, they would not, except in rare instances, exceed this sum. 
It is authoritatively stated, however, in a recent issue of a prominent journal devoted 
to men's wear that $100 the suit is not expected to create any comment next year 
in the wholesale trade, although, of course, such a price will obtain only where the 
finest imported fabric is used. As high as $12.20 a yard is known to have been paid 
already for certain English fabrics, and this is said not to be a high- water mark by any 
means. , , . . 

In this connection the attention of Commissary patrons is invited to the large 
and complete stock of English woolens on sale in the retail stores. Were this material 
available in the United States, it is believed that in some cases prices would be almost 
three times as high as those for which the goods are sold here. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 69 

Watermelons. 

The commissary purchasing agent has advised that no more shipments of water- 
melons will be made this year, the season having closed. He also stales that he could 
find no plums in shipping condition to forward. 

Native Chocolate. 

The native chocolate made on the Panama Canal plantation and sold in the 
commissaries is unadulterated and rich in fat. It is meeting with ready sales in the 
line stores. .^______ 

Papaya. 

The commissaries are now obtaining papaya in large and steadily increasing 
quantities from Bracho Plantation. About 12,000 pounds monthly are being 
received but this is insufficient to take care of the demand so that it is necessary 
for the Local Buyer also to buy this product in the Panama markets. 

Apple Sauce. 

There is still on hand in the line stores a considerable slock of apple sauce put up 
in the industrial laboratory. This comes in 10-ounce jars and is retailed at 10 cents 
The sauce is n ade from a variety which is good dessert fruit and it is believed will 
be in large request after commissary customers become better acquainted with its 
merits. ^^^^^^^^_^ 

China. 

The British manufacturers from whom a fine quality of china is received, have 
given notice that it is necessary again to revise their charges on account of the high 
cost of bone and coal. Their cheap china, verv little of which is received here, will be 
subject to an advance of 100 per cent. Their high-grade porcelains will go up. in 
price approximately 66f per cent. In most pieces, however, the C ommissary Division 
is well protected so that no general increase need be made for some time. 

Hosiery. 

From an authoritative source comes the information that the present uncertainty 
as regards Government requirements is < ausing hosiery mills in the United States to 
turn down a considerable amount of Business. 

While buyers are anxious to place liberal orders the nulls will not accept them. 

It is further stated that few retailers have enough stock on hand to meet require- 
ments and with the mill men refusing orders a serious shortage is likely to result. 

The reason given by the manufacturers for their unwillingness to accent orders is 
that should they begin civilian work and then be compelled to fill Government require- 
ments the change would necessitate a great expense and the taking of large quanti- 
ties of yarn out of use for the time being. 



Books, Cards, and Gift Stationery. 

A requisition for a large number of books for juveniles and adults; for Xew Year 
cards; for gift stationery; and for a small quantity of toys for the holiday trade, 
has just been sent to Xew York. 

The total amount of this year's Christmas order is much less than formerly. 1 lus 
is in line with the recommendations of the Council of National Defense that useless 
giving at Christmas time be discouraged and that money ordinarily wasted on presents 
of doubtful utility be saved and invested in Thrift Stamps and \\ ar Saving Stamps. 

Even in the midst of war, of course, there are times when gift-giving is desirable, 
if not absolutelv necessary, but with the full and varied lines ordinarily earned by the 
Commissary Division and the few extras that will be secured for the holiday season, 
it is believed that customers will have ample opportunity to make suitable selections. 

Persons may ascertain whether certain articles, which they desire to buy, will be 
carried by making inquiries at their local store. 

Flour and Bread. 

Late advices received from the Federal Food Administration explain certain 
phases of the wheat conservation program which is believed are not fully under- 
stood by commissary customers. . , 

Substitutes sold with wheat ilour in the ratio of 1 pound to 4 pounds are to be used 
io making bread. No all-wheat bread ia to be baked, a mixture to be used m every 



70 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

case, which action will be voluntarily enforced in all patriotic households. It has 
been reported that a number of persons in the Canal Zone use substitutes they are 
obliged to duv, for purposes other than bread mixtures. For instance, rice is served 
as a cereal and in other ways instead of being combined in proper proportions to make 
Victoiy bread; likewise rolled oats, oatmeal, buckwheat flour, corn starch etc are 
not being generally used for the purpose intended. The Food Administration ^oes 
so far as to say that even when corn meal is bought, it must not be used exclusively 
for corn bread on the presumption that if it is used it will be satisfactory at other 
times to make all-wheat bread; a mixture with wheat flour must be used in addition 
to the normal consumption of corn bread. 

War Books. 

_ Asked to name 25 books of history and general literatui e dealing with the war which 
in their opinion would be of permanent value, a number of literary critics and history 
experts sent in lists to The Bookman and their selections are as interesting as, to the 
aveiage person, unusual. 

The Literary Editor of the Chicago Tribune names the following personal experi- 
ence books, which have been or will be sold in the commissaries: "The First Hundred 
Thousand," by Ian Hay; "Kitchener's Mob," by James Norman Hall; "Under 
Fire," by Henri Barbusse; "The Glory of the Trenches," and "Carry On," by 
Comngsby Dawson. Two books which have attained the greatest sale* are ignored 
by this critic— -"Over the Top" and "Mr. Britiing Sees it Through;" he states that 
he thought of including the latter but came to the belief that it contained little of 
value, either as fiction, philosophy or as a picture of conditions. 

In poetry he prefers "Ardours and Endurances," by Robert Nichols to the poems 
of Rupert Brooks, Alan Seeger, or John Mascfield, as does also the Literary Editor 
of the New York Sun. The latter places second on his list "The Old Huntsman," 
by Siegfried Sasson, which is now on order by the Commissary Division. 

for his personal experience books he thinks Barbusse's "Under Fire," and "Winged 
Warfare," by Major Bishop are best — the retail stoies will have these for sale shortly. 
"The Amazing Interlude" by Mary Roberts Rinehart is also cited as good var fiction. 
His other recommendations concern books, technical and journalistic, and essays and 
war history, the demand for which so far has not been sufficient to warrant carrying 
them in stock. 




will be sold m the commissaries, will provide the nucleus of essential war books 
that have particular value. 



RECIPES. 
Cream of Lima Bean Soup. 

1 cup dried lima beans 2 tablespoonfuls fat 

3 pints cold water 2 tablespoonfuls flour 

2 slices onion 1 teaspoonful salt. 

4 slices carrot _ i teaspoonful pepper. 

1 cup cream or milk 

Soak beans over night; in the morning drain and add cold water; cook until soft, 
and rub through a sieve. Cut vegetables in small cubes, and cook five minutes in 
half the fat, remove vegetables, add flour, salt, and pepper, and stir into boiling soup. 
Add cream, reheat, strain, and add remaining fat in small pieces. 

Wafer Corn Bread. 

2 cups corn meal 1 tablespoon lard compound 
2 teaspoors baking powder 1 egg 

1 teaspoon salt 3 cup St. Charles* milk 

2 tablespoons molasses (if desired) 1 \ cups water. 

Mix thoroughly corn meal, baking powder, and salt. Add melted lard compound, 
molasses, well-beaten egg and milk. Beat well. Pour into greased shallow pans 
(the batter should be about ?-inch deep) and bake in hot oven until brown on both 
sides. The bread should be less than £-inch thick when baked. 



Postal Address of The Panama Canal. 

The postal address is. "The Panama Canal. Balboa Heights, Canal Zone." or "The Panama Canal. 
Washington. D. C." 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreim, $1.50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal. Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter, February 6. 1018, at the Post office 

at Cristobal, C. Z , under the Act of March :i, 1879. 





Volume XII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 2, 191 8. No. 7. 

Duty on Goods Taken Into United States by Employees. 

Employees returning from the United States sometimes complain 
that they have been forced to pay customs duty on piece goods of 
wool, linen, or other material intended to be made up into suitings, 
and that the SI 00 exemption is not considered by customs inspectors 
of the United States. The Chief of the Division of Civil Affairs took 
up this matter with the Division of Customs, Treasury Department, 
and has received the following reply dated August 26, 1918: 

The Department is in receipt of your letter of the 8th instant, in which you state 
that employees of The Panama Canal, returning from vacations in the United States, 
occasionally complain that they arc forced to pay duty on piece goods of wool, linen! 
or other material intended to be made up into suitings, even when the total value 
of merchandise brought in by them comes within the ^$100 exemption allowed each 
passenger. 

As purchases of the kind described by you are usually passed under the Si 00 
exemption, the Department does not understand why collectors of customs should 
assess duty thereon. If you will furnish the particulars of a specific case, or cases, 
naming the port where duty was collected, an investigation will be made." 

Regulations Governing Exports of Conserved Commodities from the United 
States Insular Possessions and Panama Canal Zone. 

War Trade Board, 
Washington, September 16, 1918. 
The War Trade Board announce the following regulations with 
respect to the exportation from the insular possessions of the United 
States and the Panama Canal Zone of conserved commodities origi- 
nating in the continental United States: 

1. No export license shall be granted foi the exportation from an insular possession 
of the United Stat( s or tic 1 nal Zone of any conserved commodity (com- 
modities included in the export conservator list) which has originated in the con- 
tim ntal I nited State?, unless an application has been made and the license for such 
exportation has been obi ir to the shipment of the said commodity from the 
continental territory of the United Si ites. 

2. When application is m license to export a conserved commoditv from 
any insular possession of the United States or ( he Panama Canal Zone, the application 
must be accompanied b\ nee showing whether the commodity to 
be exported originated intl ecpntinenti 1 United States. If the commodity originated 
in the continental United States, the date on wl ich it was shipped to the insular 
possessions or the Panama Canal Zone should be shown in the evidence which 
accompanie s the applical ' 

3. The foregoing regulations shall not apply to the exportation of small quantities 
of conserved commodities, such as it has been customary to ship, in carrying on the 
normal local commerce between any of tl e insular possessions of the United States or 
the Panama Canal Zone and near-by foreign countries. 

Vance C. McCormick, Chairman. 

Address of Ordnance Depot and Armament Officer. 
The offices of the Commanding Officer, Panama Ordnance Depot, 
and the Armament Officer, Panama Armament District, have been 
moved to Corozal, and mail for these offices should be addressed 
accordingly. 



72 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Passports for Subjects of Spain. 

Panama, September 17, 1918. 
Sir: You would oblige me greatly by giving notice to the corre- 
sponding authorities, whose duty it is to grant permits to leave the 
country, through the ports of Balboa and Cristobal, that due to orders 
received from the Embassy of His Majesty the King of Spain, at 
Washington, D. C, all passports to Spanish subjects will be issued 
by this Consulate only, cancelling, therefore, from this date on, the 
authorizations granted by this Legation, to the other Consular 
Agencies in the Republic of Panama. 
I am, Sir, 

Yours very truly, 

Luis San Simon y Ortega, 
Vice-Consul of Spain and in Charge of the Legation. 
To the Hon. C. A. Mcllvaine, 

Executive Secretary of The Panama Canal, 
Balboa Heights. 



Red Cross Election. 

A very regrettable error occurred in furnishing copy to the printer 
for the Red Cross Election ballots distributed last week through 
The Panama Canal Record in leaving off the ticket the names of 
the candidates for Vice Chairman. A separate ticket for Vice Chair- 
man containing the names of S. P. Verner. W. J. Daglish, and Gerald 
D. Bliss will be printed immediately and issued with copies of this 
week's The Panama Canal Record. Upon receipt of the ballots 
members of the Red Cross will please vote for one Vice Chairman 
and send the ballot to the Red Cross Election Committee, Balboa 
Heights. 

Piano for Balboa Playground. 

The Balboa Playground Association, by means of a dance, has 
raised enough money to purchase a piano for the use of the various 
classes in the drills, calisthenics, and folk dances in the playground 
shed. A piano has been secured and will be placed in the shed in a 
well-protected receptacle within a few days. 

It is now desired that a few ladies volunteer to play the piano for an 
hour each morning, the hours of play being from 9 to 11, to assist the 
directress and assistant in their work with the children. With over 
100 children to be instructed by the directress and assistant, it is 
readily seen that they have no time for piano work. 

The awakening of a community interest in the playground work has 
been manifested during the past week, when three ladies volunteered 
to assist in kindergarten work. This spirit of cooperation is com- 
mendable and shows appreciation on the part of the public in the work 
being done by the Government here for the children of its employees. 

Volunteers should send or give their names to Miss Pugh, the play- 
ground directress, or to Mr. T. S. Booz, at the Balboa Clubhouse. 



W.S.S 



HELP YOUR COUNTRY 

BUY WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 

On Sale At All Canal Zone Post Offices 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



73 



Joint Commission. 



Decision of the Umpire. 

In the matter of the claim of John J. 
Gibbons for 25 hectares of the property 
known as "El Guayabal." 

Decision of the Umpire, award No. 
185, docket No. 1365. 

On June 14, 1913. John J. Gibbons filed 
his claim before the Joint Commission 
for the tract of land known as "El Guay- 
abal" expropriated by the Government 
of the United States for Canal purposes. 
The lands in question comprise 789 hec- 
tares, 50 of which were not considered 
by the Commission at the trial of this 
case on account of a conflict as to their 
ownership which existed between the 
claimant and the heirs of Filomena Car- 
rillo de Carbone who were claimants also 
before the Joint Commission, having filed 
their claim on July 17, 1914, for an 
adjoining property known as "Guana- 
bano." In making the award for the 
"Guayabal" tract the Commission de- 
cided to postpone the appraisal and pay- 
ment of the 50 hectares in conflict until 
such time as a settlement could be reached 
between the parties, or until the conflict 
could be otherwise decided. 



On April 8, 1918, when the "Guana- 
bano" claim came on for hearing, the 
heirs of Filomena C. de Carbone stated 
that they had reached an agreement with 
John J. Gibbons as to the ownership of 
the 50 hectares in conflict, and requested 
die Commission to appraise 25 hectares 
which belonged to them by virtue of this 
agreement, and include payment there- 
for in the award for the "Guanabano" 
tract. The 25 hectares belonging to John 
J. Gibbons were not passed upon at this 
time. 

On April 30, 1918, the Commission 
made an award in the sum of S36.620 in 
favor of the heirs of Filomena Carrillo de 
Carbone, and in compliance with their 
request, included in this award the value 
of the 25 hectares above referred to. 

The Commission met on July 10, 
1918, to consider the claim of John J. 
Gibbons for the 25 hectares belonging to 
him, but were unable to reach an agree- 
ment as to the value, the discrepancy 
being between S29.65 and S60 per hec- 
tare. The first figure is the valuation 
placed upon the property by Honorable 
Burt New, .Member of the Joint Com- 
mission on the part of the United States. 
His colleague did not join in this opinion 
nor did he file an opinion of his own. The 
second figure represents the appraisal of 



El Arbitro de la Comisi6n Mixta de 
Tierras Estados Unidos de Ameri- 
ca— Repiiblica de Panama, Pan- 
ama. 

Reclamacidn de John J. Gibbons por 
25 hectdrcas de tierra, pertenecientes a la 
finca "El Guayabal" tambien de su pro- 
piedad. 

Decisidn del Arbitro fallo No. 185 
expediente No. 1365. 

El 14 de Junio de 1913, John J. 
Gibbons, dueno del predio denominado 
"El Guayabal," presento una reclama- 
tion ante la Comision Mixta con moti- 
vo de la expropiacion de dicha propie- 
dad por parte del Gobierno de los Esta- 
dos Unidos, para los usos del Canal. 

Las tierras en cuestion comprendfan 
789 hectareas, de las que, al celebrarse 
la vista para su fallo, el 19 de Junio de 
1916, se descontaron 50 hectareas en con- 
troversia con los herederos de Filomena 
Carrillo de Carbone, reclamantes tam- 
bien ante la Comision Mixta desde 17 
de Julio de 1914, por la expropiacion de 
su finca denominada "El Guanabano" 
colindante con la de John J. Gibbons. 

Al fallar la Comision la reclamacion 
del "Guayabal" en 7 de Agosto de 1916, 
lo hizo aplazando el avaluo de las 50 hec- 
tareas en controversia, interin se ponian 
en claro los derechos a las mismas o se 
llegaba a un arreglo por parte de los 
litigantes. 

Al tocar el turno a la reclamaci6n del 
"Guanabano," el 8 de Abril de 1918, 
los herederos de Filomena Carrillo de 
Carbone, declararon haber llegado a un 
arreglo con John J. Gibbons acerca de 
las 50 hectareas en desacuerdo delas que, 
25 les correspondian a ellos, y solicitaron 
su avaluo y pago con el resto de la re- 
clamacion; y las otras 25 quedaban a la 
disposition de John J. Gibbons. 



El 30 de Abril del afio corriente, la 
Comision fallo la reclamacion del "Gua- 
nabano" abonando a los herederos de Fi- 
lomena Carrillo de Carbone, la suma 
de 836,620 por las 863 hectareas que 
formaban la finca, incluyendo en aque- 
11a suma las 25 hectareas discutidas. 

La Comision se reunio el 10 de Julio 
proximo pasado, para decidir acerca de 
las 25 hectareas pertenecientes a John 
J. Gibbons, pero no llcgo a ponerse de 
acuerdo respecto del valor, resultando 
una divergencia entre §29.65 y $60 por 
hectarea. 

De la primera cifra es sustentante 
uno de los miembros de la Comision 
(Honorable Burt New) por parte de los 
Estados Unidos; su companero se ha 
abstenido de adherirse a ella y no ha 
emitido la suya propia. Ambos miem- 



74 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



both the Panamanian members. Briefs 
have also been filed in this case by the 
attorneys for the Government of the 
United States as well as by counsel for 
the claimant. 

The Commissioner on the part of the 
United States in his written opinion states 
that he estimated the value of these 25 
hectares in accordance with the appraisal 
of the property of the heirs of Filomena 
Carrillo de Carbone. In this case the 
Guanabano tract was considered as a 
whole, no distinction being made as to 
the different sections. The improve- 
ments belonging to the claimants were 
valued at $10,925 and the lands them- 
selves at $25,695. The land, therefore, 
was appraised at the rate of $29.65 per 
hectare, which valuation he considers 
just in this case. 

The Commissioners on the part of 
Panama in their written opinion maintain 
that these 25 hectares should be appraised 
in accordance with the precedents es- 
tablished by the Commission in several 
awards, among which was the award for 
the "Guayabal" tract to which the 25 
hectares, subject of this claim, belonged. 
They state over their signature, that in 
the appraisal of this pioperty they divided 
the 739 hectares which it comprised, into 
three sections, placing a valuation of $60 
per hectare on the section adjacent to the 
Cruces Road and the Guanabano River 
at its southernmost part, and $30 and 
$15 per hectare on the remaining sections 
according to their location. 

In estimating the value of the land 
claimed by the heirs of Filomena Car- 
rillo de Carbone, they state that they 
proceeded in the same manner; that is 
to say, they divided the 863 hectares into 
three sections, and appraised the value of 
each section according to its location. The 
figure obtained as a result of this division 
seemed equitable to their American col- 
* leagues who accepted it, and the award 
was paid without delay. 

The Panamanian members conclude 
their argument as follows: "The Com- 
mission having thus awarded on four 
different occasions and without any pro- 
test, the sum of $60 a hectare for land 
situated in the vicinity of the Cruces 
Road, the Paso Real de Cardenas and the 
Guanabano River, and the undersigned 
being of the opinion that the said ap- 
praisal constitutes a just and equitable 
precedent, we believe that John J. Gib- 
bons is entitled to an indemnity of $1 ,500 
for the 25 hectares belonging to him, in 
the lot of land in conflict with Mrs. 
Filomena C. de Cat bone, situated be- 
tween the Cruces Road and the Guana- 
bano River to the north of the Paso 
Real de Cardenas." 



bros por Panama sostienen la segunda. 

Tanto los abogados de parte del Go- 
bierno de los Estados Unidos como el 
del reclamante han presentado al Arbi- 
tro alegatos escritos sustentando cada 
cual los derechos de sus representados. 

El Comisionado de los Estados Uni- 
dos, en su opinion escrita, manifiesta 
que para el avaluo de esta reclamacion, 
se ha atenido al establecido en la de los 
herederos de Filomena Carrillo de Car- 
bone. Expone que las tierras fueron 
consideradas en globo, sin tomar en con- 
sideracion la diferente situacion de las 
mismas; y distinguiendo solo por razon 
de las mejoras, han correspondido a los rec- 
lamantes en concepto de estas $10,925 
y por las tierras en si $25,695 de ma- 
nera que esta ultima suma deja un 
cuociente de $29.65 por hectarea, a cuyo 
precio se atiene 

Los miembros por Panama, en su 
opinion tambien escrita, aseguran ajus- 
tarse en este avaluo a los precedentes 
establecidos por la Comision en diver- 
sos fallos, entre otros, precisamente el 
mismo de la reclamacion del "Guayabal," 
a cuya finca pertenecian las 25 hecta- 
reas objeto de la presente. Aseguran, 
bajo su firma. que para el avaluo de di- 
cha reclamacion procedieron dividiendo 
el lote de las 739 hectareas de que se 
componia, en tres partes: abonando a 
razon de $60 por hectarea. por las 
adyacentes al Camino de las Cruces y 
al Rio Guanabano en su parte meridio- 
nal, y el resto, segun su situacion, entre 
$30 y $15 por hectarea. 

Con respecto a la reclamacion de los 
herederos de Filomena Carrillo de Car- 
bone, afirman haber procedido de la 
misma manera, dividiendo las 863 hec- 
rareas con respecto a su situacion, y ava- 
luandolas en su conformidad, arribaron 
de esta suerte a una cifra total que, so- 
met ido a sus Colegas de los Estados Uni- 
dos, merecio su aceptacion y fue pagada 
sin reparo. 

"Los miembros panamenos terminan 
su alegato: "Habiendo pagado pues la 
Comision en cuatro ocasiones difer- 
entes y sin protesta de nadie, la suma de 
$60 por hectarea al avaluar las tier- 
ras situadas en las inmediaciones del 
Camino de las Cruces, Paso Real de 
Cardenas y Rio Guanabano; y pare- 
ciendo a los . subscriptos Comisionados 
que este avaluo constituye un preceden- 
te justo y equitativo, somos de opin- 
ion que John J Gibbons tiene derecho 
a una indemnizacion de $1,500 por 
las 25 hectareas que le corresponden 
de un lote de terreno en conflicto con 
Filomena C. de Carbone, situado en- 
tre el Camino de las Cruces y el Rio 
Guanabano, al Norte del Paso Real 
de Cardenas." 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



75 



It is evident that both sides proceeded 
with the appraisal of this land in a manner 
which each considered consistent with 
his own views, and the discrepancy, 
therefore, is the result of the method by 
which each arrived at the same valuation. 

Taking into consideration the views 
expressed in my award of October 13, 
1917, with regard to the manner of ap- 
praising the values of 1903, eliminating 
from consideration all speculative values 
of 1912, in my opinion, .S2 ( '.65 and §60 
per hectare can not in the present case 
represent a difference between values 
prior to 1903 and after 1912. That $60 
per hectare does not represent 1912 
values is proven by the fact that the 
owners of the "Guaya*bal" tract in 
estimating the value of their property 
as of that date, claimed at the rate of 
$200 per hectare. 

Believing that the disagreement be- 
tween the Pananamian Commissioners 
and the Commissioner on the part of the 
United States is one of calculation, and 
not of principle; and 

Considering that the only opinion filed 
by : he Commissioners on the part of the 
United States clearly states the cause 
of the difference in the appraisal of the 
25 hectares, subject of this claim; and 



Considering that the Panamanian 
members in dividing laige tracts into 
sections and appraising the value of each 
section according to its location, have 
adhered to a precedent established by the 
Commission, and maintained in my 
decision of October 13, 1917, above 
referred to; and 



Consideiing that the 50 hectares in 
conflict represent not only the best 
located section of the tract, but also 
the most valuable, it being the only 
section of the property upon which im- 
provements were located, as stated by 
the Attorney for the Government of the 
United States during the course of the 
trial of the "Guayabal" claim which 
began en Jure 19, 1°16 (page 7 of the 
Transcript ) ; 

1 agree with tie Panamanian members 
that John J. Gibbons is entitled in justice 
and equity to tin- sum of $1,500 for 25 
hectares belonging to him of the lot of 
land in conflict with the heirs of Filomena 
Carrillo de Carbone. 



A mhos puntos de vista, como se ve, 
seinspiran en laequidad yen lo que cada 
uno estima consecuente con sus propias 
resoluciones. Ahora bien, la discrepancia 
estriba en el diferente procedimiento 
por el que cada cua! arribo a la misma 
cifra. 

Teniendo en consideracion lo sentado 
en mi laudo de 13 de Octubre de 1917, 
acerca de la manera de apreciar los va- 
lores de "1903" en contraposicion con 
los de especulacion llamados de "1912," 
abolidos de piano en mi referido laudo; 
no considero que la diferencia entre 
$29.65 y $60 por hectarea, con res- 
pecto a tierras como las de que se trata, 
envuelvan una disparidad de principio; 
y lo prueba el hecho de que apoyandose 
en esos valores de "1912" se reclamaba 
por el "Guayabal" a razon de $200 por 
hectarea. 

Considerando pues, que la dispari- 
dad entre los Comisionados panamenos 
y uno de los de los Estados Unidos, 
entiendo, no es de principio, sino de 
calculo; 

Considerando que la t'mica opinion 
de parte de uno de los miembros de la 
Comision por los Estados Unidos, pone 
claramente de manifiesto la causa de 
la disparidad en la apreciacion del ava- 
luo de las 25 hectareas objeto de esta 
reclamacion; 

Considerando que los miembros de 
la Comision por parte de Panama, tra- 
tandose, como se trata, de una gran 
area, a! dividir las tierras con respecto 
a su situacion, para proceder a su ava- 
luo, se han atenido a una regla esta- 
blecida y puesta en practica por la Co- 
mision y adoptada para mis fallos en 
mi mencionado laudo de 13 de Octu- 
bre de 1917; 

Considerando que las 50 hectareas en 
ill- put a represent aban no solo la parte 
mejor situada de la finca, sino la mas 
valiosa, por razon de ser la unica cul- 
tivada de! "Guayabal, segun lo mani- 
festo el Abogado del Gobierno de los 
Estados Unidos, en la vista de la re- 
clamacion de dicha finca el 19 de Junio 
de 1916 (Pagina 7 del testimonio); 



Poi tanto: vengo en otorgar a John 
J. Gibbons, como just a y equitativa 

compensacion por las IS hectareas que 
le corresponden de las 50 en conflict o 
con los herederos de Filomena Carrillo 
de Carl lone, la suma de Mil Ouinientos 
Dollars ($1,500). 



Therefore, an award is hereby made against the United States of America in 
favor of John J. Gibbons in the sum of $1,500, United States currency, for all 
right, title, and interest the said John J. Gibbons may possess or may have 
possessed in and to one-half of the 50-hectare lot of land in conflict between 



76 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



John J. Gibbons and the heirs of Filomena Carrillo de Carbone, and comprised 
within the property known as "El Guayabal," covered by claim docket No. 
1365, including any and all damages sustained on account of the expropriation 
of this property by the United States of America . 

This award shall be paid on or before the 1st day of November, 1918, and if 
payment or tender of payment is not made on or before that date, said award 
shall thereafter bear interest at the rate of 6 per centum per annum until paid. 



Done in English and Spanish in the 
National Palace, Panama, on the first 
day of October, 1918. 
(Sgd.) Manuel Walls y Merino, 

Umpire. 



(Sigue la orden de pago a favor del 
reclamante.) 

Dado en espahol y en ingles, en el Pa- 
lacio Nacional de Panama a 1° de Oc- 
tubredel918. 

(Fdo) Manuel Walls y Merino, 

A rbitro. 



Official Circulars. 



Appointment. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 27, 1918. 
Circular No: 661-64: 

Mr. Elwood P. Sine is appointed Collector of 
The Panama Canal, effective September 21, 
1918, vice Mr. Thomas L. Clear, resigned. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Appointment. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 26, 1918. 
Circular No. 661-63: 

Effective this date, Mr. Frederic E. Williams is 
appointed a member of the Board of Admeasure- 
ment, vice Lieut. Clarence W. Chaddock, U. S. N., 
relieved from duty with The Panama Canal. 
Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Increase in Ocean Freight Rates. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Accounting Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 20, 1918. 
R. A. Circular No 593: 

To all agents — The freight rates on the Panama 
Railroad Steamship Line between New York and 
the Isthmus have been increased by 25 per cent 
on the ocean rate and the new rates are covered 
by the following tariffs and supplements: 

1. New York to Colon and Cristobal Supple- 
ment ^ T o. 1 to Tarjff No. 25, effective September 9. 

2. New York to Panama City Supplement No. 
4 to Tariff No. 21, effective September 12. 

3. Panama City to New York Tariff No. 27, 
effective September 10 cancelling Tariff No. 24. 

4. Colon and Cristobal to New York Tariff No. 
26 cancellirgTariff No. 23, and Supplement No. 1 
to Tariff No. 26, both effective September 10. 

There is to be no increase in the railroad's pro- 
portion of the Panama City rates, and for that 
reason it will be necessary to change the per- 
centages used for dividing the freight revenue 
between the railroad and the steamship line which 
were 38 per cent to the railroad and 62 per cent 
to the steamship line. 

Effective with the dates on which the new rates 
went into effect as above, the division between 
the railroad and the steamship line will be 32 per 
cent to the railroad and 68 per cent to the steam- 
ship line. 

Please acknowledge receipt of this circular, and 
advise if you have received the above tariffs and 
supplements. 

H. A. A. Smith, 

Auditor. 



Clubhouses Will Accept Bond Subscriptions. 

The Panama Canal, 

Accounting Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 28, 1918. 
Memorandum to all Clubhouse Secretaries: 
Effective at once and during the Fourth Liberty 
Loan drive it will be permissible for clubhouse 
secretaries to accept cash subscriptions for Lib- 
erty Loan Bonds in amount of $50 or multiples 
thereof. 

You will use the regular receipt form 5128, and 
take up same in your cash book under special 
account headed "Fourth Liberty Loan sub- 
scriptions." Remittances will be made in the 
usual manner and at the close of the drive you 
will issue a voucher in favor of the Treasurer, 
Liberty Loan Committee ,for the amount of such 
collections. 

H. A. A. Smith, 
Auditor, The Panama Canal. 



Old Rubber Stamps. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 27. 1918. 
To all concerned — It is respectfully requested 
that all old rubber stamps no longer required in 
the various offices of The Panama Canal and 
The Panama Railroad Company, be forwarded to 
The Panama Canal Press, Mount Hope, where 
they can be utilized to good advantage. 

R. K. Morris. 
Chief Quartermaster. 



Observance of "Liberty Day." Fourth 
Liberty Loan. 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 25, 1918. 

All concerned — October 12 has been designated 
by the President of the United States as Liberty 
Day for the Fourth Liberty Loan. The local 
committee has decided to hold a parade and gen- 
eral rally at the Pacific terminals at Balboa on 
that date. Information has been requested by the 
Governor from Washington as to whether or not 
a holiday will be granted with pay to Govern- 
ment employees in the States on that day, and 
in the event that a holiday has been granted 
similar action will be taken in regard to the Canal 
Zone. 

In any event, we will hold a parade on that 
date and it is desired to secure as large a turnout 
as possible. All organizations, departments, and 
individuals who expect to take part in this 
parade should advise the undersigned in writing 
as soon as possible, and not later than October 8, 
of the number of persons, vehicles, and floats, 
they expect to participate in the parade so that 
positions may be assigned. 

The District Quartermaster at Balboa Heights 
will place at the disposal of departments and 
organizations such motor trucks and vehicles as 



THE PANAMA CAN'AL RECORD 



77 



are available. Applications for same should be 
made to him assoonas possible. 

The exact hour and route of the parade will be 
announced later. All who expect to take part are 
urged to begin preparations at once. 

The Atlantic terminal expects to hold their 
parade on September 28 and have already begun 
elaborate preparations and from present indica- 
tions, if the Pacific Terminal is to have a parade 
and rally which will compare favorably with the 
demonstration at the Atlantic terminal, it is up 
to us to get busy. 

R. K. Morris, 
Chairman, Committee Rallies and Parades. 



Trading with the Enemy. 

The Panama Canal. 
Executive Department, 
Division of Civil Affairs, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z.. September 25, 1918. 
To all concerned — The following changes in the 
United States Enemy Trading List, showing ad- 
ditions and removals, have been made by the 
War Trade Board, effective September 20, 1918: 
ADDITIONS. 

CHILE. 

Haverbeek & Co Valdivia. 

Haverheck, Alberto (of Haver- Valdivia. 

beck & Co.). 
Haverl>eek, Carlos (of Haver- Valdivia. 

beck & Co.). 
Sehalweit, Rodolfo (of Haver- Valdivia. 

bock & Co.). 

C0L0MBL\. 

Fresen, Max Bogota. 

ECTADOR. 

Balda, Cesar A Manta. 

Bruckman, L. E Guayaquil. 

Cueva. Teotilo Vivar Quito. 

Deasum & Co Guayaquil and Quito. 

Lemos. Rafael Esmeraldas. 

Sehneidcwind, Paul C. (Paul T.) . Rioliamba. 

Sussmann, Adolf Cojimies. 

Tramontapa, Lucas Guayaquil. 

MEXICO. 

Arreola, Jose Gomez Guadalajara. 

Brockmullel, Fedcrico Mexico City. 

Buckenhofer. Guillerrao Chihuahua. 

Concha. Antonio de la San Luis Potosi. 

Garcia. Fuentee, Snors Torreon. 

Henchell, Edmund Bajonea. 

Linga, Carl Mazatlan. 

Milan, J. y Cia Mazatlan. 

Mora, F. & Co San Bias. 

Cia. Quimica Nacional dc Mex- Mexico City, 
ico. 

Reinbeck & Becker Mexico City. 

Seitz, Carlos Mexico City. 

Stauffer & Forster Acaponeta. 

Stege, Otto (La Union) Chihuahua. 

Union, La (Otto Stege) Chihuahua. 

Velas, S. A. Cia Monterey and Tampico 

PERU. 

Moises, Jacobo y Hermanos Cuzco. 

8ALVADOR. 

Benoga, Federico San Salvador. 

Dciningcr Hermanos San Salvador. 

Duartc, F. I. & Co San Salvador. 

Garcia, Saul San Salvador. 

Hermann, Emilio San Salvador. 

Laufer, Curt San Salvador. 

Menjivar, Ricardo San Salvador. 

Raemsch, Louis San Salvador. 

Roeder, Max San Salvador. 

Widawcr, Alfredo San Salvador. 

ffidawer, Leon San Salvador. 

REMOVALS. 

MEXICO. 

Arcineaga y Sotres Mexico City. 

Austin, Carlos Merida. 

Bernal, M. N Nogales. 

Ruu, B. R Tampico. 

C. H. Calhoun, 
Chitf. Division of Civil A fain. 



Assignments of Teachers. 

The Panama Canal. 
Executive Department, 
Division of Schools, 

Balboa Heights. C. Z., September 26. 1918. 

To teachers of white schools — Teachers have 
been assigned to duty for the ensuing school year 
as lollows kGrades indicated are necessarily pro- 
visional) : 

lialbua hi >;h school— Geo. A. Manning, principal, 
history, room 4.*; B. L. Boss, science, room 59; 
Olga J. Frost, modern languages, room 36; May 
L. Smith, languages, room 27; Myrtis M.Gallup, 
English, room 54; Elizabeth Burkeheiser, com- 
mercial, room 41 ; Helen L. Kahle, English 
history, rooms 52 and 54; Leona M. Armstrong, 
biology, room 52; Isa Dolores Reed, mathe- 
matics, room 60. 

Balboa grade school — L. M. Holton, principal, 
room 20; Elsie E. Boyd, grade 1. room 15; Jessie 
Wilson Clark, grade 1, room 2; M. St. Clair 
Nisbet. grade I, room 16; Grace M. Trumbull, 
grade 1, building 804; Ruth Dale, grade 2, 
building 804; M. Ethel Mackin, grade 2, room 14; 
Isabelle C. Glubka, grade 2, room 1; grade 3, 
room 3 (not yet reported); Irma Doran, grade 3, 
room 12; Florence Mackin, grade 3, room 4; 
Efb> E. Littell, grade 4, room 6; N'ina P. Beeler, 
grade 4. room 24; grades 4-5, room 13 (not yet 
reported'l; Mary Healy, grade 5. room 25; 
Anna E. Larkin, grade 5, room 26; Dove L. 
Prather, grade 6, room 29; Susie P. Core, grade 
6. room 34; Ann Christenson. grade 7, room 38; 
Stella M. Johnson, grades 7-8, room 39; Ruth 
Porter, grade 8, room 37. 

Ancon grade school — Grace E. McCray, prin- 
cipal, grade 1, room 3; Florence M. Dildine, 
grades 1-2, room 1 ; Grace E. Keleher, grades 
2-3, room 2; Martha J. Sadler, grade 3, room 5; 
Mary D. Cro.vell, grades 3-4, room 8; Minnie 
O. Russell, grade 4. room 6; Florence M. Jones, 
grade 5, room 7; Leona M. Thacher. grade 6, 
room 9; Etta Peed, grades 7-8, room 10. 

Cristobal grade and hiqh school — Harry T. 
Drill, principal, history, room 30; Edna F. Healy, 
science, mathematics, room 26; English, Latin, 
room 23 (not yet reported); Franco Yillafranca, 
modern languages, room 27; Edith Loveitt, 
grade 8, room 29; Agnes O'Connor, grade 7, 
room 21 ; Hannah E. McClellan. grade 6, room 20; 
Grace E. Homes, grade 5, room 8; Beatrice 
Faulkner, grades 4-5, room 11; Martha Hamilton, 
grades 3-4, room 6; grade 3. room 3 (not yet 
reported); Effie D. Mitchell, grades 2-3, room 8; 
Margaret L. Beyschlag. grade 2. room 4; Gladys 
L. Hayden, grade 1. room 2; Geneva B. Thur- 
man, grade 1. room 1. 

Empire ?rade school — Nelle M. Shea, principal, 
grades 1-2; Maude F. Patten, grades 3 to 5. 

Pedro Miguel grade schoo' — Emma M. Cobban, 
principal, grades 7-8, room 5; Isabel Sanger, 
grades 5-6, room 4; Muriel K. Neal, grades 3-4, 
room 1; Alma R. Sander, grades 1-2, room 2. 

Gatun grade schoo! — Ida B. Potts, principal, 
grades 6 to 8. room 5; Annie E. Stone, grades 
3 to 5, room 1; Effie E. Watts, grades 1-2. 
room ?. 

Line teachers — Shirley C. Dorsey, grades 1 to 
4; Ida O. Erickson. grades 5 to S. 

Spanish in grades — Franco Villafr.mca, At- 
lantic side; Ricardo Villafranca. Pacific side. 

Music — -Arthur E. Ward, supervisor. 

Penmanship — Bliss Burkeholder. supervisor. 

Industrial education — T. G. Sutherland. su*w?r- 
visnr; M. L. Cloys, apprentice instructor; 
Bertha L. Plumb, household arts. Balboa; 
manual training. Balboa (not yet reported); 
Charlotte Gugenhan. household arts, Cristobal; 
Wallace Lee. manual training. Cristobal. 

Supervisors — F. X. Karrer, grades 6 to 12 and 
colored schools; Alice Alexander, grades 1 to 5. 
A. R. Lang, 
Superintendent of Schools. 

Approved : 

C. A. McllVAiNB. 
Executive Sucretary. 



78 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Manager, Cristobal Commissary. 
The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Cristobal, C. Z., September 23, 1918. 
Memorandum No. 761-^4: 

To all concerned — Effective as of September 5, 
Mr. H. C. Herse is appointed manager of Cristobal 
commissary, vice Mr. R. C. Thatcher, resigned. 
Roy R. Watson, 
Approved: Acting General Manager. 

R. K. Morris, 

Chief Quartermaster. 



Manager, La Boca Commissary. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Cristobal, C. Z., September 27, 1918. 
Memorandum No. 761-16: 

To all concerned — -Mr. H. C. Smith is appointed 
manager, La Boca commissary, effective Sep- 
tember 28, vice Mr. Warren Love, resigned. 
Roy R. Watson, 
Acting General Manager. 



Cattle Industry Division. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Cristobal, C. Z., September 25, 1918. 
Heads of all Departments: 

It js requested that all correspondence, circu- 
lars, reports, statements, etc., in connection with 
the cattle industry, plantations, hog farms, dairy 
farm, poultry farm, and the steamers Caribbean 
and Culebra, be addressed to the undersigned, as 
Superintendent of the Cattle Industry Division. 
Any copies of letters, reports, circulars, state- 
ments, etc., to be forwarded to employees of this 
division will be distributed through this office. 

W. B. Brown, 
Approved: Superintendent, Cattle Industry. 

R. K. Morris, 

Chief Quartermaster. 



Deposits for Milk. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Cristobal, C. Z. t October 1, 1918. 
Memorandum No. 779-7: 

To commissary managers — In future please 
arrange to accept deposits for pasteurised milk for 
15 days' delivery, in advance. Deposits must 
cover periods from 5th to 20th, and 21st of cur- 
rent month to 4th, inclusive, of following month. 
This will avoid some patrons being out of milk 
on the 1st of month, on account usual scarcity 
of commissary coupons. 

Roy R. Watson, 
Acting General Manager. 



Yellow Sugar Not Injurious. 
The Panama Canal, 

Supply Department, 
Cristobal, C. Z., September 24, 1918. 
Memorandum No. 760-84: 

To commissary managers— Complaints have 
been received recently from silver customers 
relative to the yellow sugar we are now selling to 
the silver trade, people with babies claiming that 
it was injurious to their health. In order to learn 
if there was any basis to this statement we sub- 
mitted samples to Ancon laboratory and are 
advised by them as follows: 

"A chemical analysis of this sugar failed to 
reveal anything that would be injurious to those 
using the sugar. 

"The addition of cane sugar to our formulas for 
feeding babies, except in the form of sweetened 
condensed milk, is not called for and should not 
be used; therefore, there should be no cause for 
complaint as regards babies under 1 year old. 
Those over 1 year old, who require sugar on 



cereals, can, in the opinion of this department, 
use the yellow sugar with perfect safety." 

The above for your information in the event 
that other complaints are received. 

Roy R. Watson, 
Acting General Manager. 



Tailoring. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Cristobal, C. Z., September 25, 1918. 
Memorandum No. 782-3: 

To all concerned — Effective this w-eek, orders 
for tailoring will be taken at Cristobal commissary 
on Saturdays, and at Pedro Miguel commissary 
on Thursday afternoons. 

The cutter will be located at Ancon laundry and 
arrangements may be made with him through 
commissary manager to have him call at Cristo- 
bal, Pedro Miguel, or Gatun commissaries on any 
other day. 

Before a call is sent in for a special trip for the 
cutter, commissary managers are urged to secure a 
sufficient number of orders to make the trip 
worth while. 

Roy R. Watson, 
Acting General Manager. 



Misdirected Letters. 

The following insufficiently addressed letters 
and papers have been received in the office of the 
Director of Posts, and may be obtained upon 
request of the addressees. Requests may be made 
by telephone No. 182, Balboa: 
Barksdale, Cody G. Humber, Capt. R. C. 
Bourne, Airs. Theresa A. Jones, Mrs. Robert 
Bow, Mrs. Justine (Box Lebland, Miss Lucette 

782) (Box 69) 

Daveney, Capt. A. B. Lewis, Chas. 
Davis, Mrs. Elmira ^Maristang, Carlos 
Dotton, Inza Moran, J. P. (Box 408) 

Forbes, Miss Isabel O'Dell, H. M. 

Hamburg, Mrs. Delia Renis, Harry 

(Box 386) Richardson, Cyril 

Tyler, Alfred 



Stages of the Chagres and the Lakes. 

The maximum elevations of the Chagres River, 
G?tun Lake and Miraflores Lake, in feet above 
mean sealevel, during the week ending at mid- 
night of Saturday, September 28, were as follows: 





Chagres River 1 Gatun Lake i „;__ 


Date 


Vigia 


Alha- 
juela 


Gam- L . i ilores 
boa (Gatun, La k e . 


Sun., Sept. 22 
Mon., Sept. 23 . . . . 
Tues., Sept. 24 ... . 
Wed., Sept. 25 . 
Thurs., Sept. 26 . . . 

Sat., Sept. 2S 


(') 

C) 
132.35 
129.65 
128 50 
128 15 
128.05 


(0 

C) 
96.50 
95 31 
93 54 
93.16 
93.12 


85.25 
85.25 

85.28 
85.33 
85 32 
85 40 
85.40 


85.14 53.80 

85.15 53.85 

85.16 54.00 
S5.23 54.42 
85.29, 54.46 
85 37 54.30 
85.3.3 53.80 


Height of low water 
to nearest foot. 


126.0 


91.0 




I 



'Chagres River telephones out of order. 



Additions to Commissary Stock. 

Buttons, pearl, ea SO. 03 

Buttons, pearl, doz 24 

Buttons, khaki, doz 07 

Chemises, envelope, ea 1 .35 

Chemises, envelope, ea 1 . 35 

Chemises, envelope, ea 1 . 35 

Collars, celluloid, ea 15 

Collars, youth's, Exton, No. 8, ea 16 

Curtain, yd 30 

Dress goods, pique, white, 35/6", yd 52 

Hats, straw, children's, ea 2 .35 

Hats, straw, children's, ea 61 

Hats, straw, children's, ea 1 . 50 

Hats, straw, children's, ea 61 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second- .-lass matter, February 6, 1918. at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 




Volume XII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 9, 191 8. 




No. 8. 



CANAL WORK IN AUGUST. 

The report of the Governor to the Secretary of War of Canal 
operations in August, 1918, is printed, in part, below: 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 27, 1918. 
The honorable, the Secretary of War, 
Washington, D. C. 
Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of The Panama Canal for 
the month of August, 1918: 

Business transacted at the Atlantic and Pacific ends of the Canal, respectively, 
for the month of August, is presented in the following tabulation: 



Item. 



Cristobal. 



Balboa. 



Total. 



Water sold to ships gallons. 

Vessels dry docked 

Passengers arriving: 

First cabin 

Other than first cabin 



6,772,370 
15 



1,701 
1,977 



Total 

Passengers departing: 



First cabin. 

Other than first cabin. 



3,678 



1,574 
2,250 



Total 

Total movement of passengers 

Services to American seamen: 

Seamen shipped 

Seamen discharged 

Seamen deceased 

Seamen deserted 

Seamen destitute 

Seamen's identification certificates issued. 

Seamen's wages received 

Seamen's wages disbursed 

Balance on hand, Sept. 1, 1918 

Commissary sales to commercial vessels: 

Ice 

Wholesale groceries 

Wholesale cold storage 

Laundry 

Miscellaneous 



3,824 
7,502 



207 
171 



$2,113.64 
$2,458 60 



$418 00 

$1,145 74 
6,958.30 

20,726.56 
1,435 05 
1,331.10 



Total. 



Commissary sales to Government and Panama Railroad : 

Ice 

Wholesale groceries 

Wholesale cold storage 

Laundry 

Miscellaneous 



31,596.75 

$7 51 

6,677.91 

33,665.25 

82.70 

46.55 



Total 

Grand total of commissary sales. 



40,479.92 



72.076 67 



1,244,250 
6 



707 
9S1 



8,016,620 
21 



2,408 
2,958 



1,688 



639 
1,015 



1,654 
3,342 



tit 
125 



$1,042 90 
$759 68 



$662 25 

$513.12 

2,502.88 

11,833 84 

150 41 

907.08 



15,907.33 

$281.26 

5,598 26 

9,934.61 

51.79 

2,208 21 



5,366 



2,213 
3,265 



5.47S 
10,844 



271 
296 



21 



$3,156.54 
S3.21S 28 



$1,110 25 



$1,658 86 
9,461 18 

32,560.40 
1,585.46 
2,238 18 



47,504.08 

$288.77 

12.276,17 

43,599.86 

134 49 

2,254.76 



18,074.13 



33,981 46 



58,554.05 



106,058.13 



BUY LIBERTY LOAN BONDS. 

Ownership of Liberty Loan Bonds indicates in possession mere'y invest- 
ment caution coupled with business wisdom. Possession to capacity 
of means is genuine and added proof of loyal and dependable citizenry. 



80 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



GATUN HYDROELECTRIC STATION, GATUN SUBSTATION, CRISTOBAL SUBSTATION, 
ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC LOCKS. 

Installation of unit No. 4 at the Gatun hydroelectric station was practically com- 
pleted at the end of the month. The turbine was operated, unloaded, without any 
mechanical trouble developing. Building construction of the extension at this 
station was virtually completed. There were no interruptions in service or repairs to 
equipment during the month. The net output of the station was 4,520,038 K. W. H. 
on a computed water consumption of 3,170,880,000 cubic feet of water; the ratio 
between water used for power and that for lockages, 1,304,910,000 cubic feet, being 
2.4 to 1. Lockage draft at Gatun aggregated 680,910,000 cubic feet. Estimated rain- 
fall over the Gatun Lake watershed was 10.48 inches, or 11 per cent below the 8-year 
mean. The elevation of the lake on August 31 was 85.10 feet. 

The piping for cooling water for transformers at Gatun substation was completed 
except connection for the 8,400 KVA unit. Work on the preparation of switchboards 
advanced satisfactorily, and conduit work for the ,2, 200- volt feeder circuits was 
completed. All cable between switch cells and the two 1,500 KVA transformers was 
installed, but construction was completed at the transformer end only. 

No work was done on the 11,000-volt improvements at the Cristobal substation; 
this installation remaining 70 per cent completed. It has been thought best to 
complete the work at Gatun Substation before proceeding further at Cristobal sub- 
station; it being impossible to secure a working force sufficient to carry on the 
work at both points simultaneously. 

Gatun locks — The usual work of inspection and minor repairs to the lock apparatus 
were made during the month. Work has been started on new switch bank room and 
changing the high tension feeder layout. Excavation for the room was completed 
and the floor laid. Six control cables in the intermediate crossover were relocated, 
which leaves six ducts available for pulling in the power cable to the center wall. 
The changing of the power cables in the upper cross-under tunnel and transformer 
rooms was started during the month. 

Pacific locks — In addition to the necessary maintenance of the operating equip- 
ment and work on construction of a new launch for use at these locks, considerable 
repair work was done on the fender timbers at Miraflores and the walks at Pedro 
Miguel. Foundations were started for the storage shed which is to be removed from 
its present site near Cocoli Hill to the west side of the locks at Miraflores. Lockage 
draft from Gatun Lake aggregated 624,000,000 cubic feet; that from 'Miraflores 
Lake, 562,040,000 cubic feet. 

Transmission line — There was a total of 9 interruptions to transmission line service 
during August; 1 caused by heavy lightning discharge, 8 by insulator failures. 
Repairs were promptly made, and the greatest period of interruption was 11 minutes 
at Darien. There were 13 insulators replaced during the month, all caused by 
electrical failure. 

Miraflores steam plant — On two occasions during the month this plant carried the 
load for pumping Balboa dry dock, and once the entire load on the southern end on 
account of a double transmission line failure. The net output was minus 111,720 
K. W. H.; the total amount of oil used, 2,818.69 barrels. 

Total power output — The total net output of both generating stations was 4,454,118 
K. W. H.; and the total amount of power distributed to feeders by substations and 
generating plants was 3,718,217 K. W. H. Total losses in transmission and trans- 
formation was 690,101 K. W. H., representing an energy loss of 15.65 per cent. 

DREDGING DIVISION. 

Dredging excavation for the month was as follows: 



Location. 



Earth 
Cu. yds. 



Rock 
Cu. yds. 



Total 
Cu. yds. 



Classified as: 



Mai nt. 
Cu. yds. 



Constr'n. 
Cu. yds. 



Auxiliary 
Cu. yds. 



Pacific entrance channel 

[nner harbor at Balboa 

Gaillard Cut: 

Paraiso P. I. impr. work 

East Oulebra slide 

West Culebra Slide 

Cucaracha Slide 

Total from Gaillard Cut . 

Atlantic entrance^ 

Gatun Lake Section — 

Auxiliary works, Atlantic terminals 

Grand total — Ocean to ocean. 



117,400 
16,500 

2,000 

12,900 

700 

7,100 



4,000 



11,500 

5,800 

700 

6,900 



121,400 
16,500 

13,500 

18,700 

1,400 

14,000 



68,400 
6,500 

13,500 

18,700 
1,400 
14,000 



53,000 
10,000 



22,700 
4,700 
14,100 
68,400 



24,900 
16,100 



12,700 



47,600 
20,800 
14,100 
81,100 



47,600 

'u.ibo' 



20.SOO 



81,100 



243,800 



57,700 



301,500 



136,600 



164,900 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



81 



On September 1, 826,183 cubic yards remained to be excavated, distribution as 
follows: 



Location. 


Earth. 


Rock. 


Total. 






















25,000 


25,000 










216,600 


105,500 


322,100 








216.600 


130.500 


347.100 










2,073 
181,850 


2,073 




295,160 


477,010 








295,160 


183,923 


479,083 








511,760 


314,423 


826,183 



Of the material excavated from the Pacific entrance canal prism, 64,300 cubic yards 
were dumped at sea, west of the channel, and 57,100 cubic yards were placed on the 
San Juan Dyke fill. AH material taken from Gaillard Cut and Gatun Lake was 
dumped in the lake north of Gamboa. Two thousand cubic yards dredged from 
area No. 1, Cristobal harbor, were dumped on the East Breakwater extension, and 
8,700 yards pumped on Telfer's Island west of Cristobal coaling station. Of the 
material removed from Balboa inner harbor, 16,500 cubic yards were pumped through 
relays to the Corozal fill. All proposed fill on the Corozal and Corundu River 
fills was completed during the month. Seventy thousand four hundred (70,400) 
cubic yards of material excavated from the approach to the Submarine Base was 
pumped on Area "A" Navy Base. 

Drilling and mining work was continued at both the Paraiso and Miraflores P. I. 
stations throughout the month; the three graders were in continuous service in 
gfading and sluicing at the East and West Culebra Slides and in connection with the 
Paraiso P. I. work. Surveys were made behind the dredges at Cristobal harbor 
(area No. 1), Gatun Lake, Gaillard Cut, Pacific entrance, Coco Solo, and Balboa 
inner harbor, hydrographic survey from oil berth, Balboa, to station 2500+00 in the 
Canal prism, completing all field work for the general survey, Atlantic to Pacific 
Oceans. A survey and estimate was made for the proposed dump north of Balboa 
inner harbor, and an estimate prepared for available mateiial for the fill along the 
east shore of Manzanillo Bay, as well as the amount of material necessary to com- 
plete all authorized fills for Army and Navy bases. 

TERMINAL CONSTRUCTION. 

The following tabulation shows the progress for the month with percentages of 
completion of Pier No. 6, Cristobal: 



Item. 



Forms placed square feet . . 

Reinforcing placed pounds. . 

Concrete poured cubic yards . . 

Steel struts erected each . 

Steel struts concreted each . . 



Accom- 
plished 
during 
month. 



48,479 

473,605 

2,371 

4 

3 



Total in 

place. 

Aug. 31. 



293,239 

3,257,059 

14,413 

93 

85 



Percent- 
age of 
completion 



SHOPS, FOUNDRY AND DRY DOCK WORK. 

The Mechanical Division authorized a total of 944 job orders during the month; 
this including 198 individual and company job orders at Cristobal. 

Foundry output for the month was as follows: Iron, 107,795 pounds; steel, 
76,962 pounds; brass, 13,891 pounds. 

The customary locomotive and crane equipment was hostled, Panama Railroad 
cars repaired and maintained, and inspection given locomotives, cranes, and other 
equipment under the jurisdiction of the division. 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. 

The construction force of the Building Division, southern section, was principally 
utilized on the buildings of Ancon Hospital, Tivoli Hotel kitchen, Pedro Miguel 
hotel, the larvacide plant at Ancon, and miscellaneous work at the playgrounds, 
Ancon and Balboa, also the clubhouses at these points. Work on the Ancon Hospital 
structures was mainly plastering and wall finishing, tiling, etc. The placing of form 
work and concrete, steel reinforcing, and cork insulation, with the installation of 
plumbing and carpentry work at Mount Hope ice and cold storage plant brought 
this building to 85 per cent completion. 



82 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



The work of this division, previously divided between the northern and southern 
districts, was consolidated on August 1 and placed under the supervision of a single 
Superintendent of Construction with headquarters at Cristobal. Building con- 
struction in the former southern district has been reduced to a minimum, and it 
was considered impracticable to maintain a separate organization of the division at 
this end. 

MUNICIPAL DIVISION. 

The usual maintenance and repair work was performed during August. Work 
on the resurfacing of Main Street, Gatun, was completed. Various minor items of 
grading and surfacing at the Army aviation and submarine bases were continued. 
The lowering and covering of the water line to Margarita was commenced, also the 
resurfacing and relocation of the Mount Hope-Gatun Road. In the southern district 
the work was principally that of grading within Ancon Hospital grounds, around 
the Hotel Tivoli kitchen; and construction of cement sidewalks within the district. 
A road to the steel pier, Balboa, was commenced, and the concreting of the motor 
truck company's garage at La Boca begun. 

A total of 162,768,500 gallons of water was pumped at the 4 stations in the 
northern district, and 576,266,400 gallons at the 8 stations in the southern district. 
Consumption of water by the cities of Colon and Panama was 123,111,575 gallons; 
that sold to ships, 8,016,620 gallons, a total of 131,128,195 gallons. At the three 
nitration plants 428,505,000 gallons were filtered for domestic purposes. 

WORKING FORCE. 

Statement of the working force effective August 21, representing the second half- 
month, follows: 



Department or Division. 



Gold. Silver. Total. 



Operation and Maintenance: 

Office 

Building Division 

Electrical Division. 

Municipal Engineering . 

Lock operation , 

Dredging Division 

Mechanical Division 

Marine Division 

Fortifications 



33 
208 
182 

70 
125 
129 
511 

91 



53 

1,799 
326 

1 ,349 
579 

1,091 

1,531 
275 
361 



Total 

Supply: 

Quartermaster 

Subsistence 

Commissary . 

Cattle industry— plantations. 



1,387 

95 
20 
185 
28 



7,364 

1,656 
410 

1,531 
834 



Total. 



Accounting 

Health 

Executive 

Panama Railroad — 

Superintendent and coaling stations. 

Transportation 

Receiving and Forwarding Agent 



328 

208 
203 
390 

126 
140 
68 



4,431 

12 
921 
189 

927 

242 

2,140 



Total Panama Railroad. 
Grand total 



334 



3,309 



,850 16,226 



The total gold force is a decrease of 172 from the 3,022 employed Jul\ 
the silver force is an increase of 593 over the 15,633 shown on that date. 

QUARTERS. 

The following statement gives the occupation of Canal quarters, August 31 : 



86 
2,007 

508 
1,419 

704 
1,220 
2,042 

366 

399 



8,751 

1,751 

430 

1,716 

862 



4,759 

220 

1,124 

579 

1,053 

382 

2,208 



3,643 



19,076 



24th; 



Occupants. 


Men. 


Women. 


Children. 


Total. 




2,943 

196 

5,880 


2,019 

30 

2,048 


2,195 

58 

3,287 


7,157 




284 




11,215 




9,019 


4,097 


5,540 


18,656 



PUBLIC HEALTH. 

There were 781 employees admitted to hospitals and quarters during the month, 
as compared with 779 the preceding month. Twenty-two deaths occurred among 
employees; and there were 58 births in employees' families during the month. 



TTiK PANAMA i \\\l. RECORD 
RECEIPTS AND EXPENSES. 

On August 31 the cash balance in Canal appropriations, exclusive of fortifications 
was $17,505,648.67; the balance in fortifications was $4,638,319.83. Payments 
made from the appropriations by the Disbursing Clerk, Washington, amounted to 
$505,213.71, and by the Paymaster on the Isthmus, $1,238,320.20. Payment to the 
Panama Railroad Company for commissary books amounted to $253,251.04. Total 
Panama Canal collections on the Isthmus amounted to $1,592,672.74; and co! 
lections by the Disbursing Clerk, Washington, to $23,800.68. Requisitions for pur- 
chase of material in the United States totaled $591,245.08. Receipts from the Canal 
Zone and miscellaneous funds mere $161,035.71, and disbursements from the same 
runds, $183,190.8:2. 

RespectfuJly, 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Notice to Mariners. Buoy Temporarily Discontinued, Cristobal Harbor. 
The Panama Canal, Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., September 30, 1918. 
Circular No. 643-46: 

One of the two second-class electrically lighted spar buoys, exhibit- 
ing fixed red light, established in 42 feet of water to mark the south- 
western extremity of the dredged channel of the Cristobal coaling 
station, has been temporarily discontinued, owing to dredging opera- 
tions in Cristobal harbor. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Notice to Mariners. — San Jose Light. 

The Panama Canal, Executive Office, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 5, 1918. 
Circular No. 643-47. 

1. San Jose 1 Light, referred to in Circular No. 643-45, was established 
on September 30, 1918, on the southwestern extremity of San Jose 
island, Pearl Island Group, Republic of Panama. 

2. The light is flashing, white, unwatched; exhibited from a pyram- 
idal, skeleton steel tower 15 feet high, painted white. 

Focal plane, 222 feet. Visible 22 miles. 
Illuminant, acetylene gas, 1,000 candlepower. 
Arc of illumination from 40° 30 r to 334° 30' true; the remaining 
66° being obscured by the island. 

Characteristic: 5 seconds light; 7 seconds dark. 
Position: Lat. 8° 12' 24" north. 
Long. 79° 07' 45" west. 

3. Caution: This point should be given a berth of at least 2 miles. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Correction. 

In the Official U. S. Bulletin of Friday, September 13, 1918, there 
appeared an announcement of the Censorship Board to the effect 
that confirmation of cablegrams must be in plain language on and after 
certain specified dates. Inadvertently the word "confirmation" was 
omitted from the caption under which the statement was printed, and 
it was to that extent misleading. The new requirement applies only 
to ■ confirmations and not to the use of authorized codes in the original 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 1 



cablegrams. The rules and regulations promulgated by the chief' 
cable censor on May 21, 1918, continue to govern the transmission of 
cablegrams themselves. 

The order issued on September 13 reads as follows: 

On and after October 1, 1918, no confirmation of a cablegram shall be allowed to 
leave the United States, its territories, or possessions unless it be in plain language. 

"On and after November 1, 1918, no confirmation of a cablegram shall be allowed 
to enter the United States, its territories,, or possessions unless it be in plain language. 

"It is to be noted that code confirmations will not be passed by Postal Censorship 
even when accompanied by what purports to be or actually is a transmission thereof. 

Canal Men in Army and Navy. 
The following employees of The Panama Canal have recently entered 
active military or naval service of the United States, or allied them- 
selves with other work in connection with present war hostilities and. 
are entitled to a star in the service flag which now contains 340 stars 



Anderson, Joseph H. 
Alexander, Fred P. 
Bolster, Richard H. 
Blumenberg, Carl H. 
Burton, Joseph H. 
Bechlem, Alfred W. 
Bi iggs, Gaylord S. 
Brown, William T. 
Bath, Chaiies H. 
Cerise, Robert H. 
Campbell, William B„ 
Callahan, Samuel J. 
Crowley, James 
Clisbee, Fiank A. 
Cook, Alfred S. 
Craddock, John C. 
Culbertscn, Maxwell 
Coman, James B. 
Clowe, Clarence 
Clear, Thomas L. 
Conger, Sidney S. 
Day, William A. 
Davies, John M. 
Drake, Theodore M. 
Detrick, Lester H. 
Dooling, William F. 
Dowd, Frederick F. 
Dickieson, Frederick W. 
Eason, James T., Jr. 
Erbe, Ernst A. 
Engelke, Harry W. 
French, Mortimer H. 
Folkerth, Harry L. 
Farrell, Arthur J. 
Ford, Randall H. 
Franklin, Theo. V. 
Ferguson, Chester M. 
Flynn, Peter G. 
Foust, Samuel M. 
Golden, John M. 
Gray, Dorothy 
Graff, Charles H. 
1 libson, William C. 
Grover, Edward L. 
Gill, Joseph H. 
Guinan, Edward D. 



Holden, Vernon A. 
Hull, William G. 
Howatt, Spurgeon W, 
Hoecker, George D. 
Hunter, George 
Howard, G. Arthur 
Henry, James J. 
Horle, Albert M. 
Hadaway, James L. 
Hauss, Louis F. 
Hollander, Charles S. 
Howe, William R. 
Herman, John M. 
Iser, William F. 
Klumpp, Harry 
Kirkbride, Lovs L. 
Killip, Ellsworth P. 
Koerner, Charles F. 
Kupfer, Nathan B. 
Langford, Roy 
Levy, Linda 
Lyons, Fred J. 
Lewis, James E. 
Lee, William C. 
Lang, Edward G. 
Lindstrom, William 
Luxton, William L. 
Lore, William E. 
Lundishef, Alexander A. 
McKeown, Daniel J. 
McMahon, John F. 
McLavy, John R. 
McNiel, Jacob R. 
McLaughlin, William H, 
McDonald, David S. 
Mingee, Eustace W. 
Maddox, Margaret E. 
Matthew, George E. 
Marshall, Gary B-. 
Mears, William B. 
Moyer, Robert E. 
Morrison, John H. 
Mohr, Alfred H. 
Maltby, Edward A, 
Murphy, Dennis J. 
Mullen, George F. 



Miller, Paul D. 
Meeks, Manning 
Nielsen, Frederic L. 
Naylor, William G. 
Oglesbv, Elbert {. 
Oettli, Charles P. 
Paul, Seymour 
Prager, Jerome F. 
Pendleton, George W. 
Pratt, Milo C. 
Pettoletti, Lauritz 
Poore, Walter C. 
Romaine, Frank W. 
Roberts, Richard, Jr. 
Ryan, William F. 
Russon, George 
Smith, James W. 
Smith, Maik E. 
Smith, Nello B. 
Smith, Walter F. 
Smith, Merrick A. V. 
Smith, Edward I. 
Simon, Max R. 
Schwalenberg, Henry }.. 
Schneekloth, Edward 
Swintcr, Virginia S. 
Schwindeman, August 
Strom, Carl A. 
Schotland, Maurice 
Sherrill, James W. 
Scott, John C. 
Strasser, John C. 
Symons, W. Fred 
Smithies, Charles T. 
Schweigert, John L. 
Scott, Archibald J. 
Schmidt, Richard W. 
Thomas, August 
Van Fleet, Wilfred H 
Vann, Livingston, Jr. 
Wright, Edward A. 
Wagner, Louis L, Jr. 
Walsh, Melvin H. 
Williams, Charles R. 
Young, Charles F. 



Cable Address of The Panama Canal. 

The cable address of The Panama Canal, on the Isthmus, is "Pancanal, Panama,' 
States "Pancanal, Washington." 



in the Uniter? 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



85 



Hotel Aspinwall. 

During the past week there were 70 guests at the Hotel Aspinwall. 
On Sunday, October 6 a total of 216 meals were served; 80 breakfasts, 
1 05 lunches, and 31 dinners. Contrary to the experience of past years, 
the hotel has maintained a satisfactory patronage well into the rainy 
season and indications are that the hotel will continue to have sufficient 
patronage during the remainder of the rainy season to warrant holding 
it open until the next dry season brings its crowds of pleasure seekers. 

The hotel maintains the new launch Taboguilla for the convenience 
of the guests. The launch is available for sightseeing trips around 
the island and to Taboguilla Island and for swimming parties. Moon- 
light parties are becoming increasingly popular. 



Deceased Employees. 

The estates of the following deceased employees of Tne Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad 
Company are now in process of settlement, and any claims against these estates, or any information 
which might lead to the location of heirs, or to tne recovery of property, bank deposits, postal savings 
or postal moncv order deposits, or any other moneys due them, should be presented at the office of 
the Administrator of Estates at once in order that the estates may be settled as soon as possible. All 
claims saould be itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or other public officer having a seal, and 
submitted in duplicate. These names will be published but once: 



Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 

residence. 


Employed by- 


Date of 

death. 




111802 

168893 
113111 
148821 
172578 
141958 
61069 
32247 
156138 
29924 
172604 
145343 
114S59 
127336 




Cristobal (Camp 

Bierd). 
Las Cascadas 


Panama Railroad 

Cattle Industry 

Cattle Industry 

Health Department.. 
Health Department.. 

Mechanical Div 

Mechanical Division. 
Health Department.. 
Panama Railroad. . . . 
Electrical Division. . . 

Building Division 

Cattle Industry 

Panama Railroad. . . . 


September 22, 1918. 




Colombia 

Trinidad 

Barbados 

Jamaica 

Colombia 


September 24, 1918. 


William Hay 


September 18, 1918. 


William McClow 
Joseph Phillips 


Panama 

Panama 


September 23, 1918. 
September 25, 19 IS. 
September 24, 1918. 




September 15, 1918. 
September 17, 1918. 


Archie Spencer 

Robert Sutherland. . . . 

Beresford Welch 

Romano Amor 


September 22, 1918. 


Panama 

Summit, C Z... . 


September 17. 1918 
September 15, 1918 
September 27, 1918 
September 30, 1918. 


Vicente Villas 


La Boca, C Z. . . 


September 30, 1918. 



Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there arc likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at 
Canal post offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not 
posted, persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, 
Balboa Heights (telephone 286); 

Assistant in plant nutrition (male and female) ; $1,380 a year; No. 567; October 29, 1918; Form 
2118. *§; 20 vcars and over. 

Heating and ventilating engineer and draftsman (male); $1,800 a year; No. 557; October 22, 1918; 
form 2118; age, 21 years and over. *§ 

Apprentice fish culturist (male); S600 to $960 a year; No. 549; October 20, November 24, Decem- 
ber 15, 191S; form 1312; ane, 18th but not 45th birthday. 

Bookkeeper. Bookkeeper-typewriter; Departmental Service (male and female); $1,000 a year; 
No. 2175-amendcd; every Sunday; form 304; age. 18 years and over. §t 

Laboratory assistant, intermediate grade (male and female); $1,080 a year; No. 329-amended; 
form 1312. f§t 

Laboratory assistant, junior grade (male and female); $1,000 a year; No. 329-amended; form 1312. 

t§t 

Senior aid (male and female); $900 a year; No. 329-amended; form 1212. t § t 

Applicants will be admitted to these examainations regardless of their age; but at the request of a 
department certification may be made of eligibles who are within reasonable age limits. 

Laboratory assistant (male and female); SI, 200 to $1,830 a year; No. 354-amended; form 1312; 
age, within reasonable age limits.tlt 

Inspector of telephone equipment (male); $1,800 a year; No. 553; form 1312; age, not over 60. 

tsj 

Inspector of telegraph equipment (male); SI, 800 a year; No. 553; form 1312; age, not over 60. 

tit 

Inspector of radio equipment (male); $1,800 a year; No. 553; form 1312; age, not over 60.f§t 

Inspector in vehicles (male); S1.500avear; No. 553; form 1312; age, not over 60.f§t 

Library assistant (male and female) ; S900 to $1,200 a year; No. 552; form 1312; 18 years or over. 

t§ 

Assistant to purchaser of 'supplies (male); $1,500 to $1,800 a year; No. 554; form 1312; not over 

60. t§ 



86 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Fuel inspection engineer (male) ; SI, 620 a year; No. 561; form2118; October 22, 1918. *§ 

Junior aid (male and female); $540 to $720 a year; No. 562; form 1312. f § t 

Pulp and paper engineer (male) ; $3,500 a year; No. 568; form 1312; October 29, 1918; age. 30 
years and over.* 

Investigator in seed marketing (male); $2,250 to $3,000 a year; No. 569; form 2118; October 29. 
1918; Age, within reasonable age limits. *§ 

Industrial specialist in forest products (male); $1,500 to $3,500 a year; form 1312; age, 21 years 
and over.f§ 

Messenger (female) ; $600 to $720 a year; form 304; age 18 years and over; October 27, 1918. 

Inspector of dairy products (male); $1,800 to $2,400 a year; form 2118; age, within reasonable 
age limits.t§ 



*Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business 
on that date. 

tNonassembled. Applications will be received at any time until further notice. 

tin view of the needs of the service, and until further notice, subjects of countries allied with the 
United States will be admitted to this examination, provided they are otherwise qualified. Such persons 
may not be certified for appointment, however, so long as they are United States citizens on the eligible 
list. 

§Male applicants of draft age should state in their applications their draft classification. The Com- 
mission will sustain objections of appointing officers to the certification or appointment of m^n in 
Class 1-A. 



Books. 

The demand for books, particularly those treating of the war, on the part cf com- 
missary patrons, shows no indication of cessation. Many titles are on order, some 
of which are expected by early departure ; and they are briefly described below: 

Five books recently reprinted to sell in the United States at 60 cents: 

"The First Hundred Thousand," by Captain Ian Hay (Beith) of the Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers, author of "All In It;" "K-l Carries On." A war book straight from the trenches such as only 
a trained novelist could have written. 

"Kings, Queens, and Pawns," by Mary Roberts Rinehart. Mrs. Rinehart, who is well-known on the 
Canal Zone, has seen the roost dramatic sides of the great war, and chronicled them in the style that 
has made her stories famous. 

"I Accuse!" (J'Accuse!), by a German. A scathing arraignment of the German war policy. 

"Pan-Germanism," by Roland G. Usher. A brisk, clear, simple reduction of the complex history of 
Europe during the last 40 years. 

"Germany, the Next Republic?" This book enables one fully to understand why autocratic Germany 
hates and fears democratic America and why we must defeat Germany. 

The following "Best Sellers, "all of which were published within the last few months: 

"In the Fourth Year," "Education of Joan and Peter." The latest books by H. G. Wells (whom 
nearly everybody knows), the latter still running in serial form in The New Republic. 

"The Old Huntsman," by Siegfried Sassoon: A collection of poems by an Englishman whose verse 
ranks with Masefield, Brooke, and Seeger. 

"Making Life Worth While," by Douglas Fairbanks. With 16 new pictures of the man of the rrovie 
hour in action, published September 15. 

"The First Shot for Liberty." by Corporal Osborne de Varilia. A book for Americans, by an Ameri- 
can who fired the first shot for the United States in the World War. The author comes from a heroic 
family that has participated in all our wars from the Revolution down. It is a complete and authentic 
account of the vanguard of Pershing's Army. 

"Out to Win," The History of America in France, by Lieut. Coningsby Dawson. It is a vivid, pro- 
phetic statement of America's program in France. 

"The Rough Road" — A romance of the great war. by William J. Locke. How a foppish youth, whose 
greatest ambition in life was to write a history of wallpapers, became a fighting man and a "regular 
follow." 

"The Fighting Fleets," by Ralph D. Paine. The first complete and authoritative story of our 
Navy in the present war. 

"Life in a Tank," by Capt. Richard Haigh. Describes a new kind of fighting with a new kind of 
thrill. , t 

"The Odyssey of a Torpedoed Transport." Allowed in France as the best account of the game ot 
hide and seek that our naval men play with the enthusiasm of their type. 

"The Doctor in War," by Dr. Woods Hutchinson. Treats of the great achievements of medical 
service in the war by a recognized authority. 

"General Foch." — An appreciation, by Maj. R. M. Johnston. A brief but comprehensive account of 
the life and military career of the Commander-in-Chief. . 

"Tang of Life," by H. H. Knibbs. An intense, gripping story of the West, dealing with the affairs ot 
one Jim Waring, gun fighter — a sort of unofficial sheriff whose ambition in life is to "get" bad men. 

"The City of Masks," by George Barr McCutcheon, author of "Brewster's Millions.'' "Shot with 
Crimson," "Graustark," "Beverly of Graustark," etc. A most amusing tale of New \ ork's unknown 
foreign aristocracy; a Marchioness who is a dressmaker; a titled English lady who is governess; a 
Princess who runs a pawn shop; a Lord who serves as a chauffeur and an ex-butler who is wealthy and 
moves in near-inner society circles. 

"The Light Above the Crossroads," by Mrs. Victor Rickard. The first story of an Allied spy. Gives 
an intimate view of the German people dominated by Prussian militarism; and a striking picture of 
Ireland and her problems. A romantic story with the war as a background, but with none of its horrors. 

"The Prophet of Berkeley Square," by Robert Hichens, author of "The Gardenof Allah,' It is all 
great fooling and no one but a writer as clever as Mr. Hichens could give us anything so entertainingly 
absurd. Quite unlike anything he has done before. . 

"Richard Baldock," by Archibald Marshall. Mr. Marshall's charming stones of English country 
life are fast gaining a wide and enthusiastic audience in America. They are highly recommended by 
such critics as Mr. William Dean Howells and Professor Phelps of Yale. "Richard Baldock" is his 
latest work. It has not the pep and punch of a best seller, but the charm of one that will always sell. 

"America in France," by Maj. Frederick Palmer. Colonel Roosevelt said not long ago that Frederick 
Palmer knows more about war than any living American. At our entry into the war Major Palmer 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD hi 

was on the ship that carried Genera! Pershing to England and for many months he was official censor o' 
the American Forces in France and an officer on General Pershing's staff. He is exceedingly well fitted 
to tell the story of what America is actually doing in France to-day. 

"The Bluebird," by Maurice Maeterlinck. With 24 photographs in duotone from the film production. 
Those who have seen the play or motion picture production and do not already possess the book will wish 
to obtain this fine special edition. 

"The Quest of Youth," by Maurice Maeterlinck. A sequel to "The Bluebird." It is booked for 
presentation this season on the American stage. 

The following books for juveniles are by well-known authors and will make ac- 
ceptable presents at any time: 

"The Valient Runaways," by Gertrude Atherton. 

"The Adventure Club with the Fleet," by Ralph Henry Barbour. 

"The Fighting Mascot," by Thomas Jospph Kehoe. 

"The Jessie Willcox Smith Little Mother Goose." 

"Stories for the Bible Hour." by R. Brimley Johnson. 

"You No Longer Count," by Rene Boylesve. A translation of the story which took Paris by storm — 
of the transformation of a woman after the loss of her officer husband. 

Lovers of poetry will be interested in obtaining some of the volumes on order embracing the latest 
works of Louis Untermeyer, Robert Frost, Carl Sandburg, Walter de la Mare, and John McClure. 

"Hearts' Haven," by Clara Louise Burnham. It is the sort of novel that many will like to turn 
to under war-time strain. 

"Common Cause." by Samuel Hopkins Adams. A story of the fight with pro-German sentiment in 
middle western United States. 

"PhiloGubb. the Correspondence School Detective," by Ellis Parker Butler. An uproariously funny 
book about a character already well known through his appearance in short stories and in motion pictures. 

"The Education of Henry Adams," by Henry Cabot Lodge. An extraordinary book, the history of 
a brilliant mind, with records of friendships with famous people and of various national episodes, and is, 
according to the .Vat' York Evening Post, "one of the most amusing, original, and piquant works ever 
written." Prior to the publication of this edition only 100 copies of his book were printed. 

"Uncle Remus Returns," by Joel Chandler Harris. Ten Uncle Remus stories have been discovered 
which have never before appeared in book form. Three of them are said to be as good as the best that 
UncleRemus has ever told. Interesting alike to children of all ages and to grown-ups. 

"Gallipoli," by John Masefield. 

"The Trail of Ninety-Eight," by Robert W. Service. 

Popular-priced editions by these world renowned poets. 

Other books on order of which many commissary patrons probably have read are: 

"The U. S. and Pan-Germanis:n," by Andre Cheradame. 

"The Three Black Pennya," by Il.-rgesheimer. 

"Gold and Iron," by Hergesheimer. 

"Shock at the Front," by Porter. 

"War and the Spirit of Youth," by Maurice Barres. 



Official Circulars. 



Liberty Day. 

The Panama Canal. 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 5, 1918. 

To all concerned — The President by proclama- 
tion has designated Saturday, October 12, as 
Liberty Day, and has authorized all employees of 
the Federal Government throughout the country, 
whose services can be spared, to be excused from 
their duties on that day. 

This day has been thus designated to cele- 
brate the discovery of the country, and to stimu- 
late general response to the Fourth Liberty Loan, 
and to permit commemorate , pag- 

eants, and other demonstrations to be held. 

I'mier the authority of the President's procla- 
mation, employees of the Canal will be excused, 
where practicable, for the entire day. for the pur- 
poses indicated. Employees paid on a monthly 
or annual basis will be allowed tiirfe under the 
game rules governing payment for Sunday time. 
For other employees, time will be carried the game 
as for an ordinary working day, and payment 
made only for services rendered. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Canal Quarters for Army Officers. 
The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z.. October 1, 1918. 

To all concerned — In accordance with the pro- 
visions of the Army Appropriation Act, 1919, 
approved July 9, 1918, and published as Panama 
Canal circular No. 600-55, individual army offi- 
cers serving with United States troops in the 
Canal Zone will not be charged rental for occu- 



pancy of Panama Canal quarters to which they 
may be assigned, effective July 9, 1918. A charge 
for fuel and light, however, will be collected in 
accordance with existing rates and circulars. 
Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Office Equipment in Private Quarters. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 

Balboa Heights, C Z., September 30, 1918. 

To all concerned — My attention has been called 
to the fact that typewriters and other office 
equipment have been taken by employees to their 
residences for their personal use, without au- 
thority. 

Tnis practice must be discontinued, and no 
Panama Canal office equipment will be permitted 
in private quarters without the prior approval 
of the Executive Office. 

All accountable officials are requested to send 
to this office for approval a list of typewriters 
and other office equipment for which they are 
accountable and which are in use in private 
quarters on October 1, accompanied by a state- 
ment showing the necessity for the use of this 
equipment. 

Chester Harding, Governor. 



Marine Repairs. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C Z., October 4, 1918. 
To all concerned — Effective at once, alterations 
on commercial and Government vessels transiting 
the Canal will not be undertaken by the Mechan- 
ical Division where it is possible. to make a reason- 
ably satisfactory repair. 

No new construction or alterations in existing 
Panama Canal marine equipment will be under- 



88 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



taken by the Mechanical Division without the 
approval of this office. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Accountable Official. 

The Panama Canal, 
Accounting Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z„ September 30, 1918. 
Circular No. 175: 

Effective September 23, 1918, Mr. S. R. Ford 
is designated an accountable official of The 
Panama Canal, vice E. M. Reinhold, and as such, 
will account for all nonexpendable property in 
use in the Gatun quartermaster's district. 

Effective September 19, 1918, Mr. C. Peters is 
designated an accountable official of The Panama 
Canal, vice H. H. Morehead (E. M. Reinhold, 
acting) and as such, will account for all non- 
expendable property in use in the Paraiso-Pedro 
Miguel quartermaster's district. 

H. A. A. Smith, 
Auditor, The Panama Canal. 
Approved: 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Accountable Official. 

The Panama Canal, 
Accounting Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 3, 1918. 
Circular No. 176: 

Effective October 2, 1918, Mr. F. E. Holleran 
is designated an accountable official of The 
Panama Canal, vice Mr. R. C. Jones, and as such, 
will account for all nonexpendable Panama 
Canal property charged to the Fortification 
Division and the District Engineer. 

H. A. A. Smith, 
Auditor, The Panama Canal. 
Approved: 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Accountable Official. 

The Panama Canal, 
Accounting Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 4, 1918. 
Circular No. 177: 

Effective October 1, 1918, Mr. George H. 
Holeman is designated an accountable official 
of The Panama Canal, vice Mr. O. M. Ewing, 
and as such will account for the storehouse stock, 
medical storehouse, Ancon. 

H. A. A. Smith, 
Auditor, The Panama Canal. 
Approved: 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Steamship Ticket Agent. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Superintendent, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 2, 1918. 
To all concerned — Effective October 5, 1918, 
Mr. Frederick Grunewald, Jr., is appointed 
steamship ticket agent, vice Mr. C. J. King, 
resigned. 

S. W. Heald, 
Superintendent. 



Mail Address— Chief Pharmacist. 

The Panama Canal, 
Health Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 1, 1918. 
To all concerned — Effective this date, requisi- 
tions and mail heretofore addressed to the Medical 
Storekeeper, Ancon, should be sent to "Chief 
Pharmacist, Health Department, Ancon." 

A. T. McCormack, 
Chief Health Officer. 



Cattle Industry and Plantation Division. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Cristobal, C Z., September 24, 1918. 
Circular No. 20: 

All concerned — There seems to be some mis- 
understanding relative to the duties of the super- 
visors and foremen in this division. In the future 
please be governed in accordance with the follow- 
ing: 

1. All foremen in charge of live stock, including 
Mindi dairy and hog farm will be under the super- 
vision of Dr. W. J. Taylor. 

2. All foremen in charge of construction work 
and plantations will be under the supervision 
or Mr. L. A. Byrnes. 

3. Mr. McLain, poultry expert, is in direct 
charge of the Summit poultry farm. 

4. Dr. H. L. Casey, veterinarian, will have 
charge of all veterinary work pertaining to both 
the cattle industry and plantations, and instruc- 
tions issued by him in connection with the treat- 
ment of animals will be carried out in detail. 

5. Dr. Taylor, Mr. Byrnes, Dr. Casey, and Mr. 
McLain will report direct to the undersigned. 

Under the foregoing instructions there should 

be no confiiction as to the respective duties of 

employees in a supervisory capacity, and the 

earnest cooperation of all concerned is requested. 

W. B. Brown, 

Supt., Cattle Industry andmPlantalions. 



Examinations by Board of Local Inspectors. 

For chauffeurs' licenses — At the Pacific end of 
the Canal Zone applicants will obtain authority 
for examination from the office of the Board of 
Local Inspectors, room 237, Administration 
Building, Balboa Heights; hours are from 8 to 
12 in the morning, and from 1 to 4 in the after- 
noon. The examination will then be given on 
application to the fire station at Balboa every 
Wednesday and Saturday, between 1.30 and 
4.30 p. m. 

At the Atlantic end, applicants will apply on 
Friday at the office of the Captain of the Port 
of Cristobal, at any time during office hours. 
The necessary forms may be obtained there, 
without application to the office at Balboa Heights, 
and the test will be given as soon as the applica- 
tion is submitted and approved. 

Applicants must provide themselves with 
automobiles for the test. 

For licenses as motor boat navigators — Written 
examination is conducted every other Wednes- 
day in room 304, Balboa Heights, beginning as 
8 a. m., and on the Friday immediately followint 
at the office of the Captain of the Port of Crisg 
tobal, from 9 a. m. until 3 p. m. Application- 
for examination must be submitted at least a 
day previous to the examination; forms may be 
obtained from the office of the board, Balboa 
Heights, or from the Captains of the Ports, or 
from the main office of the Dredging Division 
at Paraiso. 

Demonstration tests will be given on Thursday, 
the day between the written examinations, as 
follows: At Cristobal, by arrangement with the 
Captain of the Port; at Balboa, at 2 p. m., on 
application to the Captain of the Port; and at 
Gamboa, at 8 a. m., by the deputy inspector. 
Applicants must provide themselves with boats 
for the test. 

For licenses as pilots, masters, mates, and marine 
engineers — Written examination only, and only 
at Balboa Heights, room 304, on the same day 
(Wednesday) as the written examination there 
for motor boat navigators. Forms must be sub- 
mitted not later than the day preceding, and may 
be obtained from the same offices as the forms for 
motor boat navigators. The next date on which 
examinations for these licenses and for navigators 
of motor boats will be conducted at Balboa Heights 
is Wednesday, October 16, 1918. 

Geo. J. Vanderslick, Recorder. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



89 



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90 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Half Holiday Liberty Day. 

All Commissaries will close at noon Saturday, October 12. 



Keeping Bread Fresh. 

Bread will remain fresh and in good condition if wrapped in waxed paper and kept 
in a lefiigerator. Another good method is to place bread in a stone jar. 



Sauerkraut. 

Two tons of sauerkraut were taken from the vats in the industrial laboratory re- 
cently and the product, packed in kegs, has been sent to line stores for sale. The 
popularity of kraut is constantly increasing and a cable requisition has been placed 
for 5 tons of white cabbage for immediate shipment from New Orlears, for its manu- 
facture. 

Oatmeal Bread. 

The oatmeal bread recently placed on sale by the Commissary Division is meeting 
with exceptional favor and reports would indicate that many customers prefer it to 
the Victory loaf containing corn meal substitute. 

In this connection it is interesting to note that prior to the entry of the I nited 
States into the European war the use cf rolled oats in the making of biead was practic- 
ally unthought of. Used to a small extent as a substitute in connection with wheat 
flour at the beginning of the wheat conservation campaign, its popularity has steadily 
mounted and it is now one of the most favored of wheat substitutes, for it makes a 
fine-flavored bread, is easily digested, and is of high value in nutrition. The baking 
of bread containing oatmeal as a substitute requires very close attention but the 
result obtained — a rich, nutty flavored loaf of bread — is well worth the attention given. 



Hats. 

In connection with its efforts to conserve various materials used in the manu- 
factuie of wool and fur felt hats, the Conseivation Division of the War Industries 
Board has announced a schedule effective as of September 1, restricting the variety 
of colors in fur felt hats to black and two shades of brown, green, steel, and pearl, 
and permitting the manufacture of wool felt hats in only three additional colors. 
The use of linings, elastics, cords, buttons, and eyelets is to be discontinued and 
the use of imitation leather bands will be encouraged as much as possible. It is 
stated that hat manufacturers are in strong accord with these new conservation 
measures and they declare that styles will vary little or none in shapes or colors from 
those of the past, with the exception, of course, that the use of novelties will be alto- 
gether eliminated. The principal change will be in the matter of rising prices, many 
manufacturers anticipating an increase of from $9 to $15 a dozen above the prices of a 
year ago. 

Standard Works ol Modern Writers. 

In order that customers may be enabled to obtain standard works of modern 
writers at comparatively low pi ices, the Commissary Division has secured from a 
well-known publisher three sample sets, each containing 50 volumes which are on 
display at Ancon, Balbca, and Cristobal retail stores. 1 hese books come in attractive 
format, are hand bound in limp croft leather and from the standpoint of appearance, 
should make a welcome addition to any library. What is more important, the litera- 
ture is of enduring quality. 

After a shoit time these sets will be sent to other commissaries so that all customers 
may examine the books and select such titles as they may desire ordered for them. 
The price is only 56 cents the volume or $28 the set. 

In this connection a recent review in a Boston newspaper commented on the sur- 
prising fact that the demand for Samuel Butler's "The Way of All Flesh" and Nietz- 
che's "Thus Spake Zarathustra" exceeds that for all ethers, including such titles as 
Kipling's "Soldiers Three" and Maeterlinck's "A Miracle of St. Anthony," which 
naturally might be expected to enjoy much wider popularity. A possible explanation 
advanced for the large sale of Nietzche's book, iscuiiosityon the part of the American 
people to learn just what sort of mad philosophy is responsible for the present state 
of mind of the German military and university caste. 





THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA (ANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; Foreign, 11.50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balbi anal Zone, or 

The Panama D. 0. 

Entereda tatter, February 6, 1918, at the Post Office 

. c. /... under the Ac) of March 3, 1879. 

Volume XII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 16, 191 8. No. 9. 

Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be .1 number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted a1 
("anal posl offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not 
posted, persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service 
Board, Balboa Heights (telephone 286): 

Locksmith (male); $1,000 a year, and $3.50 a day; No. 341-amended; November 5, 1918- form 
l son-, age, 20 years and over.* 

Copyist topographic draftsman (n ale and female); Sl.ioo to $2,000 a year; No. 2268-amended • 
supplemental; form 1312; afce, 18 yenrs and over.ft 

Editorial clei lie); $1 200 1 ear; No. 451 amended: form *04 • Octnher 

20, November 24, December 15, 191 8. J ' ' w> - towr 

Assistant in pathological laboi 800 a year; No. 583; form mix- age 

20 years and over; Novembei 5, 1918 t 

stores clerk (male and female ; Grade 1. $1,000 to $1,200; Grade 2 Sl.^OO to SI 600 -i 
year; No. 2014 amendi I er.fi 

Oil gauger (male); $1,200 to $1,800 ayear; orm 1312; age, 20 years and ovei Octobei !9 

1918.*J 

Assistant engineer of tests Ifemale); Grade I, $3.76, $4, and $4.24 a day Grade 2 $4 48 

$4.72, and $4.96 a day; No. 565; foi I tnd over.ft ' ' ' 

Investigator in seed marl 10 a year; No. 569; October 29, 1918- form 

21 IS; age, within reasonable age lii i1 ' 
Toluol expert (male); $1,800 to $3,000 a year; No. $07 amended; form.1312; age 25 years and 

over.f* 

Industrial sp orest products (male); $1,500 to $3,500 a year- No. 572- form hi?- ace 

iver.ft 
Messenger (female); Departmi 10 to $720 a year; No. 571 ; form 304; October 27. 

produi SI. 800 to S2.40!) a year; No. 570; form 2118- age within 

ible age limits. ft 
Plumbing draftsn day; No. 582; form 1512; October 29 1918- ace 

25 J ears and over.* J ' 

Klevator conductor (mal* amended; supplemental; full information contained in original 

announcement No. 251. § 

distant engineer (male); No. 361 I 900 t«. $1 ,500 a vear; age, 25 years and over Full 

information contained in announcement No. 361. Junior engineer (male); age, 20 years and over- 
$900 to $1,500 a year; No 361-amendrrent. 

Assistant inspector of engineerii (4.48 to $5.92 a day; instead of $4.^8 to $4 96 

a day; No. 1268-amended; supplemental. Full information contained in original anr.oum eirent 
No. 1268-amended. 

Physician (male); No. 1957-amended; supplemental. Maximum age limits have been eliminated 
Full information in regard to this examination contained in announcement No. 1957-amended. 

*Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examination is the i-\-t day for filing applications 
and they, must be in the hands of thi Washington prioi to the hour of closing bus 

on thai 

ved at any time until further rotice. 

tM tie applii inl h ift a ssification The 

•Mission will sustain objections of appointing officers to the o i „ e n 

I A. 
|In view of th vrice, and until further notice, subjects of countries allied with the 

United States will be admitted to thi .,] Such p 

may not be certified foi United States citizens on the el 



Weather Conditions in September, 1918. 



Ra'nfall foi the month was below normal over the Pacific section, and over t 
Central section with the following exceptions: Empire, Vigi nd Daru 



. the 
( entral section with the following exceptions: Empire, \ I >. and Darien 

On the Atlantic side the rainf 11 was telow normal at Gatun and above al Brazos 
Brock and Colon. Monthly total : 91 ... U) [970 

al the Gatun Rivei -• al ion. 

The greatesl ai ouni of prei i] itation recorded on any one day was 3.68 inches at 
- Brook on the 5th. 

The aii fall over the Gatun Lake watershed, based on all available records, 

was 12 i, or 4 per cent above tl e 8-year mean, and the average rainfall over 

the Chagres River basin above All.ajuela was 15.29 inches, or 23 per cent above the 
17-year mean, 



92 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



The average air temperatures and air pressure were generally above normal. The 
relative humidity and wind movement were generally below normal, while the evapora- 
tion was below normal on the Atlantic side and above on the Pacific side, and over the 
surface of Gatun Lake. 

The elevations of Gatun Lake in feet above mean sealevel during the month were 
as follows: Maximum, 85.40 on the 30th; minimum, 85.04 on the 19th; mean for 
month, 85.18; evaporation from lake surface, 4.577 inches. 

The following table summarizes the weather conditions for the month: 







Temperature. 


OJ 


Precipitation. 


Wind. 
















, 


6 


t ri 




>> 






Stations. 


sis 

3 H 3 
eg O O 


a 

2 


a 

3 
J 


la 
Q 


a 

3 

a 

'3 


Q 


8.2 


a 

"3 
o 


CS 

c « 

O M 
03 
Si 


» o 
Q.S 


11 


s 

M o 

'3 £ 




d 
.2 

3 


Q 


*Balboa 
Heights 


29.851 


80.8 


91 


Sep. 29 


72 


Sep. 15 


89.6 


7.03 


7.75 


13 


4,050 


N.W. 


27 


N. 


Sep. 9 


29.854 


80.0 


87 


Sep. 19 


72 


Sep. 10 


88.2 


15.34 


12.67 


20 


4,988 


W. 


26 


s.w. 


Sep. 6 



*Formerly Ancon. 



Comparative Wind Records— Balboa Heights and Sosa Hill, September, 1918. 

The wind movement for the month of September was 64 per cent greater on Sosa 
Hill than at Balboa Heights, the average hourly velocity being 9.2 miles on Sosa Hill 
and 5.6 miles at Balboa Heights. 

Northwest winds prevailed at both stations. The prevailing wind direction was from 
the northwest or north 71 per cent of the time at Balboa Heights and 74 pet cent oi 
the time on Sosa Hill. 

The maximum velocities recorded during the month were 36 miles an hour from 
the east on the 30th on Sosa Hill, and 27 miles an hour from the north on the 9th 
at Balboa Heights. 

Note. — Elevation of anemometer on Sosa Hill 35 feet above ground and 405 feet 
above mean sealevel. 

Elevation of anemometer at Balboa Heights 97 feet above ground and 231 feet 
above mean sealevel. 

At The Aspinwall. 

At Hotel Aspinwall, Taboga, last week there were 52 guests. Fifty- 
nine were served at breakfast on Sunday morning, 79 at dinner, and 
23 at supper. The opening of school has affected the patronage of the 
hotel. It is expected that this will be offset in a few weeks, however, 
when the electric-light installation will be completed, and dances 
may be given. 

Night School. 

Enrollment in the evening classes of the Balboa High School will 
occur at 7 p. m., Monday, October 21, 1918. Classes offering the 
following subjects will be organized: Applied or practical mathematics, 
English grammar and literature, beginning and advanced Spanish, 
typewriting and shorthand, and bookkeeping. A class in the history 
of the Great War will be provided in case of sufficient demand. 

Classes will meet from 7 to 9 twice a week in the Balboa school 
building. With the exception of the Spanish, all classes will meet on 
Wednesdays and Fridays, unless there is quite a number of people 
wishing to take more than one subject. 

The terms are $4 per month per course, payable each month in 
advance. Typewriting and shorthand are given in one course. 

All teachers are highly qualified. 

Because the Zone is so far removed from extra-educational advan- 
tages it is believed that many more than last year will realize the 
unusual opportunity offered by the evening high school courses. But 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



93 



one section of each class will be arranged. To be sure of a chance to 
enroll you should be present the first evening. Last semester the 
enrollment was 14 in English, 29 in Mathematics, 30 in Spanish, and 
50 in the commercial work. 



NOTICE. 

Third Liberty Loan Bonds are now being mailed out. If you have changed 
your address since your application was signed last May, advise the Col- 
lector's office in writing and you will receive bonds without delay. 



Joint Commission. 



Decision of the Umpire. 

In the matter of the claim of Genarina 
Perez de Icaza et al for property known 
as "Chorrillo de la Pena" located in 
Ancon near Panama. Amount claimed: 
$51,257. 

Decision of the Umpire, award No. 186, 
docket No. 1474. 

The tract of land, subject of this claim, 
known as "Chorrillo de la Pena" (named 
from a spring located on the property) 
is situated in Ancon adjacent to the City 
of Panama, and has an area of 14,600 
square meters of which area 7,500 square 
meters are claimed by the Panama Free- 
hold Estate Company Limited. 



Together with Genarina Perez de 
Icaza there are the following claimants: 
Clementina Perez deCaballero, Mercedes 
Perez de Arias, Julio Perez, Ricardo 
Perez, Eloisa Ramos, Josefina Bermudez, 
and Victor Manuel Alvarado. 

Both sides legally represented ap- 
peared before the Joint Commission on 
December 10, 1917, for the trial of this 
claim which was the first to be heard 
alter the appointment of the new members 
<>l the Joint Commission on the part of 
the Government of the United States. 
During the tried an attempt was made to 
continue the practice of some attorneys 
before the Commission, of attacking 
high officials of the Government of the 
I'nited States and absent ex-members 
of the Commission. Ignoring the respect 
due an International Commission in 
which the Government of the United 
Stales is represented, the attorney for 
the claimants (an American citizen) re- 
ferred in abusive terms to an ex-Governor 
of the Canal Zone. 

Basing his estimate on speculative 
values (called 1912 values) he endeavored 
to convince the Commission that the 
"Chorrillo de la Pena" tract should be 
appraised at S6 per square meter, and 
in addition the claimants should be 
allowed interest at 6 per cent from 1912 
up to the present time. The value then 



El Arbitro de la Comision Mixta de 
Tierras Estados Unidos de Ameri- 
ca — Republica de Panama, Pan- 
ama. 

Reclamacion de Genarina Perez di 
Icaza, et alii por el predio denominado 
Chorrillo de la Pena situado en Ancon, 
ccrca de Panama. Canlidad reclamada: 
$51,257. 

Decision del Arbitro, laudo No. 186, 
expediente No. 1474. 

El predio conocido con el nombre de 
"Chorrillo de la Pena" (nombre derivado 
de un ojo de agua existente en dichas 
tierras) situado en la parte de Ancon 
colindante con la ciudad de Panama, 
objeto de la presente reclamacion, consta 
de 14,600 metros cuadrados, de cuya area 
reciama 7,500 metros cuadrados la 
Panama Freehold Estate Company Lim- 
ited. 

Con Generina Perez de Icaza son 
reclamantes ademas: Clementina Perez 
de Caballero, Mercedes Perez de Arias, 
Julio Perez, Ricardo Perez, Eloisa Ramos, 
Josefina Bermudez, y VictOi Manuel 
Alvarado. 

Ambas partes legal mente representa- 
das, comparecieron en la audiencia piibli- 
ca celebrada ante la Comision, para el 
fallo de esta reclamacion, el dia 10 de 
Diciembre de 1917, proximo pasado. 

Era la primera vez que se reunia la 
Comision despuesde nombrados lanuevos 
Comisionados por parte del Gobierno de 
los Estados Unidos. 



En esta audiencia, el abogado de la 
parte reclamante, pretendio reanudar 
los procedimientos que Venian prevale- 
ciendo en las vistas de estas reclamaciones 
en las que, haciendo caso omiso del 
respeto debido a un Tribunal Inter- 
nacional, en el que son parte dos Na- 
ciones, atacabase denigrantemente a 



94 



THE PANAMA canal record 



of this property would be $87,600 and 
the interest at 6 per cent from December 
5, 1912, the date of the depopulation 
order of the Canal Zone until December 
10, 1917, when the case was heard, would 
amount to $31,623.60 which addedto the 
first figures makes a total of SI 19,223.60. 
Tnis sum represents his valuation of 
an unimproved piece of land of a link 
more than one and one-half hectares in 
extension, less than half of which is 
available for building purposes. 



On the other hand the attorney for the 
Government of the United States stated 
that in his opinion the "Chorrillo de 
la Pena" tract was not worth more than 
$500. 

1 must insist upon pointing out how 
injurious to t he claimants are the met Ik »ds 
employed by some of the attorneys. With 
reference to the abusive language used, 
I have publicly and officially announi i d 
my intention not to tolerate it at the 
hearings over which I preside, and their 
persistant efforts in placing upon these 
lands a fictitious value only results in 
the Commission's disregard of their 
arguments, and the loss of valuable time 
at the hearings. This is also a factor in 
causing the Commissioners to be so 
widely divided in opinion that the de- 
cisions are most difficult lor the I'mpire. 

The Joint Commission as now con- 
stituted endeavored from the first to 
maintain its dignity, and began by 
seriously admonishing the attorney iii 
question to refrain from making disre- 
spectful comments. As a result the 
hearings of the Commission have gradu- 
ally changed, and are now free from dis- 
respectful remarks, and the indications 
of mutual concessions, respect and con- 
sideration are gratifying to note. 

During the course of the hearing of 
the above claim this same attorney ad- 
mitted that exaggerated demands were 
made and stated: "There is one claim 
which we ourselves filed here for $125,01)0 
which I never went into very thoroughly. 



elevados funcionarios del Gobierno de los 
Estados Unidos, asi como a ex Miembros 
de la Comision Mixta, ausentes por 
consiguiente. El abogado en cuestion 
(cuidadano Americano) se expreso en 
terminos injuriosos respecto de un ex 
Gobernador de la Zona del Canal; y 
echando mano de los preciosde especu- 
lacion llamados "Valores de 1912," 
pretendio convencer al Tribunal que el 
valor de aquel predio era de $6 por 
metro cuadrado, y que ademas debia 
abonarse intereses al 6 per cent, a partir 
del afio 1912. 

En su consecuencia, y haciendo uso de 
los guarismos facilitados por el abogado 
de la parte reclamante, el valor del predio 
seria de $87,600, y los intereses al 6 per 
cent contandolos desde el 5 de Diciembre 
de 1912, fecha de la orden de dcspoblacion 
de la Zona, hast a el 10 de Diciembre 
de 1917 en que tenia Iugar la vista de la 
causa, representarian $31,623.60 que 
sumados a la cifra anterior nos dan un 
toted de $119,223.60, como precio de tin 
terrcno inculto de poco mas de hectarea 
y media de extension, del que solo 
menos de la mitad es urbanizable. 

A su turno el abogado de! Gobierno de 
los Estados Unidos, declaro que en su 
opinion el "Chorrillo de la Peha" no 
valia mas de $500. 

No me cansare de hacer notar cuan 
perjudiciales son a los intereses de los 
reclamantes los procedimientosempleados 
por dichos abogados. Sobre su libert- 
ad de lenguaje tengo publica y oficial- 
mente declarado mi proposito de no 
t> lerarla en las vistas que se celebren 
bajo mi presidencia; y con respecto a su 
insistencia pretendiendo conceder a estas 
tierras un valor de que carecen, el result- 
ado es que la Comision tiene que hacer 
caso omiso de tales pretensiones, resul- 
tando un tieni] o lastimosamente perdido 
el empleado en estas audiencias, o 
contribuye a distanciar Us opiniones de 
los miembros de la Comision, a un ex- 
tremoque es imposibleal arbitro prOcurar 
aproximarlas. 

La Comision Mixta tal y como esta 
constituida actualmente, procuro desde 
el primer moment o mantenersu prestigio, 
y a dicho fin comenzo por amonestar 
seriamente al abogado de referencia por 
las libertades de lenguaje que se habia 
permit ido; y poco a poco, encauzo todo 
tie manera, que ha hecho posible una 
marcha libre de asperezas, precursora de 
mutuas concesiones, respeto y aprecio, 
que es muy grato consignar. 

El mismo abogado de la parte recla- 
mante, en el trascursode la vista de esta 
causa llego a declarar sin reparo lo 
exagerado de sus pretensiones al con- 
fesar que el mismo tenia presentada ante 
al Comision Mixta una reclamacion 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



95 



1 will frankly state that I do not think 
it is worth one twenty-fifth of thai 
amount. (Page 378 of the transcript.) 



It was agreed at the trial that 7.100 
square meters of the total area bel 
to the claimants herein, and thai 7,500 
square meters were in dispute Oct ween 
the claimants and the Panama Freehold 
e Company, Ltd. The Commis- 
sion also agreed thai of the 14,600square 
meters, 6,000 were available for building 
purposes and the remaining 8,600 were 
not available for building purpi 

Counsel for the Government of the 
ed States, as well as the attorney 
representing the claimants, agreed to the 
submission of this case on the evidence 
as to the value adduced at the hearingof 
the "San Lazaro," "Punta Mala" and 
'Huerta de Vega" claims. In view of 
this agreement 1 have announced that 
I do not consider the opinions of the 
Commission in this case necessary. 
However, \\.*n. Hun New, Commis- 
sioner on the part of the Government 
of the United States had written a very 
able opinion at the time this case was 
certified to me for decision, and this 
opinion will be sent to counsel for the 
rnment, counsel for the claimant-, 
and to the proper authorities for their 
Information. 

The members of the Commission have 
Igreed as to the validity of claimants' 
title to 7,100 square meters of the area 
claimed, and they have also agreed upon 
points which for the firsl time the} 
have clearly set out in the certificate 
of disagreement. They did not, however, 
reach an agreement as to the value and 
thee lined tome on that ques- 

tion alone. 

On September 27, 1917, I announced 
intem ion to consider as final all 
unanimous conclusions of the Commis- 
sion, and to decide only those questions 
refern d to me by reason of disagreement. 
i therefore consider as final the decisions 
of the Commission in the pr< 
which are set out in the follow 



Certificate of Disagreement. 

hi the matter of the claim of Genarina 
Peres de I for property known 

$s Chorrillo de la Pena. 

Rule No. 378, docket Xo. 1474. 

Pursuant to the provisions of Article 

f the Treaty between the United 

- of America and the Republic of 

Panama, ratified February 26,. 1904, the 

Commission hereby desires to bring to 

luly appointed 



por Si 25,000, sobre la que no 1 
hecho un estudio a fondo, que con fran 
aba no valia una venti- 
cincoava parte de lo rednmado (p.. 
378 de! testimonio). 

En la vista quedo probado el derecho 
de los reclamantesa 7,100 idra- 

ital, quedando 7,500 en 
controversial con la Panama Free' 

e Company Limited. Asi mismo 
quedo sent; do i . ' • la adaptibili- 

dad de] terreno, que de los 14,600 metros 
cuadrados, son urbanizal I y no 

son los 8,600 restantes. 

Tan 
Estados Unid< la parte re- 

nte, convinieron en que para el 
avaluo del "Chorrillo de la Pena" 
tuvieran en consideracion las reclama- 
ciones de los predios de "San Lazaro." 
"Punta Mala" y "Huerta de \ 
su vista he comunicado .' la Comision 
no hecesitai para el fallo de la presente 
n las opiniones escritas de los 
Comisionados. LI Hon. Burt New. com- 
isionado por el Gobierno de los Est 
Unidos tenia, sin embargo, escrita su 
opinion, cuando luce presente mi propo- 
sing Dicho brillante informe debera* 
viarse, como referencia, a 1' s abogados 
del < iobierno de los Estadi <- Un 
de la parte reclamante y a las autoridades 
correspondientes. 

Los miembros de la Comision Mixta 
han reconocido la validez del titulo de los 
reclamantes sobre los 7,100 metros cua- 
drados del area demandada y se han 
puesto de acuerdo acerca de otros 
ticulares que por primera vez se incluyen 
en substancioso resumen en el certificado 
de desci informidad, sometido al at 1 iil r< 
por no haber Uegado a un acu< rdo res 
pecto al valor. 

En 27 de Sep' del ano pasado 

manifeste mi proposito de considerai 
con caracter definitivo cuantas conclusi 
ones acordara unanimente la Com 
ision, aunque, por desacuerdo 
algun punto, pasara despues a mi fallo la 
reclamacion. De confo.anidad con 
proposito, considero con tal caracter las 
1 or la t lomisi 
I ual, >■ de que se hace constancia 
en el siguiente. 

Certificado de Discordancia. 

Reclamacion de < 

fcaza el al por la propiedad conocida 
nombre de "Chorrillo de la 

Fallo No. 37S, expedieute No. 1474 
De acuerdo eon lo dispuesto en el 
Artlculo XV del Tratado entre los Es 
tadbs le America y la Repi 

de Panama, ratificado el 26 de Febrero 
de l l >04. la Comision pone en conoci- 
miento del Arbitro nombrado de 



96 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



under the said Treaty, that the Com- 
mission has been unable to reach an 
agreement in the above-entitled matter 

on the following, to-wit: 

THE QUESTION OF VALUE. 

The Commission herewith certifies 
this agreement to the Umpire appointed 
under the Treaty as provided for in 
Article XV thereof. 

It is further hereby certified to the 
said Umpire that this Commission has 
agreed, and does hereby agree, upon the 
following matters, to-wit: 

1. That the area of the lands involved 
in the above-entitled claim is 14,600 
square meters; 

2. That 6,000 square meters of the 
said total area are available for building 
purposes; 

3. That 8,600 square meters of said 
total area are not available for building 
purposes; 

4. That of the 14,600 square meters 
above mentioned 7,100 square meters are 
the property of the claimants; 

5. That of the said 14,600 square 
meters the title to 7,500 square meters 
is in dispute, such portion being claimed 
by said claimants and also by the Pana- 
ma Freehold Estate Company, Limited, 
a corporation intervenor herein; 

6. That such amount as may be 
awarded as the value of the said 7,500 
square meters in dispute shall be depos- 
ited with the District Court of the Canal 
Zone, Balboa Division, until such lime 
as the said Court shall have determined 
the conflict existing as to the ownership 
of the said 7,500 square meters of land; 

7. That of the 7,500 square meters of 
land in dispute as aforesaid, 750 square 
meters are available for building pur- 
poses, and 6,750 square meters are not 
available for building purposes; 

8. That of the 7,100 square meters 
belonging to the claimants 5,250 square 
meters are available for building pur- 
poses, and 1,850 square meters are not 
available for building purposes; 

9. That the amount of such award as 
may be made for the 7,100 square meters 
which is above found to be the property 
of the claimants, and the award for 
such other property as may be found to be 
the property of said claimants in the 
7,500 square meters in dispute, shall be 
distributed as follows: 



a. To Genarina Perez de Icaza, one- 
seventh (1/7) thereof; 

b. To Clementina Perez de Caballero, 
one-seventh (1/7) thereol 



formidad con dicho Tratado, que la 
Comision no ha podido Uegar a un 
acuerdo en el negocio arriba expresado 
sob re. 

LA CUESTION DEL VALOR. 

La Comision certifica esta discor- 
dancia al Arbitro nombrado de acuerdo 
con el Tratado, segun Io dispone su 
Articulo XV. Se certifica ademas al 
susodicho Arbitro que la Comision esta 
de acuerdo sobre los siguientes puntos, 
a saber : 

1 . Que el area de las tierras de que trata 
esta reclamacion es de 14,600 metros 
cuadrados. 

2. Que 6,000 metros cuadrados de 
dicha area total son adaptables para edi- 
ficacion. 

3. Que 8,600 metros cuadrados de 
dicha area total no son adaptables para 
edificacion. 

4. Que de los 14,600 metros cuadr; dos 
arriba expresados 7,100 metros cuadrados 
son de propiedad de los reclamantes. 

5. Que de los 14,600 metros cuadrados, 
el titulo de propiedad sobre 7,500 esta en 
disputa, pues dicha portion es reclamada 
por los susodichos reclamantes y tam- 
bien por la Panama Freehold Estate 
Company Ltd., Compania que figura 
co mo tercerista en esta reclamacion. 

6. Que la suma que sea fallada como 
valor de los expresados 7,500 metros 
cuadrados en disputa debe ser depositada 
en la Corte del Distrito del Zona del 
Canal, Division de Balboa, hasta tanto 
que dicha Corte decida el conflicto 
existente sobre la propiedad de los suso- 
dichos 7,500 metros cuadrados de 
terreno. 

7. Que de los 7,500 metros cuadrados 
de terreno en disputa como queda ex- 
puesto, 750 metros cuadrados son adapta- 
bles para edificacion, y 6,750 metros 
cuadrados no son adaptables para 
edificacion. 

8. Que de los 7,100 metros cuadrados 
pertenecientes a los reclamantes, 5,250 
metros cuadrados son adaptables para 
edificacion y 1,850 metros cuadrados no 
son adaptables para edificacion. 

9. Que la suma que se mande pagar 
por medio del fallo que se profiera como 
valor de los 7,100 metros cuadrados que 
segun se ha dicho son de propiedad de los 
reclamantes, y la que se mande pagar 
como valor de cualquiera otra parte de la 
propiedad que se decida ser de perten- 
encia de los dichos reclamantes, de entre 
los 7,500 metros cuadrados en disputa, 
deben distribuirse de la manera siguiente: 

(a) A Genarina Perez de Icaza una 
sept i ma (1/7) parte; 

A Clementina Perez de Caballero 
una sept i ma 1 1/7) parte; 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



97 



i. To Mercedes Perez de Arias, one- 
seventh (1/7) thereof; 

</. To Julio Perez, one-seventh (1/7) 
thereof; 

e. T<> Ricardo Perez, one-seventh (1/7) 
i hereof; 

f. To Eloisa Ramos, mother and heir- 
at-law of Benilda Perez, deceased, one- 
seventh ( 1/7 I thereof; 

£. To Josefina Bermudez, mother and 
heir-at-law of Elida Perez de Alvarado, 
tsed, three-twenty-eighths (3/28), 
i hereof; 

h. To Victor Manuel Alvarado, hus- 
band and heir-at-law of Elida Perez de 
Ab/arado, deceased, one-twenty-eighth 
thereof; 
Done a1 the National Palace, Panama-, 
Republic of Panama, this 22d day of 
[anuary, 1910. 

(Sgd.) Federico Boyd, 
(Sgd.) George A. Connolly. 
Sgd.) Burt New, 
!.) R. J. Alfaro. 

Commissioners. 
Inasmuch as counsel for the Govern- 
ment and counsel for the claimants agreed 
to the consideration of the "San Lazaro," 
"Punta Mala," and "Ilncrta de Vega" 
claims in the appraisal of the "Chorrillo 
de la Pena" tract, and in view of the fact 
that those claims have already been 
decided by the undersigned Umpire, a 
word of explanation in regard to those 
decisions would seem advisable. 



In estimating the total amount in 
each one of my decisions I have taken 
into consideration the different elements 
of value which applied to each case. I 
not, however, allowed the price to 
determine the value, but rather the value 
to determine the price. My award, 
therefore, in the one case is not based on 
my award in the other. 

Taking each case separately, and con- 
sidering only the land in the "San La- 
zaro" claim, it would not have been just 
to have appiaised the swampy portion 
of thai tract at the same rate as that 

portion adjacent to the I. a Boca Road. 
It is impossible, therefore, to determine a 
fixed appraisal applicable to .ill i laiuis. 



On the Other hand, the hilly portion 
of the Punta Mala trad decreased the 
value of the whole tract considering its 
availability for building purposes, but 
the existence of a quarry in that portion 
offset the depreciation which it sulk-red 
1>\ reason of its to] ogi aphy. 

And in the "lluerta de Vega" claim 
the improvements made by Eladio I 



(c) A Mercedes Perez de Arias, una 
septima (1/7) parte; 

(<1) A Julio Perez, una septima (1/7) 
parte: 

(e) A Ricardo Perez, una septima (1/7) 
parte ; 

(/) A Eloisa Ramos, madre y heredera 
legit i ma de la difunta Benilda Perez, 
'ptinia (1/7) parte; 

(g) A Josefina Bermudez, madre y 
heredera legitima de la difunta Elida 
Perez de Alvarado, tres veintiochcavas 
(3/28) partes; 

(h) A Victor Manuel Alvarado, con- 
yuge superstite, y heredero legitimo de la 
difunta Elida Perez de Alvarado, una 
veintiochoava (1/28) parte. 

Dado en el Palacio Nacional de Pana- 
ma. Republics de Panama a los 28 dias 
del mes de Enero de 1918. 

(Fdo) Federico Boyd, 
(Fdo) George A. Connolly, 
(Fdo) Burt New, 
(Fdo) R. J. Alfaro. 

Comisionados." 

Desde el momento en que los abogados 
tanto del Gobierno de los Estados Unidos 
como de la parte reclamante, han con- 
venido respecto de que para el avaluo 
de este predio se tuvieran en consider- 
acion las rcclamaciones de "San Lazaro," 
"Punta Mala" y "Huerta de Vega," el 
hecho de que estas reclamaciones habian 
sido de antemano falladas por el arbitro 
que subscribe, aconsejan una aclaracion 
con respecto a los laudosen los menciona- 
dos casos. 

Para llegar a la suma total en cada una 
de sus adjudicaciones, he tenido pre- 
sente los diversos elementos de valor que 
concurrian en cada caso. No he pro- 
cedido pues sujetando el valor al precio 
sino el precio al valor. De manera que 
la adjudicacion de uno no es el resultado 
de la proporcion concedida al otro. 

Tomando cada caso separadamente y 
como ejemplo, y considerando en el de 
"San Lazaro" solamente el terrene, no 
habrfa sido justo adjudicar igual valor 
a la parte pantanosa de aquel predio. que 
a la colindante con el camino de la I 
y por tanto, no es posible obtener un 
couciente fijo, aplicable a las demas 
reclamaciones, por la divisi6n de la suina 
adjudicada, por el numero de hectareas de 
que consta la tinea, descontadas las 
mejoras. 

En el de "Punta Mala," por el con- 
trario, teniamos que la seccion mon- 
tanosa del predio restaba valor al todo, 
considerado como urbanizable, pero la 
existencia de una camera en aquella parte 
compensaba el deprecio que esperimen- 
taba a consequencia de su configuration. 

Y en la "I Iueri a de Vega," las obras de 
diversa indole llevadas a cabo por el 



98 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



considerably increased the value of his 
land, and also added to the value of the 
lot of land ceded to Valdes and Morales, 
which increase in value was not over- 
looked at the time their claim was de- 
cided. 

By this process of reasoning we arrived 
at the final decisions equitable in them- 
selves and legal under the treaty which 
governs these expropriations. 

In the present case, we must take into 
consideration the fact that although the 
tract in question is adjacent to the 
"Huerta de Vega" property it lacks those 
elements of value which were the result 
of the energy and labor expended by the 
owner of that property. Those elements 
constituted the particular value of that 
tract and were taken into consideration 
at the time his award was made. Even 
though the portion of thi tract which 
is available for building purposes is 
comparatively level, the remaining por- 
tion forms the steep slope of Ancon Hill, 
and rises to an elevation of 100 feet above 
the level of the road. 

In view of the above, the Umpire finds 
the value of the tract known as "Chor- 
rillo de la Pena" situated in Ancon near 
Panama, of an area of 14,600 square 
meters, 6,000 of which are available for 
building purposes and 8,600 of which are 
not available for building purposes, to be 
the sum of five thousand one hundred 
fifty dollars ($5,150). Of this amount 
he finds the value of the 7,100 square 
meters belonging to Genarina Perez de 
Icaza et al, to be the sum of three 
thousand eighty-seven and 50/100 dol- 
lars, ($3,087.50). 



senor Eladio Lasso mejoraron consider- 
ablemente su predio, beneficiando el 
lote que cedio a los senores Valdes y 
Morales, beneficio que tuvimos en con- 
sideracion al hacer el avaluo del mismo. 

De esta suerte hemos llegado a las 
adjudicaciones finales, equitativas en 
si y legales por ajustarse al Tratado que 
gobierna estas reclamaciones. 

En el caso presente hemos de hacer 
notar que aunque el predio linda con la 
"Huerta de Vega," carece de aquellos 
elementos de valor debidos a la actividad 
y trabajo del dueno de aquella, que con- 
stituian la peculiar caracteristica de 
aquel predio, y que se tuvieron en cuenta 
al dictar el laudo. Mientras la parte 
urbanizable es relativamente plana, el 
resto lo forma un repecho contra el Cerro 
de Ancon que se eleva hasta 100 pies 
sobre el nivel del camino. 



Teniendo en consideracion la situacion, 
extension y adaptibilidad del terreno, ava- 
luamos el predio denominado "Chorrillo 
de la Pena," situado en Ancon, cerca de la 
Ciudad de Panama, consistente en 14,600 
metros cuadrados de los que 6,000 son 
urbanizables, y 8,600 no lo son, en Cinco 
Mil Ciento Cincuenta dollars ($5,150). 
De esta suma corresponde a Genarina 
Perez de Icaza, et alii, en concepto de 
duenos legitimos de 7,100 metros cuadra- 
dos de dicho predio, la caritidad de Tres 
Mil Ochenta Siete dollars con cinquenta 
centavos ($3,087.50) en la forma siguente: 

Genarina Perez de Icaza S441 .07 

Clementina Perez de Cabal- 

lero 441.07 

Mercedes Perez de Arias .... 441.07 

Julio Perez 441.07 

Ricardo Perez 441 . 07 

Eloisa Ramos 441 . 07 

Josefina Bermudez 330.81 

Victor Manuel Alvarado 110.27 

Total S3. 087. 50 

La cantidad de dos mil sesenta y 
dos dollars con cincuenta centavos 
($2,062.50) correspondiente al area de 
7,500 metros cuadrados en disputa entre 
los reclamantes y la Panama Freehold 
Estate Company Limited, sera deposi- 
tada en la Corte de Distrito de la Zona 
del Canal, para que por la misma se 
dilucide el derecho a la referida area y se 
conceda su valor a su legitimo dueno. 



Therefore, an award is hereby made against the Unite. 1 States of America in the 
total sum of $5,150, U. S. currency, of which amount the sum of $3,087.50, U. S. cur- 
rency, shall be paid to the persons hereinafter namsd in the amounts shown alter their 
names, for all right, title, and interest which they may possess or may have poss 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



99 



in and to theproperty known as "Chorrillo de la I'ctia." located in Ancon, subject of 
claim dockci No. 1474. including all damages of whatever nature sustained through 
the expropriation of this property by the United Slates of America. 

To Genarina Perez de Icaza $441 07 

To Clementina Perez de Caballero 441 .07 

To Mercedes Perez de Arias 441 .07 

To Julio Perez 441 .07 

To Ricardo Perez 441 .07 

To Eloisa Ramos 441 .07 

To Josefina Bermudez 3.30.81 

To Victor Manuel Alvarado 110.27 

Total $3,087 .50 

This award shall be paid on or before the 10th day of November, 1918, and if 
payment or tender of payment is no1 made on or before that date, said award shall 
thereaf er bear interest at the rate of six pei centum per annum until paid. 

The balance of $2,062.50, United States currency, representing my valuation of the 
7,500 square meters in dispute between the above claimants and the Panama Free- 
hold Estate Company, Limited, is hereby ordered deposited with the District Court 
of the Canal Zone until that court shall have determined the conflict existing as to the 
ownership ol i his portion ol the "( !horrillo de la Pena" tract. 



Done in English and Spanish in the 
National Palace, Panama, on the 10th 
day of October. 1918. 

(Sgd.j Manuel \Y.\i is y Merino, 

Umpire. 



(Sigue la orden de pagO en favor de los 
recla mantes.) 

Dado en el Palacio Nacional de Pana- 
ma en espanol e ingles a los 10 dias del 
mes de ( >ctobre, 1917. 

(Fdo) Manuel Walls y Merino, 

Arbitro. 



Official Circulars. 



Personnel Transfer Between Departments. 
The Panama Canal, 
Execu 1 1 vr; Office, 
Balboa HEIGHTS, C. Z., October 11, 1918. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

Due to the present difficulty in so uring em 
ployees of certain classes there has been some 

nit regarding offers ofi employment 
by tin- head o* one department to an employee in 
another department without the consent of the 
head ol tin- department concei ned, 

No application of an employee to ti n 
should be considered unless such applicant lias the 
nl ol the head of bis department to make 
such application, and encouragement must i 
given to employees which would be detrimental 
to the work of the department in which they are 
• tnployed. 

Attention is invited to orders issued on this 

I in Circular No. 603, paragraphs <> and 7. 
a- follows: 

"6. Xo officer nor employee of one department 

shall offer indui ements to an employee in another 

department to transfer, or to resign with the 

expectation ol re-employment. 

"7. Transfers from one department to another 
de only with consent of the depart- 
uom which the employee is to be trans- 
ferred. The transfer will he effected through 
the office of the Executive Secretary, and must 
Le approved by the Governor." 

Chester Harding, 

• nor. 



Copper and Brass. 

The Panama CANAL, 
EXECUTIVl 

Balboa Heigh is, C. Z., October 8, 1918. 
.•1// concerned — A considerable quantity of 
scrap brass and copper is being stolen an.! 
to scrap dealers in Colon and Panama. To avoid 



such losses it is necessary to provide bins or 
boxes with locking facilities. All District Quar- 
termasters and heads of departments and divi- 
sions are requested to immediately provide such 
Loves and to keep scrap metal, such as brass and 
copper, undei lock and key until ready for ship- 
ment. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor, 



Monthly Report of Transfers of Rolling 
Stock. 

The Panama Canal, 
Accounting Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., August 16, 1918. 
Circular No. 174: 

Ali accountable officials — Effective August l. 
1918, Monthly Report ol Transfers of Rolling 
Stock. Form A-346, will be discontinued. Here- 
after invoicing officials will promptly furnish the 
Mechanical Division with a copy of all papers 
covering transfers, sales, or condemnations of 
rolling stock. 

II. A. A. Smith, 
Auditor, The Panama Canal. 
Approved : 
Chester Harding, 
' nor. 



Acting General Storekeeper. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
BalbOA Heights, C. Z., October 9, 1918. 
To all concerned — Effective on or about October 
10, or the date on which Mr. M. D. Smith enters 
on leave, Mr. P. G. Illwitzer will be in charge 
of storehouse operations as acting general store- 
keeper. 

R. K. Morris, 
Approved : Chief Quartermaster. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



100 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Fortification Division Personnel. 

The Panama Canal, 
Dept. of Operation and Maintenance, 
Office of the District Engineer, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 4, 1918. 
To all concerned — Effective October 1, 1918, 
Mr. G. V. Barril, Junior Engineer, will be in 
local charge of the Atlantic District of the Forti- 
fication Division vice Mr. R. C. Jones, Assistant 
Engineer, resigned. 

Mr. W. F. Grimes. Jr., Junior Engineer, will 
be in charge of the Pacific District of the Forti- 
fication Division vice Mr. G. V. Barril, trans- 
ferred, as well as in charge of the drafting office. 
Both Mr. Barril and Mr. Grimes will report 
to Mr. F. E. Holleran, assistant engineer, as 
heretofore. 

F. E. Holleran, A ssistant Engineer. 
Approved: 

C. H. Cunningham, 

Major, Corps of Engineers. 



Stages of the Chagres and the Lakes. 

The maximum elevations of the Chagres River, 
Gatun Lake and Miraflores Lake, in feet above 
mean sealevel, during the two weeks ending at 
midnight of Saturday, October 12, were as fol- 
lows: 



1 


Chagres River 


Gatun Lake 


Mira- 
flores 
Lake. 


Date 


Vigia 


Alha- 
juela 


Gam- 
boa 


Gatun 


Sun., Sept. 29 
Mon., Sept. 30 . 

Tues., Oct. 1 

Wed., Oct. 2 , 
Thurs., Oct. 3 

Fri., Oct. 4 

Sat.. Oct.Jj 

Mon., Oct. 7 

Tues., Oct. 8 

Wed., Oct. 9 

Thurs., Oct. 10... 
Fri., Oct. 11 . 
Sat., Oct. 12 


127.80 
127.60 
134.45 
129.50 
128.30 
128.00 
127.80 
127.75 
133.15 
131.00 
127.85 
127.70 
131.20 
(*) 


92.91 
92.57 
98.40 
95.00 
93.43 
92.91 
93 .05 
92.80 
97.45 
96.70 
93.04 
92.64 
96.03 
(*) 


85.46 
85.48 
85.80 
85.78 
85.62 
85.65 
85 .58 
85.65 
85.85 
85.80 
85.70 
85.72 
85.79 
85.93 


85.38 53.80 

85.39 54.00 
85.74 54.50 
85.74! 53.90 
85.641 53.95 
85.60 54.00 
85.57 54.02 
85.611 54.30 
85. 66 1 54.30 
85.67i 54.36 
85.60 54.30 
85.65 54.06 
85.71' 54.24 
85.82 54.34 


Height of low water 
to nearest foot. 


126 .o! 91.0 





*Chagres River telephone out of order. 
September Rainfall for Three Years. 



Stations. 



Pacific section — 

Balboa 

Balboa Heights 

Miraflores 

Pedro Miguel 

Rio Grande 
Central section — 

Culebra 

Camacho 

Empire . . 

Gamboa 

Juan Mina .. . 

Alhajuela... . 

Vigia 

Frijoles. 

Trinidad 

Monte Lirio 
Atlantic section— 

Gatun 

Brazos Brook 

Colon .... 



1916 1917 



6.97 
8.02 
5.38 
10.43 
10.22 

10.42 
10.57 

9.21 
11.37 
14.59 
14.96 
20.64 

6.65 

8.57 

9 

8.24 
13.03 
10.41 



1918 



9.41 
11.53 
14.25 
11.78 
11 .39 



6.58 
7.03 
6.97 

7.27 
7.81 



13.05 10.01 

9.95J 9.12 

11 .44 9.25 

9.93i 7.00 

11.51, 11.53 

9.92i 11.07 

10.67] 13.24 

13.78 12.87 

8.44 9.04 

14.10 12.06 

12.2ol 7.27 

13.31i 13.79 

17.67 15.34 



fi.92 


20 


7.75 


22 


9.22 


10 


8.83 


11 


10.36 


14 


10.74 


29 


10.31 


13 


8.78 


15 


10.41 


36 


11.85 


8 


11.69 


20 


13.13 


11 


1 1 .03 


7 


11.23 


11 


12.81 


11 


10.17 


14 


12.37 


13 


12.67 


48 



15 
13 

Hi 
19 
25 

18 
22 
24 
26 
22 
27 
26 
20 
23 
23 

19 

21 
20 



Rainfall from Sept. 1 to 30, 1912 


, Inclusive. 


Stations. 


s . 
s « 


Q 



"8 £ 

H Q. 


Pacific section — 
Taboga 


Ins. 
1.75 

2 13 

3 41 

2.08 
2.24 
1.77 

2.80 
2 64 
2.65 
1.57 
2.88 
1.68 
2 11 
1.72 
2.75 
2.54 
1.94 

3.25 

3.68 
3.39 

.68 


8 
30 
tl 
9 
9 
5 

5 
5 
5 
6 
5 
15 
6 
5 
5 
7 
2 

5 

5 
5 
6 


Ins. 
5 91 


Balboa 


6 58 


Balboa Heights 

Miraflores 


7 03 
6 97 
7.27 




7.81 


Central section — 
Culebra 


10.01 


♦Camacho 


9 12 




9.25 




7.60 




11 53 




11 07 


*E1 Vigia 


13.24 
10.97 


Frijoles 

♦Trinidad 


12.87 
9 04 




12.06 


Atlantic section — 
Gatun 


7.27 
13.79 




15.34 




2.26 







♦Standard rain gauge — readings at 5 p. m. daily. 
Automatic rain gauge at unstarred stations — values 
midnight to midnight. 
tOctober. 
^Standard rain gauge— readings at 8 a. m. daily. 

Enemy Trading List. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Department, 
Division of Civil Affairs, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 5, 1918. 

To all concerned — The following changes, effective 
October 4, 1918, in the Enemy Trading List of the United 
States, involving additions and removals, are hereby 
communicated for your information and guidance: 
ADDITIONS. 

CHILE. 

Cirici, Francisco Friedmann.. . . Santiago. 

Carlos Krauss Hermanos Santiago. 

Krauss, Herman (of Krauss Her- Santiago. 

manos). 

Krauss, Oscar (of Krauss Her- Santiago. 

manosl. 

Hochscliild, M. & S Coquimbo. 

COLOMBIA. 

Bellingrodt, Federico Barranquilla. 

Sehrader, Camilo A Bogota. 

Will, Leonard Bogota. 

Wolff, J.F Cali. 

ECUADOR. 

Hermann. Wilhelm Quito. 

Maydoub & Ramadan Quito. 

Mejia (or Mejiz), Ambato Quito. 

Ramadan, Toufic Quito and Guayaquil. 

Vecybi, Manuel Quito. 

GUATEMALA. 

Concepcion Plantagen Gesell- Guatemala. 

schaft. 

Compania Hamburguesa de San Andres. 

plantaciones. 

"Las Mercedes" plantation Costacuca. 

Meyer. Adolfo Champerico. 

Plantation "Oerro Redondo".. . 

Weissenberg, Fnrique Vijiro or Quezaltenan- 

go. 

HONDURAS. 

Payscn, Eric Tegucigalpa. 

MEXICO. 

Avella, Andres Villa Hermosa. 

Blanco, Cayetano Guadalajara. 

Bohnstedt, Max Guadalajara. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



101 



Bntica de la Reforma ( Dr. K. A. Mexico City. 

Herrera). 

Bellizia, Pascual Frontera. 

Botica, Zaragoza Monterey. 

Braschi, Humborto Mexico City. 

Buettner, Moritz Chihnahu;i. 

Buhl, Guillermo Meridaand Mexico City 

Cnmpafiia Medicinal de la Cam- Mexico City. 

pana. 

Damm, Hugo Durango. 

Damm, Jose Maxini'liano Durango. 

Damm, Max Durango. 

Eisermann, A. S Guadalajara. 

Fabrica de Tabacos Mexico City. 

Fabrica de Salchichas (Gerard Mexico City. 

Mcenan) 

Flebbe, Dr. Julio Guadalajara. 

Grobian, Andres Monterey. 

Herrera Dr. Francisco A Mexico City. 

Jaliffe, Camilo Torreon. 

Kuhn, Carlos Mexico City. 

I>a Drogueria Cosmopolite. . . . Mexico City. 

LegasKi, Pedro Sanchez Mexico City. 

Liberal, El (Jose Puente) Monterey. 

Lins, Eduardo Chihuahua. 

Mier, Jueta Manzanillo. 

MierendorrT, Conrad Mexico City. 

Milan. Manuel Mazatlan. 

Modelo, El (Alfred Nader) Torreon. 

Moriera, Juan Manuel Saltillo. 

Nader, Alfred (El Modelo) Torreon. 

Occidental. El (newspaper) Guadalajara. 

Ochon y Pierrot (newspaper).. . . Mexico City. 

Stein, Robert Mazatlan. 

Sternfels, Jorge Guadalajara. 

Velasco. S. R. Y. (Sr. Y.) Cia. Guadalajara. 

(Velasco. S. R. yCia). 
Voz dei Pueblo, La 'Juan Hu- Tapachula. 

thoff) 

PANAMA. 

Leer, Herbert Bocas del Toro. 

Station Pharmacy Panama City. 

NICARA1UA. 

Peterson, Nicolay (Peterson Bluefields. 
Hotel). 

PERU. 

Puente (Peunte), Andres Lima. 

SALVADOR. 

Sauerbrey, G. A San Salvador. 

VENEZUEI.A. 

Brillimbourg Joaquim LosaIe3. 

Carlos, Miguel Ciudad Bolivar. 

Otero, J. J. Ciudad Bolivar. 

Rodriguez, Diego Trujillo. 

Rojas, Simon Egido. 

Schroeder, Federico Caracas and Maracaibo. 

Schussler, Vicente K La Guayra. 

Sombrera, La Palma Caracas. 

Urdaneta, Ezequiel Trujillo. 

V ; ew--g, E Maracaibo and Pampan. 

Wallher. Federico Ciudad Bolivar. 

REMOVALS 

CHILE. 

Bermudez. Guillcmo Valparaiso 

Gclder, Dr. G Santiago. 

Wing on Fay Quatemal. 

MEXICO. 

Banner, J. G Mexico City. 

Compaflia Comercial de Mon- Monterey. 
terry. 

Fabrics Villa I'nion Villa Union 

Sale, C. v <"i:i Vera Cruz. 

Sanchez, Jo<c y Cia Mazatlan. 

PANAMA. 

Galindo, Dr. I Panama City. 

PERU. 

Calderon, Miguel E Sullana. 

C. H. Calhoun, 
Chief, Division of Civil Affairs. 



Additions to Commissary Stock. 

Hats, straw, children's, ea $1 ..35 

Ink. blue, household, Carter's, 1 i-oz. bot. .06 

Nightgowns, ladies', ea 1 .40 

Nightgowns, ladies', ea 1 .30 



Petticoat3. ea $1 .35 

Petticoats, ea 1.7J 

Petticoats, ea 1 . 70 

Petticoats, ea 2.35 

Petticoats, ea 1 . 00 

Petticoats, ea 1 . 70 

Petticoats, ea 1 . 40 

Powder, talcum, rose white and English 

lilac, tin 15 

Rings, bag handle, pr 48 

Rings, bag handle, pr 48 

Rings, bag handle, pr 48 

Rings, bag handle, pr 48 

Rings, bag handle, pr 48 

Rings, bag handle, pr 64 

Rings, bag handle, pr 64 

Boats, sauce, Steubenville, No. 3140, ea. . 1 .05 

Cups, drinking, round, paper, doz 06 

Dishes, butter, Steubenville, No. 3140,ea. 1 .35 

Filters, disk, No. 9, ea 5 . 40 

Paper, sand, fine, No. 0, sheet, doz 14 

Paper, sand, medium, No. 1, sheet, doz.. . .14 

Paper, sand, coarse, No. 2, sheet, doz 14 

Rugs, rag, ea 1 . 25 

Candy, gum, Adam's pepsin, pkg 04 

Jelly, Guava, P. C, j-gal. jar 1 .45 

Cigars, Londres, Manila, ea 04 

Books, expense economy, ea 50 

Barrettes, ea 04 

Barrettes, ea .07 

Barrettes, ea 10 

Barrettes, ea 06 

Combs, side, black, ea 14 

Combs, dressing, cream, ea 09 

Dress goods, percale, white ground, 36", 

yd ^ 

Hats, straw, Knox, ea 2.10 

Nightgowns, ladies', ea 1 .55 

Pins, hair, crimped, 12, box 11 

Pins, hair, shell, 12, box 09 

Ties, service, 4-in-hand. ea 50 

Community Plate (Patrician pattern) : 

Spoons, tea, ea 34 

Spoons, dessert, ea 62 

Spoons, table, ea 68 

Spoons, soup, ea 68 

Knives, table, medium, ea 1 .05 

Knives, fruit, ea 97 

Ladles, gravy or sauce, ea 1 . 25 

Forks, pie, ea 62 

Forks, oyster, ea 42 

Forks, pickle, ea 78 

Forks, salad, ea 61 

Forks, ice cream, ea 47 

Forks, cake, ea 1.10 

Knives, butter, ea 68 

Knives, butter spreader, ea 50 

Server, tomato, ea 1 . 70 

Server, jelly, ea 84 

Sets, baby, curved spoon and pusher, set . 1.15 

Sets, child's, 3-piece set 2 . 30 

Community Plate (Sheraton pattern): 

Spoons, tea, ea 34 

Spoons, coffee, ea 34 

Spoons, 5-o'clock tea, ea 32 

Spoons, dessert, ea 62 

Spoons, bouillon, ea 59 

Spoons, soup, ea 68 

Spoons, orange, ea 48 

Spoons, baby (bent handle) 57 

Spoons, sugar, ea 63 

Knives, table, medium, ea 1 .05 

Knives, dessert, ea 1.00 

Knives, fruit, ea 91 

Knives, pic server or ice cream, ea 2.20 

Knives, cake, ea 2.20 

Ladles, cream or mayonnaise, ea 9') 

Carvers, large, 3-piece set 8 61' 

Carvers, small, 2-piece set 1.05 

Forks, medium, 'ea ox 

Forks, dessert, ea 62 

Forks, cold meat, ea 1.10 

Forks, pie, ea 62 

Forks, oyster, ea 42 

Forks, pickle, ea 78 

Forks, salad, ea 61 

Forks, ice cream, ea 47 

Knives, butter, ea 68 

Knives, butter spreader, ea 50 



102 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Ex-Ambassador Gerard's Bock. 

One hundred more copies of ex-Ambassador Gerard's book, "Face to Face with 
Kaiserism," have been received and are on sale in the line stores. 



Price Reduced on Women's Shoes. 

A reduction of $1.65 per pair has been made on women's shoes, stock number 22295, 
in order to close out the stock. 

This is a very desirable white kid lace boot, with a black vamp, black eyelets, and a 
black collar, and will make a pleasing addition to any woman's wardrobe. The new 
price is $6.25 per pair. 

Ready-made Garments. 

In the new priority list of essential products necessary to win the war, ready-made 
garments are conspicuous by their absence. This, it is believed, is in line with the 
position taken by the Government that there are plenty of civilian clothes in the 
hands of the retailers and leading manufacturers; and consequently there is no need 
of priority in the production for civilian needs. 

Grapes, Etc. 

A large quantity of Tokay and Malaga grapes was received on a steamship arriving 
recently. The Commissary Purchasing Agent in his comment on the fruits and 
vegetables forwarded on this boat stated that eggplant and tomatoes in the New York 
market were too wet and sandy to ship and that the cabbage was in poor condition. 
There are no peaches or watermelons in the market. 

Cotton. 

The recent decision on the part of the Government to fix a price for cotton meets 
with general approval in the yarn market, as it was considered absurd to attempt 
to stablize prices of cloth and yarn while cotton was left the plaything of the cotton 
speculators. With a crop of between 10,00b, 000 and 11,000,000 bales many believe 
that there will be sufficient to supply the needs of the world, although this amount 
will not come up to the estimates set earlier in the year. 

Ginger Ale. 

Advice has been received from a firm in the United States from which the Com- 
missary Division has for several years purchased ginger ale, stating that they have 
used the allotment of sugar furnished them by the Government and are unable to 
to fill further orders. They state that they have tried all of the sugar substitutes now 
on the market but none is such that they would care to use it and risk the reputation 
of their goods for quality. Consequently, the Commissary awards have been canceled. 

Straw Hats. 

Of particular importance to residents on the Canal Zone is a recent statement of 
the straw hat manufacturers to the effect that product ion during the coming season 
will be curtailed at least 50 per cent, while it is possible that prices will increase in 
like proportion. This industry has not been placed by the Government in an essen- 
tial class and they are therefore now receiving only 60 per cent of their normal 
supplies. This, together with the labor situation, is responsible for the curtailment 
in output and increase in price. It is believed that the manufacture of woven hats. 
Panamas and leghorns will soon be a thing of the past, as it is expected that the 
Government will put an embargo on the importation of the necessary materials. 

Toys. 

A recent statement issued by the Council of National Defense relative to the 
necessity of restricting Christmas buying during the coming holiday season is to the 
effect that tie manufacture of Christmas goods and their transportation to the poinl 
of sale has already been substantially completed, and that agreements reached with 
representatives of leading industries and retail interests concerned to the effect that 
they will not increase their working force by reason of the holiday business, will tend 
toward relieving the transportation facilities of the country and provide for conser- 
vation of material and labor. Retailers have agreed to cooperate further in this 
campaign by restricting deliveries and endeavoring to induce their customers to 
carry their own packages wherever possible. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter, February 6, 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z„ under the Act of March 3. 1879. 





Volume XII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 23, 191 8. No. 10. 

Fourth Liberty Loan Campaign on the Isthmus. 

The Fourth Liberty Loan Campaign on the Isthmus began on 
September 28 and ended October 17, two days before the conclusion 
of the campaign in the United States. The total subscription of 
Panama Canal and Panama Railroad employees was $1,100,800, an 
average of $314 an employee. 

Prior to the opening of the campaign the Governor reassembled 
the Liberty Loan Committee composed of Canal employees and filled 
vacancies which had occurred, the Fourth Liberty Loan Committee 
being composed of 21 employees. He indicated his desire that the 
Fourth Loan be so liberally subscribed on the Canal Zone that it could 
be truly said that the employees had subscribed to the limit of their 
ability. 

At its first meeting the committee resolved to request the active 
participation of the labor organizations, individuals, and each de- 
partment, division, and subdivision of the Canal organization. Upon 
the expected cooperation of these bodies it was decided that 81,000,000 
was the proper sum to fix as the quota for the Canal and Railroad 
employees. The number of employees was 3,502, and the average 
subscription required to meet the quota was $285. 

Each labor organization formed a committee to cover its members. 
Each community had a committee to conduct a house-to-house can- 
vass. The women formed committees to solicit subscriptions at 
booths located at strategic centers, at moving picture and other enter- 
tainments, at rallies, and in the shops, offices, stores, clubhouses, and 
other public centers. Volunteers not connected with committees 
proffered their services. Rallies were held. Parades were organized 
in each community. Those at Ancon-Balboa- Panama, and Cristobal- 
Colon exceeded 2 miles in length, and many original and beautifully 
decorated floats were exhibited, and unusual and picturesque costumes 
worn by the participants. The cities of Colon and Panama were deco- 
rated for the occasion, and to the active enthusiastic cooperation 
of citizens and officials of the Republic of Panama, much credit is 
due for the success of the campaign. 

At the conclusion of the campaign the Governor cabled to the 
Secretary of War: 

Total subscription Fourth Liberty Loan, Canal Zone, $1,339,800, of which 
$1,100,800 subscribed by employees, Panama Canal and Panama Railroad. 

The Secretary of War replied by cable under date of October 21 : 
Referring to your cable of the 18th instant reporting munificent tota 1 
subscriptions to the Fourth Liberty Loan, Canal Zone. Please accept my 
hearty congratulations on the excellent record made and convey an ex- 
pression of the same to the employees and others who have contributed 
to this result. I am quoting your cable to the Secretary of the Treasury, 
for his information. 



104 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



The subscriptions of the military forces were surprisingly large, 
inasmuch as no active campaign for subscriptions was conducted 
among the soldiers. 



DISTRIBUTION OF SUBSCRIPTIONS 



Departments and Sections 



Accounting Department 

Collector 

Paymaster 

Building Division 

Dredging Division 

Electrical Division 

Executive Office 

Courts — Attorneys 

Clubs and Playgrounds 

Civil Affairs 

Schools 

Police and Fire 

Fortifications 

Health Department 

Lock Operation 

Marine Division 

Mechanical Division 

Meteorology and Hydrography. . 

Municipal Engineering 

Office Engineer 

Panama Railroad Company — 

Superintendent's Office 

Coaling Plants 

Receiving and Forwarding Agency 

Transportation Department. . . 

Section of Surveys 

Supply Department — 

Cattle Industry 

Commissary Division 

Quartermaster's Division 

Joint Commission 

Nonemployees 

Silver employees 



Amount 
subscribed 



$46,000 

5,050 

5,250 

107,100 

45,100 

66,600 

45,050 

4,650 

5,200 

23,000 

14,300 

26,150 

7,950 

66,350 

66,200 

59,250 

215,350 

2,800 

25,500 

7,950 

22,350 
25,400 
21,050 
65,500 
2,600 

21,700 
37,400 
43,600 
1,400 
239,000 
15,000 



Total I $1,339,800 



Labor Organizations 



Blacksmith's No. 400 

Boilermaker's No. 463 

Boilermaker's No. 471 

Brickmason's and Plasterer's No. 1. 

Carpenter's No. 913 

Carmen's No.' 158 

Chauffeur's No. 217 

Conductor's 

Electrician's No. 397 

Electrician's No. 677 

Federal Employees No. 6 

Firemen's No. 13 

Locomotive Engineer's 

Machinist's No. 699 

Machinist's No. 811 

Marine Association 

Molder'sNo. 131 

Painter's No. 578 

Patternmaker's 

Pilot's Association 

Plumber's No. 606 

Postal Clerk's No. 126 

Sheet Metal Worker's No. 157 

Steam and Oper. Engineer's No. 595 . 

Steamfitter's No. 652 

Steamshovel and Dredgeman's No. 

19 

Teacher's No. 29 

Telegrapher's No. 158 

Unattached 

Silver employees 



Total. 



Amount 
subscribed 



$8,150 
29,200 

9,400 
21,000 
44,650 
23,400 

5.800 

14,100 

49,300 

31,450 

183,100 

4,450 
"31,200 
35,100 
68,700 
16,950 
10,000 

3,200 

2,200 
31,300 
1 ft, 700 

2.700 

6,250 
24,850 
13,200 

14,400 

7,500 

14.150 

602,400 

15,000 



$1,339,800 



Ancon-Balboa. . . 
Pedro Miguel — 

Gatun 

Cristobal 

Silver employees. 

Military 

Panama 

Colon 

Bocas del Toro. . . 



Totals $1,000,000 



Quota for 
employees 



$560,000 

100,000 

55,000 

285,000 



Amount subscribed 



Employees 



$594,750 

107,900 

58,150 

325,000 

15,000 



$1,100,800 



Non- 
employees 



$185,650 
2,500 
2,950 
47,900 



653,800 

156,850 

80,200 

*3S,000 



$1,167,850 



French col- 
ony — not in- 
cluded in 
in banks 



$7,500 



S7.500 



Total 



$780,400 
110,400 

61,100 
372,900 

15,000 
653,800 
164,350 

80,200 
*38,000 



$2,276,150 



* Bocas del Toro subscribed an additional $4,000 through the Cristobal committee . The $38,000 shown above was 
subscrib d through the United Fruit Company. 



Identification Certificates Must Be Visaed. 

Identification certificates issued on the Isthmus to employees and 
their families going on leave should be retained after arrival in the 
United States and submitted to the Washington Office of The Panama 
Canal when applying for return transportation, in order that they may 
be visaed for the return trip. Employees should submit their printed 
leave orders at the same time. 



Canal Record to Canal Service Men. 

American citizens who have served on the Panama Canal and are 
now in the military service of the United States will be sent a copy of 
The Panama Canal Record each week if they make application for 
this privilege. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 105 

Excessive Rainfall — Empire and Rio Grande. 

Heavy rainfall occurred on the afternoon of October 21, 1918, in the central 
section from Empire to Pedro Miguel. The rainfall at Empire amounted to 4.89 
inches in about 2 hours, and the rainfall at Rio Grande was 4.37 inches in 2 hours and 
15 minutes. 

The maximum precipitation in 1 hour at Empire was 4. 19 inches. This establishes 
a new maximum record at the Empire station, as the greatest precipitation previously 
recorded in 1 hour at this station was 3.63 inches on October 1, 1909. 

The heavy downpour of October 21 was of limited extent, as but 0.66 inch of rain- 
fall was recorded at Gamboa, 4 miles distant. 



Heavy Rainfall, Atlantic Side— October 15 to October 19, 1918. 

Rainfall was unusually heavy on the Atlantic side during the period from October 
15 to October 19. The heaviest rainfall occurred from October 16 to October 18. 
Cristobal reported 7.56 inches in 24 hours ending at 9.25 p. m., October 17, and 
Brazos Brook reported 8.12 inches during the same period. 

The following table gives the total rainfall for the 5-day period, October 15 to 
October 19, at stations on the Atlantic side: 

Total 
Stations. rainfall, 

inches. 

Colon 13.41 

Brazos Brook . 13 . 35 

Agua Clara 10. 15 

Gatun 9 . 48 

Monte Lirio 10.28 

Frijoles 8.75 

Severe lightning and thunderstorms accompanied the heaviest rainfall. The wind 
movement on the Atlantic side was above the average for the rainy season, but no 
unusually high velocities were recorded. The prevailing wind direction was from the 
northwest and west. 

During this period the rainfall was not usually heavy in the Central and Pacific 
sections of the Canal Zone, but heavy rains occurred over the upper Chagres River 
basin causing an 11-foot rise in the Chagres River at Alhajuela on October 17, with a 
maximum discharge of 34,000 c. f . s. 

Three spillway gates open at Gatun were sufficient to discharge the surplus flood 
waters from Gatun Lake. 



Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at the 
Canal post offices and clubhouses. Incases where such announcements are not posted, 
persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, Balboa 
Heights (telephone 286): 

Minor clerk (male and female); Departmental Service, Washington. D. C, S900 a year; No. 497- 
amended; November 3, and December 8, 1918; form 304; age, 18 years and over. 

Appointees from this examination will not be eligible for promotion to a salary in excess of $1,000 a 
year without passing the first-grade clerk examination. 

Graphotype operator (male and female); $660 to $1,200 a year; No. 488-amended; November 9, 
and December 15, 1918; form 304; age, 18 years and over. 

F-l addressograph operator, $900 to SI, 200 a year; No. 488-amended; November 9 and December 
15, 1918; form 304; age, 18 years and over. (Male and female.) 

Mimeograph operator (male and female); $720 to $1,200 a year; No. 488-amended; November 9. 
and December 15, 1918; form 304; age. 18 years and over. 

Automatic 3 addressographer operator (male and female) ; SI ,200 to $1 ,600 a year; No. 488-amended; 
November 9 and December 15, 1918; form 304; age, 18 years and over. 

Proof reader (male and female); $900 to $1,200 a year; No. 488-amended; November 9, and De- 
cember 15, 1918; form 304; age. 18 years and over. 

Live-stock market supervisor (male); $2,400 to $3,000 a year; No. 580; form 2118; age 25 years 
and over.t X 

Live-stock market assistant supervisor (male); $1,800 to S2.400 a year; No. 580; form 2118, age, 
25 years and over.t J 

Preparator, section of physical metallurgy (male and female); $900 to $1,500 a year; No. 600; 
form 1312; age. under 50 years; November 12, 1918.* 

Clerk (male and female); Departmental Service. Washington, D. C. $900 to SI, 200 a year; No. 
308-amended; form 304; age, 18 years and over; November 3, and December 8, 1918. 

* Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business 
on that date. 

t Nonassembled. Applications will be received at any time until further notice. 

I Male applicants of draft age should state in their applications their draft classification. The Com- 
mission will sustain objections of appointing officers to the certification of appointment of men in Class 
1-A. 



106 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Deceased Employees. 

The estates of the following deceased employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad 
Company are now in process of settlement, and any claims asainst these estates, or any information 
which mi^ht lead to the location of heirs, or to the recovery of property, bank deposits, postal savings 
or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys due them, should be presented at the office of 
the Administrator of Estates at once in order that the estate may be settled as soon as possible. All 
claims should be itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or other public officer having a seal, and 
submitted in duplicate. These names will be published but once: 



Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by- 


Date of 
death. 


Oscar Allen 

Alfred Johnson 

Emeterio Sanchez. 
M. Stewart 


105005 
73139 
114488 
1 70030 

161929 
6978 
1039 

156331 
6068 

127690 


Barbados 

Jamaica 

Colombia 

Jamaica 

Colombia. ..... 

United States . . . 
United States . . . 
Antigua, B.W.I. 
United States . . . 
Jamaica 


Panama 

Gamboa 

Colon 

Colon 

Summit 

Cristobal 

Balboa 

Colon 

Ancon 

Colon 


Panama Railroad. ... 
S ipply Department. 
Fanama Railroad. . . . 

Fortifications 

Supply Department. . 
Dredging Division. . . 
Supply Department. . 
Panama Railroad. . . . 

Executive Office 

Plantations Division. 


October 3, 1918. 
October 2, 1918. 
October 3, 1918. 
October 4, 1918. 
October 5 1918. 


Frank A. White 
Walter E. Stephens. . . 
Samuel N. Quinland.. . 
Delano B. Walcutt... . 
Edwin Frazer 


October 4, 1918. 
October 3, 1918. 
October 11, 1918. 
June 30, 1918. 
August 11. 1918. 



Enemy Trading List. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Department, 
Division of Civil Affairs, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 21, 1918. 
The following changes in the enemy trading list will be 
made as of date October 4, 1918: 

ADDITIONS. 

ARGENTINA. 

Alaluf & Rousso Buenos Aires. 

Missler, F., San Martin 666 Buenos Aires. 

Weiss y Preusche Buenos Aires. 

BRAZIL. 

Camara, Amantino Rio de Janeiro. 

Levy, Rafael (Casa Smyrna), Sao Paulo. 

Galeria Crystal 17019. 
Casa Smyrna (Levy, Rafael), Sao Paulo. 

Galeria Crystal 17019. 
Martfeld, C. (alia* Martifield, Muritiba, Bahia. 

C). 
Qaesada, Manuel RuadoSenado Rio de Janeiro. 

63. 

Raimbaud, Madame Sao Paulo. 

Serrario Unaio fVVillholt, Jose). . Santos. 
Willhoft, Jose (Serrario Unaio) . Santos. 

CHILE. 

Ci'ici, Francisco Santiago. 

Friedmann, Carlos Santiago. 

Krauss Hermanos Santiago. 

Krauss Herman (of Krauss Her- Santiago. 

manos). 

Krauss, Oscar (of Krauss Her- Santiago. 

manos). 

Hochschild, M. & S Coquimbo. 

COLOMBIA. 

Vellingrodt, Federico Barranquilla. 

Schrader, Camilo A Bogota. 

Wild, Leonard Bogota. 

Wolff, J. F Cali. 

CUBA. 

Abelardo (or Eberhard), Peter, of Habana. 

Kaupp & Company). 

Bohmer, Carlos, Sol 74 Habana. 

Cardenas. Enrique de Habana. 

Eberhard (or Abelardo), Peter, of Habana. 

Kaupp & Company). 
Fernandez, Francisco (of H. Up- Habana. 

mann & Company). 

Tuya, F. Gonzalez Cardenas. 

Kaupp, Arturo (of Kaupp & Co) Habana. 
Upmann, Alberto Habana. 

ECUADOR. 

Hermann, Wilhelm Quito. 

Maydoub & Ramadan Ambato. 

Mejia (or Mejiz), Manuel Bahia de Caraquez. 

Ramadan, Toufic Guayaquil and Quito 

GUATEMALA. 

Concepcion Plantagen Gesell- Guatemala City. 

schaft. 
Compaflia Hamburguesa de Plan- ban Andres. 

tations. . _ 

"Las Mercedes" Plantation Costa Cuca. 

Meyer, Adolfo Champenco. 



Plantation Cerro Redondo. 

Weissenberg, Enrique Quezaltenango. 

HAITI. 

Keitel, Gustave & Company Port au Prince. 

Keitel, Gustave Port au Prince. 

La Combe, Victor Petit Goave. 

Staube, Hans C Port au Prince. 

Coupet, Christian 

Jabon, Joseph 

HONDURAS. 

Paysen, Eric Tegucigalpa. 

MEXICO. 

Avella, Andres 

Blanco, Cayetano 

Bohnstedt. Max 

Botica dela Reforma (Dr. F. A. 
Herrera). 

Bellizia, Pascual 

Botica Zaragoza 

Braschi, Humberto 

Buettner, Moritz 

Buhl, Guillermo 

Compaflia Medicinal de la Com- 

pana 

Damm, Hugo 

Damm, Jose Ma.ximiliano 

Damm, Max 

Eisermann, A. S 

Fabrica de Tabacos, El Liberal 

(Jose Puente). 
Fabrica de Salchichas (Gerard 

Meenen). 

Flebbe, Dr. Julio 

Grobien, Andres 

Herrera, Dr. Francisco A 

Jaliffe, Camilo 

Kuhn, Carlos _ 

La Drogueria Cosmopolita 

Legaski. Pedro Sanchez 

Lins, Eduardo 

Mier. Justa 

Mierendorff, Conrad 

Milan, Manuel 

Moriera, Juan Manuel 

Modelo, El (Alfred Nader) 

Nader, Alfred (El Modelo) 

Occidental. El (newspaper) 

Ochoa, Y 

Pierrot (newspaper) 

Stein. Robert 

Sternfels, Jorge 

Velasco, S. R., y Cia 

Voz del Puebla, La (Juan Huth- 

off). 

MOROCCO 



Villa Hermosa. 
Guadalajara. 
Guadalajara. 
Mexico City. 

Frontera. 
Monterey. 
Mexico City. 
Chihuahua. 
Merida and Mexico 

City. 
Mexico City. 

Durango. 

Durango. 

Durango. 

Guadalajara. 

Monterey. 

Mexico City. 

Guadalajara. 
Monterey. 
Mexico City. 
Torreon. 
Mexico City. 
Mexico City. 
Mexico City. 
Chihuahua. 
Manzanillo. 
Mexico City. 
Mazatlan. 
Saltillo. 
Torreon. 
Torreon. 
. Guadalajara. 
Mexico City. 
Mexico City. 
Mazatlan. 
Guadalajara. 
Guadalajara. 
Tapacuula. 



Benam et Company 

Benaiman, Joseph J 

Israel, Joseph M 

Abraham Garzon, S 

Trujillo et Murto 

Trujillo, Jose. 

Trujillo, Diego 

Mauritania Commay, La. 



Tetuan. 

Tetuan. 

Tetuan. 

Melilla. 

Ceuta. 

Ceuta. 

Cueta. 

Ceuta. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



107 



NETHERLANDS. 

Beverwijk Nutv. Chemische Fab- Bcverwijk. 

nek. 
international Magnesiet Werken Rotterdam. 

NETHERLANDS — EAST INDIES. 

Batoe Bahra Cocos Compagnie Medan. 
Nutv. 

Lie Seng See Batavia. 

Lima Laras Estate Medan. 

Sourabaya Machinefabriek Sourabaya. 

\\ outers, D., Bandoeng Java. 

PANAMA. 

Leer, Herbert Boeas del Toro. 

Station Pharmacy Panama City. 

PARAGUAY. 

Sala, Juan Asuncion. 

NICARAGUA. 

Peterson, Nicolay (Peterson Ho- Bluefields. 
tel.) 

PERU. 

Puente, Andres Lima. 

SALVADOR. 

Sauerbrey, G. A San Salvador. 

SPAIN. 

Alicante Importator Alicante. 

Castillo, El, Fuencarral 10 and Madrid 

Mayor 31. 

Dia Grafieo Barcelona. 

Falkenstein, Felix, Calle Colegia- Madrid. 

ta i,;. 
Lamigueiro, Luis, Ricgo de Agua Corunna. 

38. 
Milanes, Beuno, Antonio, San Malaga. 

Juan de Dios 14. 
Mueller, Clara (See Benedix, Clara) Barcelona. 

Pesquerias Corunesas Corunna. 

Rhode, Adolfo (alias Trautmann) Barcelona. 

Cal -Claris 111. 

Snlcr. Vir^ilio Alicante. 

Trautmann, Adolfo Rhode, Callc Barcelona. 

Claris 111. 
Zcfra Milanes, Carmelo, San Malaga. 

Juan de Dios 14. 

SWEDEN 

Broker. W Stockholm. 

Vardelorvattnung 

Veitcrli-in, Walther for Wetter- Stockholm. 

liein, Walther). 
Wetterlein, Walther (or Vetter- Stockholm. 

lein, Walther). 

URUGUAY. 

Szende, Amiguel, Calle Inuzaingo Montevideo. 
1467. 

VENEZUELA. 

Brillimho.irg Jqaquim. 

i . Carlos Miguel Ciudad Bolivar. 

Otero, J.J Ciudad Bolivar. 

Rodriguez, Diego Trujillo. 

Rojas, Simon Egido. 

Schroeder, Federico Caracas and Maracai- 

bo. 

Sombreria La Pal ma, La Caracas. 

Schussler, Vicente K La Guaira. 

LTrdaneta, Eiequiel Trujillo. 

\ ii'ivi' \ K Maracaibo and Pam- 

pan. 

»\ allliir, Federico Ciudad Bolivar. 

REMOVALS. 

BOLIVIA. 

Botica Alemana Oruro. 

Frank, Jacob & Company Oruro. 

BRAZIL. 

Pcreira, Alfredo Martins Rio de Janeiro. 

Kibenro Silva & Company Rio de Janeiro. 

CHILI. 

Bermudez, Guillcrmo Valparaiso. 

Gelder, Dr. G. dc Santiago. 

CUBA. 

[bern, Jose, Mercadcres 42 Habana. 

GUATEMALA. 

Wing on Fay Guatemala City 

MEXICO. 

Comercial de Monterey Cia Monterey. 

Dauner, J. G Mexico City. 

Fabrics Villa Union Villa Union. 

Hale, C. y Cia Vera Cruz. 

Sanchez, Jos*-, y Cia Mazatlan. 



ffETHERLANDS — EAST INDrES. 

Jo Beng Tin. .A Medan. 

Schadd & Kortcling Sourabaya. 

PANAMA. 

Galindo, Dr. J. (or Dr. I.) Panama City. 

PERU. 

Calderon, Miguel F Sullana. 

SPAIN. 

Defensa, La Malaga. 

URUGUAY. 

Armellino, Adolfo Montevideo. 

C. H. Calhoun, 
Chief, Division of Civil Affairs. 



Enemy Trading List. 

To all concerned — The following changes, involving 
add ti ins and removals, have been made, effective Oc- 
tober 18, 1918, in the United States Enemy Trading List 
by the War Trade Board: 

ADDITIONS. 

CHILI. 

Compafiia de Scguros la Arau- Valparaiso. 

cania. 
Compafiia de Seguros la German- Valparaiso. 

ia. 

Gac, Samuel de Valparaiso. 

Jackson, Alberto Valparaiso and Osorno 

Presa Lueje & Company Santiago. 

HONDURAS. 

Cortes, Dr. Luis Amapala. 

MEXICO. 

Antigua Casa de Jorge Henning Mexico City. 

(Enrique Schroeder). 

Ayala, Bruno Garcia Monterey. 

Barrueta, M. (Drogueria Eco- Mexico City. 

nomica). 

Beyer, Ernesto San Luis Potosi. 

Brimbera, Ramon Mexico City. 

Casewurm, Juan (El Invernadero) Mexico City. 

Castaldi, Dr. F. J Tampico. 

( VI alio Jose y Cia Mexico City. 

Cerveceria, El Leon (Jacobo Kili- Leon. 

am) 
Drogueria Economica (M. Bar- Mexico City. 

rueta). 
Einhaus Electrics yTranvias Cia. Aguascalientes. 

S. A. 

Engels & Hofmann Mexico City. 

Gerzso, Federico (La Unica Bar- Mexico City. 

ata.) 

Gilbert, Guillcrmo San Luis Potosi. 

Horn, Pablo Mexico City. 

Horn, L., Viuda de A Mexico City. 

Invernadero, El (Juan Casewurm) Mexico City. 
Kiliam, acobo (La Cerveceria, Leon. 

El Leon). 

Llinas, Antonio Moreno . . . Mexico City. 

Lopez. Carlos Mexico City. 

Maschke, Ottwin Mexico City. 

Negociacion Mercantil Alemana. Mexico City. 

Ohrner, J. E Guaymas. 

Posse'.t. August (Saenz Hotel)... San Luis Potosi. 

Man, Enriq le Mexico City. 

Saenz Hotel San Luis Potosi. 

Schroeder. FJnrique (Antigua Mexico City. 

Casa de Jorge Ilcnning). 

Stransky, Emil Tampico. 

Swaim, Clemcnte Mexico City. 

Unica Barata, La (Federico Gcrz- Mexico City. 

so.) 
Weinberg, William Mexico City. 

PANAMA. 

Jacobs, A Panama City. 

PERU. 

Casa Rehder Lima. 

Castellano, F. W. y Hnos Lima. 

Freira, Roberto Lima. 

REMOVALS. 

MEXICO. 

Hadad, Alfredo Tampico. 

PERU. 

Orrezoli, Juan E Lima. 

VKNEZUELA. 

Paz, Carlos Valencia. 

C. H. Calhoun, 
Chief, Division of Civil Affairt. 



108 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Joint Commission. 



Decision o! the Umpire. 

In the matter of the claim of Jose Maria 
Barranco for property known as "Los 
Angeles" located in the District of Chorrera, 
Republic of Panama. 

Decision of the Umpire, award No. 187 , 
docket No. 1696. 

Under the Homestead Law of Colom- 
bia ownership of public lands was ac- 
quired by the mere cultivation. 

In 1907 the Republic of Panama pro- 
mulgated a law for the adjudication of 
public lands based upon the principles 
of the Colombian law but regulating the 
procedure with regard to the petition, 
and establishing a system of taxes for 
the provisional and perpetual adjudica- 
tion of said lands. 

In 1903 Jose Maria Barranco, cattle 
dealer by profession, resident of Chorrera, 
Republic of Panama, began the cultiva- 
tion of a tract of land, a portion of which 
is the subject of this claim. This tract 
was located in the region known as "Los 
Angeles" at the headwaters of the 
Trinidad River, District of Chorrera, and 
had an area of 230 hectares. The claim- 
ant stated that he had cleared more than 
half of this tract, and had cultivated 200 
hectares, 27| hectares being planted in 
guinea grass and the remainder in yucca 
and bananas. There were also two 
houses for the laborers on the property, 
and a corral for the cattle. The river 
bounded the tract on two sides and the 
land was particularly suitable for pastur- 
ing his cattle in the dry season. 

On the 15th of October, 1909, Jose 
Maria Barranco, in conformity with the 
Homestead Law in force in the Republic 
of Panama, requested from the Adminis- 
trator of public lands (tierras baldias e 
indultadas) of the Republic, the ad- 
judication in perpetuity of the tract 
known as "Los Angeles" which he had 
cleared and cultivated. 

By Article II of the Canal Treaty the 
Republic of Panama granted to the 
United States in perpetuity, in addition 
to the Canal Zone, all other lands and 
waters outside the Zone which may be 
necessary and convenient for the Canal 
or its auxiliary works. 

After a lock canal had been decided 
upon it was estimated that the waters 
necessary for the formation of Gatun 
Lake would extend over areas to an 
elevation of 87 feet above sea level, and 
by reason of the topography of such 
areas the overflow would cover certain 
sections in the Republic of Panama 



El Arbitro de la Comision Mixta de 
Tierras Estados Unidos de Ameri- 
ca — Republica de Panama, Pan- 
ama. 

Reclamacion de Jose Maria Barranco 
por el predio denominado "Los Angeles" 
eti el distrito de la Chorrera, territorio de la 
Republica de Panama. 

Decision del Arbitro Laudo No. 187, 
expediente No. 1696. 

Con arreglo a la legislacion agraria 
colombiana, la propiedad de tierras 
baldias se adquiria por el mero cultivo 
de las mismas. 

En 1907 la Republica de Panama 
promulgo una ley para la adjudicacion 
de tierras baldias, inspirada en los mis- 
mos principios que la colombiana, modi- 
ficandola en lo relativo al formulario de 
solicitacion y a los impuestos para las 
adjudicaciones provisionales o perpetuas 
de dichas tierras. 

En 1903 Jose Maria Barranco, gana- 
dero de profesion, residente en la Chor- 
rera, Republica de Panama, comenzo 
a cultivar un lote de tierra, parte de la 
que es objeto de esta reclamacion. Dicho 
predio estaba situado en el lugar de- 
nominado "Los Angeles," en la cabecera 
del rio Trinidad, Distrito de Chorrera. 

Constaba de 230 hectareas, de las que, 
el reclamante manifiesta habia desmon- 
tado mas de la mitad, teniendo 200 
hectareas cultivadas, 27 y media de 
yerba guinea, y elresto conyucay banan- 
os, dos ranchos para los trabajadores y 
un corral para ganado, pues a consecuen- 
cia de estar situado este predio de modo 
que tenia el rio por dos lados, era muy 
conveniente para apacentar el ganado 
durante los meses de sequia. 

El 15 de Octubre de 1909, Jose Maria 
Barranco, acogiendose a los beneficios 
de la ley agraria vigente en la Republica 
de Panama, solicito de la Administracion 
de Tierras Baldias e Indultadas de la 
Republica, la adjudicacion a perpetui- 
dad del predio denominado "Los Angeles" 
desmontado y cultivado por el. 

Por el Articulo II del Tratado del 
Canal, la Republica de Panama cedio 
al Gobierno de los Estados Unidos, ade- 
mas de la Zona del Canal, en el limitada, 
toda cualesquiera otras tierras y aguas 
que puedan ser necesarias o convenientes 
para los usos del Canal u obras auxiliares. 

Una vez decidido que el Canal se con- 
struiria por el sistema de esclusas, los 
calculos dieron por resultado que la 
inundation indispensable para la forma- 
tion del lago Gatun,. el volumen de cuyas 
aguas era necesario para el funciona- 
miento del Canal, cubriria las tierras 
marginales a una altura de 87 pies aobre 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



109 



beyond the territorial limits of the Canal 
Zone. 



In"*.anticipation of the results of this 
inundation the Department of Civil 
Administration of the Canal Zone, ad- 
dressed an official communication to the 
Government of the Republic of Panama 
under date of September 20, 1910, stating 
that when the Gatun locks and dams were 
completed, and Gatun Lake formed to 
its ultimate area, its waters would rise 
to an elevation of 87 feet above sea level, 
and all lands below that level would be 
submerged; that this overflow would 
cover certain sections in the Republic 
of Panama, and, therefore, the Govern- 
ment of Panama was requested to with- 
draw from the right of preemption and 
settlement all of the public lands which 
were likely to be flooded by the lake. 



In compliance with this request the 
Government of the Republic of Panama 
by Decree No. 89 of November 10, 1910, 
declared provisionally non-adjudicable 
all lands outside the Canal Zone which 
were to be covered by the Gatun Lake. 



In Article V of this Decree'there is the 
following exception: "The rights to 
lands which private individuals have 
legitimately acquired in the territory of 
the Republic of Panama over which lands 
the lake may eventually extend, shall 
be respected." 

On July 17, 1911, the Administrator 
of Public Lands of Panama granted to 
Jose Maria Barranco the tract of land 
known as "Los Angeles." One hundred 
fifty hectares of this tract are above the 
100-foot contour line, and the remaining 
80 are below this line. Of these 80 hec- 
tares, 55 are between the 100 and the 
87 foot contour line, and 25 hectares are 
below the 87-foot level. 

On October 10, 1913, the waters of the 
Jake began to extend over these areas 
and 80 hectares of the tract belonging 
to Jose Maria Barranco were inundated. 
He remained in possession of the re- 
mainder of the property, but on account 
of the inundation it was divided into 
three parts. 

At the hearing of this claim which 
began on February 5, 1918, the attorney 
for the Government of the United States 
admitted the existence of the improve- 
ments claimed by Jose Maria Barranco. 
He also admitted that the Government 
of the United States had expropriated 
80 hectares of the tract; that of this in- 
undated section 25 hectares were a part 



el nivel del mar, y como consecuencia de 
la formacion topografica del terreno, 
avanzaria fuera del area de la "Zona" 
interna ndose en parte de! tcrritorio de 
la Republica de Panama. 

En prevision de las consecuencias que 
esa inundacion tendria, el Departamento 
de Administracion Civil del Canal, se 
dirigio eficialmente al Gobierno de la 
Republica de Panama con fecha 20 de 
Septiembre de 1910, comunicandole; que 
tan pronto estuvieran terminadas las 
esculsas y presas para el Canal se proce- 
deria a tnundar la region que habia de 
formar el lago de Gatun, cuyas aguas se 
elevarian a 87 pies sobre el nivel del mar, 
quedando sumergidas todas las tierras 
a un nivel inferior al mismo, y que com- 
prenderia parte de terreno de la juris- 
dicion de Panama por cuya circunstan- 
cia, convendria que el Gobierno de la 
Republica, se abstuviera, interin queda- 
ban terminadas las obras, de hacer con- 
cesiones de terrenos baldios que podian 
ser inundados por el lago. 

En su conformidad, el Gobierno de la 
Republica de Panama por Decreto de 
10 de Noviembre de 1910, sefialado con el 
niimero 89, declaro quedaban provisional- 
mente inadjudicables las porciones de 
tierras baldias comprendidas dentro de 
las que cubriria el lago Gatun, fuera de 
la Zona del Canal. 

En el Articulo V de dicho Decreto se 
hace la siguiente salvedad: "Quedan a 
salvo los derechos de particulares legiti- 
mamente adquiridos en las regiones en que 
los tengan y a que inevitablemente se 
extienda la delimitacion del lago en la 
Republica de Panama." 

Con fecha 17 de Julio de 1911 la 
Administracion de Tierras Baldias e 
Indultadas de Panama adjudico a Jose 
Maria Barranco el predio denominado 
"Los Angeles." 

Del area de este predio 150 hectareas 
estan a mas de 100 pies sobre el nivel del 
mar, y las 80 restantes a menos de 100. 
De estas 80, 55 quedaban entre los 100 
y los 87 pies, y 25 a menos de 87. 

Al tener lugar la inundacion que com- 
enzo el 10 de Octubre de 1913, quedaron 
inundadas 80 hectareas pertenecientes 
al predio de Jose Maria Barranco, per- 
maneciendo en posesion del resto que, 
a consecuencia de la inundacion quedo 
dividido en tres partes. 

En la audiencia de esta reclamacion 
comenzada el 5 de Febrero de 1918, el 
abogado del Gobierno de los Estados 
Unidos reconocio la existencia de la9 
mejoras mencionadas por el reclamante; 
que el Gobierno de los Estados Unidos 
habia expropiado 80 hectareas del area 
del predio; que de estas 80 hectareas 
inundadas, 25 pertenecian a las 27 y 



110 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



of the 27| hectares which he had planted 
in guinea grass and that because of the 
inundation the remaining portion of his 
property had been divided into three 
parts. Nevertheless, he denies the right 
of the claimant to compensation for the 
25 hectares below the 87-foot level on 
the ground that this land had been ac- 
quired by the Government of the United 
States before it was granted to the claim- 
ant, and he also denies the right of the 
claimant to compensation for damages 
sustained because the remaining portion 
of his property had been divided into 
three sections. He admits, however, 
claimant's right to compensation for the 
55 hectares above the 87-foot level, and 
for the improvements. 

The attorneys for the claimant ask 
for damages in the sum of $28,400 for 
the expropriation of the 80 hectares, the 
improvements mentioned, and for dam- 
ages sustained on account of the division 
of the property. 

The Joint Commission, in discussing 
this claim, have had to disregard the de- 
mands made by the attorneys, and con- 
sider the claim on its merits. 

The members of the Commission on 
the part of Panama as well as those on the 
part of the United States are of the opin- 
ion that claimant has sustained no dam- 
ages whatever with regard to the 150 
hectares to which he still holds title, 
in the Republic of Panama, in spite of the 
fact that this property has been divided 
into three sections as a result of the in- 
undation. 

The Panamanian members of the Com- 
mission consider that the claimant should 
be compensated for the 80 hectares ex- 
propriated by the Government of the 
United States and for the improvements. 
They base their contention on the ground 
that his rights were acquired under the 
law of 1907, Article 81 of which provides 
that "The rights acquired by private 
individuals to public lands in conformity 
with laws in force prior to the present 
law. although title has not been granted them, 
shall be respected." They appraise the 
value of the 80 hectares and the im- 
provements in $3,637.50. 

Only one of the Commissioners on the 
part of the United States (Hon. Burt 
New) has filed a written opinion. In 
this opinion he concurs with the at- 
torney for the Government and denies 
the right of the claimant to compensa- 
tion for the 25 hectares above mentioned. 
The improvements and the remaining 
55 hectares he appraises in the sum of 
S2.400. 



media sembradas de yerba de guinea; y 
que consecuencia de la inundacion, el 
predio remanente habia quedado dividido 
en tres partes. 

El abogado del Gobierno de los Estados 
Unidos niega, sin embargo, que a Jose 
Maria Barranco asista derecho para 
reclamar la propiedad del terreno de las 25 
hectareas a nivel inferior de los 87 pies, 
terreno que habia sido adquirido por el 
Gobierno de los Estados Unidos con 
anterioridad a la fecha en que se le hizo 
la expropiacion, y niega el derecho a 
indemnizacion de dafios y perjuicios 
por haber quedado dividido en tres partes 
el Iote restante. Concede que tiene 
derecho sobre las 55 hectareas sobre los 
87 pies de nivel, y a las mejoras men- 
cionadas. 

Los abogados del reclamante solicitan 
una indemnizacion de $28,400 por la 
expropiacion de las 80 hectareas, las 
mejoras referidas, y en concepto de 
dafios y perjuicios por haber quedado 
dividida en tres partes el lote que con- 
tinua siendo de su pertenencia. 

La Comision Mixta al discutir esta 
reclamacion, ha tenido, en vista de las 
pretensiones de los abogados, que hacer 
caso omiso de las mismas, y juzgar por si' 
de los meritos del caso. 

Los miembros de la Comision, tanto 
por parte de los Estados Unidos como por 
Panama, estan acordes en declarar que 
el reclamante no ha sufrido perjuicio 
alguno en las 150 hectareas cuyo titulo 
conserva dentro de la Republica de 
Panama, apesar del hecho de que el 
predio ha quedado dividido en tres partes 
a consecuencia de la inundacion. 

Los Comisionados panamehos con- 
sideran al reclamante con derecho a una 
indemnizacion por las 80 hectareas 
expropiadas por el Gobierno de los 
Estados Unidos, mas por las mejoras del 
terreno, basan su opinion en el derecho 
adquirido por el mismo de conformidad 
con la ley de 1907, cuyo Articulo 81 dis- 
pone que: "los derechos sobre las tierras 
baldias adquiridos por particulares en 
conformidad con las disposiciones legales 
anteriores a la presente ley, aunque no 
hayan sido tituladas, serin respetados." 
Avaluan las 80 hectareas y mejoras en 
$3,637.50. 

Por parte de los Estados Unidos, solo 
una de los Comisionados (el Honorable 
Burt New), ha preparado opinion escrita. 
En ella se adhiere a la opinion sustentada 
por el abogado del Gobierno de los 
Estados Unidos, negando al reclamante 
derecho sobre las mencionadas 25 
hectareas, y avalua las 55 restantes y 
mejoras en $2,400. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



111 



It is evident that by Decree of No- 
vember 10, 1910, the Republic of Pana- 
ma granted to the United States the 
jurisdiction of all lands below the 87-foot 
contour line, which were comprised 
within the area to be flooded by Lake 
Gatun. In view of this fact the attorney 
for the Government of the United States 
and the American Commissioner are 
justified in contesting the ownership 
of claimant in the 25 hectares in question, 
title to which was granted him by the 
Decree declaring the non-adjudicability 
of lands below the 87-foot level. 



But Jose Maria Barranco began the 
cultivation of these lands in 1903, and 
on October 15, 1909, when he requested 
their perpetual adjudication, he had 
already acquired the right to them in 
conformity with the laws of Colombia 
and Panama. Therefore, he had legiti- 
mately acquired ownership before Sep- 
tember 20, 1910, when the United States 
declared that all lands below the 87-foot 
level were necessary for the construction 
of the Canal. 

To apply the Decree of the Republic 
of Panama of November 10, 1910, to 
the present case, would, in my opinion, 
give a retroactive effect to that law. 

In view of the above I consider that 
Jose Maria Barranco is entitled to com- 
pensation for the 80 hectares of the 
"Los Angeles" tract which were expro- 
priated by the Government of the United 
States for Canal purposes. 

This question having been decided, 
the discrepancy between the Com- 
missioners as to the value is not more 
than $200, and I, therefore, find that 
Jose Maria Barranco is entitled in equity 
to an award in the sum of $3,500. 



Es indiscutible que por el Decreto de 
10 de Noviembre de 1910, la Republica 
de Panama reconocio a los Estados 
Unidos el control sobre las tierras a 
menos de 87 pies sobre el nivel del mar, 
comprendidas dentro de las que cubriria 
el lago Gatun y que habian de constituir 
su lecho. 

En este concepto, el abogado del 
Gobierno de los Estados Unidos y el 
Comisionado Americano, estan justi- 
ficados al impugnar la fecha de la con- 
cesion del titulo de propiedad sobre las 
25 hectareas en cuestion, fecha posterior 
a la del Decreto declarando la inadjudi- 
cabilidad de las tierras a nivel inferior de 
los 87 pies. 

Pero Jose Maria Barranco al comenzar 
el cultivo de las tierras en 1903, y al 
solicitar con arreglo a la ley del pais la 
adjudicacion a perpetuidad de dichas 
tierras en 15 de Octubre de 1909, tenia 
adquirido el derecho a las mismas de 
conformidad con las leyes colombianas y 
de Panama, con anterioridad a la fecha 
(20 de Septiembre, 1910) en que los 
Estados Unidos manifestaron necesitaban 
para los usos del .Canal las tierras a 
nivel inferior a los 87 pies. 

Aplicar a la presente reclamacion el 
Decreto de la Republica de Panama de 
10 de Noviembre de 1910, representaria 
tanto como darle efecto retroactivo. 

Considero, por consiguiente a Jose 
Maria Barranco con derecho a reclamar 
por las 80 hectareas expropiadas por el 
Gobierno de los Estados Unidos para 
los usos del Canal. 

Resuelto este particular, la discrepan- 
cia entre los Comisionados acerca del 
valor, puede calcularse en unos 200 
dollars; en su consecuencia, considero 
equitativo que Jose Maria Barranco sea 
indemnizado en la suma de Tres mil 
quinientos dollars ($3,500) por los con- 
ceptos a que se refiere su reclamacion. 



Therefore, an award is hereby made against the United States of America in favo r 
of Jose Maria Barranco in the sum of $3,500, U. S. currency, for all right, title, and 
interest the said Jose Maria Barranco may possess or may have possessed in and to 
the portion of the property known as "Los Angeles," subject of claim docket No. 
1696, including all nouses, cultivations, and any other improvements of whatsoever 
nature located thereon, and any and all damages sustained on account of the ex- 
propriation of this property by the United States of America. 

If payment or tender of payment of this award is not made on or before the 14th 
day of November, 1918, said award shall thereafter bear interest at the rate of 6 
per centum per annum until paid. 



Done in Spanish and English in the 
National Palace, Panama, October 14, 
1918. 

(Sgd.) Manuel Walls y Merino, 
Umpire. 



(Sigue la 6rden de pago a favor del 
reclamante.) 

Dado en espanol y en ingles en el 
Palacio Nacional de Panama a los 14 
dias del mes de Octubre de 1918. 

(Fdo) Manuel Walls y Merino, 

Arbitro. 



112 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Official Circulars. 



Rates for Service of Cranes. 

The Panama Canal, 
Panama Railroad Company, 

Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 3. 1918. 
Circular No. 692-7 (Su erseding circular No. 
692-5) : 
Effective November 1, 1918, the following 
rates will be charged for the service of cranes: 
1. Locomotive cranes — 

Between departments and divisions of 
The Panama Canal and the 
Panama Railroad: 
With crew, including engineer, fire- 
man, groundmen, fuel, lubri- Per 
cants, and repairs: hour. 

Less than 75 tons capacity. ... $4 50 

75 tons capacity 5 . 50 

Without crew, but including ordi- 
nary repairs and such operating 
materials as are normally carried 
at the time of loan, casualty ex- 
pense to be borne by borrowing 
division: 

Less than 75 tons capacity .... 1 . 50 

75 tons capacity 2 . 25 

Note. — Locomotive service, when necessary, 
will be charged at the regular rates, in addition 
to the above. 

To individuals and companies: 
At Balboa: 

Less than 75 tons capacity $6.00 

75 tons capacity 7.00 

At Cristobal: 

Less than 75 tons capacity 8 . 50 

75 tons capacity 9.50 

Note. — These rates cover the use of locomotive 
when necessary and no additional charge will be 
made for such service in connection with deliver- 
ing the crane or returning it to its regular station. 
Crane service for individuals and compnnies, 
when in connection with shop work, may be 
charged for at the rates for departments and 
divisions plus the regular Canal overhead. 

2. 100-ton wrecking outfit — 
Between departments and divisions of 

The Panama Canal and the Panama 

Railroad $20 . 00 

To individuals and companies 25.00 

3. All of above rates cover both straight and 
overtime service. The minimum charge shall 
be for one hour. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor The Panama Canal. 
President Panama Railroad Company. 



Checks of Employees on Leaving Service. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 14, 1918. 

To all concerned — -Employees leaving the service 
of The Panama Canal or Panama Railroad will 
be required to turn in to the Paymaster their 
photo-metal checks, or a release for same, before 
receiving final payment. Employees who have 
not been issued photo-metal checks must procure 
release from the Executive Office. A charge of 
$1 will be made against all employees leaving the 
service who do not turn in a photo-metal check 
or release, and 50 cents for failure to turn in 
Panama Canal brass metal check, as provided in 
Circular No. 722. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor The Panama Canal. 
President Panama Railroad Co. 



Acting District Quartermaster. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 21, 1918. 
All concerned — Effective to-day, October 21, 
and continuing during the absence on leave of 



Mr. J. M. King, Mr. Max Herz will be in charge 
of Cristobal district as acting district quarter- 
master. 

R. K. Morris, 
Approved: Chief Quartermaster. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Acting Chief Quarantine Officer. 

The Panama Canal, 
Health Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 15, 1918. 

To all coizrenzed— Effective this date, and dur- 
ing the absence of Surgeon M. C. Guthrie, United 
States Public Health Service, Surgeon S. B. 
Grubbs, United States Public Health Service, 
will act as chief quarantine officer. 

A. T. McCormack, 
Approved: Chief Health Officer. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Operation of Speeders. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Superintendent, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 15, 1918. 
All concerned — Paragraph 14 of rules govern- 
ing the operation of speeders over the tracks of 
the Panama Railroad, contained in my circular 
of August8, 1916, and readingas follows, is hereby 
canceled: 

"Parties in charge of speeders must ascertain 
from agents or operators whether or not north 
or southbound trains are in that vicinity." 

In the future no information regarding the 
movement of trains on the road will be given to 
parties operating speeders, this being prohibited 
by Circular No. 1154 issued by Master of Trans- 
portation, this date. 

S. W. Heald, Superintendent. 
Approved: 

Chester Harding, 

Governor The Panama Canal. 
President Panama Railroad Co. 



Chief Clerk, Commissary Division. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Cristobal, C. Z., October 18, 1918. 
Memorandum No. 761-17: 

To all concerned— Effective at noon, October 
18. 1918, Mr. E. M. Reinhold is appointed chief 
clerk, Commissary Division, vice Mr. C. L. 
Yearick, resigned. 

J.J. Jackson, General Manager. 



Misdirected Letters. 

The following insufficiently addressed letters 
and papers have been received in the office of the 
Director of Posts, and may be obtained upon 
request of the addressees. Requests may be 
made by telephone, calling No. 182, Balboa: 
Anastacio, Ruiz N. Jones, Mrs. Robert 

Brewster, Wilbert Kennedy, Eugenne 

Byce, Harra Ketchell, J. M. 

Chois, U. O. Muguel, James P. 

Clare, Miss Ida(Box 37) Patterson, Albert 
Cook, J. Peak Penny, E. B. 

Cox, H. W. Plummer, Geo. S. 

Darragh, William Hart Rumler, Jose D. (Box 
Dobbs, John David 188) 

Duncan, B. Burns Safarda, Joe (Box 196) 

Edmar, Charles Stephens, E. P. 

Everson, J. L. Tomas Santiago (Box 

Fernsmark, LuisC. (Box 22) 

542) Treaves. Minian 

Gambodt(orGambrell) Vandeyar, Peter (Box 

Wm. S. 336) 

Harrison, George B. Watkins, Harvey H. (3) 

(Box 676) Weever, G. H. de (Box 

*Heinds, W. 753) 

Ingles, Rock Wiener, A. 

Jenso, Michael Wongsam, Oscar F. 



*Parcel. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 113 

COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Guava Jelly. 

The retail commissaries are carrying guava jelly, manufactured by the industrial 
laboratory, in one-half gallon jars. This is an ideal size for family use and as such 
is meeting with ready favor among patrons. It retails at $1.45 with a refund of 
5 cents on the jar. 

Laces. 

Another shipment of linen and cotton laces, which arrive infrequently from Europe, 
will be placed on sale in the commissaries on Friday, November 8. There is a wide 
range of new and unusual patterns, which coming at this time will be particularly 
appreciated because of their desirability as Christmas gifts. 

Women's Shoes. 

Two numbers of women's shoes have been reduced in price due to the fact that those 
remaining on hand are all in small sizes, or of slender proportions. For the same 
reason, an opera pump, reduced once before, has been cut this time to $1 the pair, 
and a gun metal pump, for street wear, formerly priced at $3.15 will now be sold for 
$2.50. These will be sold at all stores. 



Morgenthau on Turkey. 

Another member of the Diplomatic Corps has written his experiences while abroad, 
Mr. Henry Morgenthau, ex-Ambassador to Turkey, having contributed a dramatic 
account of Germany's intrigue in that unhappy country. His book is said to be as 
informative and revelatory as regards the Ottoman Empire as was ex-Ambassador 
Gerard's concerning Germany. It is announced for publication on October 24 and 
is already on order by the Commissary Division. 



Shoes for Red Cross. 

There is on hand, at the commissary depot, at Cristobal, a number of single 
shoes in first-class condition and several hundred cut shoes, which have been received 
from time to time as samples of different lines to be retained for comparison with 
shipments, in order to insure that all goods received were up to specifications. 

Local representatives of the Red Cross have agreed to accept these shoes for maimed 
soldiers abroad, and will ship the entire lot by the first steamer sailing directly to 
France. 



Macaroni in Cans. 

The following item from a recent issue of a States' publication may be ot interest 
to commissary patrons: 

"Packing of spaghetti and macaroni in cans will be discontinued after October 15. 
This action, in the form of a unanimous resolution, was taken by a committee repre- 
senting practically every large canner of alimentary pastes, in conference with the 
United Stales Food Administration. The manufacturers declared that they were 
willing to take any measures that might be suggested by the Food Administration 
for the conservation of tin. 

"Packing may be continued until the present stock of cans is exhausted, with 
October 15 as a limit." 



A Book Christmas. 

In accordance with recommendations of the Council of National Defense, the 
Commissary Division has limited its purchases this year to articles of genuine use 
or of more than transitory worth. A good book is always an acceptable present and 
the Commissary Division has all kinds. There are books for children of all ages, 
many charmingly illustrated; war books and popular fiction for those who like the 
latest publications; gift books, reasonably priced, in choice and limited editions — 
some in leather, some bound in boards and others in Japan vellum; little leather 
volumes put up in kits of 10 — just the size to fit a uniform blouse — a present for 
which any soldier stationed in the Canal Zone will be grateful; books of art, travel, 
and adventure; poems, plays, essays, and books on political science. Then, too, there 
are reprints of the best sellers of a year ago, together with a few volumes picked up 
through bargain purchases in New York. 

The prices charged are, almost invariably, less than those shown on the jackets 
at which prices they are sold at establishments in the United States. 



114 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Scarcity of Fruits and Vegetables. 

The scarcity of fruits and vegetables from Costa Rica recently is accounted for 
by inadequate transportation facilities from Port Limon. 



Hosiery 

The following quotation in regard to the hosiery market is trom an authoritative 
source: "Prosp|cts that machinery for making hosiery would 1 e released for a time 
by the Government and would be allowed to work on civilian contracts have been 
shattered by the arrival from overseas of urgent demands for more goods It is, 
therefore, said to be unlikely that much goods for civilian requirements can be 
turned out in the remainder of the year. So scant has been the supply for civilian 
needs that buyers who were in the market many months ago are just getting their 
goods. The trade is in such an upset condition that some merchandise ordered for 
fall and winter has not yet been delivered while that ordered for the coming spring 
is already in the retainers hinds." 



Underwear. 

As indicative of the situation in the underwear market is a statement contained in a 
recent issue of a prominent men s wear publication that one of the propositions sub- 
mitted to the War Servxe Committee of the knit goods industry is that the manu- 
facturers of underwear for the Quartermaster's Department might reduce the price 
of seconds rejected by the Arm\ and dispose of the goods to the civilian trade. For- 
merly the Quartermaster's Department took all the underwear it was possible to 
obtain whether seconds or firsts, but a short time since, the Department shut down on 
seconds and now all goods have to come up to specifications. 

As it is impossible to manufacture garments all of which are 100 per cent perfect, 
these ferments represent a loss to the manufacturers, which amounts to a not incon- 
siderable sum. It costs upward of $1.75 to make an army garment. 



RECIPES. 
Lima Bean Soup. 

1 cup lima beans % tablespoonful cornstarch 

1 quart water . 1 teaspoonful salt, paprika 

2 cupfuls milk 1 sliced onion. 
1 tablespoonful fat 

Soak beans in cold water 10 to 12 hours. Cook in same water in which beans are 
soaked with onion until tender. Rub through a sieve. Make a white sauce of fat, 
cornstarch, milk, and seasonings. Add the bean puree. If soup seems too thick 
dilute with bean water. 

Dried Lima Beans. 

1 cup beans 1 tablespoonful butter 

\ teaspoonful salt \ teaspoonful white pepper. 

Wash the beans and soak over night in plenty of cold water. Drain, boil in salted 
water 5 minutes. Add \ teaspoonful baking soda to each quart water. Put them into 
the fireless cooker for 4 hours or more, or cook slowly on back of stove until very soft. 
Drain, season with butter, salt, and pepper, and reheat if necessary. 

BUY 
WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 

With the interest from 
your Liberty Loan Bonds 

ONLY SIXTY-NINE DAYS LEFT 

to purchase these Baby Bonds 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50; addreaa 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered aa second-class matter, February 6. 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 30, 1918. No. 11. 

Executive Order.— Entrance or Departure of Persons During Hostilities. 
The Panama Canal, Executive Office, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 18, 1918. 
Circular No. 601-81: 

The Executive Order quoted below is published for the information 
of all concerned. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Whereas, by an Executive Order dated August 8, 1918, and supplemental to the 
Presidential Proclamation of the same date, rules and regulations governing the 
issuance of permits to enter and leave the United States were promulgated in pur- 
suance of an Act of Congress approved the twenty-second day of May, 1918, entitled 
"An Act to Prevent in Time of War Departure From and Entry Into the United 
States Contrary to the Public Safety;" and 

Whereas, said Executive Order provides that said rules and regulations shall 
become operative at six o'clock in the forenoon of September 15, 1918, for the Con- 
tinental United States, and for the outlying possessions of the United States at such 
time or times as the Secretary of State shall designate; 

Now, Therefore, I, Robert Lansing, Secretary of State of the United States of 
America, acting under and by virtue of the authority vested in me, do hereby desig- 
nate the following dates when said rules and regulations shall become operative in 
the outlying possessions of the United States, to wit: October 15. 1918, at 6 o'clock 
in the forenoon for Porto Rico and the Virgin Islands; October 30. 1918, at 6 o'clock 
in the forenoon for the territory of Hawaii; November 15. 1918, at 6 o'clock in the 
forenoon for the Panama Canal Zone; November 30, 1918, at 6 o'clock in the fore- 
noon for the Philippine Islands. 

Robert Lansing, 

Department of State, Secretary of State. 

Washington, D. C, 
September 4, 1918. 

Red Cross Finances. 
American National Red Cross, 

Canal Zone Chapter, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 19, 1918. 
Mr. S. W. Heald, 

Chairman Canal Zone Chapter American National Red Cross, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z. 
Sir: My accounts as treasurer of the Canal Zone Chapter of the 
American Red Cross have been audited in accordance with your in- 
structions up to the close of business October 15, 1918. All receipts 
for collections and vouchers for disbursements have been verified and 
the cash book signed by the Auditor. 

I suggest that the following summary of operations be published: 
Collections for the Red Cross War Fund started May 25, 1917, and 
up to October 15, 1918, $82,518.62 net had been collected. The 
Chapter was instructed from headquarters to retain sufficient per- 
centage of the war relief fund to pay all bills for material, supplies, 
and incidental expenses of the ladies' auxiliaries in making garments 



116 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

and articles for relief work in the war zone in accordance with instruc- 
tions from headquarters. These supply bills have been quite heavy, 
but the following amazing summary of articles shipped by the ladies' 
auxiliaries will indicate the great quantity of material necessary to 
produce them. This record of the activities of the ladies' auxiliaries 
is most admirable. 

by ladies' preparedness leagues. Pajamas, flannel 846 

To United States. Hospital bed shirts 609 

Gauze pads 8,884 Comfort kits 5,174 

Gauze wipes 552 Comfort pillows 384 

Muslin bandages 2,100 Girts petticoats 295 

Laparotomy pads 1,092 Girs aprons 379 



To Guatemala. 



Girls' dresses 73 

Girls' drawers 78 



&5S53?,' 3 >« S ,,„b,gco»er,::.v.v.:::::::: ,S 

SBKaaSi™::::::::::::: .£ J5BRS::::::"::::::::::::: £ 

by red cross preparedness auxiliaries. Booties, pr 486 

Gauze compresses 75,460 Infant's bonnets 16 

Gauze sponges 38,500 Infant's quilt 1 

Gauze wipes 8,940 Infant's garments (1 bonnet, 1 short 

Gauze folded strips 12,560 coat, 1 long coat, 1 pair booties). 

Gauze dressings, cases 2 sets 27 

Muslin abdominal bandages 835 Infant's comfort, bags (1 powder; 1 

Muslin, "T" bandages 455 soap. 1 washcloth; 2 paperssafety 

Muslin triangle bandages 700 pins) 5 

Muslin, many tailed bandages 195 Wash cloths 101 

Knitted garments, case 1 Flannel bands 4 

Knitted sweaters 218 Long flannel coats 5 

Knitted socks, pr 750 Short flannel coats 49 

Knitted wristlets, pr 523 Linen, old pieces 23 

Knitted mufflers 24 Women's house dresses, medium 75 

Knitted helmets 68 Women's morning jackets 15 

Knitted blankets 3 Women's skirts 7 

Pajamas to hospital ship 100 Single odd shoes 489 

The entire balance in the war relief fund up to October 1, excepting 
percentage retained to pay supply bills, has been remitted to head- 
quarters, leaving no balance on hand. Since October 1, $660.97 was 
collected and is on hand in the war relief fund. 

The balance in the Canal Zone Chapter funds on November 5, 1917, 
was $5,937.32. The balanceonhand October 15, 1918, was $14,536.15, 
with all bills paid that had been received at that time. The Chapter 
had invested to October 15 $6,000 in Liberty Loan Bonds. 

A large number of employees, principally in the metal trades 
branches and the civil engineers, contributed their entire pay for 
Labor Day to the Red Cross. 

Our total membership is approximately 4,200 and the monthly 
collections for the war relief fund are running approximately $4,000 
per month. 

Respectfully, 

J. H. McLean, 
Treasurer Canal Zone Chapter American National Red Cross. 



Notice. 

No deductions on account of the Fourth Liberty Loan were made 
from October pay. Any one who specified such deduction on his 
application should pay that amount to the Deputy Collector at Cris- 
tobal, or to this office. Deduction will be made irom November pay 
if payment is not made prior to that time. 

Pay roll deductions and interest charges will be discontinued at 
any time by payment in full to the Deputy Collector, Cristobal, or 
this office, 

E. P. Sine, Collector The Panama Canal. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 117 

Collections by Pay Roll Deductions. 

A statement of the September pay roll collections on the Panama 

Canal and Panama Railroad rolls for the war relief fund, by division 
or department and amounts, follows: 

RED CROSS WAR RELIEF FUMD— SEPTEMBER, 1918, PANAMA RAILROAD ROLLS. 
COLLECTIONS. 

„,,„,, Cold Roll. 

Cold Roll. Superintendent 1270.44 

Department Amount Commissary 249 75 

Executive Department $252.92 Plantations and Cattle Industry 51.00 

Law and Land 1 1 50 Transportation 355 . 58 

Civil Government 324.68 Receiving and Forwarding Afrency. . . 114 24 

Health Department 304.78 , 

Quartermaster and Subsistence 203.35 *Total of Panama Railroad rolls. . . SI. 045. 01 

Accounting '02 . 93 

Office Engineer, Met. and Hyd 131.61 Grand total for September '. . . $7,275.07 

Lock Operation 236.27 

Marine 181.71 Grand total for August S?. 274. 10 

Electrical 295.57 

Fortifications 62.37 Grand total for July $3,334.14 

Mechanical Division (hourly) 2,694 . 73 

Mechanical Division (monthly) 552.52 *,„ ,,,j„„ ei „„ r> i m m «,«,. 

Municipal Engineering 155.35 deludes $1 on Panama silver roll No. 9104. 

Dredging Division 233. 75 

Building Division 282 . 37 



Total (gold employees) $6,226 . 41 

Silver Roll. 
Municipal Engineering 3.65 



Total of Panama Canal rolls $6,230.06 

The total amount of the September collection ($7,275.07) includes 
the deductions made for Labor Day pay. The total amount of collec- 
tions for the month of August was $3,274.10, and for July, $.3,334.14, 
the total amount of gratuity pay requested to be deducted amounts to 
about $3,000, the regular monthly subscribers having increased their 
monthly contribution by about $1,000 during the month of September. 
When the amount of the contributions on the Isthmus by pay roll 
deduction for war relief fund is considered it is believed that Canal 
employees have something to feel proud of. 

Assistance in Filling Out Draft Questionnaires. 

Arrangements have been made whereby registrants under the 
Selective Service Law receiving questionnaire^ may secure the neces- 
sary advice and assistance for properly filling them out by consulting 
the following notaries public in the Canal Zone, who have volunteered 
for this duty : 

• Balboa, R. G. Adams, chiaf clerk, Mechanical Division; Balboa 
Heights, P. E. Murray, Claims Bureau, Administration Building; 
Cristobal, D. A. Coffey, ticket agent, Colon railroad station; W.'.L. 
Daniels, Building Division office (4 to 6 p. m. only, by appointment); 
Gatun, Lieut. John M. Davis, Police Station; Pedro Miguel, A. E. 
Tyson, secretary, Y. M. C. A. Clubhouse. 

Mr. J. H. Molar: of the Executive Office will continue to give as- 
sistance to registrants, but on account of the large number of persons 
who recently registered voluntarily at Panama and Colon, it is believed 
the above notaries will prove more convenient for the majority of 
employees. 

Liberty Loan Bond Information for Silver Employees. 
The work of mailing paid-up Liberty Loan Bonds of the third issue, 
which is being handled as rapidly as the clerical force of the Collector's 
office will permit, is seriously delayed by the numerous telephone 
requests for delivery information made by silver employees. Pur- 
chasers of bonds of this issue are notified that all bonds will be posted 
to their owners by November 10. 



UK THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Legal Holiday, November 4. 

Circular No. 671 of April 1, 1914, reads as follows: 

1. The following days will be observed as legal holidays in the Canal Zone: 
January 1, February 22, Good Frid .y, May 30, July 4, Labor Day, November 3, 

Thanksgiving D..y, and December 25. If a legal holiday falls on Sunday, the 
Monday following will be observed as a legal holiday. 

2. As far as practicable all public business will be suspended on these days. 
Good Friday and November 3 are not included in the list of holidays for which 
gratuity pay is allowed, and pay for services performed on those days will be calcu- 
lated the s^me as for Sundays. 

Inasmuch as November 3 falls on Sunday, November 4 will be 
observed as a legal holiday without gratuity pay. 



Identification Certificate Photographs. 

Arrangements have been made to take photographs for employees' 
identification certificates at the photo-metal check studio, Build- 
ing No. 1015, Cristobal (opposite Atlantic Terminal Building), on 
Wednesdays only, until further notice. 

Photographs may be taken any week day at the studio in the 
Administration Building, Balboa Heights. No photographs for 
identification certificates will be taken, for the present, by the photo- 
metal check studio at Balboa. 



Civil Service Examinations. 



The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service Com- 
mission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which there 
are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at Canal post 
offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not posted, persons 
interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, Balbo . Heights 
(telephone 286): 

Extension animal husbandman (male); $1,500 to $2,500 a year; No. 1454-supplemental. Receipt 
of applications closed October 18, 1918. 

Plant quarantine inspector (male) ; $1,200 to $2,500; No. 2225-amendment; age limit changed 
from 45 to 60 years.t 

Junior architectural draftsman (male and female); $1,200 to $1,800 a year; No. 333-amended. 
Supplemental.! 

Architectural tracer (male and female) ; $1,000 to $1,200 a year; No. 333-amended. Supplemental.t 

Clerk, Departmental Service, Washington, D. C. (male and female); $900 to $1,000 a year; No. 308- 
amended; form 304; November 3 and December 8, 1918. 

Surveyor-draftsman (male); $1,200 to $1,500 a year; No. 328-amended; noagelimit; form 1312. tt 

Coder (male and female); $900 to $1,200 a year; No. 438-amended; form 304; 18 years and over; 
November 10 and December 15, 1918. t 

Assistant clinical psychiatrist and psychotherapist (malel; St. Elizabeth's Hospital, Washington, 
D. C; $1,200 a year and maintenance; No. 523-amended; form 1312; November 19, 1918. *t 

Senior inspector of car equipment (male) ; $1,800 to $3,600 a year; No. 586; form 1312; November 
12, 1918.* 

Chief of survey party (male); $2,700 to $3,000 a year (Construction Division of the Army); No. 

587; form 1312. ft 

Transitman (male); $2,400 a year (Construction Division of the Army); No. 587; form 1312. Tt 
Levelman (male) ; $2, 1C0 a year (Construction Division of the Army); No. 587; form 1312. tt 
Rodman (male); $1,800 a year (Construction Division of the Army); No. 587; form 1312. tt 
Chainman (male); $1,800 a year (Construction Division of the Army) ; No. 587; form 1312. ft 
Draftsman, topographic (male and female); $2,100 a year (Construction Division of the Army); 

No. 587; form 1312.tt 

Exterior expeditor (male) ; $2,000 to $2,400 a year; No. 588; form 1312. tt 

Interior expeditor (male); $1,800 to $2,000 a year; No. 588; form 1312. tt 

Assistant interior expeditor (male) ; $1,500 to $1,800 a year; No. 588; form 1312. tt 

Junior economist (male and female); $1,200 to $1,400 a year; No. 589; form 2118; November 19, 

1918. "t 

Computor, Naval Observatory (male and female); $2.80 to $3.76 per diem and $1,200 a year; No. 

590; form 131 2. tt 

Assistant, Nautical Almanac Office and Naval Observatory (mate and female); $1,000 a year; No. 
590; form 1312. tt 

Assistant substation operator (male); $900ayear; No. 606; form 304; November 29, 1918.*t 



♦Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business 
on that date. 

tNonassembled. Applications will be received at any time until further notice. 

tMale applicants of draft age should state in their applications their draft classification. The 
Commission will sustain objections of appointing officers to the certification or appointment of men in 
Class 1-A. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 119 

Rule for the Announcement of Regla para laNotificaciondeLaudos. 
Awards. 

The undersigned, having clearly and Habiendo expuesto el que subscribe de 

definitely expressed the principles of law manera clara y terminante el principio 

which he has adopted in the decision of de derecho adoptado para la decision de 

cases certified to him in conformity with las reclamaciones sometidas a su laudo 

Article XV of the Canal treaty, and de conformidad con el Articulo XV del 

having maintained these principles in Tratado del Canal; y habiendolo susten- 

terms which can not be misunderstood, tado a partir de sus primeras declara- 

from the time of his first announcement ciones de 27 de Septiembre de 1917 hasta 

made of September 27, 1917, until the la reciente decision de 14 de Ioscorrientes, 

recent decision handed down October 14, en terminos que no dejan lugar a dudas; 

1918, in future cases, unless otherwise en lo sucesivo, y a salvo en aquellos casos 

advisable, the Joint Commission's gen- que las circunstancias aconsejen hacerlo 

eral form of award will be adopted. de otro modo, para la notificacion de 

laudos, adoptara la forma generalmente 
empleada por la Comision Mixta para 
la de sus decisiones. 

Done in English and Spanish in the Dado en Espaiiol y en ingles en el 

National Palace, Panama, October 26, Palacio Nacional de Panama a los 26 

1918. dias del mes de Octubre de 1918. 

(Sgd.) Manuel Walls y Merino, (Fdo.) Manuel Walls y Merino, 

Umpire. A rbitro. 



High Tides in Panama Bay. 

A high water stage of +11.2 feet was recorded at Balboa at 5 a. m., October 22, 
1918. This high water level has never been exceeded at Balboa during the 11-year 
period covered by our records, although the same height was reached on October 2, 
1909, during a spring tide period. 

Much damage was done along the beach in Panama City and at nearby points. 
Fresh southerly winds prevailed at the time of high water and wave action was 
responsible for most of the damage. 

The maximum wind velocity recorded at Balboa Heights was 28 miles an hour 
from the south, at 5 a. m., and the maximum velocity on Sosa Hill was 24 miles an 
hour from the southeast, at 5 a. m. It is probable that somewhat higher wind veloc- 
ities prevailed over the open sections of Panama Bay. 

The wind action probably had some influence in raising the high water level by 
piling the water up against the shore, but there was no tidal wave and most of the loss 
suffered was due to the coincidence of the abnormally high spring tides and the fresh 
southerly winds. 

High tide at Taboga on the morning of October 22, occurred at 4.55 a. m., with a 
high water stage of 10.5 feet, 0.7 feet lower than the high water stage at Balboa. 

Note. — Elevations are referred to zero of Balboa gauge approximately mean sea level. 



November Weather Probabilities. 

The following weather conditions may be expected at the Canal entrances during 
the month of November, 1918. Predictions are based on November records of 
11 and 12 years at Colon and Balboa Heights, respectively. 

Winds. — Light and variable winds with an average hourly velocity of from 6 to 12 
miles an hour will prevail throughout the month at the Atlantic entrance, the higher 
average wind velocities occurring during the middle of the day. Southeast and west 
winds will predominate. Maximum velocities of from 30 to 40 miles an hour are 
possible during local rain or thunder squalls. 

At the Pacific entrance and over the interior light northwest winds will prevail 
with a considerable percentage of variable wind during the daytime. The average 
hourly velocity will range between 5 miles during the early morning to 8 miles 
during the middle of the day, although maximum velocities of from 25 to 30 miles an 
hour are likely to occur during rain or thunder squalls. 

Rain. — The average November rainfall at Colon is 21.49 inches, and at the Pacific 
entrance 10.37 inches; these averages are based on 47 years' record at Colon and 21 
years' record at Balboa Heights. About 26 days with rain may be expected at the 
Atlantic entrance, and 23 days at the Pacific, while the average number of days with 
heavy rain (1 inch or moie) is about 8 at the Atlantic entrance, and 3 on the Pacific 
side. The greater part of the rainfall (about 70 per cent) occurs during the daytime 



120 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



at the Pacific entrance and over the interior, while along the Atlantic Coast nearly 
half of the November rainfall occurs during the nighttime. 

Fogs. — A few fogs may be expected on the Pacific Coast, but none are likely to 
occur on the Atlantic side. The average number of nights with light or dense fog 
over the Gaillard Cut section of the Canal is 14. These fogs should not prove a 
hindrance to navigation in the daytime, as practically all fogs that occur may be 
expected to lift or become dissipated before 8.30 a. m. 

Temperature. — The average shade air temperature will be approximately 79 degrees 
Fahrenheit over both coasts. Temperatures are more equal on the Atlantic Coast 
than on the Pacific. The temperature is not likely to rise above 90° F. or fall lower 
than 70° F. on the Atlantic Coast while at the Pacific entrance the maximum tempera- 
ture may be as high as 94° F. and the minimum as low as 67° F. The mean daily 
range of the temperature is approximately 8° F. on the Atlantic Coast, and 14° F. 
on the Pacific. 

Barometric pressure. — The average sea level atmospheric pressure will be about 29.85 
inches. Local barometric readings are of little value in forecasting weather conditions, 
as fluctuations in air pressure on the Isthmus are very slight, except for the well- 
marked diurnal changes. The maximum pressure during the month may not be 
expected to exceed 29.98 inches, nor the minimum pressure to be less than 29.68 
inches. 

Relative humidity. — The relative humidity of the atmosphere will average about 
88 per cent over both coasts. The range is greater on the Pacific Coast, where the 
nighttime average humidity is about 95 per cent and the average daily minimum 
humidity is about 75 per cent, while on the Atlantic Coast the average nighttime 
humidity is about 92 per cent, and the average daily minimum humidity is about 75 
per cent. 

Storms — The so-called "Northers" may extend as far south as the Atlantic en- 
trance of the Canal du'ing the month of November. These storms are characterized 
by brisk northwest winds, ranging in velocity up to 30 or more miles an hour, and are 
usually accompanied by a heavy swell. Local wind, thunder, and rain squalls, of 
more or less limited extent, may be expected quite frequently during the month. 
Generally cloudy weather will continue over both coasts, and smooth to moderate 
seas may be expected at the Pacific entrance. Storms of the hurricane type may occur 
during the month over the Caribbean Sea and West Indian Islands. 

Tides. — Tidal fluctuations need not be considered in navigating the Atlantic 
entrance to the Canal, as the extreme tidal range is but about two feet. The tidal 
range at the Pacific entrance averages about 13 feet, while the maximum range may 
reach 20 feet during spring tides. 

Panama (Balboa) tide predictions for the month are given below: 



Day of- 


Time and Height of High 
and Low Water. 


Da> 


of- 


Time and Height of High 
and Low Water. 


Day of- 


Time and Height of 
and Low Water 


High 


W. 


Mo. 


W. 


Mo. 


VV. 


Mo. 




F 


I 


1:59 8:18 
13.9 3.1 


2:35 8:31 
13.6 3.5 


M 


II 


2:26 
3.8 


8:16 
13.5 


2:51 8:5* 
3.3 13.8 


Th 


21 


5:35 
17.0 


11:48 6:10 
-0.7 16.6 




S 


2 


2:38 8:59 
14.3 2.4 


3:04 9:12 
14.0 3.0 


Tu 


12 


3:26 
4.0 


9:14 
13.2 


3:52 9:58 
3.6 13.9 


F 


22 


0:13 
0.8 


6:25 12:34 
16.4 0.1 


6:59 
16.1 


s 


3 


3:14 9:37 
14.7 1.8 


3:42 9:49 
14.4 2.6 


W 


13 


4:32 
3.8 


10:24 
13.1 


4:57 11:05 
3.5 14.2 


s 


23 


1:01 
1.6 


7:14 1:22 
15. 5 1 .2 


7:47 
15.4 


M 


4 


3:49 10:12 
15.0 1.4 


4:18 10:24 
14.7 2.4 


Th 


14 


5:39 
3.3 


11:37 
13.5 


6:03 
3 .2 


S 


24 


1:53 
2.5 


8:02 2:12 
14.6 2.2 


8:34 
14.6 


Tu 


5 


4:23 10:47 
15.2 1.3 


4:54 11:00 
14.8 2.3 


F 


*5 


0:11 
14.9 


6:44 12:47 7:08 
2.4 14.3 2.5 


M 


25 


2:50 
3.3 


8:54 3:07 
13.6 3.2 


9:27 
13.9 


W 


6 


4:53 11:21 
15.2 1.3 


5:29 11:35 
14.7 2.5 


S 


16 


1:11 

15.7 


7:44 
1.4 


1:47 8:07 
15.1 1.7 


Tu 


26 


3:48 
4.0 


9:48 4:04 
12.8 4.0 


10:22 
13.3 


Th 


7 


5:32 11:55 
15.0 1.5 


6:05 
14.6 


s 


i7 


2:07 
16.6 


8:39 
0.3 


2:43 9:01 
15.9 0.9 


W 


27 


4:48 
4.3 


10:50 5:02 
12.3 4.5 


11:21 
13.0 


F 


8 


0:11 6:08 12:33 6:41 
2.7 14.7 1.9 14.4 


M 


18 


2:59 
17.2 


9:29 
-0.5 


3:36 9:51 
16.5 0.3 


Th 


28 


5:47 
4.3 


11:55 6:01 
12.2 4.7 




S 


9 


0:50 6:45 
3.1 14.4 


1:12 7:20 
2.4 14.2 


Tu 


19 


3:52 
17.4 


10:17 
-1.0 


4:29 10:38 
16.9 0.1 


F 


29 


0:18 
13.1 


6:45 12:52 
4.1 12.4 


6:58 
4.6 


S 


IO 


1:34 7:27 
3.5 14.0 


1:58 8:04 
2.9 14.0 


W 


'20 


4:44 
17.4 


11:02 
-1.0 


5:20 11:25 
16.9 0.3 


S 


3° 


1:09 
13.3 


7:38 1:44 
3.6 12.8 


7:51 
4.3 



The tides are placed in the order of their occurrence; the times of high and low tides are shown on 
the upper lines. The figures in boldfaced type a<e hours and elevations between noon and nidnight: 
ante meridian figures are given in the ordinary lightiaced type. The time is Cosmopolitan Standard 
for tne meridian 75° W. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



121 



The elevations of the water are shown on the second line for each day; a comparison of consecutive 
heights will indicate whether it is high or low water. Heignts are reckoned from low mean seawater 
springs, which is 8.3 below mean sealevel and is the datum of sounding;, on the Coast and Geodetic 
Survey charts for this region. The depth of water nay accordingly be estimated by adding the tabu- 
lar height of the tide to the soundings, unless a minus (-) sign is before tne height, in which case it 
is to be subtracted. The annual inequality or variation in the mean sealevel is included in the 
predictions. 



Official Circulars. 



Gold. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 24, 1918. 
To all concerned — All gold collected for account 
of The Panama Canal or Panama Railroad Com- 
pany shall be deposited with the Collector of The 
Panama Canal, and under no circumstances shall 
gold received in course of Government business be 
exchanged for other money. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Scrap Iron and Steel. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 22, 1918. 
All concerned — Information received from the 
Washington office indicates that arrangements 
will be made in the near future to ship all the 
scrap iron and metals which are now on the Canal 
Zone. Reports received indicate that this mate- 
rial is urgently needed in the United States in the 
manufacture of steel and the prices which are 
being obtained are higher than they have been 
in years. 

In order that all the scrap on the Isthmus may 
be shipped as it becomes available for use in the 
United States, it is directed that all departments 
and divisions gather up all scrap around shops, 
construction jobs, power houses and locks, and 
from all other sources, and ship same to the store- 
keeper. Supply Department, Mount Hope. 
Chester Harding, 
Governor. 






Accountable Official. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 10, 1918. 
Circular No. 178: 

Circular No. 177, dated October 4, 1918, by 
which Mr. George H. Iloleman was designated 
an accountable official of The Panama Canal, 
vice Mr. O. M. Ewing, is hereby canceled. 
H. A. A. Smith, 
Auditor The Panama Canal. 
Approved : 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Accountable Official. 

The Panama Canal, 
Accounting Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 21, 1918. 
Circular No. 179: 

Paragraph 1, Circular No. 175, dated Septem- 
ber . ; 0. 1918. is amended to read as follows: 

Effective September 23. 1918, Mr. S. R. Ford 
is designated an accountable official of The 
Panama Canal, vice E. M. Reinhold, and as such, 
will account for all nonexpendable property in 
use in the Gatun quartermaster's district, and the 
storehouse stock in the quartermaster's store- 
house Gatun. 

H. A. A. Smith, 
Auditor The Panama Canal. 
Approved: . . 

Chester Hardiw. 
Governor. 



Acting Station Agent — Colon. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Superintendent, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 25. 1918. 
Circular to all concerned — Effective November 1, 
Mr. H. C. Adams will act as station agent at Colon, 
during the absence of Mr. T. M. Reynolds, on 
leave, and Mr. R. G. Farris will act as superin- 
tendent of stables at Colon, during the same 
period. 

S. W. Heald. 
Superintendent. 



Milk. 

The Panama Canal, 
Health Department, 
Balboa Heights. C. Z.. October 22. 1918. 
District Physicians, Hospitals, Post Surgeons, 
Commissary Managers. 

The following will hereafter govern in handling 
milk prescriptions; they will be made out as 
follows and given by physician to applicant for 
delivery to commissary: 

1. Date. 2. Name. 3. Class. 4. Amount. 

5. (It a child, give age.) years months. 

6. Date of expiration. 

Classes will be divided as follows: 

Class 1: Babies less than 2 years of age; and 
nursing mothers. 

Class 2. Children less than 5 years of age, 
except those in Class 1, and convalescents. 

Class 3. Invalids. 

Until further orders, the amount of milk pre- 
scribed for any one family must not be for n.ore 
than one quart, without the approval of the Chief 
Health Officer; reasons for excess of this amount 
must be given when submitting request for ap- 
proval. This restriction will be removed as soon 
as the supply is sufficient. Physicians will issue 
prescriptions only to those coming in the above 
classes; commissaries may, if they so desire, 
accept standing orders foi milk to be delivered in 
case of surplus. 

The date of expiration must be only as long as 
necessary, and in no case for more than 90 days 
from date of issue; as near as possible, the expira- 
tion should be on the 4th or 20th of the month. 
If prescriptions are received without a date of 
expiration commissary managers will discontinue 
the milk on the 20th of the month in which re- 
ceived, or on the 4th of the following month. 

In accordance with previous instructions, all 
prescriptions will be for "pasteurized milk.'' 
"Corozal milk" or "Mindi milk" will not be 
prescribed. Physicians will not issue prescriptions 
to persons who they have reason to believe have 
been refused a prescription by another physician. 

Customers should be informed that as soon as a 
new supply of caps is received all milk will be 
uniformly labeled the day milked, as is now done 
for Corozal milk. 

A list of all customers to whom milk is delivered 
will be posted by commissary managers in a place 
accessible to the public, and brought up to date 
at least once a month. 

In order that proper classification may be made 
of all prescriptions, all milk customers must pre- 
sent a new prescription, made out in accordance 
with this circular, before November 4, 1918. 

A. T. McCormack, 
Chief Health Officer. 

R. K. Morris, 
Chief Quartermaster, 
(Note. — CommisBary managers will have a copy 
of this circular delivered to each nii'.k customer, 
with last paragraph marked., 



122 THE PANAMA CANAI. RECORD 

Additions to Commissary Stock. 

Community Plate (Sheraton pattern): Kettles, cast iron, polished, Yankee, ea. . . $1 80 

Server, tomato, ea $1 . 70 Pins, rolling, hardwood, ea 19 

Server, jelly, ea 84 Sets, sugar and cream, cut glass, set 110 

Food pusher, ea 57 Vases, cut glass, ea 1.55 

Sets, baby, curved spoon and pusher, set. 1.15 Vases, cut glass, ea 95 

Sets, child's, 3-piece set 2.30 Flags, service, U. S., 2' x 3', ea !91 

Bay rum, denatured, bot 45 Flags, service, U. S., 3' x 5', ea 1 70 

(3 cents refund for return of empty bottle.) Stars, blue, for service flags, ea 05 

Caps, engineer's, ea 34 Suits, boys' wash, suit 1 10 

Corsets, style 1038, ea 4.40 Suits, boys' wash, suit 1 .40 

Bibs for children, ea 47 Men's blucher. heavy tan Russia double 

Dress goods, crepe, cotton, fancy, white, yd . 36 sole work shoes, pr 5.35 

Flags, Fnglish Jacks on sticks, 22"x 36", ea. .26 Men's blucher, heavy tan Russia double 

Flags, Panama, 6"x9i", ea 05 sole work shoes, 7" top, pr 5.65 

Flags. American, 6' x 9', ea 9.05 Women's pumps, white cloth, dainty last, pr 4.30 

Handkerchiefs, khaki, ea 14 Women's Oxfords, white cloth, Cascade 

Hose, men's, black mercerized lisle, pr 33 last, pr 4.90 

Mirrors, hand, ea 1 . 20 Women's black shoes, soap kid pump, 

Napkins, sanitary, 12s, box 54 dainty last, pr 5.85 

Suits, bathing, men's, black and orange, 

suit 5.35 ____^_____ 

Suits, bathing, men's, green and gold, suit 5.35 The Panama Canal, 

Suits, bathing, men's, cardinal and gray, Supply Department, 

Suits^bat'h'ing; men's, g'reen'and gray, s'uii 5:35 M Cristobal C.Z., October 28. 1918. 

Suits, bathing, men's, gray and white, suit 5.35 Memorandum No. 802-2: 

Suits, bathing, men's, plain navy blue, suit 4.00 To all concerned — Retail stores will be closed 

Ties, bat wing, ea 48 Monday, November 4, with the exception of 

Blades, safety razor. Gillette, 6s, set 41 groceries, cold storage, and the cigar and tobacco 

Eyes, screw, brass, |" ea 02 sections which will be kept open one hour from 

Jap-a-Lac, oak. 4-pt. tin 41 8 to 9 a. m. 

Jap-a-Lac, brilliant black, J-pt. tin 41 J. J. Jackson, 

Jugs, cream, Gwendoline, Doulton, ea 72 General Manager. 



COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Shortage of Supplies. 

The shortage of merchandise is daily growing more acute. The Commissary 
Division is fairly well protected in nearly all lines, but considerable comment is being 
made by customers relative to the shortage of many staple articles. Tobacco, 
candy, laundry soap, etc., are at present among those concerning which adverse criti- 
cism has been made. Most complaints are made by patrons who do not have a 
thorough understanding of the difficulty experienced, not only in securing transporta- 
tion from the United States, but in getting transportation to point of shipment in 
the United States. 

This condition may also be attributed in part to irregular sailings of the Panama 
Railroad steamers between New York and Cristobal and the length of time now 
necessary to make the trip in safety. 

Many articles have been listed as nonessential by the War Trade Board, and it 
is practically impossible to secure shipment for this class of goods from the point 
of manufacture to New York. Only those commodities listed as essentials are cer- 
tain of being brought to New York. There is then the likelihood of a considerable 
delay in steamship transportation. 

All things considered, the securing of necessary supplies for the Isthmus is by no 
means as easy of accomplishment as it was six months or a year ago. Commissary 
patrons will appreciate that these conditions are the result of decisions made in 
almost every case with the view of saving needless transportation, both railroad 
and steamship, needless manufacturing of nonessential commodities and the pro- 
hibiting for exportation of any article which could be used to better advantage in 
the United States — all with the one desire to further the winning of the war. 



Service Flags. 

A new stock of United States service flags in sizes 2 by 3 feet and 3 by 5 feet has 
been received and are now on sale at all commissaries. Blue stars for service flags 
have also been placed on sale at 5 cents each. 



Linen and Cotton Laces. 

In last week's issue linen and cotton laces from Europe were advertised to be 
placed on sale in the commissaries on Friday, November 8. 

This shipment arrived sooner than was expected and it is now on sale at all com- 
missaries. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription ratea, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50; addresw 

The Panama Canal Record. Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter, February 6, 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XII . Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 6, 191 8. No. 12. 

CANAL WORK IN SEPTEMBER. 

The report of the Governor to the Secretary of War of Canal 
operations in September, 1918, is printed, in part, below: 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 26, 1918. 
The honorable, the Secretary of War, 
Washington, D. C. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of The Panama Canal for th.« 
month of September, 1918: ne 

Business transacted at the Atlantic and Pacific terminals, respectively for the 
month of September, is presented in the following tabulation: 



Item. 



Water sold to ships gallons. 

Vessela dry docked 

Passengers arriving : 

First cabin 

Other than first cabin 

Total 

Passengers departing: 



First cabin. 

Other than first cabin. 



Total 

Total movement of passengers 

Services to American seamen: 

Seamen shipped 

Seamen discharged 

Seamen deceased 

Seamen deserted 

Seamen destitute 

Seamen's identification certificates issued. 

Seamen's wages received 

Seamen's wages disbursed 

Balance on hand. Oct. 1. 1918 

Commissary sales to commercial vessels: 

Ice 

Wholesale groceries 

Wholesale cold storage 

Laundry 

Miscellaneous 



Cristobal. 



6,693,561 
14 



1.763 
4,470 



6.233 



1.798 
5,154 



Total. 



Commissary sales to Government and Panama Railroad ships: 
Ice. 



Wholesale groceries. . . . 
Wholesale cold storage. 

Laundry 

Miscellaneous 



6,952 
13,185 



228 
135 



Balboa. 



1.761.700 
15 



911 
3,410 



Total 



8,456.261 
20 

2.874 
7,880 



4,321 



872 
3,269 



4.141 
8.462 



201 
300 



$2,258.25 
$2,065.30 



$640.95 



$1,302.92 

14.051.55 

38.551.23 

1,396.82 

1.316.42 



56.618.94 

$99.01 

6.719.18 

26,083.42 

133.00 

366.35 



Total 33.400.96 

Grand total of commissary sales j go 019 90 



$2,669.98 
$1,845.02 



$1,487 21 



10,5.54 



2,670 
8.423 



11,093 
21,647 



429 
435 



$4,928.23 
$3,910.32 



$892.14 

3,808.92 

14.626.87 

108.70 

1.397.57 



20.834.20 

$237.70 

3,768.07 

7.740 04 

.77 

693.42 



12,440 00 



33,274 20 



$2,128.16 

$2,195 06 
17,860.47 
53,178.10 
1.505 52 
2.713.99 



77,453.14 

$336 71 

10,487.25 

33.823.46 

133.77 

1.059.77 



45.840.96 



123,294 10 



CANAL ZONE 
UNITED WAR WORK CAMPAIGN 

Opens Nov. 11, Closes Nov. 17 



124 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



GATUN HYDROELECTRIC STATION, SUBSTATIONS, AND LOCKS. 

The new generating unit, No. 4, was placed in operation on September 29 and 
governor tested for regulation at different loads varying from 750 KW to 3,200 KW. 
Full load was not put on at that time due to lack of feeder capacity at 6,600 volts. 
This unit is the largest capable of installation at the Gatun hydroelectric station. 
The net output of this station for the month was 4,367,034 KWH on a computed 
water consumption of 3,145,014,900 cubic feet. Lockage draft at Gatun was 
773,010,000 cubic feet, and at Pedro Miguel 687.600,000 cubic feet; the ratio between 
water used for power and that for lockages from the lake being 2.15 to 1. The 
average estimated rainfall over the Gatun Lake watershed was 12.30 inches, or 4 
per cent above the 8-year mean. Elevation of the lake on September 30 was 85.39 
feet. 

No work was performed at the Cristobal substation in connection with electrical 
installation during the month. At the Gatun substation the installation of electrical 
auxiliaries in connection with the increased capacity of the hydroelectric station was 
advanced to 70 per cent completion. 

Transmission line — There were 14 interruptions to the high-tension line during the 
month. A double line failure occurred at Balboa on September 1, resulting in an 
8-minute interruption to the lighting load and a 57-minute interruption to the power 
load. Practically all failures were caused by defective insulators. 

Miraflores steam plant — The net output of this plant for the month was minus 
69,130 KWH. The total amount of fuel oil used was 2,988.06 barrels. On six occa- 
sions this plant carried load to help handle the dry dock pumping plant at Balboa. 
The load on the south end of the transmission line system was carried twice during 
the month, due to line failures. In addition to ordinary routine work at this plant, 
the No. 4 machine was reassembled with complete sets of new bearings, and made 
ready for service on the 18th of the month. Tubes were replaced in boilers Nos. 6 
and 10. Boiler No. 5 was taken out of service on the 1 7th for wash-out and inspection 
and was still out of service at the end of the month. 

Total power output — The total net output of both generating stations was 4,297,904 
KWH; and the total amount of power distributed to feeders by substations and 

? generating plants was 3,667,491 KWH. Total losses in transmission and trans- 
ormation were 631,379 KWH, representing an energy loss of 14 per cent. 

DREDGING DIVISION. 

Dredging excavation for the month was as follows: 





Earth 
Cu. yds. 


Rock 
Cu. yds. 


Total 
Cu. yds. 


Classified as: 


Location. 


Maint. 
Cu. yds. 


Constr'n. 
Cu. yds. 


Auxiliary 
Cu. yds. 




171,600 
2,000 

8,700 
3,800 
3,000 
4,800 


9,400 


181,000 
2,000 

40,900 
5,700 
7,000 

10,800 


148,100 

40,900 
5,700 
7,000 

10,800 


32,900 






2,000 


Gaillard Cut: 


32,200 
1,900 
4,000 
6,000 
































20,300 


44,100 


64,400 


64,400 




























5,400 
98,100 


68,000 
10,000 


73,400 
108,100 






73,400 








108,100 










Grand total— Ocean to ocean 


297,400 


131,500 


428,900 


212,500 


32,900 


183,500 



In addition to the above, 300 cubic yards of original excavation were rehandled by 
dredge. On October 1, 793,283 cubic yards remained to be excavated, distribution 
.as follows: 



Location. 



Earth. 



Gaillard Cut. . . . 
Pacific Entrance. 



Total, Canal prism. . . 
Cristobal Coaling Station. 
Balboa, Inner Harbor 



Total Cristobal Coaling Station and Balboa Inner Harbor. 
Grand total— Ocean to ocean 



192,600 



192,600 
"295,160 



295,160 



487,760 



Rock. 



Total. 



25,000 
96,600 



25,000 
289.200 



121,600 314,200 

2,073 [ 2,073 

181,850 477,010 



183,923 I 479, 083 
305,523 ! 793,283 



All material excavated from Gaillard Cut was dumped in Gatun Lake north of 
Gaiuboa. Of the 181,000 cubic yards taken from the Pacific entrance channel 44, 200 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



125 



yards were placed on the sea dumps west of the Canal channel, 121,400 yards 
on the San Juan fill, and 15,400 yards pumped into the Rio Grande River bed. The 
2,000 yards dredged from Balboa inner harbor were discharged into the Balboa relay 
dump. All material taken from Cristobal harbor, 73,400 yards, was dumped on the 
East Breakwater extension; that at Coco Solo on areas "A," "A*," and "C," Coco 
Solo. The drill barge, Teredo No. 2 was engaged at the Miraflores P. I. station the 
entire month, completing 8,573 lineal feet of drilling. The drilling gang at the 
Paraiso P. I. station completed 3,155 lineal feet. Total amount of dynamite used 
at both stations was 46,506 pounds. 

ATLANTIC TERMINAL CONSTRUCTION. 

The following tabulation indicates the progress for the month with percentages of 
completion of Pier No. 6, Cristobal : 



Item. 



Accom- 
plished 
during 
month. 



Total iu 

place. 

September 

30. 



Percent- 
age of 
completion. 



Forms placed square feet . 

Reinforcing placed pounds . 

Concrete poured cubic yards . 

Steel struts erected each . 

Steel struts concreted each 



63,422 

688,478 

3,424 

1 

9 



356,661 

3,945,537 

17,868 

94 



56 
56 
57 
100 
100 



Pouring of concrete for the shed was started on September 24, and 15 cubic yards 
had been poured for the columns at the end of the month, or 2 per cent of the amount 
required for the columns. 

SHOPS, FOUNDRY, AND DRY DOCK. 

The Mechanical Division had 675 uncompleted jobs at Balboa shops on the 1st of 
the month; 617 were authorized during the month; and 650 completed in this 
period. In addition, there were 260 uncompleted blanket orders in force, September 
1, of which two were completed during the month. At the Cristobal shops 218 special 
individual and company job orders were issued in September. 

Foundry output for the month was as follows: Iron, 102,004 pounds; steel, 69,215 
pounds; brass, 18,249 pounds. 

MUNICIPAL DIVISION. 

The usual maintenance and repair work of this division was performed. Work was 
commenced on draining of the swamp area near Mindi for the Supply Department, 
and replacement of the discharge line from sewage pump in Colon started. The 
road to steel pier, Balboa, begun last month, was completed. The water and sewer 
connections for the new larvacide plant, Ancon, were begun, also the construction of 
a depressed track at building No. 5, Balboa storehouse, and roadways and walks for 
the new Tivoli hotel kitchen. The concreting of the floor at the new garage, Pedro 
Miguel, was begun and completed within the month. 

A total of 162,622,250 gallons of water was pumped at the four stations in the 
northern district, and 553,492,700 gallons at the eight stations in the southern 
district. A total of 124,495,511 gallons was supplied for other than Panama Canal 
requirements. At the three filtration plants 425,346,000 gallons were filtered for 
domestic purposes. 

WORKING FORCE. 

Statement of the working force effective September 18, representing the second 
half-month, follows: 



Department or Division. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Total. 


Operation and Maintenance: 

Office 


30 
219 

74 
166 
123 
127 
630 

94 

37 


55 

2,073 

1,247 

304 

555 

1,001 

1,561 

288 

418 


85 




2,292 




1,321 




470 




678 




1,128 




2,191 




382 




455 






Total 


1,500 

109 
18 

185 
26 


7,502 

1,779 
407 

1,532 
690 


9,002 


Supply: 


1,888 




425 




1,717 




716 








338 


4,408 


4,746 



126 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Department or Diuision. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Total. 




194 
206 
392 

122 
149 
64 


12 
830 
173 

1,100 

256 

1,916 


206 

1,036 

565 

1 222 


Health 


Executive 


Panama Railroad — 

Superintendent and coaling stations 


Transportation 




Receiving and Forwarding Agent 


1 980 






Total Panama Railroad 


335 


3,272 


3 607 






Grand total 


2,965 


16,197 


19,162 



The total gold force is an increase of 115 from the 2,850 employed August 21; 
and the silver force is a decrease of 29 from the 16,226 shown on that date. 

QUARTERS. 

The following statement shows the occupation of Canal quarters on September 30: 



Occupants. 


Men. 


Women. 


Children. 


Total. 




2,869 

195 

5,539 


1,885 

30 

2,067 


2,138 

61 

3,414 


6,892 
286 




West Indians 


11 020 








Total 


8,603 


3,982 


5,613 


18,198 



PUBLIC HEALTH. 

There were 20 deaths among employees during September, with none American. 
Fifty-six births occurred among employees' families, 10 of which were American. 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

The cash balance in Canal appropriations, September 30, exclusive of forti- 
fications, was $16,626,359.09; the balance in fortifications was $4,163,435.41. 
Payments from appropriations by the Disbursing Clerk, Washington, amounted to 
$620,397.14, and by the Paymaster on the Isthmus, $1,188,433.71. Payment to the 
Panama Railroad Company for commissary books amounted to $235,000. Total 
Panama Canal collections on the Isthmus aggregated $1,591,008.64; and collections 
by the Disbursing Clerk, Washington, to $22,328.21. Requisitions for purchase of 
material in the United States amounted to $780,127.94. Receipts from the Canal 
Zone and miscellaneous funds were $177,098.67, and disbursements from the same 
source, $156,282.09. 

Respectfully, 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Executive Order— Funds for Censorship of Mails in Canal Zone. 
The Panama Canal, Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 30, 1918. 
Circular No. 601-82: 

The Executive Order quoted below is published for the information 
of all concerned. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Under the authority conferred by "An Act authorizing the President to coordinate 
or consolidate executive bureaus, agencies, and offices, and for other purposes," 
in the interest of economy and the more efficient concentration of the Government, 
approved May 20, 1918, it is hereby directed that $120,000 be transferred from the 
appropriation of $1,620,000 for the censorship of foreign mails under the Post Office 
Department for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1919, and allotted to the Secretary 
of War for the conduct of the censorship of the mails in the Panama Canal Zone dur- 
ingsaid fiscal year. 

This sum will be deducted from the appropriations made for the Post Office De- 
partment for the current fiscal year and charged to the War Department. 



WOODROW WILSON. 



The White House, 
October 3, 1918. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 127 

Canal Zone United War Work Campaign. 

The seven agencies officially recognized by the Executive Branch of 
the United States Government to provide entertainment and recreation 
for soldiers and sailors begin a campaign during the week of November 
11 to raise a fund of $170,500,000, this sum being the estimated cost 
of continuing the work outlined by these bodies for the coming year. 
Committees have been appointed to aid in raising the sum of $30,000 
which has been assigned as the Isthmian allotment. The seven 
agencies interested in the fund, with the amounts and percentages 
required by each, follow: National War Work Council of the Young 
Men's Christian Association, $100,000,000; 58.65 per cent. War 
Work Council of the National Board of the Young Women's Christian 
Association, $15,000,000; 8.80 per cent. National Catholic War 
Council, for the Knights of Columbus, $30,000,000; 17.60 per cent. 
Jewish Welfare Board, $3,500,000; 2.05 per cent. War Camp Com- 
munity Service, $15,000,000; 8.80 per cent. American Library 
Association, $3,500,000; 2.05 per cent. Salvation Army, $3,500,000; 
2.05 per cent. 

Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service Com- 
mission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which there 
are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at Canal post 
offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not posted, persons 
interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, Balbo i Heights 
(telephone 286): 

Chief engineer, Coast and Geodetic Survey (male); $100 a month; No. 1250-supplemental; 
maximum age limit eliminated: forms 1250 and 1800. t 

Scientific assistant; (male and female); Bureau of Fisheries; $900 to SI, 500 a year; No. 125- 
amended; form 1312; November 24 and December 15, 1918. t 

Geologic aid (male and female) ; $75 a month to §1,800 a year; No. 229-amended; form 1312. 
December 15-16, 1918. 

Assistant geologist (male and female); $75 a month to $1,800 a year; No. 229-amended, 
form 1312; December 15-16, 1918. 

Physical laboratory helper (male and female); $600 to $900 a year; No. 411-amended; form 
1312; November 24 and December 15, 1918. 

Printer (male and female); 60 cents an hour to 65 cents an hour; No. 462-amended; form 
304. tt 

Bookbinder (male); 60 cents an hour; No. 462-amended; form 304. ft 

Pressman (male); 65 cents an hour; No. 462-amended; form 304. ft 

Electrotyper-finisher (male); 70 cents an hour; No. 462-amended; form 304. tt 

Electrotyper-molder (male); 70 cents an hour; No. 462-amended; form 30 4. ft 

Stereotyper (male); 70 cents an hour; No. 462-amended; form 304. ft 

Senior engineer (male); SI, 800 to S2, 700 a year; No. 599; form 1312; November 19, 1918.* 

Pathologist in cereal disease investigations (male); $2,500 to $3,000 a year; form 2118; No- 
vember 26. 1918. *t 

Ordnance copyist draftsman (female); Office of Chief of Ordnance, War Department, Washing- 
ton, D. C; SI. 100 a year; form 1312. t§ 

Biological assistant (male); $900 to $1,200 a year; form 2118; November 26, 1918.*t 

Telegraph operator (male and female); No. 2157-A, Supplemental. Receipt of applications closed 
October 19. 1918. 

Telephone operator (male and female); No. 217-A, Supplemental. Receipt of applications closed 
October 19. 1918. 

Engineer of tests of ordnance material (male); and assistant engineer of tests of ordnance material 
(male); No. 1411-amended, supplemental, Nonassembled; announcement of examinations canceled. 
Hereafter these examinations will be announced and held by the Commission's district secretaries as 
the needs of the service require. 

Bookkeeper (male and female); S1.0C0 a vear; Departmental Service, Washington, D. C; No. 
212-amended; November 17 and December 15, 1918; form 304. i§ 

Bookkeeper-typewriter (male and female); SI, 000 a year; Departmental Sen-ice. Washington, 
D. C, November 17 and December 15, 1918; No. 212-amended; form 304. age, 18 years and over. 15 

Calculating machine operator (male and female); $900 to SI. 200 a year; No. 223-amended; No- 
vember 24 and December 15, 1918; form 304; age 18 years and over. 



W.S.S. 



HELP YOUR COUNTRY 

BUY WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 

On Sale At All Canal Zone Post Offices 



128 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Multigraph and writer press operator (male and female) ; SI, 000 to SI, 200 a year; No. 223-amended; 

November 24 and December 15, 1918; from 304- age 18 years and over. 

Operative (male and female); $720 to SI. 000 a year; No. 223-amended; November 24 and Decem- 
ber 15, 1918; form 304; age 18 years and over. 

Statistical clerk (male and female); $900 to SI, 200 a year; No. 223-amended; November 24 and 

December 15. 1918; form 1312; age 1 8 years and over. 

Assistant in market business practice, grade 2 (male and female); $1,200 to $1,800 a year; No. 601; 

December 8, 1918; form 1312. t 

Field matron (female); $600 to S840 a year; December 15, 1918; form 1312; age, 25 to 49 years, 

inclusive. 

Matron (female); $500 to $600 a year; December 15, 191S; form 1312; age 25 to 49 years, inclusive. 
Law clerk and typewriter (male); $1,500 to $1,740 a year; December 15, 1918; age 27 years and 

over; forms 304 and 22264 

Mastergaugeexpert (male); $2,000 to$3,600avear; No. 1520-amended; continuous; form 1312. tt§ 
Gauge inspector (male); $1,800 to $2,400 a year; No. 1520-amended; form 1312. tt§ 
Assistant gauge inspector (male); $1,200 to $1,800 a year; No. 1520-amended; form 1312. tt§ 
Gauge inspector's helper (male and female); $900 to $1,320 a year; No. 1520-amended; form 1312. tt§ 
Petroleum technologist (male); $2,500 to $3,000 "a year; No. 94-amended; November 12. 1918; 

form 1312.*t 

Engineer in forest products (male); $1,860 to $3,000 a year; No. 110-amended; form 1312. tt 
Assistant engineer in forest products (nale); $1,200 to $1,800 a year; No. 110-amended; form 

1312.tt 

Clerk qualified in modern language (male and female); No. 261-amended, supplemental; form 1312. 

November 24 and 25, 1918. 

Assistant examiner, patent office (male and female); $1,500 a vear; No. 288-amended; November 

24, 25, and 26, 1918, and December 15, 16, and 17, 1918; form 1312; age 20 years and over. t 
Senior civil engineer UTiale) ; $1,800 to $4,200 a year; No. 330-amended; form 1312. ft 
Refrigerating engineer (male); $3,000 a year; No. 330-amended; form 1312. ft 
Construction engineer (male); $2,400 a year; No. 330-amended; form 1312. ft 
Planning expert (male); $2,400 a vear; No. 330-amended; form 1312. ft 
Architect (male); $2,500 to $3,500 a vear; No. 333-amended.tt 
Structural designer (male); $2,400 to $2,700 a year; No. 333-amended.tt 
Architectural designer (male); $2,100 to $2,700 a year; No. 333-amended.tt 
Senior structural draftsman (male); $2,000 to $2,400 a year; No. 333-amended.tt 
Senior architectural draftsman (male); $1,800 to $2,100 a year; No. 333-amended.tt 
Junior structural draftsman (male); $1,500 to $2,000 a year; No. 333-amended.tt 
Junior architectural draftsman (male and female); $1,200 to $1,800 a year; No. 233-amended.tt 
Architectural tracer (male and female); $1,000 to $1,200 a year; No. 333-amended.tt 
Teacher, Indian Service (male and female); $600 to $720 a year; No. 423-amended; November 24 

and December 15, 1918, and January 26, 1919; form 1312; age 20 to 49 years, inclusive. 

Assistant in marketing, grade 2 (male and female); $1,200 to $1,800 a year; No. 593; December 8 

and 9, 1918; form 1312. t 

Assistant in preservation of fruits and vegetables in transit and storage, grade 2 (male and female); 

$1,200 to $1,800 a year No. 594; December 8 and 9, 1918; form 1312. t 

Assistant in preservation of meats in transit and storage, grade 2 (male and female); $1,200 to $1,800 

a year; No. 594; December 8 and 9, 1918; form 13124 

Assistant in preservation of poultry and eggs in transit and storage, grade 2 (male and female); 

$1,200 to $1,800 a year; No. 594; December 8 and 9, 1918; form 13124 

Scientific assistant in the economics of marketing (male and female); $1,200 to $1,800 a year; No. 

604; December 8 and 9, 1918; form 13124 

Ordnance copvist draftsman (female); Office of Chief of Ordnance, War Department, Washington, 

D. C; $1,100 a year; No. 607; form 1312; age 18 years and over.t§ 

Pathologist in cereal disease investigations (male); $2,500 to $3,000 a year; No. 608; November 26, 

191 S; form 1312; age 25 years and over.*t 

Biological assistant (male); $900 to $1,200 a year; No. 611; November 26, 1918; form 1312. *t 
Typewriter repairman (male) ; $900 to $1,500 a year; No. 614; November 26, 1918; form 304; 

age 18 years and over.*t 

Die and toolmaker (male); $4.25 per diem; No. 615; November 26, 1918; form 1800; age 20 

years and over.*t 



* Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applica- 
tions, and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing 
business on that date. 

t Nonassembled. Applications will be received at any time until further notice. 

t Male applicants of draft age should state in their applications their draft classification. The 
Commission will sustain objections of appointing officers to the certification or appointment of 
men in Class 1-A. 

§ In view of the needs of the service, and until further notice, subjects of countries allied with 
the United States will be admitted to this examination, provided they are otherwise qualified. 
Such persons may not be certified for appointment, however, so long as there are United States 
citizens on the eligible list. 



French. 

There seems to be a demand for the teaching of French in the even- 
ing classes at the Balboa High school. Anyone interested in a begin- 
ners' class in French should advise the principal of the Balboa High 
School. 



Canal Record to Canal Service Men. 

American citizens who have served on the Panama Canal and are 
now in the military service of the United States will be sent a copy of 
The Panama Canal Record each week if they make application for 
this privilege. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



129 



Deceased Employees. 

The estates of the following deceased employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad 
Company are now in process of settlement, and any claims against these estates, or any information 
which might lead to the location of heirs, or to the recovery of property, bank deposits, postal savings 
or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys due them, should be presented at the office of 
the Administrator of Estates at once in order that the estate may be settled as soon as possible. All 
claims should be itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or other public officer having a seal, and 
submitted in duplicate. These names will be published but once: 



Name. 


Check 

No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by — 


Date of death. 


Reuben Cohooncs 
(Choonsi 


123609 

170972 
9082 
3091 

n; : 82 

153392 
78450 

171681 
73108 
43855 


Jamaica 

Jamaica 

U.S. A 

U.S. A (Nat.)... 

Fortune Island. . 


Colon 


Municipal Eng. Div. . 

Building Division 
Mechanical Division 
Electrical Division. . 
Panama Railroad. . . . 


October 27, 1918. 


Colon 


October 26, 1918. 


Ralph Mendenhall . . . 

Felix F. Murray 

Robert Farquharson 
(alias Ferguson). 




October 27, 1918. 


Balboa 

Colon 

Colon 

Colon 


October 29, 1918. 
October 9, WIS. 

October 24. 1918. 


James Simson 


Jamaica 

Panama 

Antigua 


Elect leal Division.... October 1.1. 1918. 


Dionisio Nunez 


Panama 

Empire. ... 


Mechanical Di\ ision 
SudpIv Department.. 


October 17, 1918. 
AuLMi«t 20. 19 IS. 



Official Circulars. 



Appointment. 

The Panama Canal. 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 29, 1918. 
Circular No. 661-65: 

Effective November 1, 1918, Mr. C. H. Cal- 
houn, Chief, Division of Civil Affairs, will be 
Shipping Commissioner and Adn inistrator of 
Estates, vice Mr. J. E. McGrath, resigned. 
Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Appointment. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office. 
Balboa Heights, C Z., November 1, 191*. 
Circular No. 661-66: 

1. Mr. F. \V. Blackwood is appointed Office 
Engineer, effective this date, vice Mr. C. J. 
Embree. resigned. 

2. lie will report to the Engineer of Mainte- 
nance, except as to matters relating to the con- 
struction of Pier No. 6. on which he will continue 
to report to the Resident Engineer of the Build- 
ing Division. 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Hunting Prohibited. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 30, 1918. 
All concerned — Effective November 15. 1918, 
all bunting will be prohibited on Bohio Peninsula 
and the country south from the Cocoli River to 
the coast. This is due to the fact that a large 
force of men will be engaged in pasture clearing 
work in these areas from that date. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Restriction on Use of Gasoline. 
The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 2, 1918. 
To all mployees of The Panama Canal and 
Panama Railroad Company- -Official advio 
been received that the restriction relative ti 
use of gasoline by motorcycles, motor boats, and 

automobiles for pleasure purposes on Sundays, 

contained in circular letter of this office dated 
September 6. 1918, was withdrawn by the Fuel 
Administration on October 17. 

Chester Harding. 
Governor The Panama Canal. 
President The Panama Railroad Co. 



Scrap. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 27. 1918. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

Scrap burlap, rope, rags, rubber, rubber hose, 
etc., are meeting with ready sale in the United 
States at this time and at prices higher than have 
been obtained for years. It is directed, therefore, 
that all departments and divisions take immedi- 
ate steps to collect all scrap of this character under 
their control and forward it to the Storekeeper, 
Supply Department, Mount Hope, in order that 
shipment may be made at the earliest date 
possible. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Acting Chief Quartermaster. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z.. October 29, 1918. 
AH concerned — Effective October 30, and con- 
tinuing during the absence of the undersigned 
from the Isthmus on official business. Mr. Roy 
R. Watson will be in charge of the Supply De- 
partment as Acting Chief Quartermaster. 
R. K. Morris, 
Chief Quartermaster . 
Approved : 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Station Agent, Colon. 
Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Superintendent, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 28, 1918. 
To all concerned — My circular of October 25 is 
corrected to read as follows: 

"Effective November 3, Mr. ll. C. Adams 
will act as Station Agent at Colon, during the 
absence of Mr. T. M. Reynolds, on leave, and 
Mr. R. C. Karris will act as superintendent of 
at Colon, during the same neriod." 
S. W. Heald, 
Superintendent. 



Invoicing Manufactured Property Delivered 
Direct to Accountable Officials. 

The Panama Canal, 
Accounting Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 25, loix 
Circular No. 180: 

Effective November 1. 1918, the head of a 
division manufacturing nonexpendable properti 
for delivery direct to an accountable official 
invoice such pro)>ert.v on form 6024 immediately 
upon deliver;-, showing on the invoice the work 



130 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



request number or other authority for the manu- 
facture, and the party to whom the articles were 
delivered. If it is impracticable to show the cost 
of each article when delivery is made and invoice 
prepared this information must be furnished the 
receiving official as soon thereafter as possible. 

These invoices will be numbered in a special 
series and filed separate fron the regular property 
voucher numbers. The receiving official will 
assign regular property voucher numbers to 
these invoices, and file in his series of property 
vouchers, take t.ie items up in the usual manner, 
forwarding the original signed copy showing his 
voucher number to this office with a copy to 
invoicing official for his file. 

Articles manufactured by an accountable 
official for his own division .vill be handled in a 
like manner. 

On the monthly report of work performed ref- 
erence will be made to the invoice number 
covering each item of nonexpendable property 
manufactured, and a copy of each invoice at- 
tached to the report. 

These instructions apply only to property 
manufactured and delivered direct to accountable 
officials and do not apply to articles taken into 
stock in storehouses or commissaries which should 
be handled under existing instructions. 

H. A. A. Smith, 
Auditor The Panama Canal. 

Approved : 

Chester Harding, 

Governor The Panama Canal, 
President Panama Railroad Company. 



Business Secretary, Bureau of Clubs and 
Playgrounds. 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 30, 1918. 
To all concerned — Effective November 1, 1918. 
Mr. A. Korsan is designated business secretary 
of the Bureau of Clubs and Playgrounds with the 
following duties: 

He will sign all foreman's orders, work requests, 
all requistions for supplies, approve all vouchers 
for payment, conduct all business correspondence 
and business activities in general. 

He will assist the general secretary in the prep- 
aration of special reports, estimates for annual 
appropriation, annual reports, alterations and 
extensions to buildings as related to the business 
management of the Bureau. 

All matters pertaining to the above will be 
referred to the business secretary through the 
general secretary's office. 

T. S. Booz, 
General Secretary. 
Approved: 

C. A. McIlvaine, 
Executive Secretary. 



Influenza and Similar Diseases. 

The Panama Canal, 
Health Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 31, 1918. 
Circular No. 151. 

To all concerned — The following general rules 
have been formulated by the Chief Quarantine 
Officer to indicate the policy for quarantine of 
influenza. Subject to modifications, they will 
apply to other communicable diseases of a similar 
nature: 

"If there have been no cases during the voyage, 
and careful examination of passengers and crew 
reveals no sickness, a general quarantine is in- 
advisable. If cases have existed or are found on 
board, the following is advised: 

1. Taking temperature of those apparently 
well. 

2. Removal of seriously sick to hospital. 

3. Removal of those recovering or slightly sick 
to quarantine station. 

4. Officers and crews to remain on board at 
least two days after removal of ^ick. 

5. Detention for two days, preferably at 
quarantine, of passengers who have been in con- 
tact with sick. Unless unusual precautions have 



been taken, this will include everyone on an 
infected ship. 

6. Those exposed and quarantined as per 
paragraph 5, when released, should be instructed, 
in writing to report daily for three days to the 
health officer or district physician nearest their 
destination. These instructions should give 
name and address of person or persons released 
and name and address of physician to whom they 
are to report; a duplicate should be made and 
sent to the physician. It may be advisable to 
notify physician by telephone. 

7. Passengers destined for army posts having 
been exposed to infection en route or showing 
symptoms, should be held as above, but may be 
released upon written request of the department 
surgeon, U. S. Army. This request should specify 
by name passengers or organization the depart- 
ment surgeon wishes released to him. 

8. Active cases of influenza on vessels transit- 
ing the Canal should be removed. Under ex- 
treme cases it may be necessary to remove con- 
tacts or quarantine the vessel. 

"Where measures to avoid spread of infection 
on board have been carefully enforced, quaran- 
tine may be relaxed accordingly. 

"Mechanical cleaning of living quarters of an 
infected vessel must be completely carried out 
before same is released." 

The attention of district physicians and health 
officers is called particularly to paragraph 
numbered 6. 

A. T. McCormack, 
Chief Health Officer. 

Distribution of Freight Charges. 
Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Auditor, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 31, 1918. 
Circular No. R. A. 605: 

To all concerned — That part of Circular RA- 
593 fixing the distribution of through freight 
charges between the railroad and the steamship 
line at 32 per cent and 68 per cent, respectively. 
is hereby canceled. Hereafter, the division 
will be made ii\ per cent to the railroad, and 
66 § to the steamship line; in other words for 
easy calculation, \ to the railroad. 

H. A. A. Smith, 

.4 uditor. 



Making of Local Shipments. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., October 28, 1918. 
Circular No. 1162. 

All agents — Please note the following from the 
Receiving and Forwarding Agent at Cristobal: 

"We are receiving various shipments of bana- 
nas, yuccas, sugar-cane, etc., from local stations 
which bear no tags or identification marks, 
causing considerable confusion in effecting de- 
livery to the proper owners. 

"Some shipments of cane arrive improperly 
tied, and as this cane is billed out as so many 
bundles, it is impossible to check against way- 
bills. 

"Will you please issue the necessary instruc- 
tions with a view of having these conditions im- 
proved." 

Agents will please give this matter their 
personal attention in the future. The proper 
marking of freight shipments is the most im- 
portant step toward the elimination of claims for 
loss. 

W. F. Foster. 
Master of Transportation. 



Examinations by Board of Local Inspectors. 

Examinations for marine licenses and for navi- 
gators of motor boats will be conducted at Balboa 
Heights on Wednesday, November 13, 1918. 

Cable Address of The Panama Canal. 

The cable address of The Panama Canal, on 
the Isthmus, is "Pancanal, Panama;" in the 
United States, "Pancanal, Washington." 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THF. PAN'AMA CANAL. 

PuhscriiitiiiM rates, domestic. «1 00 per voir; foreiun. SI SO; address 

The Panama Canal Record. Balboa Heights, • anal Zone, or 

The I'anain.i (anal Washington. D. (J. 

Entered as second-class matter, February li |!l|8, at tl.e 1'ost Office 

at Cristobal, ('. '/,.. under the Acl of March 3, 1870. 





Volume XII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 13, 1918. No if. 

Christmas in the Commissaries. 

Practically all the retailers in the United States have agreed to the 
five propositions set forth below in accordance with the request of the 
Council of National Defense to conduct their business during the 
Christmas season this year with as little extra expense as possible with 
a view of conserving important commodities: 

1. Not to increase their working force, by reason of the holiday 
business over the average force employed by them throughout the 
year. 

2. Not to increase the normal working hours of their force during 
the Christmas season. 

3. To use their utmost efforts to confine Christmas giving, except 
for young children, to useful articles:. 

4. To spread the period of holiday purchases over the months of 
October, November, and December, in order to relieve the transpor- 
tation facilities of the country from congestion in the latter half of 
December, which would be hurtful to the interests of the nation. 

5. To induce customers to carry their own packages whenever possi- 
ble. 

The Commissary Division will endeavor to confine its Christmas 
operations along these lines and asks the patrons to cooperate. 



Executive Order— Providing lor the Licencing of Chauffeurs.* 

P>y virtue of the Act of Congress entitled "An Act extending certain privileges 
of canal employees to other officials on the Canal Zone and authorizing the President 
to make rules and regulations affecting health, sanitation, quarantine, taxation, 
public roads, self-propelled vehicles, and police powers on the Canal Zone, and for 
other purposes, including provision as to certain fees, money orders and interest 
deposits," approved August 21, 1916, I hereby establish the following Executive 
Order for the Canal Zone: 

Section 1. That hereafter it shall be unlawful for any person to operate any auto- 
mobile over the streets and roads of the Canal Zone without first having obtained a 
license as hereinafter provided. 

Section 2. Each person desiring to obtain a license to operate an automobile 
oyer the streets and roads of the Canal Zone shall make* written application to the 
Executive Secretary of The Panama Canal, stating therein his nationality, age. and 
experience in the operation of automobiles, whether operated by gasoline, electricity, 
or other mo ive power: and his application must be endorsed by two reputable citizens 
of the Canal Zone or of the ci y of Panama or Colon, Republic of Panama, vo.iching 
for his sobriety and trustworthiness. The Executive Secretary shall ( hereupon cause 
the applicant to be examined touching his knowledge of gasoline and electric motors 
and machinery, and of the mechanism and operation of automobiles, as well as in 
respect to the road laws and regulations of the Canal Zone; and the applicant may be 
required to make a practical demonstration of his ability to operate an automobile. 

Section 3. No person shall be granted a chauffeur's license unless he is 18 years of 
age or more, is of sober habits, and is able to read either the English or Spanish lan- 
guage, and shall prove to the satisfaction of the examiners that he has the knowledge, 
skill and judgment necessary for the safe and skillful driving and handling of auto- 
mobiles. 



♦Being pu bushed as Panama Canal Circular No. ool«6J. 



132 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Section 4. The persons detailed by the Executive Secretary to examine applicants 
under this order shall meet at Balboa Heights or Cristobal, or at such other points in 
the Canal Zone as the Executive Secretary may from time to time designate, and 
shall examine all applicants whose applications have been referred to them, and shall 
make a report upon such examinations to the Executive Secretary with their 
recommendations as to the fitness of the applicants to operate automobiles over the 
streets and roads of the Canal Zone. The Executive Secretary shall cause a record to 
be kept of all applications, together with the reports of the examiners in each case 
and any other papers relating thereto. If the report of the examiners is favorable 
to the applicant, the Executive Secretary may issue to such applicant a chauffeur's 
license in form substantially as follows: 

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE CANAL ZONE. 

LICENSE TO CHAUFFEURS. 

No 

Whereas, it has been reported to me by the duly appointed examiners that 
has given satisfactory evidence to said exami- 
ners that he is a skillful chauffeur or operator of automobiles, and can be entrusted 
to perform the duties of chauffeur upon the streets and roads of the Canal Zone, he is, 
therefo r e, licensed to act as such chauffeur until such time as this license may, for 
cause, be revoked. 

Witness my Land this day of 191 . . 



Executive Secretary. The Panama Canal. 

The license issued hereunder shall continue in force until revoked for cause, as 
hereinafter provided for. 

Section 5. When the Executive Secretary issues a chauffeur's license he shall 
thereupon cause to be issued to the licensee either a card, check, or badge, as may 
be determined from time to time by regulations of the Governor of The Panama 
Canal, and in such form as the latter may designate. The licensee shall be charged 
a fee of one dollar ($1) for such license, to be paid to the Collector of The Panama 
Canal; provided, that no fee shall be charged for licenses issued to chauffeurs who 
only operate automobiles belonging to or controlled by The Panama Canal or other 
agency of the United States or the Panama Railroad Company. 

Applicants for licenses to operate automobiles belonging to or controlled by any 
government agency or the Panama Railroad Company need not be endorsed by two 
citizens as provided in Section 2 hereof for other applicants, but such applications 
shall be endorsed by the chief of the office, division, or unit in which the applicant is 
employed. 

Upon the request of any Canal Zone police officer it shall be the duty of every licen- 
see hereunder, while in charge of any automobile on the Canal Zone streets or roads, 
to exhibit to such officer the card, check or badge so issued to him. 

Section 6. The Executive Secretary is hereby authorized to revoke for cause any 
license issued hereunder or heretofore issued. 

Section 7. The Governor of The Panama Canal is hereby authorized to promulgate 
rules and regulations from time to time to carry out this order. The licenses, cards, 
checks and badges heretofore issued in conformity with preexisting laws, shall continue 
to be effective unless revoked for cause. 

Section 8. Any person who operates an automobile over the streets and roads of the 
Canal Zone without first having obtained a license as provided for under this order, 
or who fails to comply with the other requirements of this order or of the regulations 
of the Governor issued pursuant to this order, shall be deemed guilty of a misde- 
meanor, and upon conviction thereof shall be punished by fine not to exceed $25 or by 
imprisonment in jail not to exceed thirty days, or by both such fine and imprisonment, 
in the court's discretion, as authorized by the above-mentioned Act of Congress. 

Section 9. The ordinance enacted by the Isthmian Canal Commission of April 
15, 191 1, entitled "Ordinance providing for the licensing of chauffeurs for automobiles," 
the ordinance enacted by the Isthmian Canal Commission dated February 3, 1914, 
"Amending Section 8 of Ordinance providing for the licensing of Chauffeurs for auto- 
mobiles," and all other ordinances, orders and regulations, or parts thereof, in conflict 
with this order are hereby repealed. 

Section 10. This order shall take effect thirty days from and after its publication in 
The Panama Canal Record. 

WOODROW WILSON 

The White House, 
9 October, 1918. 

(No. 2971.] 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 133 

Supplement No. 5 to Tariff No. 2. 

The following amendments are made to Tariff No. 2, Schedule of 
Rates for Supplies and Services Furnished to Shipping and Allied 
Interests at the Panama Canal: 

Item 21— Coal. (Effective December 1, 1918.) 

Cristobal-Colon. Balboa. 

1. For steamships $13.00 $14.50 

2. To parties taking less than carload lots 14.50 16.00 

3. When request is made by commander of vessel chief engineer, or agent for trim- 

ming > n deck, between decks, or special trimming in bunkers for convenience 
of vessel, an additional charge of 60 cents per ton will be made for extra 
handling. 

4. For lump coal delivered in sacks. $10 per ton additional. Should the vessel furnish 

satisfactory sacks the p.ice will be $3 per ton additional. Not more then five 
tons will be supplied to a vessel. 

5. For coal delivered on Sundays and holidays an additional charge of 50 cents per 

ton will be made to cover the additional expense to the Panama Railroad 
Company for making such deliverty. 
Item 22 — Fuel and Diesel Oils. (Effective November 15, 1918.) 

Cristobal. Balboa. 

1. Fuel oil, per barrel of 42 gallons, delivered to vessels $3 .00 $3 .00 

Note— Prices September I. 1918, to November IS. 1918 3.00 2 SO 

2. Diesel oil is n< t sold by The Panama Canal, but may be obtained from private 

concerns at approximately S3. 50 per barrel. Cable arrangements should be 
made in advance of arrival of vessel. 

3. Pumping oil into and out of private tanks. 4 cents per barrel. Oil heavier than 14° 

Ban me at 60° Fahrenheit will not be handled by Panama Canal handling 
plants. 
The General Storekeeper at Balboa should be advised as to the approximate dates 
that steamers are due to arrive with oil either at Cristobal or Balboa, so that 
necessary arrangements may be made for handling. 



Panama Canal Identity Certificates. 

Tn order to comply with the new foreign travel regulations which 
become efTcdive November 15, a revised form of Panama Canal 
Identity Certificate has been prepared for issue to persons traveling 
to the United States. Application therefor should be submitted on 
form 15-3, wl ich has been recently revised, and copies furnished 
to heads of divisions. 



Red Cross Magazine in Spanish. 

The local Chapter has been advised that the Red Cross Magazine will 
be printed in Spanish beginning with the November, 1918, issue and 
issued every other month thereafter, making 6 issues instead of 12 
in a year. A few sample copies have been received which are being 
distributed gratis. 

Any Spanish friends who contribute as much as $2 per year to the 
American Red Cross through the Canal Zone Chapter are entitled 
to receive the Spanish issues of this magazine free of charge, in place 
of the monthly issues of the English edition. 

If you wish the Spanish issues, send your name and address plainly 
written to the Secretary, Canal Zone Chapter, American Red Cross, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z. If you are not a contributor to the Red Cross 
to the extent of $2 per year and wish to receive the Spanish copies of 
the magazine, you may remit $2 United States currency to the secre- 
tary and become a member with the magazine privilege. 



134 TITE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Information and Instructions Regarding Entry Into and Departure from 

the Canal Zone. 

The Pamana Canal, Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 1, 1918. 
The following new and revised rules, many of which have been in 
effect for some time, are here stated for the information of all con- 
cerned, and in accordance with the proclamation of the Secretary of 
State, September 4, 191 S, those rule? governing entry and departure 
will become effective in the Canal Zone November 15, 1918, at 6 a. m. 

ADMINISTRATION 

1. By authority of the Secretary of State, the administration in the 
Canal Zone of the President's proclamation of August 8, 1918, govern- 
ing the issuance of passports and the granting of permits to depart from 
and enter the United States, and of the rules and regulations of the 
President's Executive Order of August 8, 1918, has been delegated to 
the Governor of The Panama Canal. 

2. Representatives of the Police and Fire Division shall act as 
Permit Agents and Entry Control Officers, and representatives of the 
Division of Civil Affairs and Bureau of Customs shall act as Depar- 
ture Control Officers. 

3. The following rules and regulations define the procedure for 
applying, in the Canal Zone, the provisions of the above-mentioned 
Proclamation and Executive Order: 

DEPARTURFS 

4. Aliens traveling to United States ports with alien declarations 
shall not be required to make formal application ; and departure permit 
may be issued after examination of their passports and other identi- 
fication papers. 

5. Aliens traveling to foreign ports shall make formal application, 
in quadruplicate, for departure permit. 

6. Foreign officials accredited to the United States or friendly 
countries shall not be required to apply for or procure departure per- 
mits. However, passports or other identification papers shall bear 
endorsement seal of Permit Officer. 

7. Transit passengers not landing at a Canal Zone port shall not 
be required to have departure permits or visa. Leaving the ship on 
which passenger arrives is considered a landing under these regulations. 

8. Official departure permit or endorsement seal of Departure Permit 
Officer shall be authority for steamship companies to sell transportation 
to persons desiring to depart from the Canal Zone. This permit shall 
not be taken up by the steamship company. 

9. The original departure permit or visa of Permit Officer shall be 
authority for passengers to enter the docks for the purpose of going 
aboard ship upon which they are about to depart. They are to be 
considered only as a provisional permit to depart. No person, except- 



TIIE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 135 

ing members of the crew and agents and authorized employees of 
steamship lines, and government eniplo the performance of their 

duty shall be permitted to go aboard any ship in C /one waters 

without permission from the Departure Control Oilier. Passes issued 
by Captains of the Ports for admission to docks shall not be considered 
authority for going aboard any ship without approval of Departure 
Control Officer. 

10. Departure Control Officers shall take up original departure per- 
mit at ship's side when passenger goes aboard. After departure permit 
has been taken up by Departure Control Officer, passenger shall not be 
permited to leave the ship. 

11. Persons not required to have departure permits shall have en- 
dorsement seal of Departure Permit Officer on passports or other 
identification papers. 

12. Departure Control Officers shall endorse all original departure 
permits, giving date and ship upon which passenger departs from the 
Canal Zone. 

SEAMEN 

13. No alien seaman, excepting those on vessels only transiting the 
Canal, shall be permitted to sail from the Canal Zone unless in posses- 
sion of seaman's identity card. 

14. Seamen citizens of the United States may be permitted to sail 
on Seaman's Certificate or valid passport. 

15. Crews of all ships departing from the Canal Zone shall be mus- 
tered by a Customs Officer and identity cards properly endorsed. 

16. No member of a crew shall be permitted to return ashore, except- 
ing at ship's side in performance of duty, after departure endorsement 
has been placed on identity card. 

ARRIVALS 

17. Examination shall be made of incoming passengers and papers 
required by incoming travel chart, and if, in the opinion of the Entry 
Control Officer, passenger is a proper person to land in or enter the 
Canal Zone passport or other identification papers shall be properly 
endorsed. 

18. Passports shall be endorsed in accordance with declaration of 
passenger as to whether or not such passenger intends to remain on the 
Isthmus more than thirty (30) days. Alien declarations shall be taken 
from passengers en route to a foreign port or declaring intention to 
remain on the Isthmus more than thirty (30) days, and such declara- 
tions shall be forwarded to Permit Officer at port of arrival. 

19. No endorsement shall be made on passports of passengers not 
declaring intention to land in the Canal Zone. 

20. No passengers shall be permitted to land in the Canal Zone 
without endorsement of Entry Control Officer. 



136 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

21. Passengers permitted to land in the Canal Zone shall remain 
ashore until boarding ship for final departure, when they will be re- 
quired to secure permission to depart from the Permit Officer. 

SEAMEN 

22. Entry Control Officers shall examine all seamen and their identi- 
fication papers. All seamen, excepting those on vessels only transiting 
the Canal, entering the Canal Zone or departing therefrom, shall be 
required to have citizen or alien seaman's identity cards, excepting 
citizens of the United States who may enter or depart on Seaman's 
Certificate or valid passport. 

23. Seamen arriving on vessels only transiting the Canal shall be 
examined and passed by Entry Control Officer if, in his opinion, they 
are proper persons to be permitted to pass through the Canal and are 
not enemy aliens subject to internment. They shall not be required to 
procure seaman's identity cards, but they must have passports or other 
valid identification papers, if en route to a foreign port, and when not in 
possession of such papers, they may be removed and returned to port 
of departure at the expense of the vessel bringing them to the Canal 
Zone. 

24. No seaman shall be permitted to land in the Canal Zone until his 
identity card, or other identification papers, has been endorsed by 
Entry Control Officer. 

25. Alien seamen not in possession of identity cards may be per- 
mitted to land for the purpose of procuring such cards, by special 
permit card (form 1429) issued by Entry Control Officer, and such 
seamen shall be directed to apply for seaman's identity cards at the 
Customs Office. 

PANAMA CANAL IDENTITY CERTIFICATES 

26. Employees of The Panama Canal, the Panama Railroad Com- 
pany, and the members of their families, civilian employees of the 
United States and the members of their families, and the families of 
members of the Army and Navy traveling between the continental 
United States and the Panama Canal Zone may carry identification 
certificates issued by The Panama Canal in lieu of passports or identity 
cards issued by immigration officials. Identity certificates of The 
Panama Canal shall ba issued only to citizens of the United States. 
Aliens resident in the Canal Zone, or alien employees of The Panama 
Canal, the Panama Railroad Company, of alien civilian employees of 
the United States desiring to depart from the Canal Zone will be 
required to have passports or other satisfactory identification papers 
issued by the official of their Governments. Such aliens desiring to 
depart for a United States port will be required to execute, before 
an American Consul at Panama or Colon, two weeks prior to depar- 
ture, the regular form of declaration of aliens about to depart for the 
United States. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 137 

27. All persons traveling on Panama Canal Identity Certificates 
shall have such certificates visaed and endorsed by the Departure 
Control Officer before they will be permitted to go on board the vessel 
on which they expect to depart. 

28. The date of expira'ion of Panama Canal Identity Certificates 
shall be within two weeks within the estimated time of arrival of holder 
in the United States. Before return transportation to the Canal Zone 
will be issued, such certificates must be visaed by the Washington 
Office of The Panama Canal. Passengers will surrender such certifi- 
cates to customs officers at examination on dick after landing for 
forwarding to the Executive Office, upon arrival in the Canal Zone. 

INSTRUCTIONS TO PASSENGERS 

29. Limit the articles on your person or in your baggage, as far as 
possible, to necessary wearing apparel and toilet articles. 

30. All baggage which is not to be retained in the stateroom should 
be delivered at the baggage room 24 hours before sniling time. All 
passengers having such baggage should arrange with the Chief Customs 
Inspector to have the baggage examined as far in advance of sailing 
time as possible. 

31. For all articles of commerce and other commodities, excepting 
necessary wearing apparel and toilet articles of passengers, a Shipper's 
Export Declaration must be surrendered to the Customs Inspector 
at the time of the inspection of outgoing baggage before such articles 
may be placed aboard a vessel. Such declaration shall be applied for 
in the Customs Office at least 48 hours before departure. This in- 
cludes commercial travelers' samples, etc., unless they have been 
previously brought into Panama or the Canal Zone by the same car- 
rier, in which case no export declaration is required. Customs officials 
will determine as to whether or not an export license is required. Failure 
to comply with the above may result in seizure of the goods and makes 
the passenger- liable to prosecution. 

32. It is unlawful for any person to send, or take out of, or bring 
into, or to attempt to send or take oat of, or bring into the Canal Zone 
any letter or other writing, or tangible form of communication, except 
in the regular course of the mail. The penalty for a violation of this 
Statute is a fine of S10,09'J or 10 years' imprisonment, or both. 

In absolutely necessary cases a license to take or send such matter 
out of the Canal Zone outside the regular course of the mails may be 
granted upon application to the Chief, Division of Civil Affairs, Balboa 
Heights, at least 72 hours before the time of sailing. Application 
forms may be obtained from the customs offices or the Civil Affairs 
office v In case the letter or other writing, or tangible means of com- 
munication, is to be delivered directly or indirectly to an enemy or 
ally of enemy country, the application for a license must be made to the 



138 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

War Trade Board at Washington. No such license will be granted in 
the Canal Zone. 

33. Travelers should not have in their posse . either on their 
person or in their baggage, any firearms, ammunition or explosives, nor 
any written or printed matter, including accumulations of old letters 
and papers, as the possession of any letter or other writing, book, 
map, plan or other paper, or picture, or any telegram, cablegram, or 
wireless message, or any form of communication, may subject the 
person or persons concerned to detention. (See paragraph 37, follow- 
ing.) 

34. The taking out of the Canal Zone, by travelers, of any amounts 
of money in excess of those specified below is unlawful: 

(a) United States notes, National Bank notes, Federal Reserve 
notes, or Federal Reserve Bank notes, not to exceed SI. 000 for each 
adult; or an equivalent value of currency, bank notes and coin, other 
than gold, of the countries for which passports have been duly issued 
to them. 

(b) Subsidiary silver coins not to exceed $100 for each adult, such 
coin to be in lieu of a like amount of notes under (a) above. 

This means that no gold of any kind, no American silver dollars and 
no United States gold certificates or silver certificates shall be carried 
out without a license; and that no other coin or paper currency of any 
country, in excess of $1,000, shall be taken out of the Canal Zone by 
any person, except under license. 

Applications for license may be obtained from customs officers, and 
license to take out greater amounts of money than those specified will be 
issued by the Governor only for good and sufficient reasons. Such 
application must be made at least 72 hours before time of sailing. 

The penalty for a violation of the above statute is a fine of $10,000 
or two years' imprisonment, or both. (See paragraph 37, following.) 

35. All passengers will be required to make declaration, on a form 
provided for that purpose by the Permit Officer, as to the communica- 
tions or amounts of money which they contemplate carrying with them 
at the time that departure permit is secured. (See paragraph 37, 
following). 

36. On sailing day passengers must appear at the dock in ample time 
to permit inspection of their documents and stateroom baggage. The 
time when this inspection is to be made by customs authorities for any 
outgoing vessel can be learned from the steamship company. 

37. Paragraphs 33, 34, and 35 do not apply to passengers leaving 
the Canal Zone for the United States by direct boat. 

As regards paragraph 33, the communications, maps, pictures, written 
matter, etc., mentioned therein, may be taken out of the Canal Zone 
by passengers bound direct to the United States at their own risk. Upon 
entering a United States port passengers will be required to describe 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



139 



all such papers upon their customs declarati >ns. Such declaration 
will relieve the passenger of the penalty provided by law for carrying 
even innocuous papers, but will not insure the return of the papers if 
they are seized by the United States customs authorities at the port 
of entry. 

38. Friends and relatives of outgoing passengers, or of the officers 
or members of the crew, will not be permitted to enter the docks on 
sailing day, except for very special reasons, when individual passes 
will be issued by the Port Captain. They should be instructed not to 
send anv fruit, flowers, candy, cigars, or other gifts to the vessel. 

39. All passengers should comply strictly with the foregoing instruc- 
tions and regulations, and should have all arrangements made before 
sailing date. It is particularly important that application for departure 
permit be made as soon as possible before the time of sailing, and pas- 
sengers neglecting to make application early enough may not be able 
to take the vessels on which they hope to depart. 

DIAGRAM OF OUTGOING TRAVEL FROM CANAL ZONE 
(For explanation of diagrams, see page HO.) 







ULTIMATE DESTINATIONS OF JOURNEYS 


Designation of persons. 


Ports of oonti- 

nental Uiiited 

Stales. 


Ports of Unite'! 

States insular 

possessions. 


Pannnvi ports, 

other than Pana 

im t'i'v. Colon 

City and Tuboga 

Island.' 


All other points. 


General Clatset. 
United States citiaens 


PaVe E 


PaVe E 


P 


PaVeE 




'Hostile aliens 


PaVD. S 


PaVD S 


S 


PaVeS 






PaVDP 


PaVDP 


Cer. Res P 


• PaVePV 


HlKcial Ciatrei 


O. S. forces 
Foreign forces 


CE 


CE 


CE 


CE 


Members of military or 


Host. Al 
CE 


Host. Al. 
CE 


Hon Al. 
CE 


Host. Al. 
CE 


•aval lurd-s of U. S. or 
•ubeliigereul. 


Other Al. 
CE 


Other Al. 
CE 


Other Al. 

CE 


Other Al. 
CE 




U. S. Cit. 

c 


U. S. Cit. 
CE 


U. S Cit. 
CE 


U. S. Cit. 
CK 


f D. S. citizens 
Seamen I Hostile aliens 




Ce 


Ce 


Ce. 








IS 


IS 


IS 


IS 




I Aliens not hostile 


I 


I 


I 


1 


Foreign officials accredited to U. S. or 
friendly countries. 


PaVe E 


PaVeE 


Cer. Res E. 


•PaVVe E 


Employees of The Panama Canal. Panama 
Railroad, or U. S. Government ami their 
families, and mi-ml^n of families of 
U. S. citizen members of U. S. Army 


IE 


IE 


IE 


PaVo E 





•Permit to be issued direet from Governor. Special, or under Section 3-B, Trading with Enemy Act. 
•Visa of U. S. Consul. Pinam i or Colon City only for those journeying on U. S. vessel. 

«Thesje foreign travel regulations do not apply to travel between the Canal Zone and the cities of 
Panama and Colon, or Taboga Island. 



140 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



DIAGRAM OF INCOMING TRAVEL TO CANAL ZONE 







STARTING POINTS OF JOLRNEYS. 


Designation of persons. 


Ports of conti- 
nental United 

States. 


Ports of United 

States insular 

possessions. 


Panama ports, 
other than Pana- 
ma City, Colon 
City, and Taboga 
Island.' 


All other points. 


United State 
' Hostile alie 
Aliens olher 

Members nf< 
v itfi uiiliti 
forces uf 1 
belligerent 


Gewru, Ctaastl. 


Pa 


Pa 


Cer. Res. or S 


PaVe 




PaVS 


PaVS 


PaVS 


PaVS D 




PaV 


PaV 


Cer. Res. 


I'aVD 


Special Claaet. 

rconnei'ted | Ilostile aliens 

r> • ' naval 1 

I. S ur w>- [ Other persunv 


C 

c 


C 

c 


C 

c 


C 
C 




Ce 


Ce 


Ce 


Ce 










IS 


IS 


IS 


IS 








i 


I 


I 


I 


I 


Fo'cien offi 
Inendly cc 

Employees <> 
Itnilrnad. 
famiiii'S, : 
U.S. Am 


•ials a<'credi'ed to U. S. or 


PaV 


PaV 


Cer. Res. 


PaV 


The Panama Canal. Panama 
>r L'.S Gnvjrnment and tlitir 
i.l members ol families of 




I 


I 


I 


Pa 







1 Special permit i-isucd by Governor or under Section 3-B, Trading with Enemy Act. 

■These foreign tnvel renditions lo not apply to travel between the Canal Zone and the cities 
of Panama and Colon, or Taboga Island. 

EXPLANATION OF DIAGRAM OF OUTGOING AND INCOMING TRAVEL 

The left-band vertical columns of the diagrams designate, respectively, the classes of persons who will 
depart lioin or entei the Canal Zone. Three genera! classes are designated in accordance with national 
character. These classes taken together include all travel. As a matter of fact, certain persons, accord- 
inn to their [dace of residence or occupation, are entitled to special preferential treatment in respect to 
c-rtain journeys. Consequently four special classes are somewhat subdivided, as designated. Until 
familiar with the diagram, permit and control officers must be careful in each case for which he uses 
them to examine both the general and special qualifications, as he may otherwise enforce general rules 
against persons entitled to special preferences. The top horizontal columns of the diagram designate, 
nsprct'vly tne ultimate destination of outgoing journeys and the starting points of incoming journeys. 
The letters within the squares formed by the intersection of the horizontal and vertical lines indicate the 
documents required of the various classes of persons departing for the various destinations or entering 
from the various starting points. It should be borne in mind that in all cases where documents other 
than passports or regular permits, are allowed, passports or regular permits are. nevertheless, available 
in lieu of such special documents. The symbols employed in the diagrams, either singly or in coinbina- 
tiou, have the following values: 



SYMBOLS. 

C Command (military or naval). P. 

Ce Certificate of American citizenship. Pa 

D Declaration (alien). S 

I Identity card or Panama Canal identi- V 

ficrtio-i certificate. Ve 

Cer. Res. Certificate of residence, R. P. E 



Permit in regular form. 

Passport. 

Special permit. 

Visa. 

Verification. 

Endorsement of permit officer. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Hotel AspinwalJ, Taboga. 
The Hotel Aspinwall at Taboga does not seem to have lost any of 
its old-time popularity and with its new electric lighting system in 
operation, the hotel looks from the sea to be nothing short of any sea- 
shore resort. On Saturday, November 16, there will be a dinner dance. 
Boats will leave Balboa at 6 o'clock p. m. Music will be furnished by 
one of the well-known local orchestras. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 141 

Telephone Directory. 

A new issue of The Panama Canal telephone directory will be made 
effective January 1, 1919. 

The directory has been corrected to date from information obtained 
by the telephone department. If there are any changes in organiza- 
tion likely to take place that will in any way affect the telephone 
directory, such information should be forwarded to the Telephone 
Supervisor, Balboa Heights, at the earliest date but' in any case not 
later than December 10, 1918, as book will go to press December 15. 

Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service Com- 
mission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which there 
are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at Canal post 
offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not posted, persona 
interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, Balboa Heights 
(telephone 286): 

Ship draftsman, architectural, mechanical, and structural-steel draftsman (for ship work) (male an •* 
female); No. 1 698-amended. This announcement cancels announcement No. 22'»6-amended. of ih 
continuous open competit've nonassembled examination fur architectural, mechanical, and structural* 
steel draftsman, for the Navy Department and Navy Yard s-rvice. Gride I $4 to $196 p<»i hem; 
Grade 2. over SI°'j to S3 92 per diem; Grade 3, over 55.92 to $6.88 per diem; Grade 4, over S6 88 per 
diem.t} Form J.? 12. 

Mechanician, qualified as instrument maker (male); No. 1161-amended; forms 304 and 2029; 
$1.20) to 81.800 a .ear. ft 

Oner (male); $840 a year; No. 347-amended; December 3, 1918; form 1800; age. 18 years and 
Over.* 

Blue printer (male and tcmale); $2 per diem to $900 a year; No. 441 -amended: form 1312; aye 18 
eas and ov t r ft 

Teacher (male and fema'e) ; Indian Service; $600 to S720 a year; Novembei 24, December IS, 
1918, and January 26 1919; age, 20 to 4<> years, inclusive. Form 1312 i 

Biological assistant (male); St. 200 to St. 800 a year; November 26. 1918; No. 61 1-amendment * 

Cement tester (male); Sur) / to SI .200 a vea>; No. 22S1 -amende.!, supplemental. t 

Assistant in warehouse investigations, Grade 2 (male): $1,200 to $1,800 a year; Decembers, 1918; 
No. 5«S; form lit 2 { 

Assistani in transportation, grade I (male); $1,800 to S2. 700 a year; No. 596; form 211* t 

Assistant in transportation, grade 2 (male and female); $1,200 to $1,800 a year; December 8. 1918; 
No 597; form t d i. \ 

Textile tester (female); $1,080 to SI. 330 a year; December 3, 1918; No. 616; form 1312, age, 20 
to 59 years, inclusive.* 

Farmer (male); $600 to $930 a year; No. 617; form 1312; aw. 21 to 54 years, inclusive, ft 

Field matron (female); $600 to $840 a year; No. 618; form 1312; December 15, 1918; age. 25 to 
49 ye irs. inclusive. 

Matron (female) ; $600 to $840 a year; No. 618; form 304; DecembcrlS, 1918; nzc, 25 to 44 years, 
Inclusive. 

Assistant in extension work with women (female); Grade 1. $2,200 to $3, 000 a yar; Grade 2, $1,800 
to $2,400 a year; No 619; lorm 2lts : December 3. 1918; age. 25 to 54 years, inclusive. 

Law clerk and typewriter (male); SI, 500 to $1,740 a year; No. 620; forms 304 and 2226; age, 27 
years an I over; December 15, 1918 ; 

Assistant inspector of weights and measures (male); SI. 200 to SI, 800 a year; No. 624; form 1312; 
December 3. 1918.* { 

* Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applica- 
tions, and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing 
business on that date. 

t Nonassembled Applications will be received at any time until further notice. 

J Male appl cants ol draft age shoul 1 state in their applications their draft classification. The 
Commission will sustain objections of appointing officers to the certification or appointment of 
men in Class I -A. 

5 In view of the needs of the service, and until further notice, subjects of countries allied with 
the United States will be admitted to this examination, provided they are otherwise qualified. 
Such persons may not be certified for appointment, however, so long as there are United States 
citizens on the eligible list. 

Weather Conditions in October, 1918. 

Rainfall for the month was unusually heavy over the Atlantic section, generally 
above normal in the Central section, and below normal along the Pacific Coast. 
The monthly totals at Frijoles, Monte Lirio. Gaum, and Brazos Brook were the high- 
est of record for the month of October, and the monthly rainfall at the Colon station 
was the heaviest October rainfall of record at this station since 1872. 

The monthly rainfall in the Canal Zone and vicinity ranged from 3.90 inches at 
Taboga to 27 30 inches at Brazos Brook. The greatest amount of precipitation 
recorded in 24 consecutive hours was 8.12 inches at Brazos Brook on the 1 6—1 7th. 

The estimated average rainfall over the Gatun Lake watershed was 17.81 inches, 
or 15 per cent above the 8-year mean and the average rainfallover the Chagres River 
basin above Alhajuela was 20.86 inches, or 43 per cent above the 17-year mean. 



142 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



The average air temperature and relative humidity were approximately normal. 
The wind movement was above normal at all stations and the atmospheric pressure 
was slightly below normal on both coasts. 

Wind action caused much damage along the beach in Panama city and at nearby 
points on October 21 and 22, due to the coincidence of abnormally high spring tides 
and fresh southerly winds. 

The cloudiness was uuusaully heavy over the Atlantic section, and approximately 
normal on the Pacific side. Evaporation from the surface of Gatun Lake was slightly 
below normal. 

Elevation of Gatun Lake (feet above mean sea level) were: Maximum S6.46 on the 
18th; minimum 85.38 on the 1st; monthly mean 85.91. 

The evaporation from Gatun Lake surface was 4.127 inches. 

October weather conditions at the two coast stations are summarized in the fol- 
lowing table. » 





-a 

£i a 

«| g 

3 B 3 
S O O 

ty ** — 1 


Temperature. 


s 

S9 8 
89 


Precipitation. 


Wind. 


Stations. 


f 
c 

c3 
S3 

79.8 
79 4 


a 

_a 

91 

89 


"5 
Q 


a 
a 

2 


© 

Q 


~3 

o 
H 


> 
a 

c ai 
•- a 


o o 

J. S 
o o 

Q.S 

19 

25 


11 


c 

M 3 

c ■ — 

£-5 

N.W. 
W. 


>> 

s 

28 
3fi 


(5 


Q 


•Balboa 

Heights 

Colon 


29.834 
29 832 


Oct. 5 
Oct. 23 


71 
72 


Oct. 1 
Ost. 1 


9.16 
27 07 


10.25 
14 89 


5.367 
5.676 


s.w. 

E 


Oct. 22 
Oct. 1 



•Formerly Auceu. 



Official Circulars. 



Foremen Respons ble for Safe-keeping of 
Materials and Equipment. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office. 
_ Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 7, 1918. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

My attention has been called to the fact that a 
considerable quantity of cen.ent sacks, scrap cop- 
P'T and brass, building hardware, etc.. which was 
stolen from The Panama Canal has been recovered 
by the Police Division, and it is evident that the 
foremen who are responsible for the safe -keeping 
of this material have been negligent. 

All foremen handling such material for which 
there is a ready sale should be advised that they 
will be held personally responsible for the safe- 
keeping of same, and that they will be required 
to pay for any material which may be stolen 
through the'r negligence. All material of salable 
value should be kept under lock. 

Chester Harding, 

Coventor. 



Special Rates, Panama Railroad. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Auditor, 
Balroa Heights, C. Z.. October 21, 1918. 
Circular R. A. No. 603: 

To 'ill concerned — Effective November 1, 1918, 
Circulars Nos. RA-5/56 and 540. providing special 
passenger rates and rates for special cars and 
trains on the Panama Railroad, will be can- 
celed and the following rates become effective: 

I. SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS. 

a. Special round-trip rates for Sundays and 
holidays will be granted as follows: 

1. First-classround-trip tickets $2.50 

2. Second-class round-trip tickets 1.50 

3. Employees' first-class round-trip tickets 1.50 

b. The first-class S2.50 tickets may be sold 
to any first-class passenger. 

c. The first-class SI. 50 tickets will be sold only 
to employees of The Panama Canal, Panama 
Railroad, and United States Government on 
the gold roll, and to their families. Employees 
of The Panama Canal and Panama Railroad, and 
Others who have the commissary authority cards, 
will identify themselves with these cards when 



purchasing tickets for themselves and families. 
Officers and enlisted men of the Army and Navy 
in unijorm may purchase these tickets for them- 
selves and families without further identification. 
d. These special Sunday and holiday tickets 
will be good only going on regular passenger 
trains leaving terminals after 4 o'clock p. m. 
on Saturdays and on the days preceding holidays, 
and on Sundays and holidays to and including 
trains leaving terminal* at 7 o'clock p. m. 

II. SPECIAL EXCURSION RATES. 

Special rates for one-day excursions may be 
granted to organizations where 403 or more 
tickets will be sold, at the one-way rate for the 
round trip, with a minimum of 25 cents per 
ticket either first or s.-coid-class and a maximum 
of SI first -class and 75 cents second class. 

Note: Sunday and holiday and excursion tick- 
ets so'.d at the above rates w 11 r:ot be accepted 
for transT'ortatio.i on ary other trains except as 
s eeified above, and under no circumstances will 
lefund be made for unused port.ons of such 
tickets. 

in. special cars. 

Special coach for passengers holding regular 
transportation good on train to which coach ia 
to be attached (one way). S21. 

IV. SPECIAL TRAINS. 

a. The charge for running a special train will 
be S100, which amount must be deposited or 
guaranteed before the train is furnished. The 
rate for one-way train is the same as for a roii'id 
trip. This rate is for outsiders, as well as em- 
ployees, and the passengers must have the same 
forms of transportation as are required on the 
regular trains, that is, regular tickets, pusses, 
24-trip tickets, or mileage. 

b. For special trains for organizations entitled 
to employees' rates, on which transportation is 
not to be collected, the charge for a special train, 
of one coach will be S10C, a? above, and for each 
additional coach, $40. On such trains conductors 
will simply make a report of the number of 
passengers carried. 

H. A. A. Smith, 

.4 udilor. 
S. W. Heald, 
Superintendent Panama Railroad Company. 
Approved : 
Chester Harding, 

President The Panama Railroad Company. 
Gjiierajr The Panama Canal. 



TITE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



143 



Enemy Trading List. 

The Panama Canal. 
Executive Depakiment, 
Division of Civil Affairs, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 2. 1918. 
To nil enncerned—Tht following changes, involving ad- 
dilioimand removals, have been made, effective November 
J, 1918, hi the United States Enemy Trading List by the 
War Trade Board: 

ADDITIONS. 

CHILI. 

Casa Alcmana (R. Klapp & Co..' . Temueo. 
Chodowiecki & Co., Osorono Lau- Valparaiso. 

taro. 
Klapp, R. & Co. CCasa Alcmana) . Temuco. 
Mullcr, Osorotio I.amaro . . . Valparaiso. 
Oestreich, Dr. Gustavo. Eaijepe. . Santiago. 
Victor A Co.. Emanuel Santiago. 

GUATEMALA. 

Dicsseldorff. F. P Cohan. 

Thomas Hermanoa Coban. 

MEXICO. 

Aladro, Manuel Vera Crus. 

Alzuveta y ' 'h., Sucrs Acapulce. 

Biltms. h. Frank Me> >o City. 

fiudad de Mexico 'A. Salman) . San [..lis I'oioat. 

Car ia \l> irez Hermanos Mexico City. 

Henniiig, August Puebla. 

Petersen, Fedi-rien Puebla. 

Salman, A. (Cia lad de Me\i?o) . San Luis TotoaL 

VENEZUELA. 

Bramkam',)!. Max Caracas. 

IS man * Company Caracas. 

Jcrcr & Co Maracaiho. 

Soi iedad Cnmercial Corporation Maracaibo. 
(Cooperative). 

REMOVALS. 

CHILI. 

Roepckc, Otto Valdivia. 

COST* RICA. 

■Gncll. Ronelio Fernandez (!.l 1m- San Jose. 
parcial). 

GUATEMALA. 

Perez Hermanos Guatemala City. 

MEXICO. 

Camcz & Co Mexico City. 

Garcia, Manuel (La Internacional Torrcon. 

I'rontcra 
Sirrra. U. y Hermanos, Sucrs., Vera Cruz. 
"Arco Iris." 

PERU. 

Benites, Guilh'rmo Lima. 

Benites, .lose T Lima Naranjo (1). 

(Lima and Naranjo) 

Luis, Carlos Lima and Callao. 

Koincro. Abraham V Mollendo. 

VENEZUELA. 

Mir, Andres Ciudad Bolivar. 

C. H. Calhoun. 
Chief, Division of Civil Affair*. 



Band Concert Schedule. 

16th Band. Coast Artillery Corpi. 
Army and Navy club. Cristobal — November 7. 

14, 21. and 28. 
Fort Shorn, an movies — November 5, 12, 19, and 

26. 
Port Randolph movies — November 6, 13. 20. and 

27. 
Fort de Lesseps (afternoon) — November 6, 13, 

20. and 27. 

Fort Randolph (afternoon) — November 7. 14, 

21. and 28. 

Enlisted men's dance at Fort Sherman or Fort 

Randolph — No von. her 2 and 16. 
SSd Infantry Bund. 
Cr'rtohal bandstand — November 5, 12. 19. and 

26. 
New Gatun — November 4. 11. IS. and 25. 
Gatun clubhouse — November 1 and 15. 
Sibert s curve, Gatun — November 6, 13, 20, and 

27. 
Officers' club dance — November 8 and 22. 



Porto Rican Infantry Band. 
Corozal — November 5. 12. 19, and 26. 
Empire movies — November 4, 6, 11, 13, 18, 20, 

25. and 27. 
Camp Otis movies — November 7. 14. 21. and 28. 
Camp Gaillard officers' dance — Novembci 8 and 

22. 

Blh Band. Coast Artillery Corps. 
Quarry Heights — November 6. 13, 20, and 27. 
Fort Amador — November 7, 14, 21. and 28. 
Fort Amador movies — November 1, 5, 8, 12, 

19, 22. 26, and 29. 
Officers dance — November 1. 
Enlisted men's dance — November 2 and 

U. S. Nnval Air Station and Submarine Band. 
Cristobal bandstand — November 15. 



15. 



16. 



Misdirected Letters. 
Balboa Heights, C. Z.. October 2"), 1918. 

The following insufficiently addressed letters 
and papers have been icceived in the office of the 
Director of Posts, and may b<' obtained upon 
request of the addressees Requests may be made 
by telephone, calling No. 182, Balboa: 
♦Bourne, Mrs. Theresa *Linthictim, Harry E. 

A. Riofaco, Gorgouio 

Brown, Geo. E. (Box Snvigny, De. A. B. 

192) Strunk. Wilbert T. 

♦Chevannes, Mrs. Mary Tucker. Olive 
Everson, J. I.. Vaughn, Mrs. William 

Gaynor. Arthur B. T 

Jasper. G. H. Welan, Mrs. IsabelM.de 

Jefferson. W. (Box 534) Young. Miss Rosa A. 
Balboa Heights. C. Z , November 8. 1918. 
Agard James A. Masters. A. 

Armstrong, J. W. McConey, Mrs. Eugene 

Atkins. Mrs. Jos A. Offutt. Caspar Y. 

Augustini. MissLionide Pring, J. E., Box 2. 



Bussing. Elmer 
Clint. Mrs. M. L. 
Cotter. John II. (2) 
Domenich, Chas. G. 
Dotton, Inza 
Jackson, R. W. 
Lindgren, Harry 

* Paper or parcel. 



t Greslwm 
Sterling. Chas., c'o A. C. 

Foullc 
Sp, ulding. Rev. C. E. (2) 
Thomas. C. II. 
Thomas, Magrit 



October Rainfall lot 


Three Years. 








NCHE8, 








OO 










a> 
























to 


-d 


O 


Stations. 












m 




1916 


1917 


1918 


a 
o 

0) 

TO 


o 


-i 
>» 

a 
'1 


Pacific section — 












Balboa 


10. 8R 


5.7!] 


8.52 


9.32 20 


20 


Balboa Heights. 


1,1.17 


(ill 


9 16 


10.25 22 


19 


Miraflores 


14 27 


7.50 


1 1.01 


12:05 II 


21 


Pedro Miguel 


15.72 


6.01 


1 i 57 


11 84 11 


23 


Rio Grande 


15.30 


5.92 


10.02 


12.48 14 


24 


Central action — 












Culebra . . . 


14.52 


5 .56 


16.81 


11.41 30 


22 


Camacho .... 


13 81 


6 7ii 


IH 66 


13.20 13 


27 


Empire 


1 1 2.i 


6.3J 


20.15 


13 23 14 


25 


Gainboa 


l.i 4>i 


11 21 


i; .25 


12.7!) 36 


25 


Juan Mina .. 


20 3!) 


1 1 7.) 


16 77 


14.83i 9 


25 


Alhajuela 


19 31 


13.7-1 


12 03 


14.01 20 


26 


Vigia .... 


17 85 


10. S> 


It. SI 


16.22 11 


20 




13.83 


. 2! 


19.36 


15 91 1 7 


23 


Trinidad . . 


17.00 


11.05 


15.71 


14.19 11 


27 


Monte Lirio 


17.251 


10.04 


23.57 


16. SO 


n 


25 


Atlanti'. taction— 














Gatun 


16.37 


10.05 


22.73 


16.50 


14 


27 


Brazos Brook 


18.11 


10. 5C 


27 :50 


16.!)* 


13 


25 


Colon . 


17.59 


'* 


27.07 


11.89 


.. 


25 



Cable Address of The Panama Canal. 

The cable addresr of The Tanama Canal, on 
the Nthmus. is "Pancanal." Panama;" in tue 
United Stales, "Paucauul, Wasnington." 



144 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Rainfall from Oct. 1 to 31 


, 1918 


Inclusive. 


Stations. 


a 

B 

IS 

•2 c 


Q 


$4 

•2 

_-6 

«a 2 


Pacific section — 


Ins. 

1 .83 

2 20 
2 07 

2 20 
4 59 

4 30 

3 28 

5 09 
2 62 
2 76 
2 04 
2 92 

4 86 

2 43 

3 33 

4 77 

5.42 
8. i2 
7 66 
1 18 


21 
6 
7 
21 
21 

21 
21 
21 
28 
12 
11 
11 
18 
14 
1 
18 

16-17 

16-17 

16-17 

12 


Ins. 

8 52 




9 16 

10.01 




10 57 


Rio Grande 

Centred section — 


16 02 
16 81 




16 66 




20.15 
17.25 




16 77 




12 03 


*EI Vigia 


13 81 

18 86 


Frijnles 


19.36 
15 71 




23 57 


Atlantic section — 

♦Brazos Brook 

Colon . 


22 73 
21 30 
27 07 




4 32 







♦Standard rain gauge — readings at 5 p. m. daily. 
Automatic rain gauge at unstarred stations — values, 
midnight to midnight. 
tStandard rain gauge — readings at 8 a. m. daily. 



Additions to Commissary Stock. 

Dress goods, voile, white, 27", yd $0.30 

Holders, hair ribbon, ea 08 

Hose, children's, pr 24 

Needles, sewinu. 25s. paper 15 

Paste, tooth, Forhan's, tube 23 

Petticoats, white muslin, embroidery 

trimmed, ea 1 .25 

Petticoats, white muslin, embroidery 

trimmed, ea 1 .55 

Soap. Resinol, cake. . 23 

Suiting, cloth. Gaff, yd 1.15 

Suits, union, ladies' lisle, suit 75 



Thread, Clark's, white, 200-yd. spool $0.07 

Ties, 4-in-hand. silk, ea 47 

Child's patent vamp, chromo mat, kid 

top button shoes, sizes 3 to 8, pr 1.90 

ChilJ's patent vamp, chromo mat, kid 

top b'ltton shoes, sizes »j to 1 1. pr.... 2.85 
Child's patent vamp, white kid top. but- 
ton shoes, sizes 3 to X. pr 2 . 20 

Misses' white cloth lace bals, 6j" top, 

sizes 8 J to 1 1 . pr 2 . 65 

Misses' white cloth lace bils, "t\" top, 

sizes llj to 2, pr 2.85 

Men's bluchers, tan lotus calf brogan, 

double sole, pr 7 25 

Women's white kid lace ba!s, pr 8 50 

Women's gray cloth top, lace bals, pr. ... 4.20 
Won en's white cloth, leather trimmed 

lace bals, pr 4.10 

Women's dull kid lace Oxfords, plain toe, 

pr , 5 05 

Women's gun metal lace Oxfords, military 

heel, pr 5.05 

Women's golden brown kid lace Oxfords, 

military heel, pr 

Women's white suetlp lace Oxfords, pr. ... 

Dressing, shoe, mahogany p'iste, box 

Polish, shoe, white liquid, bot 

Bags. hand, matting, ea 

Bowls, finger, ea 

Community silver, par plate, Monroe pat- 
tern: 

Spoons, tea. ea 

Spoons, dessert, ea 

Spoons, table, ea 

Forks, dessert, ea 

Forks, medium, ea 

Knives, medium, embossed handle, ea.. 

Knives, dessert embossed handle, ea... 

Rackets, tennis, Slocum, ea 

Screw driver. No. 130, Yankee, quick re- 
turn, right and left, spiral ratchet, ea. . . 

Books, crochet. No. 2. ea 

Books, crochet. No. 3, ea 

Books, crochet, No. 5, ea 

Books, crochet, No. 10, ea 

Dress goods: 

Voile, white, 40", yd 

Vo'le, white, 40", yd 

Voile, white, 40". yd 

Hose, children's, cotton, pr 

Ties, 4-in-hand. open end, ea 

Vests, ladies', cotton, ea 



3 05 

5.05 

.17 

.17 

l.tio 

.28 



.12 
.23 
.25 
.23 
.25 
.34 

3 85 

2.15 
.08 
.08 
.08 
.08 

.45 
.58 
.84 
.32 
.73 
.18 



COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Baseball Shoes. 

Two numbers of Spalding's official baseball shoes are now carried in stock at Balboa, 
Cristobal, and Pedro Miguel commissaries. 

Bottles. 

Patrons are requested to cooperate to the extent of returning all empty bottles as 
promptly as possible. Our bottling plant is sometimes handicapped owing to shortage 
of bottles and it is desired to restrict the purchase of new bottles to the lowest possible 
minimum on account of the present high prices. 

Bathing Suits. 

On a shipment of bathing suits recently received from the States each garment 
bears a tag reading as follows, which will doubtless be of interest to commissary 
patrons: 

"While we believe this garment to be fast in color under all ordinary conditions, 
the present scarcity of dyestuffs makes it impossible for us to guarantee it." 

Cigars and Cigarettes. 

A shipment of six brands of Havana cigars and one biand of cigarettes, and a 
shipment of Jamaica cigars and cigarettes have been received. The difficulty in 
securing transportation was the principal cause of the tobacco shortage on the 
Canal Zone. A large order has been placed for States' cigars and with shipments 
from the other markets, there is every reason to believe that such a shortage will not 
be repeated. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 145 

Heavy Iron Kettles. 

Polished cast-iron 6-quart kettles are now on sale in all commissaries. They will 
fill a want for an exceptionally heavy kettle for the making of preserves, jellies, etc. 



Electric Irons. 

The commissary has received a shipment of electric irons. These have been 
placed on sale at a price of $4.95 each. 



Bath Robes. 

A recent addition to stock, men's Jacquard blanket bath robes with girdles, is an 
especially good value and is meeting with ready sale. 



Christmas Cards. 

Yuletide cards and greeting cards were placed on sale at'Ancon.' Balboa, Cristobal, 
Pedro Miguel, Gatun, and Empire commissaries on Thursday, November 7. 



Straw Hats. 

A shipment of 60 dozen men's straw hats of exceptionally good quality has been 
received from a well-known manufacturer. They are on sale at the low price of 
$2.10. 



Steamer Rugs. 

One of the best values being offered to-day by the commissaries is English woolen 
steamer rugs. These rugs were purchased at pre-war prices and they are very much 
appreciated by those going to the States during the winter months. 



Ladies' Neckwear. 

The announcement of the arrival of a good assortment'of ladies' novelty neckwear, 
in pink, blue, and white, consisting of collars and collars with cuffs to match will be 
of interest to many commissary patrons. 



Bathing Suits. 

A new line of men's 1-piece bathing suits with cluster trimming has recently been 
received in the following combination of colors: Black and orange, green and gold, 
cardinal and gray, and green and gray. 

There was also received a shipment of 2-piece suits with V-neck in gray and white. 
Both styles are priced at $5.35 per suit. 



Ladies' Wear. 

The commissaries have recently received quite a number"of ladies' ready-to-wear 
articles, some of the more attractive ones being nightgowns and chemises, satin 
petticoats with escalloped edges and elastic waist bands; also muslin petticoats, lace 
and embroidery trimmed. There are also some very attractive pink camisoles in silk 
and silk crepe being displayed. 



Make Our Own Crackers. 

Advice has been received from the commissary purchasing agent to the effect that 
the biscuit companies, from whom we have been purchasing, have discontinued the 
manufacture of soda crackers at the present time as their ovens are being used ex- 
clusively for the manufacture of hard-tack for the Government. 

The Commissary Division anticipated this state of affairs and has already arranged 
for the purchase of cracker- ma king machinery. When this is received, it will insure 
an ample supply of fresh crackers at all times. 



Women's Shoes. 



Three items of women's shoes recently received will meet with demand for the type 
of shoe suitable for semidress wear. 

Two are of white "Reignskin" — cloth easily cleanable with white soap and a^stiff 
brush— one a pump and the other a plain toe lace Oxford with the slender lines and 
high heels now in vogue. The third is a dull-kid pump, similar to the white that are 
being worn for evening use in place of the usual patent leathers. 

They are priced at $4.30, $4.90, and $5.85, respectively. 



146 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

"Army Shoe" Withdrawn from Sale. 

Two styles of the so-called Army shoe sold by the Commissary Division have been 
withdrawn from stock temporarily due to the fact that the sole leather in these shoes 
has proved to be of inferior quality although from all appearences it seems good. 

It is not the intention of the Commissary Division to sell anything but first-class 
goods and it has been decided not to retail these two numbers pending correspondence 
with the suppliers regarding satisfactory adjustment. 

Among the other styles of work shoes which the commissary has on hand are the 
following: Russia calf, army last bluchers. Stetson, at $9.50; Russia calf, outing 
bals, scout style, at $4.75; Russia, heavy double welt soles, at $5.35 and Russia, 
heavy double welt soles, extra high top, at $5.65. 



Utiristmas Toys. 

Christmas toys will be placed on sale at 8 a. m., Monday, November 18, in the ware- 
house at rear of Cristobal commissary. Gatun commissary, Balboa commissary, 
Red Tank rommissarv for Pedro Miguel, Empire, and Paraiso, Lodge Hall over 
Y. M. C. A. at Anron." 

Orders for Christmas trees at 60 cents (small), $1.20 (medium) and $3 (large) will 
be taken by solicitors and at commissaries and by the deposit account order desk at 
Cristobal commissary. November 21 to 20. inclusive. 

The Commissary Division must be advised of any change in patron's address 
between time of placing order and receipt of tree. 

Managers are instructed not to permit inspection, sale, or reservation of toys prior 
to opening of sale. 

Custom Tailoring. 

So that Cristobal and Gatun patrons may have the same service that is enjoyed 
by those living on the Pacific side, a complete tailoring establishment has recently 
been opened at Cristobal commissary under the di.'ect supervision of a white Amer- 
ican tailor, and suits are now being turned out in five or six days time. Thisis proving 
much more satisfactory than the former system of having the tailor at Cristobal 
commissary but one day a week to take measures and make "try-ons." 

With this shop running, much better results are expected both as to time and class 
of work as the working force is smaller, which permits the tailo.* in charge to keep in 
very close touch wi.h the work at all stages. The Cristobal shop is opened not only 
to eliminate the conges. ion at Ancon, but also wi h a view of giving better service 
to the customers living on the Atlantic side of the Isthmus. 

Arrangements have also been made at both Ancon and Cristobal to take care of 
any orders received for ladies' tailoring. 



Linen. 

While the s^o~k of linen is diminishing diily and the manufacture of pure linen is 
practically prohibited in Belfast, except for war purposes, the Commissary Division 
still has a very good assortment at the present time to offer its patrons for the Cnrist- 
nia« trade. 

The present assortment consists of the following items: 

Tablecloths, with napkins to match; tablecloths without napkinsto match; napkins 
without tablecloths to match; hand embroidered, hemstitched, tea or lunch cloths; 
plain linen hemstitched tea or lunch cloths; scalloped edge and embroidered tea or 
lunch cloths; hemstitched and embroidered tea or lunch sets; round tea or lunch 
cloths embroidered with scalloped edge; embroidered tea or lunch napkins; hem- 
stitched damask tea or lunch napkins; round embroidered plate doilies; embroi.lered 
and hemstitched sideboard and dresser scarfs; plain linen, hemstitched tray cloths; 
embroidered and hemstitched linen bedspreads for large double beds; embroidered 
and hemstitched linen bedspreads for single and three-quarter beds; plain linen, 
hemstitched pillowcases; embroidered and hemstitched pillowcases; embroidered and 
hemstitched and lace trimmed pillowcases; hemstitched huck towels; embroidered 
guest huck towels; huck toweling by the yard; kitchen toweling by the yard. 



Canal Record to Canal Service Men. 

American citizens who have served on the Panama Canal and are 
now in the military service of the United States will be sent a copy of 
The Panama Canal Record each week if they make application for 
this privilege. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50; address 

'lhe Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter, February 6, 1'118, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 20, 191 8. No. 14. 



Publication of Ships' Movements. 

The Secretary of the Navy, on November 12, published the follow- 
ing: 

"The Navy Department considers that th? restrictions that have 
been placed on publication of arrivals and departures of merchant 
vessels and other shipping news may now be removed. The Depart- 
ment appreciates the cooperation that the press has given it in this 
particular matter. Should the occasion arise when it might become 
necessary to place the same restrictions on shipping news as has 
been placed in the past, the press would be so informed. The Depart- 
ment does not expect that such a necessity will arise. If it does we 
feel sure that we can expect the same cooperation that previously 
has prevailed." 

Notice to Mariners— Lighthouse Subdivision. 

The following aids to navigation have been relighted November 
13, 1918: 
Atlantic entrance — 

Toro Point Lighthouse 

West Breakwater Beacon 

East Breakwater Gas Buoy 
Pacific entrance — ■ 

Gas Buoy No. 1 

Gas Buoy No. 2 

Gas Buoy No. 5 

Gas Buoy No. 6 

Gas Buoy No. 9 

Gas Buoy No. 10 

Gas Buoy No. 13 

Beacon No. 17 has been damaged; will be reconstructed at earliest 
possible opportunity. 



Tower No. 5 — Mindi ) Sea 
Tower No. 6 — Gatun \ Range 



Gas Buoy No. 14 
Gas Buoy No. 18 
Beacon No. 19 
Beacon No. 21 
Tower No. 1 ) c „ 
Tower No. 2 f Sea Ran ^ e 



F. Kariger, 

Pilot in Charge Aids to Navigation. 



Circular Letter to Local Telegraph and Shipping Offices. 
Naval Radio Station, Balboa, Canal Zone, 

November 12, 1918. 
1. By order of the Director of U. S. Naval Communications, com- 
mencing November 15, 1918, regular commercial traffic between 
U. S. merchant ships and U. S. naval radio shore stations and vice 
versa will be permitted on 600 meters with radio stations at 
Portland, Me.; Portsmouth, N. H. ; Boston, Siasconsette, Mass.; 
New York; Cape May; Virginia Beach; Beaufort, N. C; Charleston, 
S. C. ; St. Augustine, Jupiter, Miami, Key West, Tampa, Pensacola, 
Fla.; Mobile, Ala.; New Orleans, Burwood, La. ; Port Arthur, Gal- 



148 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

veston, Point Isabel, Texas; Balboa, and Colon, C. Z. Regular 
commercial radio procedure shall be used. 

2. You will be immediately informed when authority is received 
to establish regular commercial radio traffic with other that U. S. 
merchant ships. 

F. L. Riefkohl, 
Lieutenant Commander, U. S. Navy, 
Communication Cfficer, Canal Zone. 



Panama Railroad Ships Will Not Stop at Charleston. 

Effective November 13, ships of the Panama Railroad Line ceased 
making calls at the port of Charleston, S. C. 

Traffic Via New Orleans, Swan Island, and Canal Zone, 

Resumption of commercial traffic between New Orleans, Swan 
Island, and Canal Zone has been authorized, effective November 15. 



War Savings Stamps. 

The cash sales of War Savings Stamps from March 22, the date when 
the first lot was received, to October 31, amounted to $433,565.88, 
representing $505,000 maturity value of the stamps. Sales to the 
cash value of $48,947.80 were made during the month of October, in 
spite of the fact that the Fourth Liberty Loan campaign was in full 
blast, during which all War Savings publicity was temporarily sus- 
pended. The Canal Zone quota arbitrarily fixed at $500,000 maturity 
value in the campaign ended June 28, 1918, has therefore been exceeded 
two months in advance of the expiration date. 



Dance at the Aspinwall. 

An enjoyable dance was given the guests of the Hotel Aspinwall, 
Taboga, Saturday evening, November 16. The hotel was attrac- 
tively decorated for the occasion, and its new electric lighting system 
contributed to the general effect. 

There were 132 guests served at the Aspinwall on Sunday, the 17th. 
Another dinner dance will be held November 30. 



Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service Cora- 
mission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which there 
are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at Canal post 
offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not posted, persons 
interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, Balboa Heights 
(telephone 286): 

Assistant market milk specialist (male); No. 76-supplemental; $1,500 to $1,740 a year. November 
8, 1918.** 

Production expert (male and female); No. 463-amended; form 2118; grade 1, class "A," $4.48 to 
$5.52 per diem ; grade 1, $5.92 to $6.88 per diem ; grade 2, $6.88 to $8.32 per diem.t 

Chemical laboratorian (male and female); No. 516-amended; form 1312; $900 to $1,500 a year. 
Applicants must not have reached their fortieth birthday on date of examination. t 

Chemist's aid (male and female); No. 516-amended; form 1312; $720 to $900 a year. Applicants 
must not have reached their thirtieth birthday on date of examination. t 

Traveling auditor, income tax unit. Internal Revenue Bureau; (male and female); form 1312; grade 
1, $1,800 to $2,500 a year; grade 2. $2,500 to $3,000 a year; grade 3, $3,000 to $4,500 a year.tt 

Resident auditor, income tax unit, Internal Revenue Bureau (male and female); form 1312; grade 
1, $1,800 to $2,500 a year; grade 2, $2,500 to $3,000 a year; grade 3, $3,000 to $4,500 a year.f t 

Assistant physicist qualified in microscopy (male and female); form 1312; $1,400 to $1,800 a year. 
Applicants must have reached their twentieth birthday on the date of making oath to the application. tt 

Laboratory assistant quali*ied in microscopy (male and female); form 1312; $1,200 to $1,400 a year. 
Applicants must have reached their twentieth birthday on the date of making oath to the application.! t 

Chemical laboratorian (male and female): $900 to $1,500 a year; No. 516-amended; form 1312. 
Applicants must not have reached their fortieth birthday on date of making oath to application, ft 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 149 

Chemist's aid (male and female) ; $720 to $900 a year; No. 516-amended; form 1312. Applicants 
must not have reached their thirtieth birthday on date of making oath to application. tt 

Fire test foreman (male); Bureau of Standards, Department of Commerce, Pittsburgh, Pa.; $1,500 
a year; No. 634; form 1312; December 10, 1913. Applicants must have reached their twenty-fifth 
birthday on date of examination.* ; 

Production expert (male and female!; Bureau of Construction and Repair, Navy Department, 
Washington, D. C; No. 463-amended; form 2118; grade 1. class A, $4.48 to $5.92 per diem; grade 1, 
class B, $5.92 to S6.88 per diem; grade 2, $6.88 to $8.32 per diem. tt 

Railway mail clerk (male and female); $1,100 a year; No. 456-amended; form 404. Applicants 
must have reached their eighteenth but not their thirty-fifth birthday on date of examination, must 
measure at least 5 feet 2 inches in height without boot9 and shoes, and must have no physical defects. 
December 1. 19184 

Assistant in nematology (male and female) ; $1,000 to $1,800 a year; No. 629; form 2118; Bureau of 
Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C; December 10, 1918. Applicants must 
have reached their twenty-first birthday on date of examination.** 

Assistant physicist qualified in microscopy (male and female); Bureau of Standards, Department of 
Commerce, Washington, D. C; $1,400 to $1,800 a year; No. 623; form 1312. Applicants must have 
reached their twentieth birthday on date of making oath to application. tt§ 

Laboratory assistant Qualified in microscopy (male and female); Bureau of Standards, Department 
of Commerce, Washington, D. C; $1,2C0 to$l,400a year; No. 623; form 1312. Applicants must have 
reached their twentieth birthday on date of making oath to application.! t§ 

Traveling auditor (male and female); Deputy Commissioner, Income Tax Unit, Bureau of Internal 
Revenue, Treasury Department, Washington, D. C. grade 1, $1,800 to $2,500 a year; grade 2, $2,500 
to $3,000 a year; grade 3, $1,000 to $4,500 a year; No.625- form 1312. tt 

Resident auditor (male and female); Deputy Commissioner, Income Tax Unit, Bureau of Internal 
Revenue, Treasury Department, Washington, D.: C, grade 1, $1,800 to $2,503 a year; grade 2, $2,500 
to $3,000 a year; grade 3, $3,000 to $4,500 a year; No.625; form 1312. ft 

• Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applica- 
tions, and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing 
business on that date. 

t Nonassembled. Applications will be received at any time until further notice. 

X Male applicants of draft age should state in their applications their draft classification. The 
Commission will sustain objections of appointing officers to the certification or appointment of 
men in Class 1-A. 

{ In view of the needs of the service, and until further notice, subjects of countries allied with 
the United States will be admitted to this examination, provided they are otherwise qualified. 
Such persons may not be certified for appointment, however, so long as there are United States 
citizens on the eligible list. 

Canal Zone United War Work Campaign. 

The campaign for raising the Canal Zone quota of $30,000 to the 
United War Work Campaign of $170,000,000, is meeting with gratify- 
ing support. The Governor has addressed a letter to employees of 
The Panama Canal and the Panama Railroad Company explaining in 
detail the work of the organizations interested and urges support of 
the undertaking in its closing paragraphs which follow: 

At the request of the President, these organizations have combined their forces 
for the purpose of raising funds and have foimed the organization known as the 
United War Work Campaign. Among the activities conducted by these organiza- 
tions are the following: 

Places for rest and recreation are provided for soldiers. Canteens are couducted. 
Motion pictures are shown free. Over two thousand recreational centers are main- 
tained in France. Educational and religious work is provided. Over ten thousand 
welfare workers are maintained overseas many of whom serve without compensa- 
tion. These will serve to illustrate a few of the many lines of welfare work prose- 
cuted, which must be done thro i^h otharthn governmental agjnne?. 

The cause is a noble one and worthy ot all that we can do to make it success- 
ful. The coming months will be especially trying to our forces. With mote time 
at their disposal, temptation in its various forms, will place itself before our men. 
We must supply the means to strengthen the organization engaged in the work 
that relief may be carried on until the emergency has passed. 

The Canal Zone quata is $30,000. It is estimated that approximately $10,000 
has been raised during the past week. We must depend upon contributions from 
employees to raise the balance of the fund. All have been provided with card9 
authorizing monthly deductions from pay for this fund. Contributions may be 
made in three ways: (1) A cash payment to the Treasurer of the Canil Zone 
United War Work Campaign, Mr. J. H. McLean, Balboa Heights. (2) A subscrip- 
tion in one payment by pay roll deduction. (3) Monthly payments by pay roll 
deduction. 

For this fund, the way is open for each employee to donate as liberally as pos- 
sible, either in a lump 6um or in monthly installments until the emergency has 
passed. 

Let us all help the cause by signing and sending in our pay roll deduction 
pledges, or by making substantial cash contributions. 



150 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Deceased Employees. 

The estates of the following deceased employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad 
Company are now in process of settlement, and any claims against these estates, or any information 
which might lead to the location of heirs, or to the recovery of property, bank deposits, postal savings 
or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys due them, should be presented at the office of 
the Administrator of Estates at once in order that the estate may be settled as soon as possible. All 
claims should be itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or other public officer having a seal, and 
submitted in duplicate. These names will be published but once: 



Name. 



Edgar S. Davis 

Manuel Calcamont. . 

AlphoDso Dillon 

Ernest Leach 

Manuel Massa 

Thomas Qupmmie. . . 



Check 
No. 



162137 
136386 
26019 
41083 
43860 



Native of— 



U.S. A 

Colombia 

Jamaica 

Barbados 

Panami (C. R.) 
St. Vincent 



Isthmian 
residence, 



Balboa. . 
Panama. 
Panama. 
Colon . . . 
Panama. 



Employed by- 



The Panama Canal . , 
Supply Department. 
Dredging Division. . 
Dredging Division. . 
Supply Department. 
Mechanical Division 



Date of death. 



October 26, 1913. 
October 18, 1918. 
October 30, 1918. 
October 21, 1918. 
October 24, 1918. 
November 5. 1918. 



Official Circulars. 



Appointment. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 13, 1918. 
Circular No. 661-67: 

1. Mr. Thomas F. Roth is hereby appointed 
Deputy Collector of The Panama Canal. He will 
act for the Collector of The Panama Canal during 
such periods as he may be designated by the 
Governor of The Panama Canal to perform the 
duties of the Collector during the Collector's 
absence or disability. 

2. Before authority is given him to act for the 
Collector, the required stipulation and consent 
agreements must be executed by the surety on 
the bond of the Collector. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Indistinct Carbon Copies. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 16, 1918. 
All concerned — Complaint has been received 
that carbon copies of official correspondence, 
cablegrams, etc., sent to officials and employees 
for their information, are frequently so indistinct 
that they can be read only with difficulty. This 
is due to the use of worn carbon paper, or by 
typists attempting to secure too many copies 
at one operation. 

Carbon copies of communications which are 
difficult to decipher should not be sent to others 
to read, and file copies in particular should be 
clear cut and legible. Stenographers and typists 
will be held responsible for the legibility of their 
work. 

C. A. McIlvaine, 
Executive Secretary. 



Sunday and Holiday Tickets. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Auditor, 
Balboa Heights. C Z., October 31, 1918. 
Circular No. R. A. 603-1 : 

To all concerned — Sunday and holiday tickets 
and excursion tickets sold at rates fixed in Circu- 
lar No. R. A. 603, dated October 21, 1918, will 
not be accepted for transportation on any other 
trains except those specified, and under no cir- 
cumstances will refund be made for unused 
portions of such tickets. Refunds will be made 
for whole tickets in cases, where, for unavoidable 
reasons, the purcnasers can not make use of the 
tickets on the dates for which the tickets were 

sold. 

H. A. A. Smith, 

Auditor. 
S. W. Heald, 
Approved : Superintendent. 

Chester Harding, 

President Panama Railroad Company 
Governor The Panama Canal, 



Cable Service. 
Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 16, 1918. 
CntcuLARNo. 1178: 

Agents and operators — The following telegram 
from the Central and South American Cable 
Company, dated to-day, is quoted for your 
information and guidance: 

"Owing to heavy congestion due to interrup- 
tions cables between New York and Europe and 
shortage of staff at British cable stations on 
account of epidemic of sickness, discontinue 
acceptance of deferred rate cablegrams to Europe 
from midnight to-night." 

W. F. Foster. 
Master of Transportation. 



Enemy Trading List. 

The following changes in the Enemy Trading List will 
be made as of date November 1, 1918: 
ADDITIONS. 

ARGENTINE. 

Argentinisches Tageblatt 

Boo Brothers & Company 

Compafiia Rural Bremen 

Fabrica Alemana de Productos 

Quimicos (Muller, RodolfoG., 

Stigiiano & Company). 
Kulcke, Franke! & Company. . . 
Muller, Rodolfo G., Stigiiano & 

Company (Fabrica Alemana 

de Productos Quimicos). 
Rohde, Rappard & Langloh — 
Seidel, F 



BRAZIL. 

Barber, Alfredo & Company. . . 
Behrend, Schmidt & Company. 



Burkhardt, Max, Joao, Alfredo 99 

Hoepcke, Carlos, Jr 

Hoepcke, Max 

CHILI. 

Casa Alemana (Klapp, R., & Co.) 

Chodowiecki <fe Company 

Emanuel, Victor & Company — 
Klapp, R., & Company (Casa 
Alemana) 

Muller, Gustavo 

Oestreich, Dr 

CUBA. 

Bataltan, Juan 

GREECE. 

Recanati, Sam 

GUATEMALA 

Diesseldorff, F. P 

Thomas Hermanoe 

MEXICO. 

Aladro, Manuel 

Alzuyeta y Cia., Sucre 

Baltrusch, Frank 

Ciudad de Mexico (A. Salman). . 

Garcia Alvarez Hermanos 

Beoiung, August .,,,,,.,, 



Bnenos Aires. 
Buenos Aires. 
Buenos Aires. 
Calle PueyTedon 49, 
Buenos Aires. 

Buenos Aires. 
Calle Pueyrredon 49. 
Buenos Aires. 

Buenos Aires. 
Mendoza. 

Para. 

Rua da Alfandega 46 
and Caizade Consio 
724, Rio de Janeiro. 

Para. 

Florianopolis. 

Florianopolis. 

Temuco, Osorno, Lao- 

taro. 
Valparaiso. 
Santiago. 
Temuco, Osorno, Lan- 

taro. 
Punta Arenas. 
Santiago. 

Habana. 

Salonica. 

Coban. 
Coban. 

Vera Cru». 
Acapulco. 
Mexico City. 
San Luis Potosi. 
Mexico City 
PuebU- 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



151 



Petersen, Federieo Puebla. 

Salman, A (Ciudad de Mexico). . San Luis Potoa. 

MOROCCO. 

Gumpert, Francisco (alias Paco) Tetuan and Rio Mar- 
tin. 

Gumpert, Leopoldo Tetuan. 

Paco {See Gumpert, Francisco) 

NETHERLANDS. 

Arntzenius, A. M Amsterdam. 

Beukers, A. J Rotterdam. 

Bouwuman, W. P Dorecht. 

Dam, C. W. H Rotterdam. 

Gooische Verfabriek, V. H. V. D Velzen. 

Fockens & Company Ijmuiden. 

Gottschalk, I Reyen. 

Hanne, J Reyen. 

Hoyer, Karl Rotterdam. 

Jenbaeff, Uarl Rotterdam. 

Landsvatej Prins Hendrixka- Rotterdam. 

deacb. 

Jurling, J. H Rotterdam. 

Mannheimer Dampschleppe Rotterdam. 

Schiflartgesellschaft. 
Nederlandsche Stoomlederfabriek Reyen. 

N. 

Rheinische Lloyd Rotterdam. 

Schimmelmann, K. A Rotterdam. 

Schlosser F Rotterdam. 

Schmetz, Conrad Rotterdam. 

Staib, C Rotterdam. 

Wentjes, F. W Rotterdam. 

NETHERLANDS, EA8T INDIES. 

Adanan Bin Marah Aban Sibolga. 

Bansion, John & Company (or Sibolga and Gorontalo. 

Tansiong. John). 
Choa Hain Yong (or Gooi Sin Medan. 

Yong). 

Cohen, David Samarang. 

Crull, Meta Samarang. 

Duveen, F Samarang. 

Flipas Sumatra. 

Hensche, W Samarang. 

Jason. Sumatra. 

Jop Njan Siong (or Yap Ngean Medan. 

Siong). 

Kboo Thean Lai Medan. 

Saubert, Mme. Marie Samarang. 

Sie Tjing Djin Samarang. 

St. Rloy Dod? En Zilversmederij Djoejakarta, Java. 

Juweelen En Horlogehendel. 
Strutt, Djoejakarta Java. 

SPAIN. 

Banco Hispano-Austro-Hungara, Madrid. 

Gran Via 24. 
Fabrica de Lamparas Defilamen- Madrid. 

to Metalico. 
Flindcr, Theodore, Caballero de Madrid. 

Gracia 60. 
Libreria Alemana, Caballero dc Madrid. 

Gracia 60. 
Mare, Enedro, Calle Cortes 658 . Barcelona. 

Pielhoff Echeverria y Cia Zaraus. 

Schumacher, Adollb, Caballero Madrid. 

de Gracia 60. 

SWEDEN. 

Akermann A Lion Stockholm. 

Brandsjo & Olycksfallsforsak- Stockholm. 

rings, A. B. (Skandinavien 

Malmindustri A. B). 
Skandinavien Malmindustri A. Stockholm. 

B. (Brandsjo & Olycksfallsfor- 

eakrings, A. B). 

VENEZUELA. 

Bramkampf, Max Caracas. 

Burau & Company Caracas. 

Ferrer 4 Company Maracaibo. 

Sociedad Commercial Corpora- Maracaibo. 
tion (Cooperative). 

REMOVALS. 

ARGENTINA. 

Burbank, Adolph G Buenos Aire*. 

BRAZIL. 

Andrade, Marcelino Santos. 

Ebner, Charles Porto Alegre. 

Lima, Casimiro Rio de Janeiro. 

Oliveira, Sebastian Pereira de . . . Rio de Janeiro. 



CHILI. 

Roepcke, Otto Valdivia. 

COSTA RICA. 

Guell, Rogelio Fernandez (El San Jose. 
Impartial). 

CUBA. 

More, J. Garcia Habana. 

GREECE. 

Anoyanakis, E. D., Candia Crete. 

Charamis, Panayiotis Piraeus. 

Cohne, Simando Piraeus. 

Danlos Brothers Andros. 

Export Society Piraeus. 

Lianos, C, Brothers Piraeus. 

J.ianos Soulakas & Goumas Piraeus. 

Miceli, E. & C. B., Zanthos 20 Place de la Liberte, 

Athens. 

Stringos, George Piraeus. 

Yannoukakis, Nicolas Piraeus. 

GUATEMALA. 

Perez Hermanos Guatemala City. 

MEXICO. 

Gamez & Company Mexico City. 

Garcia, Manuel Frontera. 

La International Torreon. 

Sierra, R., & Hnos, Sucre., "Arco Vera Cruz. 
Iris." 

MOROCCO. 

Eljarrat, Jacob, Amram, Juddah Alcazar. 
& Moir. 

Ragonez, Abraham Larache. 

Tordjeman, Haim, Jaime Tangiers. 

PERU. 

Benites, Guillermo Lima. 

Benitez, Jose T Lima. 

Naranjo, Luis Carlos Lima and Callao. 

Romero, Abraham V Mollendo. 

SPAIN. 

Sirera, Jose, Navellos 9 Grao de Valencia. 

UBUGUAT. 

Favaro, Aquiles Montevideo. 

Fraga Hermanos Montevideo. 

VENEZUELA. 

Mir, Andres Ciudad Bolivar. 

C. H. Calhoun, 
Chief, Division of Civil Affairs. 

Stages of the Chagres and the Lakes. 

The maximum elevations of the Chagres River, 
Gatun Lake, and Miraflores Lake, in feet above 
mean sealevel, during the three weeks ending at 
midnight of Saturday, November 2, were as 
follows: 





-hagres River 


Gatun Lake 


Mira- 


Date 




Alha- 


Gam- 






Vigia 


juela 


boa 


Gatun 


Lake. 


Sun., Oct. 13 


(*) 


(*) 


86.08 


86.01 


54.53 


Mon., Oct. 14 


132.20 


96.35 


86.20 


86.13 


54.30 


Tues., Oct. 15 


134 .90 


98.60 


86.30 


86.17 


53.99 


Wed., Oct. 16 


129.70 


95.17 


86.23 


86.16 


54.29 


Thurs., Oct. 17.... 


142.40 


101.75 


86. 65 


86.40 


'53.98 


Fri., Oct. 18 


130.75 


95.68 


86.6. 


86.46 


54.40 


Sat., Oct. 19 


130.10 


95.00 


86.42 


86.39 


54.40 


Sun., Oct. 20 


131.00 


95.50 


86.30 


86.20 


53.95 


Mon., Oct. 21 


136 80 


9:i . 75 


86.42 


86.37 


54.60 


Tues., Oct. 22 


132.65 


97.75 


86 35 


86.35 


54 37 


Wed, Oct. 23 


129.30 


94.12 


86.18 


86.20 


53.81 


Thurs , Oct. 24 


129 45 


94.19 


86.15 


86.10 


54.26 


Fri., Oct. 25 


129.75 


94 61 


86.20 


86.12 54.30 


Sat.,0.t.26 


131 30 


95.65 


86.17 


86.11 54 26 


Sun., Oct. 27 


130 45 


95.60 


86.15 


86.11 


54 20 


Mon., Oct. 28 


132 70 


96 60 


86.22 


86.17 


54.29 


Tues., Oct. 29 


131 25 


95.65 


86.32 


86.24 


54 20 


Wed., Oct. 30 


129 75 


94 72 


86 22 


88 22 54.21 


Thurs., Oct. 31 


129 20 


93.99 


86.19 


86 2l| 54.25 


Fri., Nov. 1 


130 0C 


94 67 


83.37 


86.30|t51.60 


Sat., Nov. 2 


128 35 


93.68 


86.40 


86.30 


51.60 


Height of low water 


126.0 


91.0 








to nearest foot. 













* River telephone out of order. 
t-Miraflores lake surface lowered for sanitary 
purposes. 



152 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Examinations by Board of Local Inspectors. Laces, filet, yd $0 10 

Examinations for marine licenses and for navi- Perfumes, extract, Mary Garden! l-oz.'bot. 2 *20 

gators of motor boats will be conducted at Balboa r>™„^«„- ^i-,.™ vr—../- -j u-^ . 

Heights on Wednesday, November 27, 1918. flesh^bot '. 57 

Additions to Commissary Stock. Powder, face Mary Garden. No. 1 , white 

„ ,. ,, -, . " .- „. and flesh, box 95 

Cream, greaseless, Mary Garden, jar $0.81 cu:,,, „,„„• „„„i- m. c * 

r rMm ™ a «, a <™ M*™r.=„-H*n *V ?7 Shirts, men s negligee, with soft turnover 



Cream, massage, Mary Garden, jar 57 

Curtain, marquisette. Beige, yd 44 



cuffs, ea 1 . 85 



Curtain! marquisette', white, yd'.'.'.'.'.'. '.'.'.'. .'38 Ties - batwing, silk, ea 68 

Dress goods: Ties, batwing, silk, ea 44 

Voile, white, fancy, 36", yd 50 Water, toilet, Mary Garden, small, bot. . . 2.85 

Voile, white, fancy, 36", yd 47 

Voile, white, fancy, yd 62 



Canal Record to Canal Service Men. 

American citizens who have served on the Panama Canal and are 
now in the military service of the United States will be sent a copy of 
The Panama Canal Record each week if they make application for 
this privilege. 

COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Cigars. 

In order to prevent a recurrence of the recent shortage of cigars on the Isthmus, a 
shipment was ordered and has recently been received from the United States, which 
consists of the following brands: El Toro Commodore, 7 cents; El Toro Panatelas, 
7 cents; El Toro Brevas, 7 cents; Cremo Perfect os, 7 cents; Alabanza Perfectos, 
7 cents; Personality Diplomaticos, 11 cents; Personality Duponts, 11 cents; Portina 
Rothschild, 11 cents; Que Placer Selectos, 11 cents. 

Canned Goods. 

Considerable difficulty is being experienced by the Commissary Division in obtain- 
ing canned fruits and vegetables of any kind, due to the fact that the output of 
most of the canneries is almost entirely taken for Government use. A recent item 
in a United States publication states that although the canning output of tomatoes 
is the largest on record, yet the Government will take 45 per cent of the output which, 
of course, reduces considerably the amount left for others. 



Turkeys. 

At a recent meeting of a poultry shippers' association it was the unanimous opinion 
that the number of turkeys slaughtered and marketed in Texas this year would fall 
below normal, and that as a result the price will be high. It was estimated that not 
more than 300 carloads of dressed turkeys will be shipped from Texas to the markets 
of the North and East, whereas last year approximately 650 carloads were shipped. 

The shortage is attributed to the severe drought that prevailed throughout the 
West and southwest Texas during the past two years. It is expected that the price 
of dressed turkeys will be 50 to 75 per cent higher in the East this year. There is also 
a shortage of eggs in that section of the country. 

Small-sized Shoes. 

The commissaries have the following bargains to offer those who can wear small- 
sized shoes: 

Women's patent Colonial pumps, Stock No. 22228, at $2.50. A very "dressy" 
shoe, excellent value. 

Women's opera pumps, Stock No. 22242, at $1; fancy; a bargain. 

Women's kid pumps, Stock No. 22299, at $4. A high-grade shoe of the finest 
materials. The same shoe bought at advance prices is selling at $7. 

Women's gun metal pumps, Stock No. 22237, at $2.50. A shoe for everyday wear, 
strong and serviceable. 

Women's vici pumps, Stock No. 22311, at $3.45. For those who like a nice soft, 
snug-fitting shoe, with a good appearance. 

Women's Colonial pumps, Stock No. 279-C, at $2.95. An attractive shoe for dress 
occasions. 

Women's Blucher Oxfords, Stock No. 22243, at $2.50. A strong, well-made shoe 
for hard wear. 

Women's canvas Blucher Oxfords, Stock No. 22261, at $1.50. The I nockabout 
shoe for everyday work and play. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50; addro* 

'ihe Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Carjal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter, February 6, 1918, at the Post Offio* 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 




Volume XII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 27, 1918. No. 15. 



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154 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 155 



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156 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 157 



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158 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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180 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Extension— New Travel Regulations. 



Supplementing Information and Instructions Regarding Entry into and Departure from 

the Canai Zone. 

The Panama Canal, Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 16, 1918. 

1. Through passengers on board a vessel bound to or from United 
States or allied ports (i. e., passengers on continuous voyage via the 
Panama Canal without change of vessel in Canal Zone ports) may, 
on application, be permitted, by indorsement of Entry Control Officer, 
to land from such vessel for the whole or any portion of the visit of 
the vessel in Canal Zone ports, and to return on board the same vessel 
for departure from the Canal Zone; provided that, after examination 
by Entry Control Officer, they are considered to be proper persons 
to land in the Canal Zone. 

2. Such passengers, once landed, will, as provided in paragraph 21 
of Regulations, be prohibited from returning on board ship except for 
the purpose of final deprture. They will not, however, be required to 
secure permission from the Permit Officer to depart; the original 
indorsement of Entry Control Officer sufficing, in their cases, both for 
landing and departure (on board same vessels). 

3. The foregoing is an extension of paragraphs 7, 9, 11, 18, 19, and 
21 of Regulations of November 1, 1918, and accompanying travel 
diagrams. 

4. Erratum. The words "Departure Control Officer" appearing in 
Paragraph 27 of the above-mentioned Regulations as published, should 
read "Permit Officer." Change will be made accordingly in the copies 
issued. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Radio Service Extended to Neutral Vessels. 

The District Communication Superintendent at the Naval Radio 
station, Balboa, advises as follows: 

The Director of U. S. Naval Communications has authorized the 
various shore stations named in reference (a) to establish regular com- 
mercial traffic between these stations and neutral vessels on 600 meters, 
regular commercial procedure to be used. No ship stations other than 
U. S. and neutral have been authorized to carry on commercial traffic 
with these shore stations. Commercial traffic to be handled by U. S. 
Naval Radio stations is limited to English, French, and Spanish 
languages. No code will be permitted for private messages. 

Reference (a) mentioned above was published in The Panama 
Canal Record of November 20, and is as follows: 

By order of the Director of U. S. Naval Communications, com- 
mencing November 15, 1918, regular commercial traffic between U. S. 
merchant ships and U. S. naval radio shore stations and vice versa, 
will be permitted on 600 meters with radio stations at Portland, Me. ; 
Portsmouth, N. H.; Boston, Siasconsette, Mass., New York; Cape 
May; Virginia Beach ; Beaufort, N. C; Charleston, S. C; St. Augus- 
tin, Jupiter, Miami, Key West, Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.; Mobile, 
Ala.; New Orleans, Burwood, La.; Port Arthur, Galveston, Point 
Isabel, Tex.; Balboa and Colon, C. Z. Regular commercial radio 
procedure shall be used. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 181 

New Office of French Line. 

The Compagnie Generate Transatl antique has transferred its office 
from Battery Beach, Colon, R. P., to the new building on Roosevelt 
Avenue, Cristobal, C. Z. The office phone is " Cristobal 185," and the 
residence phone of Mr. G. Schang, the agent, is 218, both Cristobal 
and Colon exchange. 

Dinner Dance ot Taboga. 

A dinner dance will be held at Hotel Aspinwall, Taboga, on Saturday 
evening, November 30. The launch for Taboga will leave the Port 
Captain's landing, Balboa, at 6 p. m. on that date. 

Comparative Wind Records— Balboa Heights and Sosa Hill, October, 1918. 

The wind movement for the month of October was S3 per cent greater on Sosa Hill 
than at Balboa Heights, the average hourly velocity being 11 miles on Sosa Hill and 
7.2 miles at Balboa Heights. 

Northwest wind prevailed at both stations. The prevailing wind direction was from 
the northwest or north 68 per cent of the time on Sosa Hill and 69 per cent of the time 
at Balboa Heights. 

The maximum wind velocities recorded during the month were 36 miles an hour 
from the north on the 11th on Sosa Hill and 28 miles an hour from the southwest on 
the 22d at Balboa Heights. 

The wind movement for the month at Cape Mala was the same as on Sosa Hill, 11 
miles pei hour, and the maximum velocity recorded at Cape Mala was 46 miles an 
hour on the 1st. 

Note— Sosa Hill anemometer is 35 feet above ground and 405 feet above mean sea level and Bal- 
boa Heights anemometer is 97 feet above ground and 231 feet above mean sea level. Cape Mala 
anemometer is 110 feet above ground and ISO feet above mean sea level. 



December Weather Probabilities. 

The following weather conditions may be expected at the Canal entrances during 
the month of December, 1918. Predictions are based on Colon and Ancon-Balboa 
Heights records for the past 1 1 and 12 years, respectively. 

Winds — With the approach of the dry season, there will be an acceleration of the 
wind movement at both Canal entrances. North and northeast winds will prevail 
over the Atlantic Coast, with an average hourly velocity of from 9 to 14 miles an 
hour, the higher velocity occurring from noon to 5 p. m. The maximum velocity for 
a 5-minute period is not likely to exceed 35 miles an hour. 

Northwest winds will continue over the interior and at the Pacific entrance, the 
average hourly velocity being from 6 to 9 miles an hour. Here too, a maximum 
velocity of 35 miles an hour may occur during occasional wind squalls. 

Rain — The month of December usually marks the transition from rainy season to 
dry season conditions. Occasionally the dry season begins as early as the first of the 
month, while in other years rainy season weather has continued until the end of the 
month. The tendency is for the rains to linger later in the season along the Atlantic 
Coast than on the Pacific, and for the percentage of daytime rainfall to be greater on 
the Pacific side. The average rainfall for the month is 11.90 inches at the Atlantic 
entrance, and 4.45 inches at the Pacific entrance, these averages are for periods of 47 
and 21 years, respectively. About 22 days with rain may be expected on the Atlantic 
Coast and about 15 on the Pacific side, while the average number of days with heavy 
rain (1 inch or more) is 3 and 2, respectively. 

Fogs — No fogs are likely to occur at either Canal entrance, but night and early 
morning fogs may be expected over ( he interior. The average number of fogs during 
the month over the Gaillard Cut section of the Canal is 15. All of the fogs that occur 
may be expected to lift or become dissipated before 8.30 a. m. 

temperature — The average shade air temperature will be close to 80° Fahrenheit 
over both coasts. On the Atlantic Coast the temperature is not likely to rise above 90* 
F., or fall lower than 66° F., while on the Pacific side a maximum temperature as high 
as 94° F. may occur. Sixty-six degrees Fahrenheit is the minimum record on both 
coasts. The mean daily range in temperature should be about 8° F. on the Atlantic 
Coast, and 16° F. on the Pacific. 

Barometric pressure — Atmospheric pressure over the Isthmus is remarkably con- 
stant and uniform, and except for the well-marked diurnal changes, local fluctuations 
n pressure are so slight that they have little value as indicators of future weather 



182 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



conditions. The average sea level pressure will continue close to 29.85 inches. 
The maximum reading for the month is not likely to exceed 30 inches, nor the mini- 
mem to fall lower than 29.65 inches. 

Relative humidity — With the approach of the dry season there will be a decrease in 
the percentage of moisture in the air. The humidity should average about 85 per 
cent over both coasts. The daily range, however, is greater on the Pacific Coast. 

Storms — The so-called "Northers" occasionally reach as far south as the Atlantic 
entrance to the Canai during the period from October or November to April, inclusive. 
These storms are characterized by brisk, northerly winds, ranging in velocity up to 
30 or more miles an hour. The winds alone are of insufficient force to seriously affect 
navigation, but they are usually accompanied by a heavy sea or swell that may at 
times prove very troublesome. Local thunderstorms will not be bO frequent during 
the month of December. The average number of thunderstorms during the month is 
4 on the Atlantic Coast, and 5 on the Pacific. 

Generally smooth seas may be expected throughout the month at the Pacific 
entrance to the Canal. 

Tides — Tidal fluctuations at Colon are so slight that they need not be considered 
in navigating the Atlantic entrance to the Canal. 

Panama tide predictions for the month are given below: 



Day of- 


Time and Height of High 
and Low Water. 


Day of- 


Time and Height of High 
and Low Water. 


Day of- 


Time and Height ol 
and Low Water 


High 


W. 


Mo. 


W. 


Mo. 


W. 


Mo. 




S 


I 


1:54 8:25 
13.7 3.0 


2:29 8:38 
13 .2 3 .8 


Th 


12 


4:05 10:02 
2.8 13.5 


4:27 10:34 
2.9 14.7 


M 


23 


1:28 
2.0 


7:38 
14.5 


1:43 
1 J 


8:08 
14.8 


M 


1 


2:35 9:08 
14.1 2.4 


3:11 9:21 
13.6 3.3 


F 


13 


5:09 11:10 
2:6 13.5 


5:31 11:40 
3.0 14.9 


Tu 


24 


2:16 
2.6 


8:21 
13.7 


2:30 
2.6 


8:49 

14.0 


Tu 


3 


3:10 9:48 
14.4 1.0 


3:52 10:00 
14:1 2.S 


S 


14 


6:14 12:20 
2.2 13.8 


6:37 
2.8 


W 


25 


3:07 
3.3 


9:07 
12.9 


3:20 
3.5 


9:33 
13.4 


W 


4 


3:55 10:25 
14.7 1.4 


4:32 10:39 
14.4 2.6 


s 


15 


0:43 7:18 
15.3 1.6 


1:24 7:42 
14.4 2.3 


Th 


26 


4:00 

3.8 


9:57 
12.2 


4:12 
4.2 


10:22 

12.3 


Th 


5 


4:35 11:02 
14.8 1.2 


5:12 11:17 
14.7 2.4 


M 


16 


1:43 8:18 
15.7 0.9 


2:25 8:41 
15.0 1.7 


F 


27 


4:56 
4.1 


10:55 
11.8 


5:07 
4.6 


11:18 
12.6 


F 


6 


5:15 11:38 
14.9 1.1 


5:51 11:56 
14.9 2.3 


Tu 


17 


2:41 9:12 
16.1 0.1 


3 :21 9 :34 
15.5 1.1 


S 


28 


5:55 
4.1 


11:59 
11.6 


6:06 
4.8 




S 


7 


5:55 12:16 
14.8 1.3 


6:29 
15.0 


W 


18 


3:36 10:01 
16.3 -0.4 


4:15 10:24 
16.0 0.7 


S 


29 


0:15 
12.6 


6:53 
3.9 


12:57 
11.9 


7:07 
4.7 


s 


8 


0:37 6:35 
2.4 14.7 


12:57 7:10 
1.5 15.0 


Th 


19 


4:29 10:47 
16.4 -0.5 


5:02 11:11 
16.0 0.6 


M 


30 


1:10. 
12.8 


7:43 
3.3 


1:50 
12.3 


8:03 

4.2 


M 


9 


1:20 7:18 
2.5 14.5 


1:44 7:53 
1.9 15.0 


F 


20 


5:20 11:30 
16.2 -0.4 


5:56 11:55 
16.1 0.8 


Tu 


31 


1:59 
13.2 


8:37 
2.7 


2:38 
12.9 


8:53 
3.6 


Tu 


IO 


2:10 8:05 
2.7 14.2 


2:31 8:40 
2.3 14.9 


S 


21 


6:08 12:15 
15.8 0.1 


6:41 

15.9 














W 


ii 


3:05 8:59 
2.8 13.8 


3:26 9:33 
2.7 14.7 


s 


•22 


0:41 6:55 
1.3 15.3 


12:59 7:24 
0.9 15.4 















Official Circulars. 



Enemy Trading List. 

The Panama Canal, 
. Executive Department, 
Division of Civil Affairs, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 19, 1918. 
To all ccncrni'il — The following removals have been 
made, effective November 15, 1918, from the United 
States Enemy Trading List by the War Trade Board: 

ECUADOR. 

Man Lee & Co Gua> aquil. 

Mejia (or Mejiz), Manuel.. Bahia de Caraqucs. 

MEXICO. 

Abastccedor Eleetrico, El (Men- Mexico City. 

doza & Llanos ). 

Maisterrena & Hijos Topic and Chihuahua. 

Martino, Antonio Mexico City. 

Mendoza & Llanos (El Abaste- Mexico City. 

cclor). 

Ygaza, P. de San Bias and Tepie. 

PERU. 

Said e Hijos Arecjuipa. 

C. H. Calhoun. 
Chvf, Division of Civil AJJair$. 



Prohibition of Photography Removed. 

The Panama Canal, 

Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C Z., November 22, 1918. 
Alt concerned — -The prohibition of the taking 
of photographs or making ol plans or sketches of 
the Panama Canal, or of vessels in transit through 
the Canal, or of shipping at the terminal port*, 
contained on page 5 of the "Notice to Masters," 
dated June, 1918, is hereby canceled. Any cam- 
eras which may have been seized will be returned 
to the owners, if possible. 

The instructions to Canal employees to refrain 
from taking photographs of any of the Canal 
utilities, contained in circular dated December 
22, 1917, are hereby revoked. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Selective Service Registrants. 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 18, 1918. 

To all concerned — There is quoted hereunder a 
cablegram from the Department of State, re- 
ceived by the American Consul General, relative 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



183 



to registration under the Selective Service Law: 
"On the 11th November orders were issued by 
direction of the President that all general and 
voluntary special calls now outstanding for the 
induction and mobilization of registrants for the 
army be canceled, and that pending further in- 
structions no more inductions shall be made into 
the army, nor entrainment permitted or under- 
taken under such calls. All registrants whose 
induction orders are thus canceled shall revert to 
their status existing at tne time of the issuing of 
the original induction call, including a resumption 
of their order and serial number. This measure 
does not affect calls for inductions into the navy 
or marine corps, which will proceed as ordered, 
nor does it relieve from the consequences of his 
acts any registrant affected by the orders who 
has heretofore become a delinquent or deserter. 
The measure is for the purpose of canceling 
outstanding calls and stopping entrainment 
thereunder of men for the army. All registrants 
thus released are liable for immediate call in the 
usual manner at any time. Men from 18 to 36, 
both inclusive, who have received questionnaires 
should return them to their local boards properly 
filled out. Men from 37 to 45. both inclusive, 
should return their questionaires without filling 
them out." 

C. A. McIlvaine. 
Executive Secretary. 



Charges for Chagres River Sand and Gravel. 
The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 21, 1918. 
Circular No. 711-3 (.superseding Circular No. 
711-2.) 

Effective at once sand and gravel will be fur- 
nished at the following rates: 

Sand, No. g, Gravel or Run-of-ftank Gravel. 
To Departments and Divisions of The Panama 
Canal and Panama Railroad. 

F. O. B. cars 
Gamhoa 
Cu. yd. 
In lots of 3,000 cubic yards, or more, per 

month $1 .00 

In lots of 500 cubic yaras, or more, pe/ 

montn 1 . 20 

In lots of less than 500 cubic yards, per 

mouth 1 . 35 

\mounts per month to be the aggregate of 
sand and gravel delivered. 

2. To the U. S. Army and Navy and other 
departments of the Government: 

Delivered 
at any point 
F. O. B. on the 
cars. Gam- Panama 
boa. Railroad. 
Cu- yd. Cu- yd. 
In carload lots, 500 cu- 
bic yards, or more, 

rer month $1.35 $2.35 

In carload lots, less 
than 500 cubic yards 
per month 1 50 2.50 

3. To individuals and companies: 
In cardlond lots delivered at any 

point on the Panrrna Railroad, 2.50 

4. No. 1 gravel will be furnished to depart- 
ments and divisions of The Panama Canal and 
Panama Railroad at 2 5 cents per cubic yard, plus 
actual cost of loading ;<nd transportation. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Restriction on Flour Purchases Removed. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights. C. Z., November 15, 1918. 
All concerned — Effective at once, that part of 
n»y circular letter addressed "To All Concerned" 
under date of March 11. 1<J18. reading: 

"Beginning March 19. no wheat bread will be 
offered for sale by the commissaries unless it 



contains 20 per cent of wheat substitute. No 
flour will be sold by the commissaries unless the 
buyer purchases at the same time one pound of 
wheat '.lour substitute for every four pounds of 
wheat flour purchased." 

is canceled; official advice having been received 
from the United States that, due to cessation of 
hostilities, the Food Administration considers 
the loregoing requirement no longer necessary. 
Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Sugar. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 15, 1918. 
Atl concerned — Official information has been 
received from the United States Food Adminis- 
tration that the sugar allowance per person has 
been increased from 2 to 3 pounds per month. 
Effective at once the same ruling is made appli- 
cable to the Canal Zone. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Sunday and Holiday Tickets. 
Panama Railroad Company, 

Office of Auditor, 
Balboa Heights. C Z., November 22, 1918- 
Circular No. R. A. 603-2: 

To r.ll concerned — Effective November 23, 
1918, paragraph D of the schedule lor Sunday 
and holiday special passenger rates on the Panama 
Railroad, as published in Circular No. R. \. 603, 
is amended to read as folllows: 

(d) These special Sunday and holiday tickets 
will be good only going on regular passenger 
trains leaving terminals at or alter 11 o'clock 
a. m. on Saturdays and on the day preceding 
holidays, and on Sundays and holidays to and 
including trains leaving terminals at 7 o'clock 
p. m. 

Returning, these tickets will be good on all 
regt'lar trains leaving terminals between the time 
of sale of the tickets and 12 o'clock midnight 
on the Sunday or holiday. 

H. A. A. Smith, 

A nditor. 
S. W. Heald, 
Approved: Supt., Panama Railroad Co. 

Chester Harding, 

President Panama Railroad Co. 
Govirnor The Panama Canal. 



Gasoline Drums. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 16, 1918. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

We recently received, under Washington'Order 
No. 85832, Zone Requisition 5387-A. approxi- 
mately 500 gasoline drums, tne property of the 
West India Oil Co., which we are obligated to 
return to San Francisco at the earliest possible 
date. 

It is requested that all divisions cooperate with 
the Supply Department in their efforts to effect 
prompt return of drums, bearing the above marks, 
by seeing that they are not retained after being 
emptied, but are immediately returned to the 
General Storekeeper, Balboa. 

Roy R. Watson, 
Aclin-i Chief Quartermaster. 



Toys. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Cristobal, C. Z., November 19. 1918. 
Memorandum No. 813-3: 

To commissary managers — For your informa- 
tion and that of your trade, you are advised that 
the following items of Christmps toys are on order 
and may be expected in the near future: Assort- 
ment of dolls, doll carriages uhree numbers), 
doll sulkeys, fire patrols, police patrols, fire 



184 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

engines and several other numbers of similar iron Car Scales at Mt. Hope Yard. 

toys, sad irons, ranges, banks, Jack stones, pianos, p AW4M . r 4T t on » n r ftMD1 »» 

xylophones, rcetalophones, harmonicas, flying _ Panama Railroad Company. 

aero gliders, ten pin s . Jack-in-the-box, rubber Office of Master of Transportation, 

bouncing balls, Christmas stockings, tea sets, Balboa Heights, C. Z„ November 22, 1918. 

doll beds, garden sets, colored beads, glass orna- Circular No. 1179. 

ments, paper ornaments, stuffed animals. Conductors and Engineers— Ths new scales at 

Orders are also pending for additional numbers Mount Hope Yard are installed and will be 

of books as well as clocks, pin cushions, jewel ready for u=e shortly 

cases, manicure sets, biby sets, picture frames. In weighing cars on Mount Hope scales, as well 

tiays, mirrors, and various items or toilet ac- as coalin? plant> conductors will see that engines 

cessones in Fi ench and pyralin ivory. No do not cro3S scaIe or get their engine on scale 

definite date of delivery can be given but there when handlin? ^ rs on sca i e track, 

is every indication that a supply will be on sale ,., „ „„__„„ 

the early part of December. m W t.hOSTER, 

J. J. Jackson, General Manager. Master of Transportation. 



COMMISSARY NOTES. 



White Duck. 

A small shipment of men's white duck suiting, an item which is very scarce and 
difficult to obtain at this time, has been received by the Commissary Division. 



Toilet Accessories. 

A stock of another popular brand of toilet specialties consisting of perfume, toilet 
water, face powder, talcum powder, massage cream and greaseless cream has been 
received and is now on sale in the line commissaries. 



Colombian Butter. 

A supply of Colombian butter, packed in 1-pound tins, has been received and 
is now on sale in the grocery section of all commissaries at 56 cents per pound. This 
is a first-class butter and should appeal to the trade on account of the comparatively 
low price. 

Men's Holiday Goods. 

Two items recently received by the Commissary Division, men's silk embroidered 
clox hose, in white embroidered on black, black on white and black on gray, and men's 
linen handkerchiefs, both in plain hemstitched and with embroidered initials, should 
be of interest to the Christmas trade. 



Nut Shortage. 

In a recent letter the commissary purchasing agent advises that the market on nuts 
is very much upset, stocks are scarce and in most cases exhausted and he is experienc- 
ing considerable difficulty in filling our requisitions. In the case of Brazil nuts he 
states that it is impossible to secure these because of the fact that the United States 
Food Administration has placed a ban on them; concerns holding them can sell only 
to users who will guarantee the return of the shells to the Government for use in 
making charcoal for gas masks, which naturally precludes sales to retailers. Due 
to the unsettled condition of the market and the inability of the Commissary Division 
to procure any variety, there were no mixed nut's on sale to the Thanksgiving trade. 



Articles of Food Short. 

The manufacturers have discontinued putting up liver and bacon in tins, as they 
are unable to secure containers. 

Sour gherkins can only be ordered in small quantities as the manufacturers are 
unable to keep up with their orders and they have discontinued accepting orders 
for future delivery. 

Shredded wheat will undoubtedly be exhausted in a short time, as the manu- 
facturers advise they are unable to fill any orders at present except for the home trade, 
and they will be unable to resume shipments to us until they have caught up with their 
back orders. 



California Lemons High. 

The following item is quoted from a recent issue of a States' publication: 
"Arrivals of California lemons here this week again fell short of trade requirements, 

and price changes, though small, favored sellers. The bulk of the lemons were sound, 

but theii quality left much to be desired." 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50: address 

'lhe Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter, February 6, 1118. at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z.. under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 4, 191 8. No. 16. 



Executive Order— Guarapo Naval Air Station. 

The Panama Canal, Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 27, 1918. 
Circular No. 601-84: 

The Executive Order quoted below is published for the information 
of all concerned. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



1. The areas hereinafter described situated within the Canal Zone are hereby set 
apart and assigned for the uses of a naval air station, and other naval purposes, under 
the control of the Secretary of the Navy: but the said areas shall be subject to the 
civil jurisdiction of the Canal Zone authorities in conformity with the Panama Canal 
Act. 

2. The said areas are described as follows: 

I. That island narred Guarapo Island, in its entirety and shown on Hydro- 
graphic Office Chart No. 5000, dated December, 1914, lying to the westward of 
and approximately parallel to the Canal prism, and directly to the southward 
of Gatun Dam, between latitudes approximately 9° 14' 50" north and 9° 15' 40" 
north, and longitudes approximately 79° 55' 44" west and 79 c 56' 04" west; 
together with the srrall islets immediately adjacent to the westward. 

II. That water area lying between the Canal prism and the island of Guarapo. 
also the water areas off of the northerly, westerly, and southerly shores of said 
island, to a distance of two hundred (200) yards. 

3. The said a eas are more particularly desrihed on blue print 4301-16, dated the 
27th clay of September, 1918, issued by the Governor of The Panama Canal. 

WOODROW WILSON 
The White House, 
November 4, 1918. 

Cable Messages to Belgium. 
The Central and South American Cable Company will accept 
messages for the liberated part ol Belgium at sender's risk as to delay 
and censorship. 

Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service Com- 
mission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which there 
are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at Canal post 
offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not posted, persons 
interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, Balboa Heights 
(telephone 286): 

Automotive draftsman (male and female): No. 185-amended; $1.-100 tc $2,000 a year.t 

Automotive tracer (male and female); SI. 000 to SI. 400 a year; No. 185-amended.t 

Law clerk and typewriter (mile); No. 6 .'0 -supplemental; December 19.1918. Age limit of 27 years 
has been reduced to 25 years. 

Ship draftsman (male and female); Navy Department and Nr>./y Yard Service; grade 1, $4 to $4.96 
a day; grade 2. over $4.96 to $5.92 a day; grade 3; over S5.92 to S6.88 a day; erade i, over $6.88 a 
day; No. 1698-rmer.ded (cancelling 2206- amended) ; age, 18 years and over, ttf 

Architectural, mechanical, and ttnictural-steel draftsman (lor ship work) (male and female); Navy 
Department and N : avy \ ard Service; grade 1, $4 to S4.96 a day; grade 2, over $4.96 to $5.92 a day; 
grade 3, over S5.92 to J/.88 a dav; grade 4, over $6.88 a day] No. 1698-aracnded (cancelling 2206- 
amendc 4 ); age 18 years and over.1 tS 

Statistical draftsman (male and iemale): $1,200 to $1,600 a yesr; No. 136- amended; form HI?; 
age, within reasonable ave limits. t} 

Assistant in cotton testinc, (male); grade 1, $1,800 to $2,400 a year; grade 2, $1,200 to $1,800 a year; 
No. 639; form 211S; December 21, 1918; age, within reasonable age limits.* J 



186 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Assistant in cotton business methods (male) ; 81,500 to S2, 400 a year; No. 638; form 2118; age, 
reasonable age limits; December 21, 1918. *t 

Investigator in agricultural insurance (male); S1.S00 to $2,700 a year; No. 637; form 2118; De- 
cember 21, 1918; a;e, 25 years bJt not 50 years.* 

Lay inspector, grade 1 (male); S1.030avear; No. 447-amended; form 304; age, ! 8 year s and over; 
December 15, 1918. January 26, 1919, February 23, 1919. 



* Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations in the last day lor filing applications, 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business 
on that date. 

T Nonassembled. Applications will be received at any time until further notice. 

t Male applicants of draft age should state in their applications their drait classification. The Com- 
mision mil sustain objections of appointing officers to the certification or appointment of men in Class 
1-A. 

§ In view of the needs of the service, and until further notice, subjects of countries allied with the 
United States will be admitted to tuis examination, provided they are otherwise qualified. Such 
persons may not l>e certified for appointment, however, so long as there are United States citizens 
an the eligible list. 



Canal Record to Canal Service Men. 

American citizens who have served on the Panama Canal and are 
now in the military service of the United States will be sent a copy of 
The Panama Canal Record each week if they make application for 
this privilege. 

Deceased Employees. 

Tne estates of the following deceased employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama Raiiroad 
Company are now in process of settlement, and any claims against these estates, or any information 
which might lead to the location of heirs, or to the recovery of property, bank deposits, postal savings 
or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys due them, should be presented at the office of 
the Administrator of Estates at once in order that the estate may be settled as soon as possible. All 
claims should be itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or other public officer having a seal, and 
submitted in duplicate. These names will be published but once: 



Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of— 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by — 


Date of death. 


Alex. J. CooklWn. 

Carlos Navarro 

Jose Velasquez 

Francis Joseph 

Henry Charles 


11573T 
168915 
115232 
120723 

172393 


Jamaica 

Panama 

Peru 

Guadeloupe 

St. Lu-ia 


Color. 

Mandmia 

CoIjd 

'''oiks River 

Panami 


p anaTia Riiiroad. . . 
Supply Department.. 
Panama Railroad.. . 
Munioinai Eng. . . . 


VcvemN* 11, 1918. 
Novemr-er 11, 1918. 
November 10, 1918 
November 17, 1918. 
November 26. 1918. 



Official Circulars. 

Licensing of Chauffeurs. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 

Balboa Heights, C Z.. November 23, 1918. 
Circular No. 723: 

By virtue of the authority vested in me bvthe 
Executive Order of October 9, 1918, published in 
The Panama Canal Record of November 13, 
1918. and, therefore, becoming effective on De- 
cember 13, 1918, providing for the licensing ol 
chauffeurs on the Canal Zone, 1 hereby establish 
the following rules an I regulations to govern 
the issuance of licensas under this Executive 
Order: 

(a) Applications for license as chauffeur must 
be made upon the prescribed form, and must be 
sub nitteJ at least one day prior to the date of 
examination. 

(&) The Executive Secretary has designated the 
Chief of Police and Fire Division, and any sub- 
ordinates that he may select as being properly 
oualified, to examine all applicants for license 
as chauffeurs; and such examiuatioas will be 
hild at Bj'.boa and Cristobal fire stations be- 
tween <! and 5 p. m. daily, except on Sundays 
and holidays. 

(c) Applicants for chauffeur's license must pro- 
vide themselves with automobiles with which 
to demonstrate their ability as chauffeurs. 

(<f) Licenses will be issued hy the Executive 
Secretary in the form of a small card, numbered 
serially as issued, in continuation of the series 
now being uied by the Board ol Local Inspectors. 

(e) A photograpa of each person to whom a 
chauffeur's license is issued mjst be attached 
to the license and to the application torm. The 
Official Photographer miy take the necessary 
photographs for this purpose. 



(J) Any applicant who fails to qualify for 
a license will not be permitted to receive another 
examination for a period of three months from 
date of failure, u.iless in the opinion of the ex- 
aminer, a shorter period might be fixed, which 
snail not be less t'aan 10 days in any case. 

(?) Licenses wuich ha-ze been lost or destroyed 
rray be renewed upon an affidavit being sub- 
mitted in each case covering the circumstances 
and upon payment of the regular license fee of SI. 

(Ji) A bona file tourist who has brought his 
own auto nobile with him, and who holds a 
rhauffeur's license issued in any other country. 
State, or territory, or produces satisfactory 
evidence of such authority having been issued, 
will b_* granted, vvitaout fee. a 30-day permit to 
operate such auto nobile over the streets and 
roils of the Canal Zone, after having passed an 
oral examination on the rules of the road. 

(») Me nbers of the military and naval forces 
of the United States, stationed on the Canal 
Zone, will not be required to have chauffeur's 
license wiien operating self-propelled vehicles 
bslon^ini, to those organizations, and plainly 
marked as such. 

Chester Harding, 

Coietnor. 



Promotion of Student Recorders. 
The Panama Canal, 
Executive Officb, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 29, 1918. 
Circular No. 603-15: 

The pro notion of student recorders shall be 
made upoi. recommendation of head6 of depart- 
ments and divisions, after one year s satisfactory 
service as stulent recorders and after having 
pissed an examination before the Local Board 
of Examiners for Civil Engineering positions. 
Chester Harding, Governor. 



TIIE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



187 



Subsistence for Silver Roll Employees. 

The Panama Canal. 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 18, 1918. 
Head* of Departments and Divisions: 

Referring to Section 2 of Circular No. 666-11 
of this date: 

S.lver roll employees on a nonsubsisted basis, 
who are subs' sted at any mess other than those 
maintained by the subsistence division of the 
Supply Department for ge ieral service, must be 
charged at the rate of i>12 a month for subsis- 
ten:e. Oily eniioyees subsisted for the good 
of the s^rv.ce -ni/ oe rate 1 >n istbsistel basis. 
Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Enemy Trading List. 

The fallowing changes in the Enemy Trading List will 
be nil, ji j. Ji.a .»' >/ i a >;■ 1 >, HIS: 

ADDITI0N3. 

NErHERLATOS. 

Phillips Gabroeiurj Wolt'strait Maastricht. 
lot). 

Wotan Transport <S- Ilandeis Rotterdam. 
Mij N/V., Veerhaven 2. 

NErHBSl,A.VD3 E\ST INDIES. 

Becker, A. F. W Sjurabaya. 

Bitteling, Tb., Bodjong Saniarani;. 

Conrad. Alfred Li Batavia. 

DaviJ, (Jh. A. M Samirang. 

VVdrlich, Miss C. J., Bodjoni- Samiran^. 
scbeweg. 

6PAIN. 

Celsius, Sociedad Anonima. Madrid. 

Cailc Cartagena 9. 

ivraus. Otto Las Palnas. 

El Dii Ln» Palmas. 

El Diario Montanes Santander. 

Sola y Azurin, jox Maria No- Valencia. 

velda y Mureia and Calle de 

las Barcas 5. 

ewfibEN. 
Anderson, Gunner W., A/B., Gothenburg. 

Olive Oalsgatan 13. 

Irid.isiri'i Ban* Stockholm. 

Privut Emission Autb Stockholm. 

Stockholm) Pri/at Hank Autb. Stockholm. 
Svenaka Finansingstitutot Gothenburg. 

REMOVAL?. 

BRAZIL. 

Diimazio, Guilhermino, Raa 24 Sant03. 

de Maio. 
Gojrley, T P., * Company, Rio de Janeiro. 

Rua da Candelaria 76. 

DOMINICAN KBPCBLIC. 

Guzman, Juan Z . . . Kan Pedrc de Maooris. 

Valdez, Enrique San Pedro de Macoria. 

ECUADOU. 

Man T.ee & Company Guayaquil. 

Mejia (or Mcjiz) Manuel Bahia de C'araquez. 

GREECE. 

Recanati, Sam Salonika. 

VEX It >. 

Abastecedor Elcctriro, El (Men- Mexico City, 

doza & Llanos;,. 

Mauterrenn y ' Iijos Tepic and Chihuahua. 

Martino, A.ntotuo Mexico City. 

Mendoz.i & Llanos (El A baste- Mexico Citv. 

cedor). 

Ygaza, P. de Kan Bias and Tepic. 

SPAIN. 

Anitua y Charola Eibar. 

Charola y Anitua Eibar. 

rRUGUAy. 
Ires, Alfredo Montevideo. 

PEhU. 

Said e Hijos Arenu,pa. 

C. H. Calhoun, 
Chi'f, Dititivn of Civil Af/airt. 



Thrift Stamps and War Savings Certificates. 
The Panama Canal, 
Executive Department. 

Balboa Heights. C Z., December 2, 1918. 

To all concerned— f'nited States Thrift Stamps 
and \Var-S'ivi:igs Certificate Stamps will continue 
to be sold during the coming year at all Canal 
Zone post offices, but the pay-roll deduction 
method ha9 been discontinued. 

Stamps so ordered by silver employees on 
November pay will be delivered by the post 
offices after December 20, but orders received 
for stamps to be daducted from December or 
later pay will not be accepted. 

War-Savings Stamps are the best and safest 
kind of snail invest nent one can make. They 
contribute 1 greatly to the winnin? of the war. 
If you want to save money, put it into these 
stamps. 

C. H. Calhoun, 
rtireclor of War oai ings. 

Misdirected Letters. 

Balboa Heights, C Z., November 19, 1918. 

The following insufficiently ad Iressed letters 
have been received in tne oifice of the Director 
of Posts, and may be obtained upon reiuest of 
the addressees. Requests may be made by tele- 
phone, calling No 182, Balboa: 
Betson. Mrs. J. W. Marshall, Mrs. W. E.« 

Brown, M : ss Martha Martin. Irvin 
De Field. Alexander Morris. Emery 



Dorn, Mrs. W. F. 
Fitzgerald, Miss Mary 
F'ood, Robert D. 
Eraser, Mrs. A. E. 
Halloway, Ray 
Jones. Robert 
Hermick, W. L. 
Kruc. Clarence P. (2) 
Lee, Mrs. Margaret 



O'Brien. Lewis 
Rohlof, Edd. 
Roney, J. H. 
Rosenthal. Mrs. L. 
Spaulding, Rev. C E. 
Sweden, Mrs. Rebecca 
Sweet, E. S. (2) 
Tierney, Joseph 



•Card. 



Stages of the Chagres and the Lakes. 

The maximum elevations of the Chagres River, 
Gatun Lake, and Miraflores Lake, in feet above 
mean sealevel, during the four weeks ending at 
midnight of Saturday, November 30. were as 
follows: 



Date 


IChagre 


3 River 
Alha- 


Gatun Lake 
Gam- _ , 


Mira- 




Vigia 


juela 


boa .Gatun 


Lake. 


Sun., Nov. 3 


12V 45 93.38 


86.45 86.33 


51 60 


Mon., Nov. 4 .... 


.1128.10' 93 14 


86.37! 86 31 


51 .55 


Tues.. Nov. 5 . . . 


.134 20 9.8.08 


86.50 86 39 


51.77 


Wed., Nov. 6 ... 


.130.00 94.78 


86.4o 86.31 


52 .45 


Thurs., Nov. 7..,. 


.1129.10 94 26 


86.46 86.39 


51 65 


Fri., Nov. 8 


.123.90 93.77 


86.45 86.39 


52 40 




1129 65 1 94.46 


86.32 86.34 


51.80 


Sun. Nov. 10 


.112* 70 9J.50 


86.44 86.36 


51.78 


Mon., Nov. 11 . .. 


. 128.23 92 91 


86.35 86.23 


52.02 


Tues.. Nov. 12.... 


. 128. 00; 92 68 


86.42 86.31 


52.80 


Wed., Nov. 13.... 


.'■127.701 92.53 


86 45 86.35 


53.15 


Thurs. Nov. 14... 


.127.60 92 45 


86.47 86.38 


53.20 


Fri., Nov. 15 


J123.S0 93.73 


86.52 86 46 


52.20 


Sat., Nov. 16.... 


. 130.90, 95.55 


86.70 86.64 


51.40 


Sun., Nov. 17 ... 


.(128 25 93 27 


86 82 86.75 


52 50 




.129 2» 94.17 


86 92 86.80 


51 90 


Ties., Nov. 19 .. 


.128 60 93 59 


86.86 


86 75 


52 82 




.1128 40 1 93 3S 


86 84 


86 78 


52. "6 


Thurs.. Nov 21.. 


. 132. 00; 96 3C 


87.05 


86.88 


53.20 


Fri.. Nov. 22 ... 


.1129 10 94.22 


86 83 


86 81 


53 23 


Sat., Nov. 23 . . . 


.128 25 93 12 


86 90 


86.82 


53 60 


Sun., Nov. 24 . . 


Jl29 45 94 22 


86 82 


86 81 


53.87 


Mon.. Nov. 25... 


. 130 20 95 0C 


86.77 


86.78 


54 15 


Tues., Nov. 26 .. 


.129 SO 94 9$ 


86.92 


86.81 


54.28 


Wed. Nov. 27... 


.127 85 92 6£ 


86.97 


86.83 


54 00 


Thurs, Nov. 28.. 


.. 127 63 92 44 


8'5.93 


86.86 


54 13 


Fri., Nov 21 . . 


. 127.60 92 41 


87 00 86 93 


54.20 


Sat.. Nov. 30.... 


127 55 92 41 


86.92 86.92 


54.20 


Height of low water! 126. 0\ 91.0 








to nearest foot. 


I 1 









188 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Meeting of Local Inspectors. Tape, cctton, white, 2", yd $0 .03 

A meeting of the Board of Local Inspectors T , hr ? ad ', clark '^ cotton, spool 05 

will be held at the Administration Building. Umbrellas, ladies', ea 3.00 

Balboa Heights, December 11, 1918. Automobile and motorcycle accessories: 

Tubes, inner. Auto, Firestone, 28"x3", 
ea 3.10 

Additions to Commissary Stock. Tubes,inner,Auto,Firestone,32"x3$". 

ea 4 . 20 

Buttons, pearl, line 10, doz $0 09 Han pers. clothes, ash, square, ea 2.65 

Buttons, pearl, line 12, doz 10 Hampers, clothes, bathroom, ash, ea 2.05 

Buttons, pearl, line 10, doz 09 Knives, pocket, imitation stag handle, ea. .99 

Buttons, pearl, line 12, doz 10 Community plate: 

Dress goods, Organdie, white, yd 84 Spoons, berry or preserve. Patrician, ea . 1 . 60 

Embroideries, edgings, yd 05 Spoons, berrv or preserve, Sheraton, ea. 1.60 

Flags, Italian, 18" by 27", ea 20 Strings, black lamb gut, for tennis rackets, 

Flags, French, 14" by 24", ea 10 19-foot, ea 1.70 

Flags, English, 1 4" by 23", ea ! 4 Strings, black lamb gut, for tennis rackets, 

Handkerchiefs, children's, embroidered, ea .08 21-foot, ea 1.75 

Handkerchiefs, ladies', assorted colors, ea. .13 Women's all white kid lace Oxfords, turn 

Handkerchiefs, ladies', silk crepe, ea 30 sole, pr 6.10 

Handerchiets, ladies', embroidered, ea 08 Women's patent kid lace Oxfords, turn 

Hose, black, ladies', pr 40 sole, pr . 4.85 

Hose, silk, men's, pr 1.15 Women's white poplin bluchers, Gibson 

Laces, filet, special, yd 09 ties, pr 1.90 

Laces, torchon, yd 08 Heels, rubber, men's, black, U S. Co. 

Laces. Venise edges, yd 05 brand, pr 20 

Suitings: Heels, rubber, men's, tan, 17. S. Co. 

Cloth, Palm Beach, yd 1.50 brand, pr 20 

Duck, white cotton, yd 77 Heels, rubber, men's, white, U. S. Co. 

Tape, cotton, white, 5/8", yd 01J brand, pr 21 



COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Waists. 

Ladies' waists, in silk crepes and in white voile, in various styles and prices, were 
received lecently and are now on sale in the commissaries. 



Soldiers and Sailers' Christmas Presents. 

The commissaries are well stocked with presents suitable for soldiers and sailors 
and no difficult}' should be experienced in finding something which will be satisfac- 
tory alike to both donor and recipient. 

Scrubbing Brushes. 

The commissary purchasing agent advises that the prices on a recent requisition 
for family scrubbing brushes have increased approximately 100 per cent and that only 
a part of our order could be filled. In the United States brushes of every kind are 
very scarce, due to war conditions. 



Chinaware. 

Advice has just been received from England that prices on Minton chinaware would 
be doubled on almost all pieces. These prices will apply on all orders filled after 
November 4. The same mail brought advice that Doulton chinaware would be 
increased 10 per cent, effective November 1. 



Tennis Rackets. 

Tennis players will be interested to know that they can new secure first-grade 
black lamb gut in 19 and 21 foot lengths from the commissaries and can restring 
their own rackets, thus avoiding the delay incident to returning them to the States 
or restringing. 

"Dixie Style" Bacon. 

"Dixie style" bacon is now being produced at the cold storage plant. It is put 
up in small squares, and is cured in accordance with the formula approved by the 
United States Department of Agriculture. This mild-cured bacon can be produced 
only in limited quantities. 

Stamped Fancy Work. 

Recent advices from the Commissary Purchasing Agent inform us that it was 
necessary to cancel our requisitions for several items of dry goods as the manufactuiers 
had discontinued making them. The items consist of Royal Society stamped pie es 
for embroidering and comprise children's dresses, boys' pique suits, night. 
boudoir caps, aprons, dressing sacques, Turkish towels, and knitting bags. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 189 

Soap. 

Contrary to information contained in an item in a local publication early this 
week, the Commissary Division has an ample supply of all grades of soap on hand in 
the various commissaries as is evidenced by the following statement: 140 000 cakes 
Lenox, 12,500 cakes Ivory, 110,000 cakes white naphtha, 12.880 cakes Swift's Pride, 
4,390 cakes Fels Naptha, 3,012, cakes laundry, common, and 730 cakes Grandpa's, 
a total of 283,512 cakes. This does not include toilet soaps, an ample supply of which 
is always carried in stock. 



Appropriate Christmas Presents. 

Commissaries will not have the same elaborate assortment of holiday goods as in 
former years. This is in accordance with request of the Council of National Defense. 
In order to relieve this situation, attention of the trade is failed to the regular stock 
in the hardware section, as there are many items there that will make suitable Christ- 
mas gifts. 

One of the most valued gifts is silverware, which is offered in single pieces and in 
6ets to suit the purchaser, at prices 40 to 50 per cent under those quoted by retaileis 
in the States. A few mahogany and "snake skin" silk silverware chests in different 
sizes have just been received. 

Two styles in cut glass (lower vases are on sale at 95 cents and $1.55 each. 

Decorated china ware pitchers, punch and salad bowls are also on sale. 

A new supply of electric coffee percolators has just been received. 



Laundry. 

Almost every Chinese laundry does work in exactly the same way. The clothes are 
packed into cold water in which sulphuric acid has been placed and stand in this 
solution 20 minutes. They are then subjected to a wringing. Next they are put into a 
tub containing water at 70 degrees and are washed and rubbed hard to take out soil 
and stains. Following the rub they are rinsed two or three times and each water has 
more sulphuric acid. They are then starched, folded up, and ironed. No drying. 
The clothes are not sterilized except to the extent that «ulp'iun'c acid may do it, 
and this sulphuric treatment would eat the fiber before it could do effective steriliz- 
ing. 

In the commissary laundries your clothes are first put into cold water with a 
neutral soda solution added. Tais sodi solution loosms tie dirt, and then the water 
is heated to 150 d.-grees and the dirt is fixated off. Purest soap an i necessary chem- 
icals insure the entire eradication of dfrt in succeeding processes, and your clothes 
are free from handling 90 per cent of the time- they are in process. Co npare that with 
the constant handling in a fonl-sm.'Uinj. disease-breeding Ciin;se lauaJry. 

The Commissary Division invites all of its patron- to take a trip through either of 
its laundries where they can see just how the work is handled, ami the efforts used 
to make the clothes scrupulously clean without injury caused by using harmful acids. 



Complaints and Suggestions. 

To encourage cooperation on the part of its patrons, the Commissary Division had 
printed and distributed sometime ago forms on which suggestions, criticisms, and 
complaints might be conveniently transmitted. At first these blanks were used by 
employees interested in the most successful operation of the commissaries, and out of 
many suggestions received, a goodly number proved of practical value and of genuine 
advantage to the service. 

Recently this form has not been used to an appreciable extent, and as it fur- 
nishes the simplest and best method of keeping in touch with patrons and learning 
their wishes as regards stock and service, it is desired to obtain their continued 
cooperation. 

It is not necessarily implied that we care to be made acquainted only with cir- 
cumstances which provide occasion for criticism or complaint; if the policies of this 
division have met with the approval of customers; if they desire to see other changes 
made, or those of recent origin continued in force, advice on such points will be 
appreciated. 

All commissary managers have on hand a supply of suggestion blanks and will 
be glad to give them out on request. Communications may be muled directly to the 
General Manager in official business envelopes, or handed in at local commissaries. 



Cable Address ol The Panama Canal. 

The cable addres* of The Panama Canal, on the Isthmus, is "Pancanal, Panama," in the United 
States "Pancanal, Washington." 



190 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50; address 

'ihe i'anunin Canal Record, Balboa Heights, ('anal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter, February 6, l')18, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z.. under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., December n, 191 8. No. 17. 



Executive Order.* 

Section 4 of the Executive Order dated February 2, 1914, providing conditions 
of employment for the permanent force for The Panama Canal, and paragraph 15, 
subdivision I, schedule A, of the civil service rules, as amended by the Executive 
Order of April 5, 1918, are hereby amended so as to permit appointments to clerical 
positions in the Federal s-jrvice on the Isthmus of Panama paying not more than $106 
a month, without examination under the civil service rules. This order shall remain 
in effect only so long as the unusual conditions due to the present war exist and no 
longer than six months from the end of the war. 

WOODROW WILSON 

The White House, 

16 Navermber, 1918. 

[No. 2996.] 

♦Being published as Panama Canal Circular No. 601-85. 



CANAL WORK IN OCTOBER. 



The report of the Governor to the Secretary of War of Canal 
operations in October, 1918, is printed below: 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 27, 1918. 
The honorable, the Secretary of War, 
Washington, D. C. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of The Panama Canal for 
the month of October, 1918: 

CANAL BUSINESS. 

The number of ocean-going ships passing through the Canal for the month was 189; 
not including 3 U. S. subchasers, 1 U. S. tug, 1 U. S. Navy collier, 1 U. S. Navy 
destroyer, and 1 British Navy cruiser. Net tonnage of the 189 ships aggregated 
425,141 tons, Panama Canal measurement. Total cargo carried was 657,597 tons 
of 2,240 pounds. Ships of 14 different nations were included in the month's traffic. 

Tolls collected amounted to $545,430.65. Deposits of $408,022.51 were made with 
the Assistant Treasurer of the United States to be applied in payment of tolls and 
other charges against vessels using the Canal. 

Storehouse and commissary sales of supplies to ships aggregated $234,615.87, 
including $115,350.38 worth of fuel oil. 

Of the total of 485,391 tons northbound cargo, 433,355 tons consisted of the follow- 
ing commodities: Nitrates, 306,378 tons, mixed cargoes of nitrates, copper, and wool, 
20,800 tons; wheat, 29,809 tons; flour, 35,874 tons; mixed cargoes of flour and Red 
Cross supplies, 21,548 tons; sugar, 18,946 tons. Eight of the 11 vessels northbound, 
in ballast, were oil tankers. 

Business transacted at the Atlantic and Pacific ends of the Canal, respectively, 
for the month of October, is presented in the following tabulation: 



Item 



Ships making transit of Canal 

Net tonnage of ships through Canal 

Cargo through Canal tons. 

Nationality of ships through Canal: 

United States 

. British 

Chilean 

Chinese 

Costa Rican 

Danish 

Dutch 

French 

Japanese 

Mexican 



Cristobal 



75 
75,951 
172,206 

27 
17 
3 



Balboa 



114 
349.190 
485,391 

48 

28 

4 
1 



Total 



189 
425.141 
657,597 

75 
43 
7 
1 
1 
11 
1 

11 

II 

1 



192 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Item 



Cristobal 



Balboa 



Total 



Nationality of ships through Canal — Continued 

Norwegian 

Peruvian 

Spanish 

Swedish 



Total. 



6hips through Canal without cargo, but not in ballast. 

Net tonnage of ships without cargo 

Ships through Canal in ballast in addition to above. . . 

Net tonnage of ships in ballast 

Total transits without cargo 

Net tonnage of all ships without cargo 

Motor ships through Canal . 

Net tonnage of motor ships 

Sailing ships through Canal 

Net tonnage of sailing ships 

Tolls levied on ships entering Canal 

Total ships entering port 

Total ships clearing from port 

Net tonnage of vessels entering 

Net tonnage of vessels clearing 



Total net tonnage ._ 

Vessels entering port, not passing through Canal 

Net tonnage of above 

Vessels clearing port, not passing through Canal 

Net tonnage of above 

Vessels passing through Canal, which handled passengers or cargo at port, 
entering 

Net tonnage of above 

Vessels passing through Canal, which handled passengers or cargo at port, 
clearing 

Net tonnage of above 

Local cargo arriving 

Local cargo shipped 



Total local cargo tons. 

Cargo received by Receiving and Forwarding Agency of P. R. R tons. 

Cargo dispatched by Receiving and Forwarding Agency of P. R. R., . . tons. . 
Cargo rehandled by Receiving and Forwarding Agency of P. R. R., . . .tons 

Total cargo handled tons. 

Cargo stevedored, included i n above tons. 

Fuel oil received during the month bbls . 

Fuel oil sold to commercial steamships from Canal tanks bbls . 

Fuel oil issued to U. S. Navy vessels bbls. 

Fuel oil issued to U.S. war vessels bbls. 

Total issues of fuel oil from Canal tanks bbls. 

Fuel oil on hand, November 1, 1918 bbls. 

Diesel oil on hand, November 1, 1918 bbls. 

Vessels supplied with water 

Water sold to ships, galls . 

Vessels dry docked 

Passengers arriving: 

First cabin 

Other than first cabin 



Total. 

Passengers departing: 

First cabin 

Other than first cabin 



Total 

Total movement of passengers 

Services to American seamen: 

Seamen shipped 

Seamen discharged 

Seamen deceased 

Seamen deserted 

Seamen's wages received 

Seamen's wages disbursed 

Balance on hand, November 1, 1918. 
Commissary sales to commercial vessels: 

Ice 

Wholesale groceries 

Wholesale cold storage 

Laundry 

Miscellaneous 



Total 

Commissary sales to Government and Panama Railroad i 

Ice 

Wholt^sale groceries 

Wholesale cold storage 



75 

6 

6,645 

30 

70,913 

36 

77,558 

4 

2,601 

1 

2,667 

$186,447.65 

204 

211 

503,261 

519,588 



11 

37,563 

11 

37,563 

4 

2,539 

5 

11,049 

$365,449.14 

199 

201 

496,301 

504,152 



1,022,849 
26 

46,850 
26 

47,047 

21 
36,902 

18 
30,385 
17,740 
3,724 



21,464 

47,976 

39,706 

3,210 



90,892 
39,630 



4,431.67 
428.92 
296 69 



5,157.28 
94,284.80 



128 

4,998,542 

5 

1,125 
913 



2,038 



846 
414 



1,260 
3,298 

236 

130 

2 

9 

$2,750.31 

1,791.72 

1,599.54 

$1,098.67 
8,305.49 

24,423 38 
1,266 10 
1,243.24 



1,000,453 
10 

33,005 
10 

33,005 

24- 

38,287 

24 

38,287 

24,784 

426 



25,210 
7,924 
6,799 
1,021 



15,744 

14,199 

29,135 32 

38,278.25 

1,520 58 



39,798.83 
57,032.01 
3,916.72 

76 
2,387,700 

12 

649 
333 



982 



476 
568 



1,044 
2,026 



$881.87 

1,443.80 

925.28 

$572.09 

2,615.78 

11,596.83 

115.11 

701.91 



$36,328.33 

$15.75 

5,386.69 

29,849.02 



$15,601.72 

$339.06 
2,649.53 
8,177.02 



189 

6 

6,645 

41 

108,476 

47 

115,121 

8 

5,140 

6 

13,716 

$551,896.79 

403 

412 

999,562 

1,023,74 



2,023,302 

36 

79,855 

36 

80,052 

45 

75,189 

42 

68,672 

42,524 

4,150 



46,674 

55,900 

46,505 

4,231 



106,636 

53,829 

29,135.33 

42,709.92 

1,949.50 

296.69 



44,956.11 

151,316.81 

3,916.72 

204 

7,386.242 

17 

1,774 
1,246 



3,028 
1,322 



2,304 

S.324 



185 
3 
10 

$3,632 18 
3,235.62 
2,524.83 

$1,661.78 

10,921.27 

36.020.68 

1,381.21 

1,945.15 



$51,930.05 

$354.81 

8,036.23 

38.026.04 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



193 



Item 


Cristobal 


Balboa 


Total 


Commi-pary salts to Government and Panama Railroad ship3— Continued. 


240 22 
132.74 




240.22 




212.88 


345.62 








$35,624 42 


$11,378.49 


$47,002 01 








$71,952.75 


$26,980 21 


$98,032.95 



LOCKS. 

Lockages of commercial vessels for the month were as follows: 





Number 

of 
lockages 


Number 

of 
vessels 


G tu 


177 
192 

189 


190 




195 




195 



In addition to the above, 88 lockages were made of vessels of the U. S. Army and 
Navy and floating equipment of The Panama Canal; 21 at Gatun, 34 at Pedro 
Miguel, and 33 at Miraflores. 

GATUN HYDROELECTRIC STATION, GATUN SUBSTATION, ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC LOCKS. 

The work on installation of new belt-driven governors on units 1, 2, and 3, Gatun 
hydroelectric station, has been advanced to 33 per cent completion; and the instal- 
lation of mechanical auxiliaries completed. The new generating unit which was 
installed last month has been under continuous operation without developing any 
mechanical or electrical trouble. Inspection of the baffle piers at the spillway dis- 
closed numerous signs of erosion on the new plates. The net output of this station 
for the month was 3,905, 151 KWH on a computed Water consumption of 4,485,453,000 
cubic feet. 

At the Gatun substation one 2,200-volt bus was completed and put into service, 
connection to Gatun Locks being made by temporary feeders. The 6,600-volt 
feeders Nos. 1, 4, and 5 have been pulled into new location and placed in service. 
One 100-KW 6,600-volt transformer was taken from the old Fort Sherman bank, 
cleaned, overhauled, and placed in permanent station service bank. 

Gatun locks — All lockages were made without particular incident. Machines and 
apparatus were regularly inspected and all ordinary maintenance accomplished 
under regular schedule. Numerous changes were made in connection with new pri- 
mary feeders, and this work was in progress at the end of the month. Power originally 
taken from the hydroelectric station is now delivered from the substation under a 
different voltage, making the changing of the primary feeders necessary. Repairs on 
locomotive No. 644 were completed during the month at a total approximate cost of 
$1,700. This locomotive was damaged last month in an accident on the incline. 
The east chamber was used for lockages from the 1st to the 10th of the month, in- 
clusive; the west chamber being also utilized on the 7th, 9th, and 10th. The west 
chamber was used for the balance of the month, the east chamber being required, in 
addition, from the 24th to the 28th, inclusive. Water consumed for lockages aggre- 
gated 780,110,000 cubic feet. 

Pacific locks — Only the ordinary work of operation and maintenance was carried 
on during October. At the request of the Health Department, Miraflores Lock was 
lowered from elevation 54.2 to 51.0 for the purpose of clearing the shores to eliminate 
mosquitoes. Lockages at Ped o Miguel consumed 734.600,000 cubic feet of water 
from Gatun Lake; those at Miraflores, 689,640,000 cubic feet from Miraflores Lake. 
Transmission line — There were seven interruptions to transmission line service 
during October. Two resulted from tie line trouble; two from lightning discharge; 
two from insulator failure; and one from the automatic opening of a circuit breaker. 
The greatest interruption to service was 14 minutes. Three failures occurred on the 
idle transmission line, none of which caused any interruption to service. Nine insu- 
lators were replaced; 8 due to electrical failure and 1 because of mechanical injury. 
Miraflores steam plant — A stand-by order for 3,000 KW was kept in effect at this 
plant during the entire month. This was necessary on account of trouble experienced 
in placing 6,600-volt feeders in service at Gatun. Two machines were kept under 
steam, and pressure maintained on five boilers. The gross output of the plant was 
339,100 KWH; net output, 285,900 KWH. The fuel oil consumed aggregated 
4,988.68 barrels. 

Total pouer output — The total net output of both generating stations was 4,191,051 
KWH; and the total amount of power distributed to feeders by substations and 



194 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



generating plants was 3,919,071 KWH. Total losses in transmission and trans- 
formation was 271,980 KWH, representing an energy loss of 65 per cent. 

DREDGING DIVISION. 

Dredging excavation for the month was as follows: 





Earth 
Cu. yds. 


Rock 
Cu. yds. 


Total 
Cu. yds. 


Classified aa: 


Location. 


Maint. 
Cu. yds. 


Constr'n. 
Cu. yds. 


Auxiliary 
Cu. yds. 




56.600 
7,000 

1,700 

600 

13.300 

1,500 


44 . 700 
7,100 

12.200 
6,000 

37.500 
4.500 


lOt, 300 
14,100 

13,900 
6 600 

50.800 
6,000 


80,700 

13.900 
6 6 JO 

50.800 
6,000 


20,600 






14,100 


Gailiard Cut: 






























Total from Gailiard Cut 


17.100 
102,100 


60.200 
86,900 


77.301 
189,0 JO 


77,300 










189,000 












1S2 810 


198 910 


381,700 


158,000 


20.600 


203,100 











On November 1 the following excavation remained to be done: 



Location. 


Earth. 


Rock. 


Total. 






25 .000 
81,200 


25.000 




184.400 


268,600 








184.430 


109.200 

2,073 

174.750 


293.600 




2.073 




288,160 


462,910 








2S8.160 


176,823 


464.983 








472,560 


286,023 


758 ,583 





On the night of October 23, East Culebra slide showed movement between station 
1775+00 and 1792+00; material crossing the east prism line into the channel for 75 
feet, giving a minimum depth of 30 feet near the east prism line. A surface move- 
ment between the above stations was evident and the bank between stations 1779+00 
and 1788+00 showed a maximum movement westward of 70 feet. Two 15-yard 
dipper dredges were placed on the slide at once. This slide in no way interfered with 
navigation. West Culebra and Cucaracha slides showed no unusual movement dur- 
ing the month. 

All material excavated from Gailiard Cut was dumped in Gatun Lake north of 
Gamboa. Of that taken from the Pacific entrance, 57,500 yards were placed on the 
sea dumps west of the channel; 55,900 yards were pumped into the old Rio Grande 
river bed; 1,000 yards of earth dumped west of prism at station 2210; and 1,000 
yards of rock dumped in bayou opposite station 2207. At the Atlantic terminals, 
88,900 cubic yards dredged from area No. 9, Cristobal harbor, were dumped on the 
east breakwater extension, from the east end of present breakwater to Margarita 
Point. The material dredged from Coco Solo and Margarita Bay consisting of 13,400 
cubic yards from the approach to the Submarine basin and 86,700 yards from 
Margarita Bay, was pumped to the Navy fields. Fields A and A' were completed. 

Work in drilling, blasting, and excavating at both the Miraflores and Paraiso 
P. I. stations was continued throughout the month. A total of 14,473 linear feet 
of hole was drilled; 35,397 pounds of blasting powder being consumed in this work. 

SHOPS, FOUNDRY, AND DRY DOCK WORK. 

The Mechanical Division had 706 uncompleted job orders at Balboa on the first 
of the month; 757 additional orders were issued in October; and 782 were uncom- 
pleted at the end of the month. There were 259 blanket orders in force at this 
time. The Cristobal shops issued 147 individual and company job orders during the 
month, two of which were for work on submarines and 15 on other U. S. Navy craft; 
48 covered repairs to ships touching at Cristobal or in transit of the Canal, exclusive 
of Panama Railroad ships. 

Foundry output for the month was as follows: Iron, 132,404 pounds; steel, 41,254 
pounds; brass, 13,661 pounds. 

The repairing and preparation for shipment of thirty-five 301-class locomotives 
for the Army was practically completed at the end of the month. Forty additional 
Rodger ballasts and 30 Western dump cars for the Army and Alaskan Engineer- 
ing Commission were ordered during the month. Status of this work is shown in the 
following tabulation: 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



195 



Number 
ordered 



Total 
shipped 



Addition*! 
ready fur 

shipment 



For Alaska: 

Lidaerwoods , 

Rodger ballast* 

Western dumps 

For United States Army: 

LidsjTwoods 

Rodjter baiiasts 

Oliver dumiw 

We -.tern dumps .... 



400 
30 
30 

150 
140 
60 
1*2 



105 
30 
30 

150 
100 
50 
102 



175 



25 



Every effort was made to complete the locomotive job and to clean up miscellaneous 
pending work so that adequate preparation could be made for expediting the work 
on the ex-German vessels brought in for repairs. 

The following vessels were at the Balboa shops for repairs during October: 

Steamships Advance, Allianca, Ancon, Ardmore, Arnold Maersk, Arundo, Bachus, 
Balboa, Barabos, Caddo, Caribbean, Coalinga, Cristobal, Duender, Gen. Ernst, Gen. G. W. 
Getty, Gen. Gorgas, Gen. Hodges, Jamaica, Jobhaven, Manavi, Noorb, Brabant, Panama, 
Point Lobus, Reims, Rhakotis, Siam, Sierra, Cordoba, Tuscaloosa, Ucayali, War 
Cariboo, War Puget, War Selkirk, War Tatle, West Galeta, West Humhow, Westerner, 
Western Cross, and Western Pride; Standard Oil barge No. 95, U. S. S. Defiance, 
Ozaukee, Pequeni. West Gotomska, and Farragul; Cable steamer Guardian; schooner 
Inceborg, motor schooner James Timpson; French barque Rene; U. S. destroyer Schley, 
submarine R-17; and submarine chasers Nos. 281, 282, 283, 286, and 1841. The 
following vessels were in dry dock at Balboa: Cable ship Guardian, steamships 
Cristobal, Ancon, Ozaukee, Sierra Cordoba, and Rhakotis; scows Nos. 105, 121, 123, 
106, and 135; crane boat La Valley. 

The boiler for the Coast Guard Cutter Manhattan was erected and tested, and it 
is anticipated that this boat can be made ready for the sea about December 15. 

The following vessels were repaired at Cristobal shops: Steamships Caribbean, 
Gen. Ernst, Gen. Gorgas, Allianca, Gen. Hodges, Gen. Goethals, Panama, Colon, Fair- 
haven, Nortonian, Heredia, Jobshaven, Northbend, Josey, Maumee, Fredericksburg, 
Ypresville, Madalena, War Soldier, Peru, Ucayali, Isomnonia, Fort Bragg, Pollux, 
Point Adams, Eugene Grossos, San Juan, Western Maid, Boullon, Duendes, Guanacaste, 
Trontolite, Western Comet, Qidlpue, Huallaga, Bord Brebant, Western Hope, City of 
Para, U. S. S. Dubuque, submarine patrol boats Ncs. 1841. 2232, and 2235; sub- 
marine chasers Nos. 279, 280, and 287 , submarines R-15, R-17, and R-18, speed 
boats Nos. 2 and 4; launches 11, Azimuth, and J. W. McKie; dredges No. 86 and 
Cascadas, Tugs Porto Belln, Bohio, and Coco Solo, barge No. 29; scows Nos. 132 
and 135; pile driver No. 198; derrick boat La Valley; mine planter Graham, cable 
shipC. W. Field, motor vessel Orotina. schooner Laura C. Hall, Constance, and Acapulco, 
U. S. S. Poe, tug Engineer, steamship Balboa. Of these, the following were dry 
docked at Cristobal: Steamship Balboa, schooners Constance and Acapulco, tug 
Engineer, and U. S. S. Poe. 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. 

The Ancon Hospital garage was completed during the month. Work was begun 
on the superintendent's house. Of the remaining hospital structures, ward groups 
Nos. 7 and 8 were advanced to 68 and 48 per cent completion, respectively. No 
work was performed on passageway No. 5, this remaining 98 per cent completed. 
Equipment for the ice and cold storage plant, Mount Hope, arrived in considerable 
quantities throughout the month and its installation carried on as rapidly as possible. 
The refrigerating equipment is being installed under the supervision of a representa- 
tive of the contractors. The building as a whole is 89 per cent completed. Assem- 
bling of the towers and buildings for the Puma Mala radio station wascompletedand 
the entire outfit transported to the station site by barge on October 20. No other 
structures were begun during the month; the working force was employed contin- 
uously on the buildings already under way. 

Terminal construction — Progress of the work on Pier No. 6, Cristobal, is shown in 
the following tabulation: __^ 



Item. 



Accom- 
plished 
during 
month. 



Total in 

place, 

October 

31. 



Forms placed Bquare feet. . i 83,941 

Reinforcing placed pounds . 604,493 

Concrete poured cubic yards. . | 3,676 

Steel struts erected each. .1 

For shed- 

Forms placed square feet . . I 4,875 

Reinforcing p!a-ed .pounds. . 22,831 

Concrete poured cubic yards. . I 77 



439.7^7 

4.61v 1 "6 

21,525 



5.710 

24.705 

95 



Percent- 
age of 
completion. 



71.0 
78.4 
75 
100.0 

1.5 
1.7 
IS 



196 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



MUNICIPAL DIVISION. 

The routine maintenance and repair work of this Division was carried on during 
the month. The construction work in progress in the northern district and at the 
Army aviation and submarine bases advanced satisfactorily. The changing of the 
oil lines at Mt. Hope was completed, also the installation of the 10-inch pipe line 
to concrete tank at same place. In the southern district, all concrete sidewalks in 
Ancon-Balboa were completed as far as authorized. Grading for the Tivoli kitchen 
was also finished. Other construction work was advanced satisfactorily. Equipment 
for the necessary municipal work to be done at Punta Mala radio station was 
shipped to that point on October 20. A well is being driven and other municipal 
work is in progress there, being 50 per cent completed October 31. Road work in 
progress on the west side of the Canal was temporarily stopped on October 30, by 
direction of the Panama Canal Department, for whom it was being done. 

A total of 762,028,350 gallons of water was pumped at the various stations; 
173,247,750 gallons in the northern district, and 588,780,600 gallons in the 
southern. Panama was furnished 70,510,000 gallons; Colon, 45.8 14,000 gallons; and 
7,386,242 gallons were sold to ships. A total of 450,857,220 gallons was filtered for 
domestic purposes. 

WORKING FORCE. 
Statement of the working force employed on October 23d, follows: 



Department or Division. 



Gold. I Silver. 



TotaL 



Operation and Maintenance: 

Office 

Building Division 

Municipal Engineering . 

Electrical Division 

Lock operation 

Dredging Division 

Mechanical Division 

Marine Division 

Fortifications 



29 
246 

79 
198 
124 
117 
677 

96 

40 



47 

2,216 

1,368 

342 

615 

1,009 

1,678 

364 

360 



76 

2,462 

1,447 

540 

737 

1.126 

2.355 

460 

400 



Total 

Supply: 

Quartermaster 

Subsistence 

Commissary 

Cattle industry — plantations . 



1,606 

112 
22 

197 
29 



7,997 

1.834 
444 

1.S59 
798 



9,603 

1,946 
466 

1,756 
825 



Total 

Accounting 

Health 

Executive 

Panama Railroad — 

Superintendent and coaling stations . 

Transportation 

Receiving and Forwarding Agent . . . . 



360 
205 
206 
136 

124 

134 

75 



Total Panama Railroad . 



333 



Grand total 2, 



4,6*3 
12 



1.017 

234 

1,653 



4.993 
217 

1,114 
346 

1,141 

368 
1,728 



2,904 



3,237 



16,064 



19,519 



The total gold force is a decrease of 119 from the 2,965 employed September 18; 
the silver force is an increase of 467 over the 16,197 shown on that date. 

The following statement shows the occupation of Canal quarters, October 31, 1918: 



Occupants. 


Men. 


Women. 


Children. 


Total. 




2,917 

193 

5,652 


2,001 

25 

2,059 


2,203 

58 

4,193 


7,121 




276 




11,904 








Total 


8,762 


4,085 


6.454 


19.301 



PUBLIC HEALTH. 

There were 19 deaths among employees during October; three American, 16 
colored. Births among employees' families totaled 61; 15 American, 46 colored. 
There was a total of 24 deaths from broncho-pneumonia; 1 employee, 20 non- 
employees, and 3 nonresidents — 2 from the U. S. T. Kilpatrick and 1 from 
a snip at Cristobal. Twenty-six deaths occurred from lobar pneumonia; 3 em- 
ployees, 17 nonemployees, and six nonresidents from the U. S. T. Kilpatrick. _ Three 
deaths from this disease occurredatsea on this transport while enroute to Cristobal. 
There were 6 deaths from pneumonia, unqualified, all nonemployees. Five deaths 
from influenza occurred among nonemployees; and in addition to this number, 2 
cases taken from the Kilpatrick died in our hospitals. The S. S. Abangarez arriving 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 197 

at Cristobal, reported the death en route from New Orleans of one passenger from 
Spanish influenza. There were 42 cases of smallpox admitted during the month, 
making a total of 98 cases to date since the outbreak in August; 63 cases were dis- 
charged well, leaving a balance in hospital of 35 at the end of the month. There have 
been no deaths from this disease. Fourteen cases admitted were from the village of 
Chepo, 40 miles from Panama. 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

The cash balance in Canal appropriations, October 31, exclusive of fortifications, 
was $16,612,175.92; the balance in fortifications was $3,841,766.18. Payments 
from appropriations by the Disbursing Clerk, Washington, amounted to $338,125.34, 
and by the Paymaster on the Isthmus to $1,187,424.28. Payment to the Panama 
Railroad Company for commissary books amounted to $252,925.76. Total Panama 
Canal collections on the Isthmus were $1,716,272.78; and collections by the Dis- 
bursing Clerk, Washington, $34,463.30. Requisitions for purchase in the United 
States totaled $752,282.08. Receipts from the Canal Zone and miscellaneous funds 
were $165,001.49, and disbursements from the same sources, $212,937.08. 

Respectfully, 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 

Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at 
Canal post offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not 
posted, persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, 
Balboa Heights (telephone 286) : 

Veterinarian (male); SI, 500 a year; No. 448-amended ; December 15. 1918; January 26, 1919; 
February 23. 1919; Form 1312; age, 21 years and over. 

The United States Civil Service Commission announces that owing to the cessation of hostilities 
and the tact that sufficient eligibles to meet the needs of the service have been obtained from the fol- 
lowing continuous open competitive nonassembled examinations for the Construction Division of the 
War Department, until further notice no applications for any of these examinations will be accepted 
vemb 3 r 25 191 «■ Coramisslon at Washington. D. C, prior to the hour of closing business on No- 

No. 296 -Blue print file clerk (male and female), $1,000 to $1 500 
No. 330 — Senior civil engineer (male); $1,800 to $4,200. 
Refrigerating engineer (male), $3,000. 
Construction engineer (male), $2,400. 
Planing expert (male); $2,400. 
No. 331-amended— Inspector of mechanical or electrical equipment (male); $2 700 

I nspector of structural steel ( male) ; $2,400. 
No. 333-amended— Architect (male); $2,500 to $3,500. 
Structural designer (male). $2,400 to $2,700. 
Architectural designer (male), $2,100 to $2,700. 
Senior structural draftsman (male), $2,000 to $2,400. 
Senior architectural draftsman (male), $1,800 to $2,100. 
Junior structural draftsman (male). $1,500 to $2,000. 
Junior architectural draftsman (male or female), $1,200 to $1 800 
Architectural tracer (male or female), $1,000 to $1,200. 
No. 554 — Assistant to purchaser of supplies (male), $1 .500 to $1 800 
No. 587— Chief of survey party (male), $2,700 to $3,000. 
Transitman (male). $2,400. 
Levelman (male), $2,100. 
Rodman (male;). $1,800. 
Chainman (male), $1,800. 

Draftsman, topographic (male and female), $2,100. 
NO. 558 — Exterior expeditor (male), $2,000 to $2,400. 
Interior expeditor (male), $1,800 to $2,000. 
Assistant interior expeditor (male), $1,500; to $1,800. 
•rv?' 'f 5 . s ~supplemental— Extension poultry husbandman (male) $1,500 to $2,500. 
"I he United States Civil Service Commission announces that as sufficient eligibles to meet the needs 
w the 'service have been obtained from the continuous open competitive nonassembled examination 
for extension poultry husbandman, for men only, for filling vacancies in the Bureau of Animal Industry 
Department of Agriculture, at entrance salaries ranging from $1,500 to $2,500 a year, until further 
notice no applications for this examination will be accepted unless filed with the Commission at Wash- 
ington, D. C. prior to the hour of closing business on November 25, 1918 
No. 147 — Expert aid (male). 

No. 148 — Supervising engineer, construction (male). 

The United States Civil Service Commission announces that as sufficient eligibles to meet the needs 
« the service have been obtained from the continuous open competitive nonassembled examinations 
lor expert aid and supervising engineer, construction, for men only, for filling vacancies at navy yards 
and other naval establishments of the United States, until further notice no applications for either of 
inese examinations will be received unless filed with the Commission at Washington, D. C. prior to the 
nour of closing business on November 25, 1918. 

io?of C / a,ist 'ii^'J!^ 1 huabandrv * nd dairying (male and female), $1,800 to $2,500 a year; January 7, 
*"«Vt lonu ^lio. 



198 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Automatic scale expert (male); $1,600 a year; January 8, 1019; form 1312; as<\ t8 years and over. 
Laboratory aid in chemistry and physics (male); $900 to $1,0~0 a year, form 1312; age. 18; but not 

No a oTl -amended— Biological assistant (male) ; $1,200 to $1,800 a year; form 2118; age. reasonable 
age limits; January 7, 1919.* 

* Nona««embled Pa'e given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hourof closing business 



on that date. 



Dinner Dance— Hotel Aspinwall. 

A dinner dance will be held at the Hotel Aspinwall, Taboga, on 
Saturday, December 14, 1918. The hotel has been well patronized 
for the last week. 

1919 War Savings Stamps Not To Be Sold Here, 

A cable message has been received from the Washington Office of 
The Panama Canal which reads as follows: 

"Am forwarding copy letter from Assistant Secretary of the Treas- 
ury stating that after careful consideration and with much reluctance 
Treasury Department has decided not to place on sale War Savings 
Certificate Stamps of Series of 1919 at any points outside mainland 
of United States which do not have postal service under direct juris- 
diction of Postmaster General." 

This decision to sell War Savings Stamps next year only in the 
United States will affect several thousand investors on the Isthmus 
who have bought War Savings Stamps as a safe, simple, and profitable 
method of putting away their savings. Over $500,000 worth were sold 
hereduring thepast eight months. The 1918 stamps will continue to be 
sold at all Canal Zone post offices during the rest of this month, and 
it is expected that the supply on hand will be exhausted as only a few 
days are left to buy them here. The fact that War Savings Stamps 
will not be sold here after December 31 should not cause anyone to 
cash his certificates. The Government still needs the money. 

Continue to Buy War Savings Stamps, 

The Hon. W. G. McAdoo, Secretary of the Treasury, has sent the 
following cable to Mr. C. H. Calhoun, Director of War Savings for 
the Panama Canal Zone: 

"I most earnestly urge upon you that your organization make every 
possible effort to the end that pledges for the purchase of War Savings 
Stamps be fulfilled before the close of the year. 

The Government's monetary requirements were never greater nor 
more pressing than they are to-day. Expenditures for November were 
greater than in any similar period. These expenditures growing out 
of the war must be met by borrowing from the people, and their 
magnificent response heretofore to the Government's requirements 
makes me confident that they will not fail to continue their support, 
to the end that all payments resulting from war necessities will be 
promptly met. . , 

Much remains to be done. Our brave troops must be maintained 
and paid until their work is fully accomplished and they are returned 
to their homes. This is not a time for us to relax our efforts, and the 
Treasury Department is making plans for larger and even more im- 
portant work during the coming year. Please make every effort to 
bring this statement before the people in your district, and to urge 
upon them the continued holding of their War Savings Certificates, 
the fulfillment of their pledges, and additional purchases as their 
means permit." 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



199 



Christmas with the Lepers. 

Christmas gifts (books in English or Spanish, toys, games, 
candies, phonograph records, musical instruments, novelties, etc.) 
or cash donations, for the Palo Seco Leper Asylum will be received 
by the Chaplain, Rev. H. R. Carson, Ancon, C. Z., or may be sent 
direct to the asylum, via Pier 19. 

Comparative Wind Records— Balboa Heights and Sosa Hill, November, 1918. 

The wind movement for the month of November was 71 per cent greater on Sosa 
Hill than at Balboa Heights, the average hourly velocity being 10.7 miles on Sosa 
Hill and 6.3 miles at Balboa Heights. 

Northwest winds prevailed at both stations. The prevailing wind direction was 
from the northwest or north 84 per cent of the time at Balboa Heights and 85 per 
cent of the time on Sosa Hill. 

The maximum wind velocities recorded during the month were 28 miles an hour 
from the northwest on the 15th at Balboa Heights, and 37 miles an hour from the 
northwest on the 23d on Sosa Hill. 

Note — Sosa Hill anemometer is 35 feet above ground and 405 feet above mean sea level, and 
Balboa Heights anemometer is 97 feet above ground and 231 feet above mean sea level. 



Weather Conditions in November, 1918. 

Rainfall for the month in the Canal Zone and vicinitiy was everywhere below nor- 
mal. The deficiency was greatest at Trinidad — 10.17 inches, and least at the Pacific 
Coast stations. Miraflores, Pedro Miguel, Juan Mina, Vigia, Trinidad, and Gatun 
recorded the least November rainfall of record. 

Monthly totals ranged from 4.03 inches at Taboga to 15.37 inches at Monte Lirio. 
The greatest amount of precipitation recorded in any one day was 3.88 inches at 
Colon on the 5th. 

The estimated average rainfall over the Gatun Lake watershed was 9.73 inches 
or 38 per cent below the 8-year mean, and the average rainfall over the Chagres 
Riverbasin above Alhajuelawas 10.74 inches, or 43 per cent belowthe 17-year mean. 

Average air temperatures were approximately 1 degree Fahrenheit above normal, 
The wind movement also was generally above normal, while the atmospheric pressure, 
relative humidity, and cloudiness were slightly below normal. 

The evaporation from the surface of Gatun Lake was the highest November 
evaporation of record since the creation of the lake. 

Elevations of Gatun Lake (feet above mean sea level), maximum, 86.94 on the 29th; 
minimum 86.21 on the 2d; monthly mean, 86.54. 

Evaporation from Gatun Lake surface, 4.621 inches. 

The following table gives a summary of the weather conditions for the month: 





-a 


Temperature. 


P 


Precipitation. 


Wind. 
















M 






^ 






(Stations. 


5 S 3 

goo 


a 


a 

3 

a 

e8 


c 


a 

3 

a 

'3 


© 


2 >. 

= 1 


a 
"3 


OS 

S V 
O tt} 

■z: at 


o 

■3 a 


11 


B 
tt O 


Is 


a 
o 

.is 


& 

m 




£ 


S 


S 


Q 


2 


Q S 


H 


CO 


a.s 


HU 


Oh 


2 


Q 


a 


•Balboa 


29.835 


80 2 


92 


Nov. 3 


70 


Nov. 11 90 


9.61 


10.33 


16 


4 533 


N.W. 


28 


N.W. 


Nov. 15 


Heights 


































29.843,70 


86 


Nov. 4 


72 


Nnv.20 


84 


14 23 


21.34 


M 


6 783 


N. 


27 


N W. 


Nov. 15 






70 2 

6 


90 
90 


Nov. 3 


68 


Nov. 14 
Nov.20 




5 C 6 

1 11 49 


12.10 
20.53 


21 
23 


3.195 

3.495 


NE. 


?ri 


NE. 

N.W. 


Nov. 1» 


Gatun 




Nov. 20 


7J 


N. ' 


15 


Nov. 14 



•Formorly Ancon. 



Official Circulars. 



Intoxicating Liquors to Soldiers. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights. C. Z., December 6, 1918. 
7*o all concerned — Kor your information the 
following is quoted from War Department Bul- 
letin No. 35. dated July 3. 1918: 

"Under authority of Section 12 of the Act of 
Congress 'To authorize the President to increase 
temporarily the Military Establishment of the 
United States,' approved May 18, 1917, which 
section reads as follows: 



"Sec 12. That the President of the United 
States, as Commander-in-Chief of the Army, is 
authorized to make such regulations governing 
the prohibition of alcoholic liquors in or near 
military camps and to the officers and enlisted 
ment ot the Army as he may from time to time 
deem necessary or advisable: Provided, That no 
person, corporation, partnership, or association 
shall sell, supply, or have in his or its possession, 
any intoxicating or spirituous liquors at any mili- 
tary station, cantonment, camp, fort. post, 
officers' or enlisted men's club, which is being used 
at the time for military purposes under this Act. 
but the Secretary of War may make regulations 
permitting the sale and use of intoxicating liquors 



200 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



for medicinal purposes. It shall be unlawful to 
eell any intoxicating liquor, including beer, ale, 
or wine, to any officer or member of the military 
forces while in uniform, except as herein pro- 
vided. Any person, corporation, partnership, or 
association violating the provisions of this section 
or the regulations made thereunder shall, unless 
otherwise punishable under the Articles of War, 
be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and be pun- 
ished by a fine of not more than SI, COOor imprison- 
ment for not more than twelve months, or both' — 
the following regulations are established by the 
President and the Secretary of War, to continue 
during the present emergency, and shall super- 
sede all former regulations issued under the afore- 
said authority except the regulations of March 2, 
1918, relating to the Island of Oahu, Territory of 
Hawaii: 

" '1. Around every military camp at which 
officers and enlisted men, not less than two hun- 
dred and fifty in number, have beenor shallbe sta- 
tioned for more than thirty consecutive days, 
there shall be for the purposes set forth in this 
regulation a zone five miles wide, except that 
within the existing limits of an incorporated city 
or town, within which the sale of alcoholic liquor 
shall not be prohibited by the State or local law, 
the zone shall not include any territory more 
than one-half mile from the nearest boundary of 
such camp. Alcoholic liquor, including beer, ale, 
and wine, either alone or with any other article, 
shall not, directly or indirectly, be sold, bartered, 
given, served, or knowingly delivered by one 
person to another within any such zone, or sent, 
shipped, transmitted, carried, or transported to 
any place within any such zone: Provided, That 
this regulation shall not apply to the giving or 
■erving of such liquor in a private home to mem- 
bers of the family or bona fide guests, other than 
members of the military forces, or to the sending, 
shipping, transmitting, carrying, or transporting of 
such liquor to a private home for use as aforesaid: 
Provided also. That this regulation shall not apply 
to the sale or gift of such liquor by registered 
pharmacists to licenced physicians or medical 
officers of the United States for medicinal pur- 
poses, or to the sending, shipping, transmitting, 
carrying, or transporting of such liquor to regis- 
tered pharmacists, licensed physicians, or medical 
officers of the United States for use as aforesaid. 

" '2. Alcoholic liquor, including beer, ale, and 
wine, either alone, or with any other article, 
shall not, directly or indirectly, be sold, bartered, 
given, served, or knowingly delivered to any 
officer or member of the military forces, within 
the United States, their territories or possessions, 
or any place under their control, except to medical 
officers for medicinal purposes or when adminis- 
tered by or under the direction of a licensed physi- 
cian or medical officer. 

" '3. The sale or supply of intoxicating liquors 
to licensed physicians and medical officers for 
medicinal purposes, and the possession, use, and 
administration thereof by such physicians and 
officers for medicinal purposes, at any military 
station, cantonment, camp, fort, or post is per- 
mitted. 

" '4. All prior violations of former regulations 
and all penalties incurred thereunder shall be 
prosecuted and enforced in the same manner and 
with the same effect as if these superseding regu- 
lations had not been established. 

The White House, Woodrow Wilson. 
June 27, 1918. Newton D. Baker, 

Secretary of War." 

The attention of employees is especiallydirected 
to the heavy penalty provided for persons who 
are instrumental in supplying to officers or enlist- 
ed men intoxicating liquors of any kind. 

Chester Harding, Governor. 



effective November 24, 1918, vice Surgeon M. C. 
Guthrie, U. S. Public Health Service, relieved 
from duty with The Panama Canal. 

Chester Harding, 
Cover nor. 



Appointment. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 2, 1918. 
Circular No. 661-68: 

Surgeon S. B. Grubbs, U. S. Public Health 
6ervice, is appointed Chief Quarantine Officer, 



Act of Congress— Deficiency Appropriation, 
1918 and 1919. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 3, 1918. 
Circular No. 600-58: 

The extract from an Act of Congress quoted 
below is published for the information of all 
concerned. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



AN ACT Making appropriations to supply de- 
ficiencies in appropriations for the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1919, and prior fiscal 
years, on account of war expenses, and for 
other purposes. 
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives of the United States of America in 
Congress assembled, That the following sums are 
appropriated, out of any money in the Treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, to supply deficiencies 
in appropriations for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1919, and prior fiscal years, on account of 
war expenses, and for other purposes, namely: 

FORTIFICATIONS 

******* 

PANAMA CANAL. 

******* 

For the purchase, manufacture, and test of 
ammunition for seacoastand land defense cannon, 
including the necessary experiments in con- 
nection therewith, and the macninery necessary 
for its manufacture, $350,000. 

For the purchase of submarine mines and nets 
and the necessary appliances to operate them 
for closing the channels leading to the Panama 
Canal, $2,000, to be available for the fiscal years 
1918 and 1919. 

For alteration, maintenance, and repair of 
submarine-mine material, $6,866, to be available 
for the fiscal years 1918 and 1919. 

******* 

Approved, November 4, 1918. 



Expediting Mail Deliveries. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Department, 

Bureau of Posts, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 7, 1918. 
To all comcerned — Attention is again directed 
to the fact that all mail for the Balboa Radio 
station, the Balboa quarantine station, and the 
Palo Seco Leper Asylum should be addressed to 
Fort Amador, Canal Zone. Such mail addressed 
to Balboa will be subject to delay incident to its 
forwarding to Fort Amador. 

C. H. Calhoun, 
Director of Posts. 



Saturday and Sunday Stops at Bohlo. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z.. December 7, 1918. 
Transportation Bulletin No. 569: 

Conductors and engineers, P. R. R. — Effective 
this date and until further notice, trains Nob. 
7 and 8 will stop at Bohio siding Saturdays 
and Sundays for the accommodation of pasture 
clearing laborers. Second-class coaches should 
be stopped just opposite Bohio signboard. 
W. F. Foster, 
Hatter of Transportation 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



201 



Amendment to Section 17, P. R. R. Time- 
keeping Rules. 
Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Superintendent, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., November 27, 1918. 
To all concerned — Trie following additional 
paragraph to Section 17, Panama Railroad Time- 
keeping Rules, will govern the time lost on account 
ot rain by the silver hourly employees of the 
maintenance of way department, Panama 
Railroad Company: 

Silver hourly employees of the maintenance of 
way department losing an hour or less in a 4- 
hour period will be allowed full time. In case they 
lose more than an hour, the whole time lost will 
be deducted. 

S. W. Heald, 
Superintendent. 
Approved : 
Chester Harding, 
President. 



Fatuch Y Nogaim (La Palma).. . Chihuahua. 

Fatuch, Salim Chihuahua. 

Palestina, La (Felipe Ayub) .... Chihuahua. 

Palma, La (Fatuch y Nogaim)... Chihuahua. 

Sundberg, Gustavo Mexico City. 

Violeta, La (Salamon Ayub) Chihuahua. 

SALVADOR 

Gastearazoro, Dr. Jose C San Salvador. 

C. H. Calhoun, 
Chief, Ditirion of Ciril A fair*. 



French Bread and Rolls. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Cristobal, C. Z„ December 9, 1918. 
Memorandum 757-28: 

To commissary managers — Orders may be 
placed up until 9 o'clock Wednesday morning 
for Thursday morning delivery for French 

^_^^^^_____^^_ bread at 9 cents per loaf and French rolls at 18 

wm.__Li.-_ -r -»i i n_i cents per dozen. In addition dinner rolls will 

Enemy Trading List. be added to the list at j 5 cents a dozen. 

The Panama Canal, Ancon. Balboa, Gatun. and Pedro Miguel will 

Executive Department, order the latter from the hotels; Cristobal will 

Division of Civil Affairs, orfler f rom the bakery. 

Balboa Heights, C Z., December 3, 1918. J- J- J ACKSON > 

To all concerned-The following changes, involving General Manager. 

additions and removals, have been made, effective No- ,^____^_^_ 
vember 29, 1918, in the United States Enemy Trading 

List by the War Trade Board: Misdirected Letters. 

ADDITIONS Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 4, 1918. 

" The following insufficiently addressed mail 

._ . T chilis j_ ag Deen rece i ve (i j n lne office of the Director of 

Alliana Insurance Company. . . . p ostg and may be obtained upon request of the 

CompaAia de Tranvias Electricas Valparaiso. addressees. Requests may be made by tele- 

de Valparaiso phone, calling No. 182, Balboa: 

M^L^Z 1 bznUago. Davis. John W. McKeown, William 

El Submanno (newspaper) feantmgo and Valpa- Drake J M igs G , ady _ Ma rkey, Matt. 

ra,so - Gutierre, Antonio Nieves, Juliot 

_ _ , . Guatemala Harris, John W.* Stevenson, Charles A. 

Gross fedenco N Guatemala City. Kendal. Leon Voss, Harry J. 

Hoepfner, Carlos Guatemala City. 

Hoepfner, Herman Guatemala City. * Special delivery, f Paper. 

HONDURAS _______^_^_ 

Boehm, Francisco San Pedro Sula. 

mexico Band Concert Schedule. 

"El 'Liberal" Fabrics de Tabacoa mh Band Coas , Arid l„y Corps. 

(Jose It. Puente) Monterey. . , - T ' . ,_ . x . , _, . 

Hamburgo Plantation Tapachula Army and Navy Club, Cristobal— December 5. 

Huaschildt, Itickardt Mazatlan. 12, 19, and 26. 

Hotel Grande Socicdad Toluca. Fort Sherman movies— December 3, 10, 17, 24, 

Joya, La (Enrique Schacferj Mexico City. „ and 31. 

Kobe, 0. S Puerto Ancon. Fort Randolph movies— December 4, 11, 18, 

"Liberal, EJ/'FabricadeTabacos Monterey. „ and , 25 - , „ 

(Jose It. Puente). Port de Lesseps, afternoon — December 4, 11, 

Maknmus.Emilio Pochutla. „ ,8 - and , 2 , 5 -, r ^ . .„ .„ 

Palama, La (Richard Hcrmanos) Orizalia. hort Randolph, afternoon— December 5, 12, 19. 

Pommereneke. Frederk-k San Pedro Tuktla. and 2<5 - , , ,, __» 

Bchultze, Carlos Mexico City Enlisted mens dance at Fort Sherman or Port 

Wilkene,' Pablo .'.'.'.'.'. Mexico City Randolph— December 7 and 21. 

RFMOV \ I a 33J In f antry Band - 

nr ' MU u " Cristobal bandstand— December 3, 10. 17, 24, 

chile and 31. 

Haverbeek A Co. (Albert Haver- New Gatun— December 2, 9, 16, 23, and 30. 

beck and Carlos Haverbeek) . Vaidivia. Gatun clubhouse — December 6 and 20. 

Rodrlguei, Gumercindo Antofagasta. Sibert's Curve — December 4, 11, 18. and 25. 

Bagnauer A Co., Blanco 122 Valparaiso. Officers' club dance — December 13 and 27. 

Wiegand A Co Valparaiso and Huasco Porto Rican Infantry Band. 

r^ to Colombia Corozal— December 3, 10, 17. 20, 24. and 31. 

Cnsto, Jorge, A Co Cueuta. Empire movies— December 2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 

ECC4DOR 23, 25, and 30. 

Balda, Ce«ar A Guayaquil. Camp Otis movies — December 5, 12, 19, and 26. 

Mexico Officers' dance, Camp Gaillard — December 13 

Ayub, Felipe (La Palestina) Chihuahua. and 27 - 

Ayub, G. A Co., (La Ca*a Blanca) Chihuahua. 5th Hand, Coast Artillery Corps. 

Ayub Hermanos (La Ciudad de Chihuahua. Quarry Heights — December 4, 11, 18. and 25. 

Constantinople). Fort Amador, concert — December 5, 12. 19, 

Ayub, Salamon (La Violeta) Chihuahua. and 26. 

Brun, E. Y. Cia Colima. Fort Amador movies — December 3, 6, 10, 13. 

Canavati Hermanos Torreon. 17. 20, 24. 27. and 31. 

Canavati, A. Hermanos Chihuahua. Officers' dance — December 6. 

Casa Blanca La (Ayub. G. A Co) Chihuahua. Enlisted men's dance — December 7 and 21. 

Ciudad de Constantinople La Chihuahua. U.S. Naval Air Station and Submarine Band. 

(Ajub Hermanoa). Cristobal bandstand — December 20. 



202 



THE PANAMA. CANAL RECORD 









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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



203 




2C4 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Stages of the Chagres and the Lakes. 

The maxim urn elevations of the Chagres River, 
Gatun Lake, and Miraflores Lake, in feet above 
mean sealevel. during the week ending at mid- 
night of Saturday, December 7. were as follows: 





Chagres River Gatun Lake 


Mira- 
flores 
Lake. 


Date 


Vigia 


Alha- Gam- 
juela boa 


Gatun 


8un., Dec. 1 

Mon., Dec. 2 

Tuea., Dec. 3 . . . . 
Wed., D-c. 4 . . . . 

Thurs., Dec. 5 

Fri., Dec. e 

Sat.. Dec. 7 


127.85 1 92.63 
127.80 92.60 
127.40 92.21 
127.30 92.08 
127.25 92.05 
127.50 92.15 
127.80! 92.52 


86.81 
86.90 
86.90 
86.90 
86.92 
86.89 
86.92 


86.76 
86.80 
86.81 
86.82 
86.84 
86.88 
86.88 


54.05 
54.14 
54.13 
53 .35 
53.37 
53.41 
53.45 


Height of low water 
to nearest foot. 


126 .oj 91.0 

1 









Joint Commission. 



Rules of Dismissal. 

In the matter of the claim of Las Cascadas Estates 
Company. Limited, a corporation. In which rule 
of default has been entered, rule of dismissal No. 
400. docket No. 1760. November 2, 1918— On 
April 13, 1916, the Joint Commission, with the 
approval oi the two Governments, parties to the 
Treaty, adopted a rule relative to the continu- 
ance or dismissal of claims in which the claimants 
are not ready for trial on the date their claims are 
set tor hearing or who fail to appear for hearing. 
This rule provides for the entering of a rule of 
default against claimants who fail to appear 
when called. 

The said rule also provides that: 

"Upon the entry of such rule of default (at the 
end of each month) notice thereof shall be given 
by four successive publications, one each week, 
in the English and Spanish languages, in news- 
papers of general circulation in the Republic 
of Panama, notifying such claimants to appear 
in person or by attorney within sixty (60) days 
from the first of said publications and show good 
and sufficient cause why such default should be 
set aside, and take active steps to prosecute their 
claims, and failing to so appear within sixty days 
from said first publication their claims will be 
considered as having been either settled or 
abandoned and the same will be dismissed and 
forever barred." 

In the claim of the Las Cascadas Estates Com- 
pany, Limited, a corporation, docket No. 1760, 
set for hearing June 19, 1918, there was no ap- 
pearance on the part of claimants nor counsel 
for claimants, and a rule of default was accord- 
ingly entered against them. 

Due notice having been given as provided for 
in the above-qiioted section of the rule of the 
Commission, and there having been no appear- 
ance by the claimants in person or by counsel 
during the 60-day period fixed in the rule re- 
ferred to, which period began on June 27, 1918, 
the foregoing claim against the United States 
is hereby dismissed and forever barred. 

Federico Boyd, Burt New, R. J. Alfaro, 
George A. Connolly, Commissioners. 



In the matter of the claim of Gustavo Nezrt, for 
property located near Empire, Canal Zone, rule 
of dismissal No. 401. docket No. 2979. Novem- 
ber 2, 1918 — The claim of Gustavo Nezel, 
docket No. 2979, is hereby disallowed and dis- 
missed for lack of evidence sufficient to justify 
an award against the United States. 

Federico Boyd, Burt New, R. J. Alfaro, 
George A. Connolly, Commissiontrs. 



30, 1918 — The evidence before the Commission 
is that the property covered by the above-entitled 
claim has been paid for by the United States. 

In view of this fact, the claim calls for no 
further action by the Commission, and it is 
accordingly hereby dismissed. 

Federico Boyd, Burt New, R. J. Alfako* 
George A. Connolly, Commissioners. 



November Rainfall for Three Tears. 





INCHES. 
















at 










a 

3 


T3 


o» 


Stations. 








3 


V 


1 




1916 


1917 


1918 


eg 


o 










"3 


S 


>> 










CO 


!* 


3 


Pacific Section — 














Balboa 


8.12 


13.33 


8 62 


9 31 


20 


17 


Balboa Heights. 


8.77 


13.77 


9 61 


1033 


22 


16 


Miraflores 


9.55 


14.65 


5 88 


10. 87 


11 


18 


Pedro Miguel . . 


13.39 


I9.3S 


7.16 


11.26 


11 


10 


Rio Grande. . . 


14.05 


24. 79 


7.75 


11.59 


14 


18 


Central Section — 














•Culebra 


17 04 


21.62 


7.28 


12 42 


30 


15 




15.07 


25 3 


8.63 


13.40 13 


21 


Empire 


16.5S 


23 79 


7.19 


11.88| 14 


20 




9 84 


22 05 


5.86 


12.10 36 


21 


♦Juan Mina. . . . 


12 94 


22 23 


6.78 


12 96! 9 


20 


Alhajuela 


14 77 


19.83 


6.91 


14.35! 20 


21 




12 26 
12.02 


20.89 
28.10 


8.40 
14.14 


14.89 11 


22 




16.64 


7 


22 


♦Trinidad 


13.66 


28.84 


7.73 


17.90 


11 


23 


v Monte Lirio.. 


18.42 


27.04 


15.37 


21.52 


11 


20 


Atlantic Section- 














Gatun 


19.15 


30.94 


11 49 


20.53 


14 


23 


♦Brazos Brook . 


21.49 


24 86 


15.04 


22 39 


13 


20 




14.08 


20.49 


14.23 


21.34 


48 


24 







♦ Standard rain gauge readings at 4 p. m. daily. 
Automatic register at unstarred stations — values 
midnight to midnight. 



Rainfall from Nov. 1 to 3d 


,1918 


, Inclusive. 


Stations. 


a . 
" s 


■1 

3 
Q 


3 

4 


Pacific section — 


Ins. 
1.25 
2.28 
2 46 
94 
1 37 
1 65 

1 70 
1 76 
1 27 
1 12 
1 04 
1 73 
1 99 

1 43 

2 14 

1 51 

2 38 

2.77 
3.45 
3.88 


5 
23 

8 
17 
7 
6 

8 
8 
5 

19 
1 

24 
6 
1 
5 

21 

16 

5 
5 
5 


Int. 
4 03 




8 62 


Balboa Heights 

Miraflores 

Pedro Miguel 

Rio Grande. 
Central section — 

♦Culebra. 


9 61 
5.88 
7 16 

7.75 

7 28 

8 63 
7.19 

5.86 




6 78 


♦El Vigia ... 


6 94 

8 40 

9 97 


♦Frijo!e8 

♦Trinidad 


14 14 

7 73 




15 37 


Atlantic section — 


11 49 




15 04 




14.23 







In the matter of the claim of Etnestina Carrania, 
for property located in Malachin, C. 7... rule of 
dismissal No. 402. docket No. 1876, November 



♦Standard rain gauge — readings at 5 p. m. daily. 
Automatic rain gauge at unstarred stations — v»l uesi 
midnight to midnight. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 205 

Canal Record to Canal Service Men. 

American citizens who have served on the Panama Canal and are 
now in the military service of the United States will be sent a copy of 
The Panama Canal Record each week if they make application for 
this privilege. 

Additions to Commissary Stock. 

Dresses, women's house, assorted, rolled Suits, bathing, ladies', navy and orange, 

collars, ea $1.70 suit $6.55 

Dresses, women's house, assorted, rolled Suits, bathing, ladies', navy and red, suit. 6.55 

collars, ea 1 . 70 Fishing tackle : 

Dresses, women's house, assorted, V-neck, Boxes, tackle. No. 11, ea 67 

collarless ea ... 1 70 Boxes, tackle, No. 44, ea 1.40 

Embroidery, floral dress trimming, yd 17 Wjre leader, phosphor-bronze. No. 25. 

Embroidery, floral dress trimming, yd 24 Hinges. P str"p, hght stdi.'galv-anized; with 

Embroidery, floral dress trimming, yd 23 brass pins, 4", pr 15 

Ribbon, for underwear, yd 07 Sci?sors, all nickel, f>\", ea 73 

Ribbon, for underwear, yd 12 Scissors, all nickel, 1\", ea 82 

Ribbon, for underwear, yd 22 Scissors, all nickel, 8J", ea 90 

Ribbon, for underwear, yd 32 Community silver: 

Soap, castile, cake 37 Tongs, sugar. Patrician, small, ea 78 

Suits, bathing, ladies', navy and green, Tongs, sugar, Sheraton, small, ea 78 

suit 6.55 Dressing, Palm Beach, shoe, liquid, bot. . .08 



COMMISSARY NOTES. 



War Savings Stamps Christmas Cards. 

A supply of Christmas Greeting cards, which provide for the insertion of War 
Savings Stamps, has been received and will be placed on sale at all commissaries, at 
3 cents each. 



Cleaning Aluminum Ware. 

A cleaner that will positively remove all traces of soot and burned grease from 
aluminum ware is on sale at the commissaries. It is carried under the name of 
"Brillo," retails for 20 cents a package, and is guaranteed to be absolutely harmless 
either to the ware or to the hands of the housekeeper. It is composed of small pads 
of steel wool with a cake of special soap with which the utensils are scrubbed. They 
are then rinsed in clear water and present a clean and polished surface. 



War Maps. 

A supply of war maps covering the entire western front from Ostend to the Swiss 
border was placed on sale by retail stores last week. 

The map is divided into 12-mile squares and for ready reference carries a com- 
plete alphabetical list of all cities and towns in the battle area, together with the 
number of the square in which they are situated so that an\ city or town can be lo- 
cated on the map immediately. The correct pronunciation of the names of all cities, 
towns, rivers, etc., is also given. 

These maps will sell at 15 cents each, which is considerably less that the retail 
price in the States. 

Floral Dress Trimmings. 

Floral dress trimmings, in a number of dainty color combinations, have been 
received from the States and will be placed on sale in the commissaries. 



Gingham House Dresses. 



Gingham house dresses in plaids and checks of various colors, have recently been 
received from the States and will be placed on sale in the line stores. 



Christmas Suggestions. 

A pleasing gift for the housekeeper that may be purchased at the commissaries, 
is known as Kleverkraft ware, consisting of the following pieces: Candlesticks, 
casseroles, custard cup holders, ramekins and optic vases. 

Presents of a more serviceable nature consist of electric grills, hot plates, and per- 
colators. 

Novelty leather purses, the new style umbrellas with the wrist holders, and 
toilet mirrors of the be6t quality in natural ebony are also on sale. 



2C6 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Presses for Tennis Rackets. 

With climatic conditions as they are on the Isthmus a tennis racket press is almost 
indispensable. A new supply has recently been received from the States and is on 
sale at the various commissaries. 



Bathing Suits. 

The ladies' bathing suits recently placed on sale in the commissaries are meeting 
with ready sale. They are obtainable in navy trimmed with green, navy trimmed with 
red, and navy trimmed with orange. The style is attractive and the quality excellent. 



Wedgwood. 

The Commissary Division is just in receipt of advice from England to the effect 
that prices on Wedgwood china will be increased for all future orders from 10 to 100 
per cent. 

Fudge. 

A small shipment of chocolate and maple coconut fudge, manufactured by the 
Commissary Division was shipped to Ancon, Balboa, Cristobal, Pedro Miguel, and 
Gatun commissaries last week, where it met with prompt sale. If the demand con- 
tinues manufacture will be increased and arrangements made to supply stores with 
a fresh stock two days a week. 



Fishing Tackle. 

A supply of fishing tackle has been received and distributed among Balboa, Cris- 
tobal, and Gatun commissaries. The supply is complete and will fill the wants of the 
fishermen for almost any conceivable use in this section. 



Ribbons. 

A supply of ribbons in various widths and designs, including self-colored brocades, 
flowered taffetas and plain satins, has been received and is now in stock in the line 
stores. Since these ribbons are in demand for the making of camisoles, silk bags, and 
purses, boudoir caps, and other similar articles, which make very acceptable Christ- 
mas gifts, they are meeting with ready sale. 



Hats. 

The Commissary Division recently received a shipment of men's soft felt hats in 
three different styles and colors. These shapes and colors were selected from the most 
popular now being worn in the States and it is believed will meet the demand for an 
attractive, snappy hat. The popular battle-smoke gray is included in this shipment, 
also two shades of brown. These hats are now on sale at Balboa, Ancon, Cristobal, 
Gatun, and Pedro Miguel commissaries. 



Cigars. 

The stock of Jamaica cigars is again exhausted due solely to the lack of shipping 
facilities. As soon as it was learned that transportation between Jamaica and Cris- 
tobal had been discontinued, manufacturers were requested, if possible, to ship their 
cigars to Haiti to connect with the Panama Railroad steamers, and they advised 
this could not be done, as there are no boats sailing betwen these two points. Routing 
the cigars by Havana to connect with steamers from New Orleans was also out of the 
question, and latest cable advice was to the effect that suppliers would endeavor to 
ship via New York to connect with steamer from there. It is believed that a consign- 
ment is now in transit. 



RECIPE. 



Old-Fashioned Cranberry Pie. 

Line a pie plate with short pastry. Sprinkle over this a little sugar, then fill with 
raw cranberries. Pour over them molasses, in proportion of J-cup molasses to each 
cup cranberries, and sift over 2 level tablespoons flour. Wet edges of pie crust; 
cover cranberries with an upper crust and press edges closely together. Cut three 
6lits in top and bake in moderate oven about 30 minutes. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50: address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter. February 6. 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 18, 191 8. No. 18. 



Rates of Pay, Gold Roll. 

The Panama Canal, Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 11, 1918. 
Circular No. 669-24: 

The following rates of pay are established effective November 1, 1918, superseding 
rates heretofore published for these ratings. Ratings not covered in this circular 
are not affected. 



Designation or Rai.no. 



Rate. 



Hour. I 26-day. ] 28-day 



Month. 



Remarks. 



Anglesmith (special) 

Apprentice: 

1st year 

2d year 

3d year 

4th year 

Battery repairman. . 



Boatbuildcr, cabinetmaker, caulker (wood). Meet 
carpenter, planingmill hand, ship joiner, ship- 
wright. 



Boilermaker, blacksmith, machinist, moldcr, pipe- 
fitter, plumber (ship), bhipfitter, shipsmith. wire- 
man, ironworker. 



Cablesplicer, electric 

Chipper and calker, riveter 



Craneman, shop 
Coppersmith. . . 

Diver 

Electrician 

Electroplater. . . 

Engineer, steam 



$1.13 

.20 
.30 
.43 
.55 

.95 

.85 

1.03 



.85 
.80 
.75 

100 
.95 

.85 
.80 
.75 

1.00 
.95 



1.00 
.95 
.85 
.80 
.75 



.78 
.72 
.61 

1.08 

1.02 

.91 

.86 

1.88 

1.00 
.95 



1.00 
.95 
.85 

1.00 
.95 

.85 
.80 
.75 



.197. 60 
187.20 
176.80 

2U.24 

203 84 
190.32 
176.80 
166.40 
156.00 

20S. 00 
197.60 
187 20 
176.80 
166.40 
156.00 

208.00 
197.60 
187.20 



162 24 
149 76 

126 NS 



$212 80 
194 80 
190.40 

230.72 
219.52 
204.96 
190 40 
179 20 
168.00 

224.00 
212.80 
194. SO 
190 40 
179 20 
168.00 

224.00 
212.80 
194.80 



174.72 
161 28 
136.64 



208.00 
197.60 

1ST. 20 



208.00 
197.60 
187 20 
176.80 
166.40 
156.00 



224.00 
212.80 
194.80 



224 00 
212 80 
194 80 
190 40 
179 20 
168 00 



The $1.03 rate for cabinet- 
maker will apply only 
on marine work. Coach 
cabinetmakers will be 
paid 93, 88, 77, 72, and 
67 cents. 

"Machinist, fleet," and 
"machinist, automobile 
repairer," are included 
in this class. A ship- 
fitter working as lofts- 
man will be paid 5 cents 
additional to the first 
class rate. 

Blacksmith, heavy 
fire, S1.20. 

Shir smith, heavy fire, 
$1.20. 



$15.00 a day. 
Coaling plants only. 



These rate* apply to any 
equipment run by 
steam engines, includ- 
ing locomotive cranes, 
gantry crane, ditcher, 
hoist, pile driver, track- 
shifter, comfressurs, 
etc. 



208 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Designation or Rating. 



Rate. 



Engineer, steam— Continued. 

Derrick barge and 50-ton dry dock crane. 
Oil pump 



Cristobal refrigerating plant; power plant; en- 
gineer and machinist. 



Flangeturner. 



Hour. 



Forger, heavy, hydraulic press 



General mechanic. 



Helper. 



Inspector: 

Boiler 

Finished material. 
Meter, electric 



Scale 

Telephone. 



81 10 
1 05 



1.S5 



26-day. 



S20S.00 
197.60 

187.20 



1 00 
.95 



28-day. 



S224.00 
212.80 
194.80 



208.00 
197.60 
187.20 



Instrument maker. . . . 
Instrument repairman. 



Layerout . 



Lineman, transmission. 
Light and power. . 



Operator. 



Coaling plants- 
General 

Roloader, crane, tower, viaduct 



Lock- 



Control. 
General. 
Towing. 



Gamboa sand crane. Gamboa pump plant, flour 
operator witchboard operator. 



Balboa refrigerating plant. 



Painter. 



.95 

.85 

1.05 

1.00 
.95 

1 05 



20S 00 
197.60 
1S7.20 



197.60 
187.20 
176.80 



20S.OO 
197.60 



1.00 
.95 



213.00 
20S.OO 
197.60 

20S.00 
197.60 
187.20 
176 SO 
166.40 
156.00 



Month. 



?234.00 
1S7.20 
176 80 
166 40 



208.00 

20S.00 
197.60 

187.20 

187.20 
176.80 

166.40 

178 88 
168.48 
158.08 
147.68 



224.00 
212.80 

104.80 



Remarks. 



224.00 

212.80 
201.60 



212.80 

194.80 
190 40 



224.00 
212.80 



229.00 

224.00 
212.80 

224.00 
212.80 
201.60 
190 40 
179.20 
168.00 

264.00 

224 00 
212 SO 
201.60 
190 40 
179 20 
168 00 
234 00 

2:54.00 
234 00 
224.00 

224.00 

212. SO 



$234.00 
224 00 



201.60 I 


201.60 
190.40 
179.20 


192.64 
181 44 
170.24 
159.04 



Five cents more than 
first class boilermaker 
when working at flange 
fire; 5 cents more than 
regular flangeturner 
rate when working 
from a furnace on 
bending slabs. 



Five cents more than 
first class machinist 
and boilermaker rate. 



These rates may be ap- 
plied to operators of 
electric enginps, except 
as otherwise specified. 
Operator and machin- 
ist, and operator and 
wireman take the first 

Operators of De Mayo 
barges who are steam 
engineers will be rated 
on the "Engineer, 
Steam" schedule. 

Balboa Plant. 



The 26-day rate fur tow- 
ing operator is used as 
an entrance rate or 
until operator is quali- 
fied. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



209 



Designation ob Rating. 



Painter — Continued. 
Letterer and graincr. 
Sign 



Pattarnmaker 



Rigger. 



Sheet-metal worker 



Signal maintained 



Typewriter and adding machine repairman. 



Welder, electric . 
Gas 



Rate. 



Hour. 26-day. 28-day. Month 



$0 06 
1 07 

1 11 

1.05 

.95 



.83 

.71 
.66 

1.03 
.93 
.85 
.80 
.75 

.95 



1.03 
.98 

.85 

1.00 

.95 

.85 



SI S3 04 
172.64 

16] it; 

147 68 

137.23 



197 60 
187 20 
176.80 



S197.12 
185.92 
172.48 
159.04 
147.84 



212.80 
211.60 
193.40 



S22J.00 

197.60 



Remarks. 



A sheet-metal worker on 
coppersmith work will 
be paid the coppersmith 
ratej. 



A Leadincman rate 23 cents in excess of the first class rate of a trade is authorized for the Mechanical Division and 
for Electrical Division employees on ship work. 

The hourly rates will be increased by 5 per cent in the case of employees of the Mechanical Division working on 
niiht shifts whose pay is based on Navy Yard rates. This does not apply to men on day shifts working overtime, nnr 
to employees whose compensation is not based on Navy Yard rates. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



The Red Cross Magazine. 

The Red Cross Magazine publishers have advised that it will be 
impossible to furnish a magazine to every Red Cross member, on 
account of the extreme shortage of paper. They advise that every 
magazine subscriber may have their subscription renewed. In the 
past the Chapter has made every person contributing as much as $2 
a year to the War Relief Fund a magazine member, which has resulted 
in two or more copies sometimes being sent to one family, and some- 
times to one person. It is impossible for the Chapter to maintain a 
correct address record of its members unless the members advise the 
secretary of address changes, which they heretofore have not done. 
This has resulted in several hundred magazines being undelivered in 
the Canal Zone post offices. 

Effective at once the Chapter secretary will not renew magazine 
subscriptions of members unless requested to do so by the member. 
The expiration date of your magazine is shown on the wrapper each 
month below the name and address, and next to the last issue you will 
receive will contain a yellow slip stating "Your subscription expires 
with the NEXT issue. 1 ' Unless you request the renewal through the 
secretary the magazine will be discontinued. Anyone contributing 
as much as S2 per year to the War Relief Fund may request the maga- 
zine without additional charge. 

The Christmas roll call campaign ordered by headquarters wants to 
secure annual members as they can not guarantee to furnish over a 
small percentage of the Christmas roll call new members with the 
magazine. 



210 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

If you are a subscriber and you move from one town to another, or 
resign and go to the United States it would be a kindness to the Chapter 
if you would phone (Balboa 955) or write the secretary your new 
address. Much waste of the magazines would be eliminated in this way. 
Leaving your forwarding address with your postmaster is not sufficient, 
for second class mail matter is not forwarded without additional pay- 
ment of postage. 

Books. 

The sale of books by the Commissar}' Division continues to meet with favor on the 
part of patrons, and sales have been uniformly good. With the approach of Christmas, 
and the appropriateness of books as gifts, it is believed that many will wish to take 
advantage of the large stock on hand, some of which has just been received. The 
following titles, while by no means representing a complete list of those on hand, 
present a good variety from which selections may be made for gifts: 

Life in a Tank Captain Richard Haigh 

Face to Face with Kaiserism James W. Gerard 

In the Fourth Year H. G. Wells 

High Adventure James Norman Hall 

Headquarters Nights Vernon Kellogg 

My Four Years in Germany James W. Gerard 

Outwitting the Hun Lieutenant O'Brien 

Home Fires in France Dorothy Canfield 

Fragments from France Bruce Bairnsfather 

The Unpardonable Sin Rupert Hughes 

The City of Masks George Barr McCutcheon 

The Prophet of 'Berkeley Square Robert Hichens 

You No Longer Count Rene Boylesve 

Belinda of the Red Cross R. W. Hamilton 

Little Journeys Toward Paris Simeon Strunsky 

A Diversity of Creatures Rudyard Kipling 

Over Here Hector MacQuarrie 

The Earthquake Arthur Train 

Towards Morning I. A. R. Wylie 

The Emma Gees Capt. Herbert McBride 

The Blond Beast Robert Ames Bennet 

The Ladies from Hell Douglas Pinkerton 

His Second Wife Ernest Poole 

Tne Zeppelin's Passenger E. Phillips Oppenheim 

Philo Gubb, Correspondence School Detective Ellis Parker Butler 

The First Hundred Thousand Ian Hay 

The First Shot for Liberty Corp. Osborne de Varila 

Germany, the Next Republic Carl W. Ackermann 

Fighting for Peace Harry Van Dyke 

General Foch — An Appreciation Major Johnson 

Keeping up with William Maurice Barres 

Making Life Worth While Douglas Fairbanks 

Out to Win Coningsby Dawson 

Kings, Oueens, and Pawns Mary Roberts Rinehart 

Winged Warfare Major Bishop 

The Rough Road W. J. Locke 

Uncle Remus Returns Joel Chandler Harris 

J'ai Accuse! A German 

In this connection, a requisition has recently been placed with the commissary 
purchasing agent for a further supply of books, embracing all that is new in fiction, 
humor, etc., The following are among the titles ordered: 

The Red One, and other stories Jack London 

A Princess of Mars Edgar Rice Burroughs 

The God of Mars Edgar Rice Burroughs 

A Daughter of the Land Gene Stratton Porter 

The Laughing Girl Robert W. Chambers 

Shavings Jos. C. Lincoln 

Ashton-Kirk, Criminologist John T. Mclntyre 

Josselyn's Wife Kathleen Norris 

Firebrand Trevison C. A. Seltzer 

Treat 'em Rough Ring Lardner 

My Four Weeks in France Ring Lardner 

From Baseball to Boches H. C. Witwer 

The Island Mystery G. A. Birmingham 

The Clutch of Circumstance Majorie Benton Cooke 

The Money Maker Irving R. Allen 

Gaslight Sonatas Fannie Hurst 

The Cross of Fire Robert G. Anderson 

Virtuous Wives Owen Johnson 

Dere Mable E. Streeter 

The House of Torchy Sewell Ford 

The Valley of the Giants Peter B. Kyne 

Notice will be given through the columns of The Panama Canal Record when 
the above books are received, together with a short review which will serve as a guide 
to purchasers in making selections. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



211 



Deceased Employees. 

The estates of the following deceased employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad 
Company are now in process of settlement, and any claims against these estates, or any information 
which might lead to the location of heirs, or to the recovery of property, bank deposits, postal savings 
or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys due them, should be presented at the office of 
the Administrator of Estates at once in order that the estate may be settled as soon as possible. All 
claims should be itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or other public officer having a seal, and 
submitted in duplicate. These names will be published but once: 



Name. 


Check 

No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by- 


Date of death. 




25728 
169494 

130924 

11.5702 


Barbados 

Jamaica 

Barbados 


La Boca 


Mechanical Div 

Health Department. . 
Supply Department. . 
Panama Railroad. . . . 


December 5, 1918. 




December 1, 1918. 


Ernest Harper 


Panama 

Colon 


December 2, 1918. 

December 4. 1918. 



Official Circulars. 



Acting Governor. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 14, 1918. 
All concerned — Effective December 14, 1918, 
and during my absence on leave, Mr. W. J. 
Douglas, Engineer of Maintenance, will be Act- 
ing Governor. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Acting President on the Isthmus. 

Panama Railroad Company, 

Office of President, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 14, 1918. 
All concerned — Effective December 14, 1918, 
and during my absence on leave, Mr. W. J. 
Douglas, 2d vice president, will exercise such 
duties of the president as relate to the operations 
of the company on the Isthmus. 

Chester Harding, 
President Panama Railroad Co. 



Acting Superintendent, Coaling Plants. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Superintendent, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 1 1, 1918. 
All concerned — Effective December 14, and 
during the absence on leave of Mr. T. W. Mc- 
Farlane, the duties ol the Superintendent of the 
Coaling Plants will be performed by Mr. C. \V. 
Morgan as Acting Superintendent, in addition 
to his regular duties. 

S. W. Heald, 
Superintendent. 
Approved: 

Chester Harding, 
Governor. 



Acting Quarantine Officer. 

The Panama Canal, 
Health Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 11, 1918. 
All concerned — Effective this date. Dr. H. C. 
Watts will act a* Quarantine Officer, Balboa- 
Panama, during the absence on leave of Dr. M. J. 
Hoey. 

A. T. McCormack, 
Chief Health Officer. 



Hunting in Forbidden Areas. 
The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 12, 1918. 
All concerned — Referring to my circular of 
October 30, reading as follows: 

"Effective November IS, 1918, all hunting will 
be prohibited on Bohio Peninsula and the country 
south from the Cocoli River to the coast. This 
due to the fact that a large force of men will be 



engaged in pasture clearing work in these areas 
from that date." 

The foregoing circular is hereby modified so as 
to permit of hunting in these areas on Sundays 
and holidays only. However, as pasture camps 
have been established, and men will be living in 
them at all times, extreme caution must be exer- 
cised by all hunters to avoid injury to pasture 
employees or property. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Rates for Floating Cranes. 

The Panama Canal. 

Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 7, 1918 
Circular No. 686-7 (Superseding Circular No. 
686-4 and paragraph 2 (a) of Circular No. 
686-5) : 

Effective December 1, 1918. the following rates 
are established for services rendered' by floating 
cranes: 

1. To departments and divisions of The Pan- 
ama Canal and Panama Railroad, or other 
branches of the United States Government: 

Per hour. 

Ajax S35.0O 

Hercules 35.00 

La Valley 20 .00 

2. To individuals and companies: 

Ajax 42.00 

Hercules 42.00 

La Valley 25.00 

3. These rates include only the regular crew 
of the cranes; any additional force, as well as 
all towing and similar charges, will be extra at 
the usual rates. 

4. Charge will be made for all working time 
and time in transit, and time held at working 
point by request of the interest for which the 
crane is working. 

5. The minimum charge shall be for 1 hour. 
Each succeeding half hour or fraction thereof will 
be charged at one-half the rate per hour. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Cable Messages for Belgium. 
Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z.. December 13, 1916. 
Circular No. 1194: 

Agents and operators — The following telegram 
received from the Central and South American 
Cable Company: 

"As Belgium is practically, if not entirely 
liberated, messages can now be accepted for 
practically entire country." 

VV. F. Foster, 
Master of Transportation. 



Meeting of Local Inspectors. 

The Board of Local Inspectors will meet in 
room 237, Balboa Heights Administration Build- 
ing. Thursday, December 26. 1918, at 9 o'clock 



212 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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213 



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214 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Shipping Statistics. statistics of shipping via the Canal will be in the 

' The Panama Canal, 6a ™ "^""er as is followed by the Department 

c.„„„.„ „„ /-.„'„ of Commerce, Washington, D. C. 

Executive Office 4 The mani f egt sho uld be a copy of that 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 13, 1918. usually made up to cover the entire cargo of the 

Circular No. 679-5: vessel, in complete detail as to description of the 

1. For the purpose of securing uniform data, commodities, and particularly as to weight (or 
for statistical purposes only, effective January 1, cubic displacement) of the items. If the regular 
1919, each vessel entering a Canal Zone port, or manifest does not substantially comply with the 
transiting the Canal, will be required to furnish requirements, then a statement shall be furnished 
to the boarding officer a full manifest of the cargo for statistical purposes containing the information 
on such vessel, in writing, signed by the master, specified. 

and specifying the marks, kinds, and quantities 5. Article 6 of Circular No. 679 (revised) and 

thereof . the port or ports where the cargo was paragraph 2 of Circular No. 679-2 are amended 

shipped, the different ports to which it is con- accordingly. 

signed or at which intended to be entered, and the Chester Harding, 

names of the consignors and consignees. This is Governor. 

in addition to the two copies required by paragraph __^^^__^^___ 

2 of Circular No. 679-2. 

2. Any form of manifest in substantial com- Chicks and Hatching Eggs, 
pliance with these requirements will be accepted. The Panama Canal, 
and it may be in English or in the language of Supply Department 

the nation to which the vessel belongs. If in a /^„„-,.«,>.t r> -7 t-> „v. 1 ,, m!o 

foreign language other than French, Spanish. ... Crist ° b a £' C \ Z " °! COmb ^ r li ' 19 . 1 n 8 - 

or Italian, the master or agent of the vessel must -j" concerned— Effective December 15, 1918, 

furnish a translation and untl1 further notice, the sale of young chicks, 

3. Information of 'cargo thus given will be also the sale of eggs for setting purposes, from the 
held to be strictly confidential, and no details Summit poultry farm, will be discontinued. 

of consignor, consignee, or carrier will be given W. B. Brown, 

out. Publication or other dissemination of Superintendent Cattle Industry. 



COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Ginghams. 

A well-known brand of ginghams in all popular shades of plain colors and in a variety 
of patterns in plaids and checks, was recently received and is now on sale at the line 
commissaries. 

Wash Satins. 

A stock of high-grade wash satin in silver gray, steel gray, navy blue, old rose, and 
black, has recently been received and forwarded to the line stores. Inasmuch as this 
is exceptionally desirable for dresses, skirts, etc., it should meet with ready sale. 

Grape Juice. 

Recent advices from the commissary purchasing agent relative to our order for 
grape juice, which the contractors have been unable to fill, is to the effect that the 
stock at their plant was completely exhausted and that they would not know what 
could be furnished the trade until the pressing of the season's crop was over. 

Belt Buckles. 

Of interest to the Christmas shopper who has still a few gifts to buy will be the 
announcement that the Commissary Division is just in receipt of a supply of sterling 
silver belt buckles for men. These are in artistic designs and provide space for the 
engraving of a monogram and will make a very pleasing gift. 

Silk Stockings. 

A shipment of ladies' silk hosiery in black and white has just been received and dis- 
tributed among the line commissaries. Considerable difficulty has been experienced 
in keeping a complete line of ladies' silk hosiery in stock due to the fact that the manu- 
facturers have insufficient for their home trade, and do not care to export any. 

Towel Sets. 

Still another article which would make desirable Christmas gifts is the novelty 
Turkish towel sets recently received. These sets consist of one Turkish bath towel, 
one Turkish guest towel, and one wash cloth, with embroidered scalloped ends in 
various colorings. They are particularly attractive and sell at a very reasonable 
price. 

RECIPE. 

Cranberry Sauce. 

One quart cranberries, 1 pint of water, § level teaspoon salt, 1 cup sugar. 

Bring the water and salt to a boiling point. Pick over and wash the cranberries, 
put them into a pint of boiling water and cook rapidly for 5 minutes, or until the 
skins of the berries have broken. Cool slightly, add the sugar, bring to boiling 
point and cook slowly for an additional 5 minutes. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50: address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal. Washington. D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter, February 6, 1918. at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 25, 191 8. No. 19. 



Rates of Pay, Gold Roll. 

The Panama Canal, Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 23, 1918. 
Circular No. 669-24 — Corrected: 

The following rates of pay are established effective November 1, 1918, superseding 
rates heretofore published for these ratings. Ratings not covered in this circular 
are not affected. 



Designation or Rai.no. 



Rate. 



Hour. 26-day. | 28-day. 



Month 



Remarks. 



Anglesmith (special) 

Apprentice: 

1st year 

2d year 

3d year 

4th year 

Battery repairman. . 



Boatbuilder, cabinetmaker, caulker (woodl, fleet 
carpenter, planingmill hand, ship joiner, ship- 
wright. 



Boilermaker, blacksmith, machinist, molder, pipe- 
fitter, plumber (ship), ubipatter, shipsmith, wire- 
man, ironworker. 



Cablesplicer, electric. 



Chipper and calker, riveter 






Coppersmith . . . 

Diver 

Electrician 

Electroplater . . . 

Engineer. 9team 



$1.13 



.20 
.30 

.4! 
.55 



.95 



1.03 



.81 

.76 

1.00 
.95 

.84 
.79 
.74 

1.00 
.95 



1.00 
.95 
.84 
.79 
.74 



1.08 

1 03 

.91 



1.00 
.95 



1.00 
.95 
.84 

1.00 
.95 



$197 60 
186 16 

174 72 

214 24 

20! S4 
191 36 

175 88 
168 48 
158.08 

20S CO 
197.60 
180 16 
174 72 
164 32 
153.92 

20S 00 
197 60 
186.16 



.<212 80 
201 43 
188.16 

230 72 
210 52 
2.16 08 
192 61 

181 41 
170 24 

224 00 
212.80 
200 4S 
188.16 
176 96 
165.76 

224 00 
212 80 

200.48 



208 00 
197 60 

180.10 



20s. 00 

197.60 
186 16 

174 7.' 
164 32 
153.92 



224 00 
212 80 

L'HO.IS 



224 00 

212 so 
200 43 
188 16 
176 96 
165.76 



"Machinist, fleet." and 
"machinist. automol.ile 
repairer," are includi d 

in this class. A sliip- 
fitter working as Vfts- 
man will he paid 5' ents 
addi.i.'tial 10 the first 
class rate. 

Blacksmith, heavy 
fire. $1 15, SI. 20; ship- 
smi'h heavy fire, 51.15, 
$1.20. 



$15 00 a day. 
Coaling plants only. 



The«e rxte' arj ly to any 
equipment r'ji, |,y 
steam c'uin.f>. inlud- 
ine locorr.utive cranes, 
gantry crane, ditcher, 
hoist, pile driver, track- 
shifter, conn ressors, 
etc. 



216 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Designation ob Rating. 



Engineer t steam — Continued. 

Derrick barge and 50-ton dry dock orane. 
Oil pump 



Cristobal refrigerating plant; power plant; en- 
gineer and machinist. 



rTangetuxner. 



Forger, heavy, hydraulic press. 
General mechanic 



Helper. 



Inspector: 

Boiler 

Finished material. 
Meter, electric 



Scale 

Telephone . 



Instrument maker 

Instrument repairman. 

Layerout 



Lineman, transmission. 
Light and power. . 



Rath. 



Hour. 26-day. 28-day Month 



$1.05 



1.10 
1.05 



1.85 



.83 
.60 



$208.00 
197.60 
186.16 



208.00 
197.60 
186.16 



1.00 208.00 
.95 197.60 
186.16 



.95 

.81 



1.05 



1.00 
.95 



1.05 



197.60 
1S6.16 
174.72 



208.00 
197.60 



Operator. 



Coaling plants — 

General 

Reloader, tower, viaduct. 



Lock- 



Berm crane. 



Control. 
General. 
Towing. 



Gamboa sand crane, Gamboa pump plant,. floor 
operator, switchboard operator. 



Balboa refrigerating plant. 



Painter, 



1.00 
.95 

.84 
.79 
.74 



213.00 
208.00 
197.60 

20S.O0 
197 60 
186 16 
174 72 
164 32 
153.92 



$224.00 
212.80 
200.48 



224.00 
212.80 
200.48 



224.00 
212.80 
200.48 



212.80 
200.48 
188.16 



224.00 
212.80 



208.00 

208.00 
197.60 
186.16 

186.16 
174.72 
164.32 

178.88 
168.48 
158.08 

117.68 



229.00 
224.00 
212.80 

224.00 
212 SO 
200.48 
188.16 
176.96 
165.76 

264.00 
224.00 
212.80 
200.48 
188.16 
176.96 
165.76 
234.00 

234.00 
234.00 
224.00 

224.00 
212.80 

200.48 

200.48 
188.16 
176.96 

192.64 
181.44 
170.24 
150.04 



$234.00 
ISP 16 
174.72 
164.32 



234.00 
224.00 



224.00 



Remark*. 



Five cents more than 
first class Boilermaker 
when working at flange 
fire, 5 cents more than 
regular flangeturner 
rate when working 
from a furnace on 
bending slabs 



Five cents more than 
first class machinist 
and boilermaker rate. 



These rates may be ap- 
plied to operators of 
electric engines, except 
as otherwise specified. 
"Operator and machin- 
ist, ' and "operator and 
wireman" take the first 
rates. 

Operators of De Mayo 
barges who are steam 
engineers will be rated 
on the "Engineer, 
Steam" schedule. 

Balboa Plant 



The 26-day rate for low- 
ing operator is used as 
an entrance rate or 
until operator is quali- 
fied. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



217 





Ratb. 




Designation or Rating. 


Hour. 


26-day. 


28-day. 


Month. 


Remarks. 


Painter — Continued. 


$0.96 
1.07 

111 

1.06 
.95 
























.88 
.83 

.72 
.67 

1.03 
.98 
.86 
.81 
.76 

.95 

.84 


$183.04 
172.64 
161.20 
149.76 
139.36 


$197.12 
185 92 
173 60 
161 28 
150.08 




cents an hour in excess 
of the maximum of a 
trade are established 
for Planner. 








197 60 
186.16 
174.72 


212.80 
200 48 
188.16 


$224.00 
197.60 
174.72 


coppersmith work will 
be paid the coppersmith 
rates. 








1.03 

.98 
.86 
1.00 
.95 
.84 








Gas 









A Leadingman rate 23 cents in excess of the first class rate of a trade is authorized for the Mechanical Division and 
for Electrical Division employees on ship work. 

The hourly rates will be increased by 5 per cent in the case of employees of the Mechanical Division working on 
flight shifts whose pay is based on Navy Yard rates. This does not apply to men on day shifts working overtime, nor 
to employees whose compensation is not based on Nary Yard rates. 

W. J. Douglas, 
Acting Governor 



Reestablishment of Radio Service in Canal Zone Waters. 

The restrictions which were placed on radio service in Canal Zone 
waters during the war have been removed. Ships are authorized to 
use their radio in the Canal Zone waters as outlined under Radio 
Regulations, page 42 of "Sailing Directions and General Information, 
The Panama Canal" (edition revised to October, 1916). 

The Canal Zone radio stations are as yet open to commercial traffic 
only with United States, British, and neutral vessels, though official 
messages addressed to the captains of the ports may be handled from 
vessels of all the allied nations. 



Diesel Oil. 

The price of Diesel oil on the Isthmus when sold to vessels is $4 a 
barrel at this time. 

This announcement corrects the statement made in The Panama 
Canal Record of November 13, in Supplement, No. 5, Tariff No. 2, 
and the statement there made should read as follows: 

Diesel oil is not sold by The Panama Canal, but may be obtained from private 
concerns at approximately $4 per barrel. Cable arrangements should be made in 
advance of arrival of vessel. 



21 & THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Exemption from Payment of Customs Duties. 

An article appeared in The Panama Canal Record of October 2. 
1918, on the subject of complaints made by employees of The Panama 
Can a! who were compelled to pay customs duty on piece goods of 
wool, linen, or other material intended to be made up into suits, even 
when the total value of merchandise taken into the United States by 
them came within the $100 exemption allowed certain passengers. 
A specific case where an employee had to pay duty on such material 
was submitted recently to the Chief, Division of Customs, U. S. 
Treasury Department, and it has been found upon investigation that 
the reason such duty was collected was because the employee declared 
he was a nonresident of the United States upon arrival at the port of 
entry. It is now stated by the division above referred to that the $103 
exemption is allowed residents of the United States returning, and may 
consist of articles of any description, with the exception of foodstuffs 
and cigars. Paragraph 642 appearing in the free list of the Tariff Act 
of October 3; 1913, upon which the above is based, reads as follows: 

Wearing apparel, articles of personal adornment, toilet articles, and similar per- 
sonal effects of persons arriving in the United States; but this exemption shall include 
only such articles as were actually owned by them and in their possession abroad at 
the time of or prior to their departure from a foreign country, and as are necessary 
and appropriate for the wear and use of such persons and are intended for such wear 
and use, and shall not be held to apply to merchandise or articles intended for other 
persons or for sale: Provided, That in case of residents of the United States returning 
from abroad all wearing apparel, personal and household effects, taken by them out 
of the United States to foreign countries shall be admitted free of duty, without 
regard to their value, upon their identity being established under appropriate rules 
and regulations to be prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury: Provided further, 
That up to but not exceeding $100 in value of articles acquired abroad by such resi- 
dents of the United States for personal or household use or as souvenirs or curios, 
but not bought on commission or intended for sale, shall be admitted free of duty. 

C. H. Calhoun, 
Chief Division oj Civil Affairs. 



Automobile and Motorcycle License Tags. 

New automobile and motorcycle license tags for 1919 have now 
arrived on the Isthmus and may be obtained from the Division of 
Civil Affairs, room 301, Administration Building, Balboa Heights. 
The 1919 personal and commercial tags have a dark blue ground 
with white raised letters and figures. In addition to the serial number 
and letters "C. Z." the figures "1919" appear from top to bottom 
between the left-hand margin and the letters "C. Z." Personal tags 
begin with the serial No. 001, and commercial tags with No. 50C1. 

A special license tag will be issued this year for official motorcycles 
owned by either the United States or the Republic of Panama. These 
tags, 6| by 4 inches in size, are the same in design and color as the tags 
:at present in use on official automobiles, and begin with the serial 
number 501. 

Official licenses do not expire; however, no tag should be changed 
from one car to another. 

In making remittances by mail, it is requested that money be for- 
warded by registered letter, money order, or check. Checks or money 
orders should be made payable to "The Collector, The Panama 
Canal, Balboa Heights, C. Z." 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 219 

Insurance of Ships' Crews. 

The following self-explanatory cablegram has just been received 
from Washington: 

The Secretary of the Treasury has this day issued a notice announcing that he 
no longer requires owners of American merchant vessels to insure their masters, 
officers, and crews in cases of vessels sailing on and after December 20, 1918, and you 
are requested to give this notice the widest local publicity. 

For your information you are advised that the insurance of masters, 
officers, and crews of American vessels against loss of life or personal 
injur> r by the risks of war, and for compensation during detention by 
an enemy of the United States following capture, as provided by the 
Act of Congress of June 12, became effective June 26, 1917. Pending 
the receipt of the necessary forms, however, this law was not made 
effective in the Canal Zone until August 15, 1917, and it was decided 
at that time that the work of insuring masters, officers, and crews of 
American vessels should be handled in the Canal Zone by the Chief 
Customs Inspectors at Balboa and Cristobal, as was being done in the 
United States by Collectors of Customs. From that time until August 
12, 1918, insurance was mandatory only for the crews of American 
vessels clearing for Eurpean ports and ports on the Mediterranean 
coast of Africa, and vice versa. Under date of August 12, 1918, the 
area in which war risk insurance for seamen on American vessels was 
mandatory was extended to include vessels proceeding from United 
States ports situated on the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts to 
foreign ports, and vice versa, and from United States ports situated 
on the Atlantic or Gulf of Mexico coasts to other United States ports 
where the voyage included not less than 100 miles of ocean navigation 
and vice versa. 

Under the date of August 17, 1918, the Act of Congress of July 11, 
1918, to amend the War Risk Insurance Act (supra), was made effec- 
tive in the Canal Zone. This law broadened the scope of the Bureau 
of War Risk Insurance so as to authorize it to insure vessels of foreign 
friendly flags, their freights (monies), effects of the masters, officers, 
and crews, the crews themselves, and caigoes against war risks under 
certain conditions. 

C. H. Calhoun, 
Chief Division of Civil Affairs. 

Australia Thanhs Canal People for Courtesies to Soldiers. 

War Department, Washington, December 2, 1918. 
The Honorable, The Secretary of State. 

Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of 
the 30th ultimo (file WE 763.7211414169) inclosing a copy of a note 
received from the British Charge d 'Affaires at this capital in which he 
conveys the cordial thanks of the Government of the Commonwealth 
of Australia on account of the generous treatment received by 
Australian invalids while passing through the Panama Canal. 

This expression of thanks is appreciated and I am taking pleasure 
in forwarding copies of your letter and its inclosure to the Governor of 
The Panama Canal. 

For the Secretary of War . 

Very respectfully, 

Benedict Crowell, 
The Assistant Secretary of War. 



220 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Department of State, Washington, November 30, 1918. 
The Honorable, The Secretary of War. 

Sir: I have the honor and the pleasure to enclose, for your informa- 
tion, copy of a note received from the British Charge d'Affaires at 
this capital conveying the cordial thanks of the Government of the 
Commonwealth of Australia on account of the generous treatment 
received by Australian invalids while passing through the Panama 
Canal. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, your obedient servant, 

For the Secretary of State . 

William Phillips, 
Assistant Secretary. 



War Department, Washington, November 13, 1918. 

Sir: I have the honor to inform you that His Majesty's Govern- 
ment have been informed by the Government of the Commonwealth 
of Australia, of the generous treatment experienced by Australian 
invalids while passing through the Panama Canal. Invalided Aus- 
tralian soldiers on their arrival in the Dominion have expressed their 
very deep appreciation of their reception at the Canal, and the Common- 
wealth Government have requested that their cordial thanks may be 
conveyed to the Government of the United States for the kindly and 
thoughtful action which has consistently been taken by the authorities 
of the Canal Zone for the comforc of the returning men. The Australian 
Government and public appreciate the action of the American au- 
thorities no less than the men themselves, and it is felt that the rela- 
tions between the two countries can not but be most happily affected 
by the remembrance of the kindness uniformly experienced by the 
Australians during this part of their passage home. 

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, Sir, your 
most obedient, humble servant, 

Colville Barclay. 
The Honorable 

Robert Lansing, 

Secretary of State of the United States. 



Sale of War Savings Stamps Discontinued on Isthmus After December 31, 

1918. 

The Director of War Savings for the Panama Canal Zone again 
desires to call attention to the fact that after the 31st of December 
War Savings Stamps will not be sold outside of the United States, in 
accordance with a ruling of the Treasury Department. 

Owners of thrift cards which are partially rilled should complete 
the card and exchange it for a War Savings Stamp at once, as theie 
will be no stamps here to exchange for the card next year and money 
can not be realized on a thrift card otherwise. 

There is a small supply of the 1918 series of War Savings Stamps still 
available at each Canal Zone post office, and the next few days will 
be the last opportunity to invest in this best small security issued by 
the United States Government and paying 4 per cent compound 
interest, 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 221 

Civil Service Examinations. 

The Following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at 
Canal Zone post offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are 
not posted, persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service 
Board, Balboa Heights (telephone 286) : 

Copyist draftsman (male and female); $1,100 a year; No. 350-amended; form 1312; age 17 
years and over.f§ 

' This announcement cancels announcement No. 607. issued October 12, 1918, of the examination 
tor ordnance copyist draftsman Cfeirale). 

Chauffeur (male and female); $720 to S900 a year; No. 466-amendcd; form 1800; age 18 years 
and over.y 

Junior engineer, Grade 2 (male and female) ; civil, electrical, mechanical, signal, structural, telegraph 
and telephone; .No 184— amended— supplemental; $720 to SI, 200 a year; form 1312 t 

Junior engineer, Grade 1 (male and female) ; civil, electrical, mechanical, signal, structural, telegraph 
and telephone; No. 34S— amended— suplemcntal; SI. 320 to SI. 680 a year; form I 

Junior architect (male and female;; Xo. 345— amended— supplemental; $1,320 to $1,680 a year- 
torm 1311. t 

Veterinarian (male); No. 448-amended; $1,500 a year; form 1312; January 26, 1919; February 
23, 1919; age 21 years and over. 

Biological assistant (male); $1,200 to $1,800 a year; No. 611— amended; form 2118- a"e within 
■reasonable age limits; January 7. 1019.* 

Assistant observer. Weather Bureau (male); $1,080 a year; No. 1; form 304; age, 18 but not 6e 
years; January 12, 1919; February 9. 1919. 

Automatic scale expert (male); SI, 600 a year; No. 2; form 1312; age, 18 years and over; January 

Laboratory aid in chemistry and physics (male and female); $900 to $1,020 a y<»ar- Ne 3- form 
1312; age, 18 years and over; January 12, 1919. 

Specialist in animal husbandry and dairying (male and female); $1,800 to $2 500 a year- No 4 
form 2118; January 7, 1919.* 

* Nonasseinbied. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last dav for Sing applications 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business 
an that date. 

f Nonassembled. Applications will be received at any time until further notice. 

t Male applicants of draft age should state in their applications their drait classification. The Com- 
mission *ill sustain objections of appointing officers to the certification or appointment of men in Class 

§ In view of the needs of the service, and until further notice, subjects of countries allied with the 
United States will be admitted to this examination, provided they are otherwise qualifed. Such 
persons may not be certified for appointment, however, so long as there are United States citizens 
tn the eligible list. 



Official Circulars. or name; those which are the propertv of The 

Panama Canal shall bear the letters "US' - before 

Small Boats. the serial number or name. The accountable 

Thk p,v.», r.M.i official concerned shall provide any material or 

ihe Manama Canal, labor whfch thc Board - s representative may 

Executive Office, request for this purpose. 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 4, 1918. The notes taken by the Board's representative 

All accountable officials — On or before January at such meetings shall be the basis of its new 

*, 1919, you will please forward to the office of record of small boats owned by The Panama 

the Board of Local Inspectors, Balboa Heights. Canal and Panama Railroad Company. 

C. Z.. a list, in duplicate, of all small boats (those Responsibility shall rest with the accountable 

.propelled by gasoline, as well as wooden barges officials for keeping plainly decipherable, so 

and floats less than 50 feet long, pangas, cayucas, long as the craft shall remain the propertv of the 

and other rowing and paddling craft) for which Canal or railroad company, the numbers and 

you are accountable, showing the following in- names applied as above provided for. 

formation: ,11 boats constructed, rebuilt, or otherwise 

(a) Accountable official. acquired by The Panama Canal or Panama Rail- 

(6) Responsible official. road Company after the assignment of numbers 

(f) Location of boat. and names as above provided for to craft then 

(d) Serial number or name of boat. in service shall, upon written application to the 

(?) Description (type) of boat. Board of Local Inspectors by the accountable 

(/) Dimensions of boat. officials concerned, be assigned numbers by the 

In event you have any unnumberedsmailboats. Local Board, but only after personal inspection 

their location, type, and dimensions shall be of tne craft D >' tlie Board's representative; and 

given. the numbers so assigned shall in all cases be 

After receipt of such information, the Local actually applied to the craft in the presence of 

Board's representative will, as early as practi- tne accountable official or his representative and 

cable and on dates of which lie will notify yen, V,1C representative of the Local Board, before 

meet you or your authorized representative, and t,le craft mav operate. 

he will remain in your presence, or that of your Hereafter, each accountable official shall cause 

representative, until every small boat on your to be furnished to the Local Board a list of all 

list, submitted as above directed, shall have floating craft, of whatever size and type, on 

been inspected, measured, had its old number hand on March 31 and September 30 of each 

effaced, its old and new numbers noted on his year, as well as a copy of every approved sur- 

(the Board's representative's) list, its new num. vey request and of every invoice covering transfeT 

ber branded conspicuously inside its hull in of floating craft from one division to another, 

characters approximately 1 \" hign, and painted All regulations in conflict herewith are hereby 

upon its bows in characters not less than 2" annulled, 
high and of a color in marked contrast to that of 

the outside of the hull. Craft which are the prop- Chester Harding. 

erty of the Panama Railroad Company shall Governor The Panama Canal. 

fcear the letters "PRR" before the serial number President The Panama Railroad Co. 



222 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Conduct and Workmanship of Employees. 

The Panama Canal, 

Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights. C. Z., December 20, 1918. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

It is desired that in each instance where an 
employee's conduct and workmanship are marked, 
whether for promotion, demotion, transfer, ter- 
mination of service, or otherwise, the ratinm 
given should represent the actual degree of 
efficiency of the employee at the time in question. 
W. J. Douglas, 
Acting Governor. 



Fishing in Vicinity ol Gatun Spillway. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 18, 1918. 

To all concerned — Effective this date, the pro- 
hibition contained in circular dated September 
27, 1917, against fishing in the vicinity of Gatun 
Spillway during other than the daylight period 
is removed, and the following regulations covered 
by circular of January 22, 1916, will remain in 
full force and effect: 

1. Fishing in the Chagres below the Gatirn 
Spillway, and on the spillway apron, east of the 
railroad bridge across the spillway, between the 
bridge and the hydroelectric station, will be per- 
mitted only with a rod and reel; and the use cf 
hand lines, spears, nets, seines, dynamite, or 
any other means, is prohibited. Nets and seines 
may be used, however, for the purpose of obtain- 
ing bait. 

2. All other than gold employees in Canal 
service will be required to have a pass, unless 
accompanied by a gold employee. The superin- 
tendent of Gatun Locks is authorized to issue 
passes. 

W. J. Douglas, 
Acting Governor. 



Official Business Tickets. 

Panama Railroad Company, 

Office of Auditor, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 11, 1918. 
Circular No. R. A. 619: 

To all concerned — The going and returning 
parts of round trip railroad passes must cor- 
respond as to names and number of passengers, 
and stations between which transportation is 
desired. 

For example, round trip passes have been 
filled out as follows: 

Going portion: "For John Jones, from Summit 
to Panama." 

Returning portion: "For John Jones and 6, 
from Panama to Colon." 

For transportation of this kind two separate 
one-way passes should be issued. 

Panama Railroad conductors and collectors 

have instructions net to honor trip passes when 

the going and returning portions do not agree. 

Such passes will be lifted and cash fare collected. 

H. A. A. Smith, 

A udilor. 

Approved : 
S. W. Heald. 
Superintendent. 



Railroad Stops at Rio Grande. 

The Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C Z., December 17, 1918. 
Transportation Bulletin No. 570: 
Conductors and Engineers, P. R. R. 

Effective Sunday, December 22, and each 
Sunday until further notice, trains Ncs. 36 and 
38 will stop at south end of Rio Grande bridge 
for Cattle Industry laborers, who are working 
near that point, to detrain. 

W. F. Fostei, 
Ifes'er of Transportation. 



School Tickets in "Hottday" Time* 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 20, 1918. 
Circular No. 1197: 
Conductors and Collectors: 

Public schools of the Canal Zone will be closet? 
for the Christmas holidays from Saturday, De- 
cember 21, 1918, to Sunday, January 5, 1919. 

During this period school passes will not M 
honored for transportation on Panama Railroac 
trains. 

W. F. Foster, 
Master of Transportation. 



Holiday Trains. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 21, 1918. 
Transportation Bulletin No. 571: 

All concerned — The Panama Railroad win 
operate regular Saturday schedule on main lin? 
and Las Cascadas branch, Tuesday, December 
24 and Tuesday, December 31, and regular Sun- 
day schedule Wednesday, December 25 anc? 
Wednesday, January 1. 

Local freights will not run December 25 anC 
January 1. 

W. F. Foster, 
Approved: Master of Transportation. 

S. W. Heau>, 
Superintendent. 



Stages of the Chagres and the Lakes. 

The maximum elevationaof the Chagres River, 
Gatun Lake, and Miraflores Lake, in feet above 
mean sealevel, during the two weeks ending at 
midnightof Saturday, December 21, were as fol- 
lows: 





Chagres River 


Gatun Lake 


Mira- 


Date 




Atha- 








Vigia 


juela 


boa 


Gatun 


Lake. 


Sun., Dec. 8 


127.40 92.24 


86.96 


86.91 


53.44 


Mon., Dee. 9 


127.25: 92.05 


86.98 


86.92 


53 .30 


Tues., Dec. 10.... 


127.20' 92.06 


86.96 


86.93 


53 .20 


Wed., Dbc. 11 .... 


127.201 92.01 


87.02 


86.92! 53.28 


Thurs., Dec. 12.... 


127.10, 91.92 


86.94 


86.94: 53.30 


Fri., Dec. 13 


127.35 92.07 


87.00 


86.941 53.40 


Sat., Dec. 14 


127.30! 92.05 


87.01 


86.97) 53.41 


Sun., Dec. 15 


127.05, 91.87 


87.04 


86.9S| 53.50 




127.00 91. S3 


87.05 


86.96 53.46 


Tues., Dec. 17 


126.95 91. 7S 


87.00 


N6.95 53.44 


Wed., Dec. 18 


127.00' 91.79 


87.02 


86.971 53.30 


Thurs., Dec. 19. . . . 


127.20! 92.00 


S6.99 


86.96! 53.14" 


Fri., Dec. 20 


127.20 92.00 


87. 0* 86.95i 53.11 


Sat., Dfec. 21 


127.00 


91.86 


86.98 


86.96 


53.11 


Height of low water 


126.0 


91.0 








tb nearest foot. 











Enemy Trading List. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Department, 
Division of Civil Affairs, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 13, 1918. 
To all concerned — The following changes, effective thir 
date, involving additions and removals, have been made 
in the United States Enemy Trading List by the War 
Trade Board: 

ADDITIONS 

CHILE 

Hellwig, Guiilermo Santiago. 

Kahn, Herzheimer & Co Santiago. 

MEXICO 

Antigua Garage Protaa Mexico City. 

Moler Hermanos Mexico City. 

Such Universal Supply Company. Mexico City. 
REMOVALS 

MEXICO 

Nyssen, Rafael & Co Mexico City. 

C. H. Calhoun, 
Chief, Divition of Civil Affair* 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



223 



Enemy Trading List. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Department, 
Division of Civil Affairs, 
Balboa Heights. C. Z.. November 26, 1918. 
Thp following chances in the Enemy Trading 
List will be made as of date November 29. 1918: 

ADDITIONS. 

BRAZIL. 

Ahrns, Eduardo Bahia. 

Calux, E. L Rio de Janeiro. 

Garcia, A. 4 Company Rio de Janeiro. 

Mcissncr, Arthur Sao Paulo. 

Menassa, T Rio de Janeiro. 

Rawlinson, Mullcr 4 Company, Sao Paulo. 

Villa Americana 

Rizkallah, Jorge, Florencio de Ab- Sao Paulo. 

reu 11. 

Stender 4 Company Bahia. 

Tettamenti, Joao Rio de Janeiro. 

Vasconcul'os, P Bahia. 

Weinheber, Oscar Rio de Janeiro. 

CHILE. 

Allianz Insurance Company 

Compafiia du Tranvias Electricos Valparaiso. 

de Valparaiso. 

Deutsche I'rctse (newspaper) Santiago. 

S'-tbmarino, El (newspaper) Santiago. 

Valparaiso, Compafiia de Tranvias Valparaiso. 

Electricos de. 

DENMARK. 

Baltisk Union Copenhagen. 

Dansk Electricitets A/S., A. E. G. Copenhagen. 
Moller Soren 4 Company (Det Copenhagen. 

Danskc Saltkompagni). 
Danske Saltkompagni (Moller Copenhagen. 

Soren & Co.). 
Gamme:stran(h Fiskeimport A/S.. Copenhagen. 

Martini, A. E. Copenhagen. 

Banatogen Company, A. E. 0. . . . Copenhagen. 

Sanatogen Company, A/3 Copenhagen. 

Bkandinavisk Polsfabrik Copenhagen. 

Wisloff, Jacob Imanucl Copenhagen. 

GUATEMALA. 

Gross, Frederico Guatemala City. 

Hoepfner, Carlos Guatemala City. 

Hoepfner, Herman Guatemala City. 

HONDURAS. 

Boehm, Francisco San Pedro Sula. 

MEXICO. 

Fabrica dc Tabacos "El Liberal" Monterey. 

(Jose R. Puente). 

Haraburgo Plantation Tapachula. 

Hauschildt. Rickardt M izatlan. 

Hotel Grande Socio lad Toluca. 

Joya, La (Enrique Schaefer) Mexico Citv. 

Kebe, 0. S Puerto Angel. 

"Liberal, El." Fabrica de Tabacos Monterey. 

(Jose R. PuentcK 

Makrinius. Emilio Pochutla. 

Pnlma, La (Richard Hermanos).. Orizaba. 

Pommerencke, Fcdcrico San Pedro Tuxtla. 

Schultie, Carlos Me\ioo City. 

Wilkens, Pablo Mexico City. 

MOROCCO. 

Bustel, Jose Ceuta. 

Ramos Espinosa de los Mouteros Ceuta. 

Antonio. 
Manzano, Francisco Ceuta. 

NETHERLANDS. 

Nedcrlanrlschc Petroleum and As- Vlissingen 4 Rotter- 

phalt Mij. dam. 

Sinemus. F.,Leidschestr. 22 Amsterdam. 

Wals.im Handel 4 Transport Mij., Rotterdam. 

N/V. 

NETHERLANDS EAST INDIES. 

Bierman. Daniel Batavia 4 Bandoeng. 

Cor. G. J Sourabaya. 

Hauw Hin Sibolga. 

Hezewyk. H. van (S. S. Michael). Chcribon. 

Host3gocloeng. Ernest Bclawan. 

Kamboengtiong (alias K. B. T.).. Medan. 
Kim Tuan Chop (Kim Hin) Medan. 



Kwie Liong Thwan Sourabaya. 

Liem Gwan, Th. Jien Sourabaya. 

Lim Kim Hok (Oa Oie Kim Hok) Sourabaya. 

Mover. L. F., 4 Zonen Batavia. 

Oa Oie Kim Hok 'Lim Kim Hok) Sourabaya. 

Oei Djie Sien Samarang. 

Pang Tiang Bouw Medan. 

Said Achmet Bin Zcin al Jdoefri. . Sourabaya. 

Said Aloei Bin Zein al Djoefri Sourabaya. 

Sjech Oemar Bin Joersoef Mang- Batavia. 

goeij. 

Sjech Roebaya Bin Ambarek Bin Batavia. 

Talip. 

Winkelman. A Tedang. 

PARAQUAT. 

Nurnberg, Juan Encarnacion. 

SPAIN. 

Bien Publico, El Mahon, Isle de Min- 
orca. 

Bruch y Soltau Conscjo de Ciento 

286, Barcelona. 

Cervia, Balsomero Santa Cruz de Tener- 

iffe. 

Gaceta de Teneriffe Santa Cruz de Tener- 

iffe. 

GrafitosdcEspana, S. A.,Luchana Erancio. near Bilbao. 

Garcia Gutierrez, Jose Santa Cruz de Tener- 
iffe. 

Garsohol, Sociedad Anonima Ayala 70 and Fortunj 

31, Madrid. 

Gomez, Juan Ayala 70 and Fortuny 

31, Madrid. 

Kattwinkcl, Hugo Nunez de Balboa 8. 

Madrid. 

Kinder, Carlos Calle de 5 Marzo 1 1 . 

Saragossa. 

Largo, Modesto Puerto del Sol 11, 

Madrid, and Calle 
Alameda 15, San 
Sebastian. 

Lindermann y Cia, Antonio Nunez de Balboa 8, 

Madrid. 

Lindermann, Antonio Nunpz de Balboa 8, 

Madrid. 

Loewe, Enrique Calle del Principe 39, 

Madrid, and Calh- 
Fernando 30, Bar- 
celona. 

Mover. Hans Colon 64, Valencia. 

Milla Vasquez, Adolfo Apartado 452, Mad- 
rid. 

Morales Garcia Coyena Luis Gran Via Colon 24 

Granada. 

Morales Garcia Herreros, Luis . . . Calle dc la Pisas 2 
Granada. 

Noticiero Montagnes EI Santander. 

Pclteria Espagnola Consejn de Cientoi 

286, Barcelona. 

Rotger Manuel Sintes Plaza de. Principe 11. 

Bahon. Islede 
Minorca. 

Sehachtzabel Alfred Colon 64. Valencia. 

Trasl Joyero, El (or Joyero, El Puerto de' Sol It, 
Trust.) Madrid, snd Calle 

Alameda 15 San 
Sebastian. 

Waschmann, Rodclfo Calle Nunez de Arce 

14 and 17, Madrid 

Wasnau, Rodolfo Calle Nunez de Arc? 

14 and 17, Madrid 

SWEDEN. 

Initiative Company Stockholm. 

REMOVALS. 

BRAZIL. 

Guimares. F. 4 Company Bahia. 

CHILE. 

Hagnaier 4 Company Blanco 122,Valparais 

Haverbeck 4 Company (Alberto Valdivia 
Haverbeck and Carlos Haver- 
beck.) ' 

Rodriguez, Gumercindo Antofagasta. 

Wiegand 4 Company Valparaiso and Hua* 

co. 

COLOMBIA. 

Cristo, Jorge 4 Company Cucuta. 

ECUADOR. 

Balda, Cesar A Guayaquil. 

HAITI. 

Brun, Pascual A JacmeL 



224 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



Lab&slIUe L«e Aisx Tayes. 

Ramponeau George Port au Prince. Petite 

Goave Miragoane. 
Saint Marc, and 
Cape Haytbn. 

MEXICO. 

Ayub Felipe (La Pa!estma> Chihuahua 

Ayub G. & Company (La Casa Chihuahua. 

B'anca). 
Ayub Hermanos (La Ciudad de Chihuahua. 

Constantinople). 

Ayub, Salamon (La Vio'eta) Chihuahua. 

Brun, E. y C a Colima 

Canavati Hermanos Torreon. 

Canavati, A., Hermanos Chihuahua. 

Casa Blanca.La (Ayub. C.-tCo ) Chihuahua. 
Ciudad de Constantinople, La Chihuahua. 

(*yub Hermanos.) 

Fatufh y No^aim (7^a Palma) Chihuahua. 

Fat'ich, Salim Chihuahua. 

Piiiestina. La (Fe'ipe Ayub) Chihuahua. 

Palmu, La fFatuch y Xogaim). . . Chihu»htia. 

Sun-1berg, G >.stavo Mpvio City. 

Violeta, La (Sahmon Avub) Chihuahua. 

NETHERLANDS EAST INTJIBS. 

Djie Hon? Swie Sourabaya. 

Fares. M. K Batavia. 

JaDsen, .!. B Kneta Radja Suma- 
tra, Batavia. 

SALVADOR. 

Gastfarazoro, Dr Jose C San Salvador. 

C. H. Calhoun. 
Chi'f Division o' Civil Affair*. 

Additions to Commissary Stock. 

Automobile and morotcycle accessories: 

Plugs, spark, Splitdorf. 4". ea $0.61 

riugs. spark, Splitdorf, J", ea 61 

Pluss. spark, motorcycle, Splitdorf, ea. . .61 

Bails, hand, smooth, brown, 18", ea 22 .95 

Cases, suit, brown, 24", ea 29 . 70 

Knives, stag, ea 2.15 

Knives, oyster, ea 30 

Knives, pocket, stag handle, ea 96 

Bands for infants, ea 45 



Caps, engineer's •waterproof, ea $0 .59 

Cream, shaving, Palmolive, tube 30 

Dress goods: 

Gingham, kiddie cloth, khaki color, yd . . .45 

Organdie, 39". yd 42 

Voile, California, 36", yd 41 

Voile. Utah, 36", yd .42 

Voile, Paramount, 36", yd 50 

Voile, Paramount, 36", yd 50 

Suitings: 

Cloth, brown. 27", yd 78 

Drill, white cotton, 27", yd 61 

Suits, bathing: 

Ladies' one piece, with skirt, suit 2 .25 

Boys' one piece, suit 78 

Children's quarter sleeve, suit 2 .95 

Ties, four-in-hand, assorted colors, em- 
broidered, ea 50 

Ties, four-in-hand, plain color, ea 50 

Ties, four-in-hand, wash, ea 50 

Ties, four-in-hand, wash, ea 50 

Men's chocolate, Ajax, Blucher work 

shoes, pr 2 .95 



Misdirected Letters. 



Balboa Heights. C. Z., December 23. 1918. 
The following insufficiently addressed mail 
has been received in the office of the Director of 
Posts, and may be obtained upon request of the 
addressees. Requests may be made by tele- 
phone, calling No. 182, Balboa: 
Ballin, Mrs. Esther E. Majillon. Miss Rose 



Brown, H. E., c/o Miss 

Agnes E. Brown 
Daudane, Miss Emma 
de Vent, I. R. 
Eagan, Johnt 
Estrado, Jose 
Hall, Miss Rose 
Herb. Leonard J. 
Duffus, Mrs. Amy Ann 



Mazur, John (card) 
Morales, Miguel A. 
Morales, Miguel A.* 
Requa, F. A. 
Reitz, Homer 
Sealey, John H. 
Tucker, Leonard E. 
Wright, Mrs. Sam 



♦Parcel. 
fPapers. 



COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Quarterly Inventory. 

Due to the quarterly inventory all retail stores will be closed Monday De- 
cember 30, for part of the day. Grocery and cold storage sections will be opened 
not later than 10 a. m.; sections of all departments as soon thereafter as possible. 

Soap. 

Advice from the commissary purchasing agent in reference to our order for Fairy 
soap is to the effect that the contractors have withdrawn all their soap products 
from the market for export and are not entertaining any business at this time. 

Bluing. 

Advice received from the commissary purchasing agent with reference to requisition 
for laundry blue is to the effect that the contractors were unable to fill our order for 
the kind desired on account of the uncertain labor conditions prevailing at their 
plant. A cheaper grade, however, has been purchased. 

Flour Sacks. 

A supply of small and large flour sacks to be sold at 5 cents and 25 cents, respectively, 
will be placed on sale shortly in the line commissaries. These sacks are desirable for 
a number of uses, the small ones being used for dish towels, dust cloths, and wiping 
cloths, and the large ones for the manufacture of men's suits, children's play suits, 
women's skirts, and numerous other articles. 

Blackberries. 

Recent advices from the commissary purchasing agent are to the effect that he 
was unable to fill our requisition for blackberries in No. 2 tins as the only offer received 
was on No. 1 tins, on which the quality was not up to standard. He states that there 
is little hope of securing blackberries this season but that the item will not be can- 
celed until every effort has been made to secure. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



225 



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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50; address 

The Fanama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal. ( D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter, February G, 1018, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1S79. 





Volume XII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., January i, 191 9. No. 20. 

Executive Order.— Transfer of War Trade Funds for Expenditure in Canal 

Zone. 

The Panama Canal, Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 27, 1918. 
Circular No. 601-87: 

The Executive Order quoted below is published for the information 
of all concerned. 

VY. J. Douglas, 
Acting Governor. 



I ttder authority conferred by "An Act authorizing the President to coordinate or 
consolidate executive bureaus, agencies, and offices, and for other purposes, in the 
interesl ol economy and the more efficient concentration of the Government " 
approved May 20, 1918, it is hen by directed thai Fifty Thousand Dollars ($50,000) 
appropriated by "An Act making appropriations for sundry civil expenses of the 
( .owrnment for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, nineteen hundred and nineteen 
and for other purposes," approved July 1. 1918, "For expenses of the War Trade 
Board created under authority contained in the Acl entitled 'An Act to punish acts 
oi interference with the foreign relations, the neutrality, and the foreign commerce 
of the I nited States, to punish espionage, and better to enforce the criminal laws 
of the \ nited States, and for other purposes, 'approved June fifteen nineteen hundred 
and seventeen, and the ' Trading with the enemy Act,' approved October sixth, nine- 
teen hundred and scve nteen, including personal and other services and rent of offices 
in the District of Columbia and elsewhere, traveling expenses, per diem in lieu of 
subsistence not exceeding $4, law books, books of reference, periodicals, rent of 
grounds, supplies and equipnu nt. printing and binding, maintenance operation md 
repair ol motor propelled vehicles, $3,500,000," be transferred from said appropriation 
and allotted to the Secretary of War for expenditure in the Canal Zone during the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1919, under the direction of said Secretary of War for 
the purpose for which it was appropriated. 

This sum will be deducted from the appropriations made for the War Trade Board 
for the current fiscal year and charged to the War Department. 

_. .„ „ WOODROW WILSON 

I he W hite House, 

November 27. 1918. 



Panama Railroad Freight Classification. 
The Panama Railroad Company has issued Freighl Classification 
and Tariff Xo. 30, which gives Class and Commodity Rates from New 
York to Central American and Mexican ports. 



Registration of Citizens of Draft Age. 

The following cable message has been received from the Washing- 
ton office of the Panama Canal : 

"Washington, D. C, December 24, 1918. Referring to Executive Secretary's 
letter oi the 29th ultimo Provost Marshal General advises that section 53 Selective 
Service Regulations Second Edition has not been rescinded and until rescinded 
citizens of draft age should register within five days after they return to the United 
States." 



228 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

New Rainfall Stations. 

A new rainfall station was established on the Pequini River at the 
mouth of the Rio Boqueron, about 25 miles above Alhajuela, on De- 
cember 20, 1918. Rainfall measurements will be made twice monthly. 
The records will be used in estimating the average monthly rainfall 
over the Chagres River drainage basin. 

The rainfall station at Porto Bello was reestablished on December 23, 

1918, after having been closed since August, 1914. Rainfall measure- 
ments will be made daily at this station. 

Porto Bello is favorably located on the Atlantic Coast near the head- 
waters of the Boqueron branch of the Chagres River. During the six 
years that rainfall records were kept at Porto Bello, the average an- 
nual rainfall amounted to approximately 172 inches. This is the heav- 
iest average rainfall of any station on the Isthmus, and it is ex- 
ceeded in only a few known regions of the earth, in certain sections 
of India, the Philippines, the Atlantic Coast of Central America, the 
Amazon basin, and perhaps in a few other restricted areas within the 
tropics. 

January Weather Probabilities. 

The following weather conditions may be expected during the month of January, 

1919. Predictions are based on the weather records at Colon and Balboa Heights 
for the past 11 and 13 years, respectively. 

Winds — January is normally a dry season month. Fresh northerly trade winds will 
prevail, and there will be an increase in the average wind velocity on both coasts, 
compared with December conditions. The hourly wind velocity will average from 12 
to 16 miles on the Atlantic Coast, north and northeast winds prevailing. The maxi- 
mum velocity is not likely to exceed 35 miles an hour. 

The prevailing winds will continue from the northwest on the Pacific Coast, and 
the average hourly velocity will range from about 8 to 12 miles. The maximum 
velocity on the Pacific side may not be expected to exceed 30 miles an hour. 

Rain — January is a dry season month, but occasional light showers may be ex- 
pected. The dry season rainfall is usually heavier on the Atlantic side. The average 
January rainfall at Colon for the past 48 years is 3.85 inches, and the January average 
at Balboa Heights for the past 20 years is 1.03 inches. No heavy rains are likely to 
occur during the month on the Pacific side, and probably none on the Atlantic Coast. 

Fogs — No fogs are likely to occur during the month on either coast, but occasional 
night and early morning fogs may be expected over the interior. All fogs should 
lift or become dissipated by 8.30 a. m. 

Temperature — There is little change in the average air temperature on the Isthmus 
from month to month. The average shade temperature should be about 80° Fahren- 
heit on both coasts. 

On the Atlantic Coast the temperature is not likely to rise higher than 88° F. nor to 
fall lower than 70° F. while on the Pacific side the maximum temperature may be as 
high as 93° F. and the minimum may be as low as 63° F. 

The average daily range in temperature is about 18° F. on the Pacific Coast and 
over the interior, and but approximately 7° F. on the Atlantic coast. The small 
daily range in temperature on the Atlantic Coast is due to the effects of the prevailing 
equable trade winds. 

Barometric pressure — The atmospheric pressure during the month of January- should 
be slightly higher than the pressure in December. The average sea level pressure will 
be about 29.88 inches. The maximum pressure for the month is not likely to exceed 
30.04 inches, nor the minimum to be lower than 29.70 inches. 

Relative humidity — The relative humidity of the atmosphere will be lower with the . 
arrival of settled dry season weather conditions. The humidity should average about 
80 per cent over both coasts, but the daily range will be greater on the Pacific Coast, 
where the nighttime humidity is higher and the daytime humidity much lower than 
on the Atlantic Coast. 

Storms — No severe general storms are likely to occur during the month, although 
so-called "northers" occasionally reach as far south as the Atlantic entrance of the 
Canal at this season of the year. Few, if any, local thunderstorms, are likely to occur 
on either coast, and smooth seas and fair weather may be expected at the Pacific 
entrance. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



229 



Tides — Tidal fluctuations need not be considered in navigating the Atlantic 
entrance to the Canal, as the average tidal range on the Atlantic side is but about 
1 foot and the maximum range is approximately 2 feet. 

Panama (Balboa) tide tables are given below: 



Day of- 


W. 


Mo. 


W 


I 


Th 


2 


F 


3 


S 


4 


S 


5 


M 


6 


Tu 


7 


W 


8 


rh 


9 


F 


IO 


s 


ii 



Time and Height of High 
and Low Water. 



2:41 
13.7 



9:23 
1.9 



3:17 
13.5 



9:38 
2.7 



3:25 10:04 4:00 10:22 
14.2 1.2 14.1 2.0 



4:08 10:42 
14.6 0.6 



4:51 11:20 
14.9 0.2 



4:43 11:00 
14.7 1.4 



5:25 11:39 
15.2 1.0 



5:35 12:00 6:06 
15.1 0.1 15.5 



0:20 
0.8 



6:18 12:40 6:47 
15.2 0.2 15.7 



1:05 7:01 
0.9 15.0 



1:24 
0.5 



1:52 
1.1 



2:45 
1.4 



3:43 
1.7 



7:48 2:11 
14.7 1:0 



7:30 
15.7 



8:12 
15.4 



8:38 
14.2 



9:36 
13.6 



3:0S 9:0? 
1.6 15.0 



4:05 10:06 
2.1 14.6 



4:46 10:42 5:10 11:12 
2.0 13.2 2.6 14.3 



Day of- 


W. 


Mo. 


s 


12 


M 


13 


Tu 


14 


W 


15 


Th 


16 


F 


l 7 


S 


18 


s 


19 


M 


20 


Tu 


21 


W 


22 



Time and Height of High 
and Low Water. 



5:52 11:54 
2.0 13.1 



6:19 
2.7 



0:22 
14.2 



7:00 
1.7 



1:04 7:26 
13 5 2.5 



1:26 8:03 
14.5 1.2 



2:07 
14.0 



8:30 
1.9 



2.24 
14.9 



8:59 
0.5 



3:04 9:24 
14.6 1.2 



3:19 9:49 3:57 10:11 
15.2 -0.1 15.1 0.7 



4:11 10:33 
15.4 -0.4 



5:00 11:14 
15.4 -0.5 



5:43 11:54 
15.2 -0.2 



4:47 10:56 
15.4 0.3 



5:32 11:38 
15.5 0.4 



6:14 
15.4 



0:19 
0.6 



6:26 12:34 
14.8 0.3 



1:00 7:05 
1.1 14.2 



1:42 
1.7 



7:42 
13.5 



1:15 
1.0 



1:57 
1.9 



6:52 
15.1 



7:28 
14. E 



8:04 
13.9 



Day of- 



W. 



Mo. 



Time and Height of High 
and Low Water. 



2:27 
2.4 



8:21 
12.8 



2:40 
2.7 



3:15 9:03 3:28 
3.0 12.0 3.5 



8:42 
13.2 



9:24 
12.6 



4:08 9:53 4:22 10:16 
3 5 11.4 4.1 12.0 



5:07 10:55 5:21 
3.8 11.0 4.5 



6:00 12:04 6:26 
3.8 11.1 4.5 



0:22 
11.9 



7:10 
3.4 



1:20 8:06 
12.4 2.7 



1:05 
11.5 



1:59 
12.3 



2:10 8:55 2:46 
13.0 1.8 13.2 



2:58 
13.8 



9:37 
0.8 



3:30 
14.0 



11:17 
11.8 



7:28 
4.0 



8:24 
3.2 



8:13 
2.2 



9:56 
1.2 



The tides are placed in the order of their occurrence; the limes of high and low tides are shown on 
the upper lines. The figures in boldfaced type are hours and elevations between nqpn and midnight; 
ante meridian figures are given in the ordinary lightfaced type. The time is Cosmopolitan Standard 
for the meridian 75° W. 

The elevations of the water are shown on the second line for each day; a comparison of consecutive 
heights will indicate whether it is hign or low water. Heights are reckoned from low mean seawater 
springs, which is 8.3 below mean sealevel and is the datum of soundings on the Coast and Geodetic 
Survey charts for this region. The deptti of water may accordingly be estimated by adding the tabu- 
lar height of the tide to the soundings, unless a minus (-) sign is before the height, in which case it 
is to be subtracted. The annual inequality or variation in tne mean s-a level is included in the 
predictions. 



Civil Service Examinations. 
The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at 
Canal post offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not 
posted, persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, 
Balboa Heights (telephone 286): 

Aid qualified in radio (male and female); $900 a year; January 28, 1919; form 1312; age, 
reasonable age limits.* 

Assistant in agricultural technology, qualified as instrument maker (male); $1,200 to $1,800 a year; 
January 28, 1919; forms 304 and 2029.* 

Truck crop specialist (male); $1,600 to $2,400 a year; January 26, 27, 1919; form 1312; age. 25 
but not 55 years. 

Preparator in entomology (male and female); $720 to $900 a year; February 5-6, 1919; form 304; 
age, 18 years and over. Same as examination of May 22-23, 1918; described in announcement No. 
292, issued April 13, 1918. 

Wood technologist (male); SI, 800 to $3,000 a year; February 4, 1919; form 1312; age, reasonable 
age limits.* 

Cotton classer"s helper (male); $600 to $900 a year; March 16, 1919; form 1312; age, 16 but not 
25 years; No. 6. 

Stenographer-typewriter; stenographer; typewriter (male and female); No. 807-supplemental; 
Field and Departmental Service. 

After December 20, 1918, competitors taking the above examinations will be required to take the 
subjects of spelling, arithmetic, letter-writing, and penmanship. 

Receipt of applications to close December 21, 1918: 

No. 306, issued April 16, 1918; expert in textile products (male). 

No. 349. issued May 4. 1918; military storekeeper (male). 

No. 430-amended, issued September 4, 1918; master computor (male and female). 

Computer, Grades 1 and 2 (male and female). 

Xo. 465, issued July 17, 1918; photostat foreman (male and female); photostat operator (male 
and female). 



230 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



No. 490-amended, inspector of plant construction (male); issued September 25, 1918. Assistant 
inspector of plant construction (male). 

No. 1683-amended, issued October 31. 1917, finger print classifier (male and female). 

No. 2014-amended, issued September 19, 1918; balance of stores clerk (male and female) ; for dutv 
in Washington, D. C. 

No. 2184-amended, issued July 9. 1918, gauge designer (male). 

No. 2262, issued December 8, 1917; automobile draftsman (male). 

No. 404, issued June 5, 1918; field examiner (male and female). 

Clerk to commercial attache (male); SI, 800 a year with expenses for travel and subsistence from 
Washington, D. C, to place of employment and return; January 19, 1919; form 1312 and 2226; 
No. 5. 

Ceramic assistant (male); $1,200 a year; form 1312; age, reasonable age limits; No. 647. t 

Associate technologist (male and female); $2,000 to $2,800 a year; form 1312; age, reasonable age 
limits; No. 648. f 

Assistant technologist (male and female); $1,400 to $1,800 a year; form 1312; age, reasonable 
age limits; No. 64S.1 

*Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business 
on that date. 

tNonassembled. Applications will be received at any time until further notice. 



Official Circulars. 

Steamboat Inspection Service — Equipment 
of the Floating Plant of the Canal and 
Panama Railroad Company. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., Decen ber 11, 191 S. 
Circular No. 644-4: 

1. Paragraph 79 of Circular No. 644, dated 
May 1, 1914, is amended to read as follows- 

79. The following equipment shall be carried 
by the vessels and floating plant of the Canal 
and the Panama Railroad Company: 

A) Seagoing Dredges (Type"Corozal," "Culebra," 
Caribbean"). 

1 steering compass. 

1 standard compass. 

2 suitable anchors and at least 90 fathoms of 
chain for each anchor; chain to be shackled to 
anchor and to be ready for service at all times. 

1 hand lead and line, properly marked. 

1 set running lights, oil. 

1 set anchor lights, oil. 

1 set red and white globular lights. 

1 set black shapes or balls. 

1 Lyle gun, with proper accessories for same, 
as per U. S. Steamboat- Inspection Rules. 

12 life rings (properly distributed in suitable 
beckets) ; of which four shall be luminous. One 
life ring on each side of the vessel shall have at- 
tached to it a lile line at least IS fathoms in 
length. 

1 life preserver for each person on board; in 
suitable racks, properly distributed. 

300 feet of 2\" standard fire hose (with 6 
nozzles) ; properly connected to hydrants at all 
times. 

24 fire buckets, in suitable racks, properly 
located; to be kept filled with water at all times. 

8 chemical fire extinguishers, each of 2 5 gal- 
lons capacity; in suitable racks, properly dis- 
tributed. 

8 fire axes; in suitable racks, properly dis- 
tributed. 

1 mechanical foghorn. 

1 fog bell. 

1 can containing not less than 12 Coston's dis- 
tress signals, or rockets showing stars, or both. 

1 code book and set of International Signal 
flags of standard size. 

Suitable life boats and rafts to carry all per- 
sons on board; equipped in accordance with 
U. S. Steamboat-Inspection Rules. 

Also, any additional equipment that may be 
required by U. S. Steamboat-Inspection Rules 
for ocean-going steamers of same tonnage while 
on the high seas. 

(j5) Tugboats. 

1 steering compass. 
1 standard compass. 



1 suitable anchor and chain; properly shackled 
and ready for immediate service at all times. 

1 hand lead and line; properly marked. 

1 set running lights, oil. 

1 set anchor lights, oil. 

4 life rings (properly distributed, in suitable 
beckets) ; 01 which two must be luminous. Two 
life rings must be fitted with not less than 15 
fathoms of suitable life line apiece. 

1 lile preserver for each person on board; in 
suitable racks, properly distributed. 

100 feet of 2 J" standard fire hose (with 2 noz- 
zles; properly connected to hydrants at all 
times. 

12 fire buckets, in suitable racks, properly 
located; to be kept filled with water at all times. 

3 chemical fire extinguishers, each of 2\ gal- 
lons capacity; in suitable racks, properly dis- 
tributed. 

4 fire axes; in suitable racks, properly dis- 
tributed. 

1 mechanical foghorn. 

1 fog bell. 

1 can containing not less than 12 Coston's 
distress signals, or rockets showing stars, or both. 

1 code book, and set of International Signal 
flags. 

1 duplex double-acting, long-lever hand pump, 
with 2 J'' suction; should be installed on lower 
deck and properly connected with the bilges. 

Suitable life boats and rafts to carry all persons 
on board; equipped in accordance with U. S. 
Steamboat-Inspection Rules. 

Also any additional equipment that may be 
required by U. S. Steamboat-Inspection Rules for 
seagoing tugs. 

(O Clapcls. 

1 steering compass. 

1 suitable anchor and chain; properly shackled 
and ready for service at all times. 

1 hand lead line, properly marked. 

1 set running lights, oil. 

1 set anchor lights, oil. 

4 life rings (properly distributed, in suitable 

beckets); of which two must be fitted with not 

ian 15 fathoms of suitable iife line apiece. 

1 life preserver for each person on board, in 
suitable rack--, properly located. 

100 feet of 2\" standard fire hose (with 2 noz- 
zles); properly connected to hydrants at all 
times. 

9 fire buckets, in suitable racks, properly lo- 
cated; to be kept filled with water at all times. 

3 chemical fire extinguishers, each of 2 \ gallons 
capacity; in suitable racks, properly distributed. 

2 fire axes; in suitable racks, properly located. 
1 mechanical foghorn. 

1 fog bell. 

1 can containing not less than 12 Coston's dis- 
tress signals. 

Suitable life lines on both sides, to be stretched 
at all times when clapet is underway. 

Suitable life boats and rafts to carry all persons 
on board; equipped with oars and rowlocks, and 
ready tor immediate launching. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



231 



(D) Pipe-Line .Suction and Dipper Dredges; 
Crane Boats "Ajax" and "Hercules." 
4 li f e ring's, one on each corner of boat on lower 
deck; with not less than 15 fathoms of life line 
attached to each alternate ring. 

1 life preserver lor each person on board; in 
suitable racks, properly located. 

4 lire hydrants on berth deck, to be spaced to 
best advantage to sweep entire deck; and 200 
feet of 2}" standard fire hose in 50-foot lengtns; 
one len;:th of hose with nozzle attached to be con- 
nected to each hydrant at all times. 

2 fire nydrants on main deck; with one 50-foot 
length of 2 J" standard fire hose with nozzle at- 
tached connected at all times to each hydrant. 

12 fire buckets, in suitable racks, distributed 
throughout berth deck; to be kept filled with 
water at all times. 

4 chemical fire extinguishers, each of 2$ gallops 
capacity; in suitable racks, properly distributed 
throughout berth deck. 

4 fire axes; in suitable racks, properly dis- 
tributed throughout berth deck. 

4 barrels of dry sand, stowed in suitable place 
on main deck. 

Suitable anchors and cables; with proper 
facilities for operating the same. 

Sufficient life boats or rafts, equipped with 
oars and rowlocks, to accommodate all persons 
on board. 

E) Ladder Dredges (French Type); Drill Boats; 
Rock Breakers. 

4 life rings, distributed one on each corner of 
dredge on main deck, in a conspicuous and con- 
venient position on hooks; and with not less than 
15 fathoms of life line attacned to each alternate 
ring. 

1 life preserver for each person on board; in 
suitable racks, properly located. 

100 feet l\" standard tire hose (with 2 nozzles), 
properly connected to hydrants at all times. 

12 fire buckets, in suitable racks, properly lo- 
cated; to be kept filled with water at all times. 

4 chemical tire extinguishers, each of 2\ gallons 
capacity; in suitable racks, properly distributed. 

4 tire axes- in suitable racks, properly dis- 
tributed. 

Sufficient life boats or rafts to accommodate all 
persons on board; equipped with suitable oars 
and rowlocks, and so placed on board or alongside, 
as to be ready for immediate use. 

(F) Floating File Drivers. 
1 life rings, on suitable hooks, with not less 
than 15 fathoms of life line attached to each. 

1 life preserver for each person on board; in 
Buitable racks, properly located. 

2 tire axes, kept in suitable rack-:, properly 

6 tire buckets, in suitable racks, properly lo- 
ated; to be kept filled with water at all times. 

2 300-pound anchors, with suitable cables. 
properly shackled; ready for immediate use :it 
all times 

Working boats or rafts of sufficient capacity to 
hold all persons on board; equipped with oars and 
rowlocks. 
<G> Barges, Lighters, and Mud Scows, of all ( 'lasses. 

1 life ring, placed on a convenient hanger; with 
not less than 1 .5 fathoms of life line attached. 

I heaving line. 

1 anchor light. 

When employed off shore — suitable anchors, 
chain, life-saving equipment, and regulation 
lights 

{H) Steam Lauiuh, | / , ••, 8 S -foot or las). 

1 steering compass. 

1 suitable anchor and chain, properly shackled 
at all times. 

1 hand lead and line, properly marked, 

1 set running lights, oil. 

1 set anchor lights, oil. 

1 life rings, placed in suitable beckctsi with tint 

less than 15 fathoms of life line attached t.. 

1 life preserve] foi each person .>:: board; in 
suitable racks, properly lot 

I fireaxe placed i rack in pilot house 



3 fire buckets, in suitable racks, properly lo- 
cated, to be kept filled with water at all times. 

1 mechanical foghorn. 

1 fog bell. 

1 can containing 12 Coston's distress signals. 

Suitable life boats or rafts to carry all persons on 
board. 

(/) General. 

Fire equipment designated in the foregoing must 
be distinctively marked and must be used for 
fire purposes only. 

Lile rings and life preservers must never be 
locked in place, nor fastened in such manner as 
to cause delay in releasing them for immediate 
use in an emergency. 

The number of life preservers presented for 
routine inspections by any vessel must not be less 
than the number of persons that the vessel is 
licensed to carry on board. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Sick Leave for Alien Silver Employees. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z.. December 19, 1918. 
Circular No. 602-18: 

By virtue of the authority vested in me by the 
Executive Order of November 14. 1918. regula- 
tions providingfor the payment of compensation 
for time lost on account of illness, to alien em- 
ployees on the silver rolls of Tne Panama Canal 
and the Panama Railroad Company, receiving 
not more than S75 per month or 40 cents per 
hour, are hereby prescribed, effective January 1 
1919. " ' 

1. No compensation shall be paid to an em- 
ployee where the illness is due to the fault of the 
employee, as in the case of venereal disease 
alcoholism, etc. 

2. Not more than 30 days' compensation shall 
be allowed in any calendar year and not more 
than 15 days' compensation shall be allowed in 
the first six months of service. 

3. Compensation may be granted only when the 
illness is of more than three days' duration. 
Compensation will start on the fourth day of dis- 
ability as certified by a Panama Canal physician. 

4. The time lost must be covered by a cer- 
tificate of disability issued by an authorized 
physician in the service of The Panama Canal. 

5. Employees with dependent wives or children 
living on the Isthmus will be granted 50 per cent 
of their regular compensation. Employees not 
having dependent wives or children on the Isth- 
must will be granted 25 per cent of their regular 
compensation. 

6. The larger allowance of 50 per cent will be 
paid only upon the production by the employee 
of evidence that he has a dependent wife or 
children, or both, living on the Isthmus. The 
evidence should be submitted with the certificate 
of disability and may consist of a statement of 
occupancy of Government family quarters, 
showing house and apartment number, or a mar- 
riage certificate together with a current rent 
receipt showing occupancy of family quarters 
outside of the Canal Zone, or of an affidavit sworn 
to by the employee betore a notary public of the 
Canal Zone to the effect that he has a dependent 
wife or children, or both, residing on the Isthmus. 
The affidavit will contain the address of the de- 
pendents and such other facts as may be required. 

7. The compensation herein authorized sha'l 
be computed on the basis of the rate of pay at 
which such employee is carried on the rolls at the 
time of illness, and in the case of an employee 
working on an hourly basis, shall be calculated 
on the b:isis of a day of 8 hours. 

8. Employees who work irregularly, such as 
flock laborers, coal handlers, el til., will be allowed 
only 2' days' sick leave with pay for each 20U 
hours' service rendered, subject to the general 
conditions herein stated. 

>». The employee must deliver to his foreman 

lu'.tely upon his reporting for duty, his 

disability certificate together with such other 



232 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



evidence as may be necessary to support his claim 
to the 50 per cent allowance of wages. 

10. Employees furnished subsistence will be 
paid at the rate oi pay for that class of employees. 

11. Form 1700, Silver Employees Disability 
Certificate, will be given to the employee by the 
physician when the employee is discharged as 
well, able to work. 

12. Piecework employees will be paid sick 
leave at the monthly or hourly rate fixed for the 
class of work nearest that performed by the 
employee at time of illness. 

13. Payment for sick leave will not be made 
until the employee has actually returned to work, 
unless he is sick for over 30 days, in which case 
payment of the entire amount due will be made 
as soon thereafter as is practicable. 

W. J. Douglas, 
Acting Governor. 



Trespassing on Watersheds of Reservoirs. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 20, 1918. 

To all concerned — -There is quoted hereunder, 
for the information and guidance of all concerned, 
an Ordinance enacted by the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission at its 160th meeting, April 15, 1911, 
approved by the Secretary of War, April 26, 1911, 
and ratified and confirmed as valid and binding 
by the provisions of Section 2, Panama Canal 
Act, published as Panama Canal Circular 600, 
April 1, 1914: 

"Prohibiting Hunting and Other Trespassing 
upon Reservoirs and Watersheds of the 
Canal Zone." 

"Be it ordained by the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission: 

Section 1. It shall be unlawful for any person 
to hunt on any of the reservoirs of the Canal 
Zone, from which water is drawn for the use of 
the inhabitants of any city, municipality, dis- 
trict or settlement or on any of the established 
watersheds of any such reservoirs; and no person, 
except under authority of the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission or the Panama Railroad Company, shall 
enter upon any of said reservoirs or watersheds for 
any purpose." 

"Section 2. Any person who violates any of 
the provisions of this ordinance shall be deemed 
guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall be punished 
as prescribed by Section 16 of the Penal Code. 

"Section 3. This ordinance shall take effect 
thirty days after its approval by the Secretary of 
War." 

W. J. Douglas, 
Acting Governor. 



Leave of Absence. 
The Panama Canal, 

Executive Office, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 26, 193 8. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

Attention is called to paragraph 35 of Circular 
601-59, which reads as follows: 

"After accumulating leave of all kinds amount- 
ing to 120 days, an employee ceases to earn ad- 
ditional leave until he is granted all or part of the 
cumulative leave already earned, unless he shall 
enter on cumulative leave within two months 
thereafter, or be ordered by the Governor to 
defer taking leave for official reasons." 

A number of employees will have earned leave 
amounting to 120 days and over on February 1, 
1919, and in order to continue to earn cumu- 
lative leave it will be necessary to reduce such 
leave to a number of days less than 1 >0 by enter- 
ing on leave of absence within two months after 
the expiration of the current service year. In- 
formation regarding amount of leave due can be 
procured by calling up the Leave Clerk. Personnel 
Bureau, telephone Balboa 168. 

By direction of the Acting Governor. 

C. A. McIlvaine, 
ELxecuthe Secreiai 



Enemy Trading List. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Department. 
DrvisiON of Civil Affairs, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z„ December 10, 1918. 

The following changes in the Enemy Trading List wili 
be made as of date December 13, 1918. 
ADDITIONS. 

ARGENTINA. 

Brunmg, Guillermo Pozo del Molle, Prov- 
ince of Cordoba. 

Regensburger. E., y Cia Arias and Isla Verde. 

Province of Cor- 
doba. 

Widenbrueck, Pablo Rosario. 

BOLIVIA. 

Kreidler, Jose San Ignaeio. 

CHILE. 

Hell wig, Guillermo Santiago. 

Kahn, Herzheimer & Company. . . Santiago. 

CUBA. 

Armbreeht, W Amistad 124. Ha- 

bana. 

MEXICO. 

Antigua Garage Protas Mexico City. 

Moler Hermanos Sues Mexico City. 

Universal Supply Company Mexico City. 

SPAIN. 

Deutsche Zeitung fur Spanten. . - 253 Consejo de Cien- 

te, Barcelona. 

Moldenhauer, Federico Carrucha, Almeria. 

Rived y Choliz Faragossa. 

Drogueria Rived (Rived y Choliz) Saragossa. 

Reither. Karl Rambla Catahma 72 

Barcelona. 

Roeb y Cia Moreto 8. Madrid. 

Roeb. Jose Moreto S, Madrid. 

ScherdeJ (or Sterdel) Balmes47,Barcelona.- 

Sociedad Anonima Vidal Paseo de San Juan 20 

Barcelona. 

Sterdel (or Scherdel) Balmes47. Barcelona 

Vidal, Sociedad Anonima Paseo de San Juan. 20 

Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Compafiia Transatlantica de Tran- Montevideo. 

vias. 
"Transatlantica. La." Compafiia Montevideo. 

de Tranvias. 

REMOVALS. 

ARGENTINA. 

( -attaneo, Constantino Buenos Aires. 

MEXICO. 

Nyssen. Rafael. & Company. Mexico City. 

SPAIN. 

Garcia. Gumersindo Cuervo Calle Marques de 

San Estaban 50 
Dijon. 
C. H. Calhoun, 
Chief, Division of Civil Affain 

Enemy Trading List. 

The Panama Canal. 
Executive Department, 
Division of Civil Affairs, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 28, 1918. 
To all concerned — The following changes, involving 
additions and removals, have been made in the United 
Siatc, Enemy Trading List by the War Trade Board . 
effective December 27, 1918: 

ADDITIONS. 

CHILE. 

Aachener y Munchener de Aachen Valparaiso. 

(Insurance Company i . 
Albingia de Hamburger (Insiir- Valparaiso. 

ance Company). 
Frankfurter de Frankfurt (Insur- Valparaiso. 

ance Company). 
Mannheimer de Mannheim (In- Valparaiso. 

surance Company). 
Norddeutsche de Hamburger fin- Valparaiso. 

surance Company). 

MEXICO. 

Graus German Mexico Cit) 

Libreria Alemana (Muller Her- Mexico City 
manos). 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



233 



REMOVALS. 

CHILE. 

Trillo, Victor Antofagasta. 

B< l VDOR. 

Arcem, Pedro P Guayaquil. 

Cuevo, Tcofilo Vivar Quito. 

Riera, Martin Guayaquil. 

Sierra, Jose Guayaquil. 

MEXICO. 

Ca amano, Nicolas [La Prensa del Orizaba. 

Cavasos, Manuel. Jr Nuevo Laredo. 

Manuel, Sr Nuevo Laredo. 

1, Isaac Mazatlan. 

Garcia, Manual Cavasos Nuevo Laredo. 

Ilierri & Company Guayamas. 

Iberri, W '. E,, Hijoa Sucrs Guayamas. 

Rinns, Eduardo Chihuahua. 

Lowenberg & Wisburn Torreon. 

Prensa del Dia La (Casamano, Orizaba. 
Nicola 

PEKU. 

Dalraau, Juan Salaverry. 

Delgado, 0. A Paita. 

Knell H Callao. 

Umlauff, B Lima. 

Umlauff, Fernando Lima. 

VENEZUELA. 

.1 arquez Lino Ciudad Bolivar. 

Urdanema, Ezequiel Trujillo. 

C. fl. Calho , 
Division of Civil Affair*. 



To be considered first 
class fish. 



To be considered sec- 
ond class fish. 



Circular No. 8. Sealed Proposals for Sup- 
plying Fresh Fish to the Commissary 
Division. 

Sealed proposals are invited for furnishing the 
Commissary Division. Supply Department, The 
i 'anal.' a ("anal, with Forty-five t housand (15,000) 
pounds oi nrst and second class fresh fish monthly. 
in " :ordance with the following specifications: 
Hiils will be received until 4 p. m., Saturday. 
January 10, 1919, in the office of the General 
Manager, O Division, Cristobal. 

/.,>•.!■■, enclosed in i sealed envelope ad- 
dressed to the General Manager, and marked 
"Proposals for furnishing fresh fish, to be opened 
January 10, 1919." 
Spanish Mackerel ] 
Red or black, snapper I 
Corbina \ 

Snook (Robalo) J 

Jack {Ojo-can del la) ) 
lack 

Shad (Morara) 
Angel fish ( I'ojera) 
Sarjwrel 
Dalphine 
Bonito 

i >ra 

Not less than 60 per cent of the total quan- 
tity furnished Under this contract to be first class 
and the bal fish. 

hi submitting bid, prices should be quoted on 
both cleaned and uncleaned led fish 

will be understood to mean "fish with the gills 
an.l entrails removed." 

on this contract to begin January 

30, 1919, and o i» b ide in qu intities varying 

from 500 to 2.500 pounds, a^ called for daily, 

il Sundays and holidays, unless otherwise 

specified. 

Deliveries il the office of the 

local buyer of the Commissary Division at 
Panama, the cold storage plant at Balboa, or to 
the Panama Railroad station at Panama, and 
at such times as may be directed by the local 
buyer. 

All containers will be furnished by the local 
buyer at Panama, representing the Commissary 
Division, and fish supplied on this contract must 
be put Up in these containers, in such quantities 

as he may din ct. 

The contractor agrees to provide sufficient ice 
to keep the fish in first class condition while in 
transit troin the fishing grounds to point of de- 
livery. 



The Commissary Division agrees to furnish 
ice to the contractor at point of delivery, in such 
quantities as may be required to pack the fish 
in the containers furnished by the local buyer. 
The Commissary Division agrees to furnish 
boat supplies that may be in stock, gasoline 
and kerosene, at prevailing prices plus a sur- 
charge of ten per cent (10%), with the under- 
standing that any or all material so supplied is 
to be used exclusively in the performance of pro- 
curing fish for the Commissary Division, and not 
for any other purpose whatsoever. 

It is agreed that, if at any time the contractor 
is unable to supply the total quantity called for 
daily up to 2,500 pounds so that it may be- 
come necessary for the Commissary Division 
to purchase fish from other suppliers at a 
higher cost, the difference between the higher 
cost and price at which the contractor agrees to 
furnish the fish in accordance with the terms of 
this contract, together with any extra expense 
that may be incurred by the Commissary Division 
in making such purchase, will be charged against 
contractor. Should the Commissary Division 
be unable to procure fresh fish from other sup- 
pliers, when the contractor is not able to furnish 
the quantity called for, a penalty of 2 cents 
per pound will be charged against the contractor 
for each pound of fish that the Commissary 
Division is unable to obtain. 

Notice of quantity required for delivery each 
day will be furnished by the local buyer not later 
that 1 p. m. on the day previous to that on which 
delivery is to be made. 

The Commissary Division reserves the right 
for quantities in addition to those specified 
when the order is given at 4 p. m., and in excess 
of 2,500 pounds, in any one day, but no penalty 
will be imposed for failure to supply such addi- 
tional fish. 

Bids must be accompanied by guaranty bond, 
secured by sufficient surety or by certified check 
on or certificate of deposit in a bank or trust 
company agreeable to The Panama Canal and 
made payable to the Collector of The Panama 
Canal in the amount of one thousand dollars 
(Sl.OOOi U. S. C.; such check or certificate to be 
held , deposited, or collected by the Collector of The 
Panama Canal, as may be directed by the general 
manager of the Commissary Division; the same 
or their proceeds to be returned to the unsuccess- 
ful bidders on rejection of their bids, or termina- 
tion of the contract. 

This agreement may be terminated by either 
party on 10 days' notice in writing. 

The right is reserved to reject any or all bids. 



Board of Local Inspectors. 

A meeting of the Board of Local Inspectors 
will be held Wednesday, January 8. 1919, room 
237, Administration Building, Balboa Heights. 
C. /. 



Administrator's Sale. 

The Administrator of Estates, Room 301. 
Administration Building, Balboa Heights, will 
accept bids up to noon Saturday, January 1 1 
1919, for the purchase of a portion of the persona! 
effects belonging to the estate of Allen Swan, de- 
! American. The property which is offered 
for sale consists of 2 trunks, 1 valise, an assort- 
ment of clothing and personal articles and a too! 
chest containing a considerable number of carpen- 
ter's tools. 

Bids may be made for the entire lot of effects 
to be sold, or limited to individual articles. 
Prospective bidders desiring to examine the 
effects should apply at the Administrator's office 
on any business day. Bids should be in writing 
and submitted in sealed envelopes addressed to 
the Administrator of Estates. The cover should 
be marked "Bid on effects of Allen Swan, 
deceased." 

The Administrator reserves the right to reject 
any or all bids. 

Balboa Heights. C. Z. 
December 30. 1918. 



234 



TIIE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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236 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Gold Dust. 

Recent advice from the commissary purchasing agent is to the effect that the 
order for Gold Dust was canceled in accordance with manufacturer's advice that all 
of their soap products have been withdrawn from the market for export and that 
they were unable to entertain any business at this time. 

Sheet Music. 

A supply of sheet music comprising a number of the latest and most popular titles 
was received last week and distributed to the line stores. If sales warrant, this will 
be made a regular item of stock and every endeavor made to have the latest music 
on sale as soon after publication as possible. 

Unusual Values. 

Retail stores are featuring at the present time a number of items in all departments 
representing unusually good bargains. Among these may be mentioned the follow- 
ing: Meat platters, large, 80 cents; Doulton fruit dishes, $1.15 each; women's kid 
pumps, $4 per pair; lettuce forks, $1.15 each; oyster forks, 28 cents each; bouillon 
spoons, 51 cents each; men's khaki pants, $2 per pair; P. C. chili sauce, 15 cents per 
jar; men's ties, batwing, 45 cents each; ironing boards, 28 cents each; wpmen's kid 
Oxfords, $4.40 per pair; women's gun-metal pumps, $3.45 per pair. These represent 
some of the best values in the various lines and were the Commissary Division to 
attempt purchase of these items in the open market to-day, it would have to pay con- 
siderably in excess of the retail price quoted above. When the stock of these items is 
exhausted, replacement stock will have to be purchased at a considerably higher 
figure. 

A Day's Baking. 

The equivalent of 36,396 16-ounce loaves of bread and 3,684 rolls were turned 
out in the bakery on the Monday preceding Christmas. There was also turned cut 
on the same day 2,238 pounds of fruit cake, making a total of 2| tons of fruit cake 
which was baked for the Christmas trade. 

The entire bake for this day was handled by 36 men, averaging 1,000 loaves of 
bread, 100 rolls, and 62 pounds of fruit cake to the man. In addition to the above, 
only 12 packers were required to handle this output. 

Although the present bakery is crowded to some extent due to increased opera- 
tions, it is thought that within a short time they will be able to turn out a variety 
of extras, such as coffee cake, cinnamon rolls, macaroons, etc. Due notice of this will 
be given at a later date. 

It is also intended to begin the manufacture of crackers when the cracker machinery 
is received fiom the United States. 



RECIPES. 



Stuffed Rolled Round Steak. 

Have a three-quarter inch slice of steak cut from the round. Season well and make 
a bread crumb stuffing, seasoned with salt, pepper, butter, chopped parsley, and onion 
juice, and one-half cup of English walnut meats. Spread this mixture on the steak 
and roll up and tie securely. Put bits of suet over the top and roast until thoroughly 
cooked. Make a gravy from the juice in the pan, adding flour and allowing it to 
brown before the water is added. After it boils until thick enough, strain it and add 
a dozen or more chopped olives. A few whole lives will garnish the dish prettily. 

Tomato and Peanut Soup. 

Peanut butter is a wholesome and highly nutritious food not nearly as much used 
as it should be. Pound for pound it possesses higher food value than round steak, 
though it sells for a lower price. Peanut butter, added to any dish, raises its protein, 
fat, and carbohydrate value. 

l£- cups seeded and strained tomatoes j level teaspoon of paprika 
\ cup peanut butter 2\ cups boiling water. 

1 level teaspoon of salt 
Add tomatoes gradually to the peanut butter and when smooth add the seasoning 
and water. Simmer for 10 minutes and serve with croutons. Well-seasoned soup 
stock may be substituted for the water; but, if used, the quantity of salt should be 
reduced. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year; foreign, $1.50; address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter, February 6, 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., January 8, 1919. No. 21. 

Commercial Business with Canal Radio Stations. 

The Canal radio stations have been authorized to accept commercial 
messages to and from all foreign vessels. 



Coast Guard Cutter Manhattan. 

The U. S. coast guard cutter Manhattan was satisfactorily completed 
in all respects by the Mechanical Division and sailed under its own 
steam for New York, December 31, 1918, at 11.30 a. m. 

Length over all 120 feet 3 inches 

Length on water line 110 feet 

Beam, molded 24 feet 

Depth at side, top of keel to lowest point of main-deck sheer 13 feet 6 inches 

Displacement at 10 feet 6 inches mean draft, salt water, with 11,100 gallons 
fuel oil, 3,600 gallons fresh water, 6 tons stores, 13 tons salt-water ballast 

in peak tanks about 379 tons 

Main engine, triple-expansion, 13 by 21 by 34 by 26 inch stroke. 

Indicated horsepower, estimated 600 

Boiler, water tube, 200 pounds working pressure. 

The construction of this vessel represents the first sea-going vessel 
completed in all respects, ready for sea, from start to finish by the 
Mechanical Division of The Panama Canal. 

This vessel is built for the manifold use of ice-breaking and wrecking 
and can be used as well for a fireboat. It is equipped with wireless 
and a motor launch, and is seaworthy for long trips at sea. It has 
accommodations for 2 commissioned officers, 4 warrant officers, and 
26 petty officers and men. 

Notice to Mariners. 

The following dispatch, dated January 3, 1919, from the Navy 
Department to the Commandant, 15th Naval District, and transmitted 
by the latter to this office, is quoted for the information of all concerned : 

"Department contemplates closing all routing offices January 15. 
Information regarding mined areas now being issued by hydrographic 
office as notices to mariners. Inform shipping that these notices may 
be obtained through regular channels after January 15, 1919. 23002." 



CANAL WORK IN NOVEMBER. 

The report of the Governor to the Secretary of War of Canal 
operations in November, 1918, is printed below: 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 26, 1918. 
The Honorable, the Secretary of War, 
Washington, D. C. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the Panama Canal for the 
month of November, 1918. 

CANAL BUSINESS. 

. The number of ocean-going ships passing through the Canal for the month was 185, 
not including 3 U. S. Navy destroyers, 1 U. S. Navy submarine, 1 subchaser, and 1 
Army tug. Net tonnage of the 185 ships aggregated 524,682 tons, Panama Canal 



238 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



measurement. Total cargo carried was 633,848 tons of 2,240 pounds. Ships of 12 
different nations were included in the month's traffic. 

Tolls collected amounted to S512.848.45. Deposits of S345, 863. 90 were made with 
the Assistant Treasurer of the United States to be applied in payment of tolls and 
other charges against ships using the Canal. Storehouse and commissary sales of 
supplies to ships aggregated $279,388.65, including $149,922.23 worth of fuel oil. 

Of the total of 405,391 tons northbound cargo, there were 48 full cargoes of nitrates 
aggregating 223,327 tons; six cargoes of nitrates and other commodities, 30,793 tons; 
and 11 cargoes consisting of flour, wheat, rice, and other foodstuffs, 67,534 tons. 
Eleven of the 14 vessels northbound in ballast were oil tankers. 

Business transacted at the Atlantic and Pacific ends of the Canal, respectively, 
for the month of November, is presented in the following tabulation: 



Item 



Cristobal 



Balboa 



Total 



Ships making transit of Canal 

Net tonnage of ships through Canal 

Cargo through Canal tons. 

Nationality of ships through Canal: 

United States 

British 

Chilean 

Costa Rican 

Danish 

Dutch 

Ecuadorian 

French 

Japanese 

Norwegian 

Peruvian 

Swedish 



71 
199,696 
228,457 



114 
324,986 
405,391 

52 
21 
3 
1 
8 
1 
1 



Total. 



Ships through Canal without cargo, but not in ballast. 

Net tonnage of ships without cargo 

Ships through Canal in ballast in addition to above. . . 

Net tonnage of ships in ballast 

Total transits without cargo 

Net tonnage of all ships without cargo 

Motor ships through Canal. 

Net tonnage of motor ships 

Sailing ships through Canal. 

Net tonnage of sailing ships 

Tolls levied on ships entering Canal 

Total ships entering port 

Total ships clearing from port 

Net tonnage of vessels entering 

Net tonnage of vessels clearing 



71 

8 

12,122 

7 

15,846 

15 

27,968 

3 

6,943 

5 

10,597 

$195,789 .04 

193 

181 

460,822 

441 ,980 



14 

58 ,994 

14 

58,994 

4 

6,122 

4 

7,413 

$317,059.41 

194 

186 

452 ,206 

429 , 199 



Total net tonnage 

Vessels entering port, not passing through Canal 

Net tonnage of above 

Vessels clearing port, not passing through Canal 

Net tonnage of above 

Vessels passing through Canal, which handled passengers or cargo at port, 
entering 

Net tonnage of above 

Vessels passing through Canal, which handled passengers or cargo at port, 
clearing, 

Net tonnage of above 

Local cargo arriving tons. 

Local cargo shipped tons . 

Total local cargo tons 

Cargo received by Receiving and Forwarding Agency of P. R. R. ... tons. . 
Cargo dispatched by Receiving and Forwarding Agency of P. R. R. . . .tons. . 
Cargo rehandled by Receiving and Forwarding Agency of P. R. R tons. 

Total cargo handled tons. 

Cargo stevedored, included in above tons. 

Fuel oil received during the month bbls. 

Fuel oil sold to commercial steamships from Canal tanks bbls . 

Fuel oil issued to U. S. Navy vessels bbls. 

Fuel oil issued to U. S. war vessels bbls. 

Total issues of fuel oil from Canal tanks bbls. 

Fuel oil on hand, November 1, 1918 bbls. 

Diesel oil on hand, November 1, 1918 bbls. , 

Coal receive] daring November tons. . 

Coal supp'.'ei Panama R. K. Steamship Line tons. . 

Coal supp'ied Panama R. R. department tons. . 

Coal supplied individuals and companies tons. . 

Coal supplied to other steamship lines tons. . 

Coal supplied the Army and Navy tons. . 

Coal supplied The Panama Canal tons. . 



902,802 

23 

57,373 

21 

48,848 

18 
25,937 

21 

29,864 

21,963 

5,728 



881 ,405 

15,679 

4 

11,081 

43 
79 ,309 

43 

79,309 

25,436 

151 



27,691 

6S.664 

47,830 

4,130 



25,587 

1,401 

830 

118 



120,624 
51 ,454 



12,414 20 
359.94 



2,349 

452 

163,636.99 

41,844 03 

1,187.45 

462.94 



12,774.14 
76,190.07 



6,558 
1,311 
1,276 
1,160 
27,184 
476 
2,336 



43,194.42 

151,676.95 

3,099 29 

180 

2 

11 



185 
524,682 
633,848 

81 

38 
6 
2 

16 
2 
1 

13 
5 

12 
5 
4 



185 

8 

12,122 

21 

74,840 

29 

86,962 

7 

13 ,065 

9 

18,010 

$512,848.45 

387 

367 

913 ,028 

871,179 



1,704,207 

30 

73 ,052 

25 

59,929 

61 
105,246 

64 

109,173 

47,399 

5,879 



53,278 

70 ,065 

48,660 

4,248 



122,973 

51,906 

163,636.90 

53,958.23 

1,547.39 

462.94 



4,162 
310 
197 



55,968.56 

227,867.02 

3,099.29 

6,738 

1,313 

1 287 

1,160 

31,346 

786 

2.533 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



239 



Item 

Coal on hand, December 1, 1918 tons 

Vessels supplied with water 

Water sold toships, galls 

Vessels dry docked 

Passengers arriving: 

First cabin 

Other than first cabin 

Total 

Passengers departing: 

First cabin 

Other than first cabin 

Total 

Total movement of passengers 

6ervices to American seamen: 

Seamen shipped 

Seamen discharged 

Seamen deceased 

Seamen deserted 

Seamen's identification certificates issued 

Seamen's wages received 

Seamen's wages disbursed 

Balance on hand, December 1, 1918 

Commissary sales to commercial vessels: 

Ice 

Wholesale groceries 

Wholesale cold storage 

Laundry 

Miscellaneous 

Total 

Commissary sales to Government and Panama Railroad ships: 

Ice 

Wholesale groceries 

Wholesale cold storage 

Laundry 

Miscellaneous 

Total 

Grand total of commissary sales 



Cristobal 



Balboa 



Total 



238,459 

128 
4, 4,-) 1,577 



1,151 
3,378 



31,280 

122 

2,179,800 

11 

707 
3,593 



269,739 

250 

6,631,377 

20 

1,858 
6,971 



1,165 
3,330 



4,300 



663 
3,592 



8,829 



4 ,495 
9,024 

210 

230 

1 

3 

1,002 

$4,386.94 

3,868.27 

2,118.21 

$1,180.07 
8,364.62 

25,211 42 
1,066.83 
2,360.70 



4,255 
8,555 



113 
141 



1 

230 

$663 27 

1,106 84 

481.71 

$572.73 

4,042.72 

17,810.37 

3.69 

1,360.35 



8,750 
17,579 

323 
371 

1 

4 

1,232 

$5,050 21 

4,975.11 

2,599.92 

$1 ,753 .40 
12,407 34 
43,021 79 
1,070.52 
3,721.05 



$38,184.24 

$1.04 

4,003.44 

29,053.30 

155 85 

48.30 



$23 ,789 .86 

$309.68 

2,940.13 

9,880.02 

.70 

109.49 



$61,974.10 

$310.72 

6,943.57 

38,933.32 

156.55 

157.79 



$33,261.93 



$13 ,240 .02 



$46,501 95 



$71,446.17 



$37 ,029 .£ 8 



$108,476.05 



LOCKS. 
Lockages of commercial vessels for the month were as follows: 




Number 

of 
lockages 


Number 

of 
vessels 


Gatun 


177 
181 
178 


183 




182 


Miraflores 


182 



In addition to the above, 73 lockages were made of vessels of the U. S. Army and 
Navy and floating equipment of The Panama Canal; 25 at Gatun, 25 at Pedro 
Miguel, and 23 at Miraflores. 

There were no unusual incidents of operation at any of the locks during the month, 
riie military guard was removed from all locks on November 19 and the temporary 
buildings erected for their use are in process of demolition. At Gatun the west cham- 
ber was used for lockages from the 1st to the 18th, inclusive, the east chamber being 
a' c o utilized for 1 1 days of this period. The east chamber was used for the balance 
oi t^e month, during which time it was also necessary to utilize the west chamber on 
the 20th, 25th, 26th, 27th, 28 h, and 30th. The greatest delay in lockage at Gatun 
occur ed to the sailing vessel, Admiral Cecille, which was held up 4 minutes due to 
the breakage of a bow chock and rail. Work on the new primary feeders from the 
hydi i iclectric station to the locks was approximately 95 per cent completed at the end 
of the month. Lockages consumed a total of 847,810,000 cubic feet of water. 

Lockages at Pedro Miguel consumed 746,110,000 cubic feet of water from Gatun 
Lake; those at Mirailores, 626,680,000 cubic feet from Miraflores Lake. The level 
of Miraflores Lake, ordered lowered during October by the Health Department, has 
been restored to the normal elevation, the regular inflow into the lake being sufficient 
for this purpose. Grading of the site to which the old Cocoli shed is to be removed 
was completed, part of the material in the old building was removed to the north- 
west wing wall of the locks preparatory to shipping to the new site. 

Hydroelectric station and substation — The net output of the Gatun hydroelectric 
station for November was 4,169,277 KWH on a computed water consumption of 
3,105,626,000 cubic feet. Generating unit No. 1 was placed in regular operation on 



240 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



the new 6,600- volt bus on the 23d. This is the last of the machines to be changed over 
from 2,200 volts, and completes this phase of the change-over work. The entire 
station is now in regular operation at the new bus voltage. Operation of the old 
units with the new belt-driven governor has proven satisfactory and a considerable 
improvement upon the original gear drive. 

No work on the 11, 000- volt improvements at Cristobal and Miraflores substations 
was performed during the month. The principal item of work remaining at Gatun 
substation is the installation of an improved type of barrier on the secondary switches 
of the power transformers. Delay in this work has been due to failure to receive the 
necessary material on order in the States. This work can be completed within a few 
days after arrival of the material required. The installation of 6, 600- volt transformers 
at the Balboa substation was practically completed during November; the only 
work remaining being that of placing the equipment in actual service. 

Transmission line — There were five interruptions to transmission line service, and 
three failures on idle lines during the month, none of the latter causing any interrup- 
tion in service. The greatest interruption from failure of the transmission line 
occurred on the 14th, due to broken conductor on line 2. This line broke leaving Gatun 
end clear and grounding Balboa end, resulting in interrupting service at Balboa 
station for 31 minutes. There were 11 insulators replaced during the month, 7 due 
to electrical failure and 4 en account of mechanical injury. 

Miraflores power plant — The order under which this plant has been operating on 
stand-by pressure on account of the change-over work at the hydroelectric station 
was canceled on the 11th. It was necessary to consume 880 barrels of fuel oil in 
maintaining the pressure required for stand-by purposes in this period. The total 
amount of fuel oil consumed during the month was 3,479.42 barrels. The gross out- 
put of the plant was 57,560 KWH, 47,300 KWH, of which were used for excitation and 
operation of generators as synchronous condensers to improve the power factor of 
the system. The net output of 10,260 KWH was used to help out the hydroelectric 
station. 

Total power output — The total net output of both generating stations was 4,179,537 
KWH and the total amount of power distributed to feeders by substations and gener- 
ating plants was 3,628,769 KWH. Total loss in transmission and transformation 
amounted to 550,768 KWH, representing an energy loss of 13 per cent. 

DREDGING DIVISION. 



Dredging excavation for the month 


was as 


bllows : 












Earth 
Cu. yds. 


Rock 
Cu. yds. 


Total 
Cu. yds. 


Classified as: 


Location. 


Maint. 
Cu. yds. 


Coustr'n. 
Cu. yds. 


Auxiliary. 
Cu. yds. 




62,700 


5,200 


67,900 


48,400 


19,500 








Qaillard Cut: 


300 

47,300 

1,800 


1,200 

161,100 

4,200 


1,500 

208,400 

6,000 


1,500 

208,400 

6,000 












West Lirio Slide... 












Total from Gaillard Cut . . . 


49,400 

34,900 

105,800 

3,000 


166,500 


215,900 

34,900 

117,800 

3,900 


215,900 






Auxiliary works: 




34,900 




12,000 
900 






117,800 


Coco Solo fill 






3,900 












255,800 


184,600 


440,400 


264 ,300 


19,500 


156,600 



On December 1 the following excavation remained to be done, quantities being 
expressed in cubic yards: 



Location. 


Earth. 


Rock. 


Total. 






25 ,000 
79,000 


25,000 




170,100 


249,100 








170,100 


104,000 

2.073 

174,750 


274,100 




2.073 




288,160 


462,910 








2S8.160 


176,823 


464,983 








458,260 


280,823 


739 ,083 



Cucaracha and West Culebra slide showed no unusual movement during the month, 
while East Culebra slide continued to show some movement during the first part of 
the month. Two 15-yard dipper dredges worked nearly the entire month in this 
area, between stations 1774-00 and 1789-50 east, excavating 208,400 cubic yards 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 241 

of earth and rock; making a total of 259,200 cubic yards removed from this area since 
the date of the first slide movement, October 23, 1918. An adequate channel has 
been maintained and navigation in no way interfered with. 

All material excavated from Gaillard Cut was dumped in Gatun Lake north of 
Gamboa. Spoil taken from the Pacific entrance was deposited as follows: 12 100 
yards on the sea dump west of the Canal channel; 16,100 yards in the Rio Grande 
River bed; and the balance, 41,200 yards, on the San Juan fills. The 34,900 yards 
excavated at the Atlantic Terminals were deposited on Telfer's Island, along the 
main track of the Panama Railroad Company leading into the coaling station. 
Material dredged from Margarita Bay, 1 17,800 cubic yards, was pumped on the Navy 
Base nils at Coco Solo in the following amounts: Field "B," 110,200 yards- Field "C " 
4,000 yards; magazine crib and vicinity, 3,600 yards. Dredge No. 86 pumped 3 900 
yards of material from borrow pit "A," depositing this on the seaplane shed The 
usual work of surveys and inspection was maintained during the month. 
' SHOPS, FOUNDRY, AND DRY DOCK WORK. 

The Mechanical Division had 782 uncompleted job orders at Balboa on the 1st 
of the month; 761 additional orders were issued; and 920 remained uncompleted 
December 1. There were 262 blanket orders in force during the month The 
Cristobal shops issued 177 individual and company job orders in November 13 of 
which were for work on submarines and 17 on other U. S. Navy craft ■ 54 covered 
repairs to ships touching at Cristobal or in transit of the Canal, exclusive of Panama 
Railroad vessels. 

orP™<P Ut of } h e foundry for the month was as follows: Iron, 124,915 pounds; steel 
20,098 pounds; brass, 14,150 pounds. 

The cessation of the war had the effect of terminating the Army orders previously 
in enect for the repair and delivery of cars and locomotives. The work of repairing the 
locomotives had, however, been completed prior to receipt of orders terminating the 
contract; and practically all the cars were in readiness for delivery at that time 
Of the cars ordered by the Alaskan Engineering Commission, 175 Lidgerwoods which 
have been in readiness for delivery for a considerable time are expected to be moved 
about rebruary 1. 

Work on the 5 ex-German vessels, Sierra Cordoba, Rhakotis, Luxor, Uarda and 
Anubts .progressed very satisfactorily during the month, although the division was 
greatly handicapped in the lack of men and materials from the States ordered for 
this particular work The following vessels were at the Balboa shops for repairs 
during the month: Steamships Advance, Allianca, Alvarado, Anubts, Azov, Bar abos, 
Boxley Caddo, Calala, CaptameBeauchamp, Chame, City of Para, Claremont, Columbia, 
Cristobal, Culebra, Forse, General Hodges, S. D. Harkness,La Habra, Luxor, Magdalena, 
Mmeola Noord Brabant, Quoque, Republic, Rhakotis, Salvador, Santa Clara, Santa 
lecla, Henry T Scott, Sierra Cordoba, Silverado, Tacoma, Topila, Trontolile, Uarda, 
Ucayali War Cariboo, War Tatla, West Escasco, and Westerner- U S S Gen G W 
Getty, Major Wheeler , and Western Star; bark Chateau D'if; schooners Chiriqui, Con- 
stance, Uunkerque Espana; motor schooners Commandant Roisin, Guanacasle, Santa 
Elena, Santtno, and James Timpson; mine planter Gen. W. M. Graham; destroyer Ring- 
vi a sub . manne chaser No - 2 86; submarines C-l to C-5, P-1841 0-16 R-15 
* n ik c 7 ' V- d s ? lling vessel Vin & a - The Allowing vessels were in dry dock 
at Balboa: Steamships Luxor, Uarda, Azov; tug Cocoli; coast guard cutter No 30- 
mine planter Graham; destroyer Ringgold; scows Nos. 109, 135, 118, and 119 
I he U.S. Destroyer Ringgold was docked for straightening a badly bent propeller and 
proceeded on her way to the east coast. Work on the coast guard cutter Manhattan 
during the month completed its actual construction. Final trials of the vessel were 
delayed on account of the nonarrival of its crew. 

The following vessels were at Cristobal shops for repairs: Steamships Balboa, 
Claremont Henry T Scott, Culebra, Heredia, Abangarez, Colon, Panama, Gen. II. F. 
Hodges, Allianca Advance, Caribbean, Europa, Noord Brabant, Columbia, Kenoa, 
nehaUrn, Ucayali, Florence, Santa Clara, Cayala, War Comax, Newport, Ville de Paris, 
North Bend, Magdalena, Pollux, Siam, Danamarie, Mexico, Dalana, Maryanne, 
Huasco, War Cariboo, Bacchus, Peru, Saramacca, Commandant de Rose- U S T 
Kilpatrick; U S. S. Champlin, Farragut; subchasers Nos. 279, 280, and 287 ■ sub- 
marine patrol boats Nos. 1841, 2232, and 2235; submarines C-5, R-15, R-16 R-17 
K-18,0-16, and C-l; tugs San Juan, Porto Bello, U. S. Mariner, U. S. Chame, and 
Engineer; steamer Albert G. Force; launch F-l, Naos, Barbacoas No. 2, Isthmian, 
Activo Ao. 11 Margarita; dredges Nos. 84 and 86; clapet No. 7; barge No. 71; 
derrick barge No. 157; pile driver No. 198; supply boat No. 1; boat McKie; 
launch Azimuth; motor ship Tacoma; and motor boat No. 1242. The following 
vessels were in Cristobal dry dock for repairs: Steamships Balboa, Claremont, 
netiry {.Scott and Culebra; tugs San Juan and Porto Bello; pile driver No 198- 
Submarine C-3; and steamer Albert G. Force. 



242 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. 

... Passa g ewa y No - 5of the Ancon Hospital buildings was completed during November, 
Ward groups Nos. 7 and 8 were 70 per cent and 56 per cent completed, respectively, 
at the end of the month. The oil-handling equipment at Balboa oilhouse, and one 
12-stall garage at Pedro Miguel were completed. The material was assembled and 
general preparatory work begun on the completion of the cement block walls of the 
lumber shed, Balboa. One type-17 house was completed at Punta Mala radio 
station; one tower was erected and the other started. This work as a whole was 75 
per cent completed. Both the ice plant building and cold storage building at Mt. 
Hope were brought to 96 per cent completion during the month. Equipment of the 
machinery was 75 per cent completed. Various repair jobs were in progress during 
the month. Progress on practically all construction work was considerably handi- 
capped on account of delayed receipt of materials from the States. 

Terminal construction — Progress of the work on Pier No. 6, Cristobal, is shown in 
the following tabulation: 



Item. 



Floor system: 

Forms placed square feet. . 

Reinforcing placed pounds. . 

Concrete poured cubic yards 

For shed: 

Forms placed square feet. . 

Reinforcing placed pounds. . 

Concrete poured cubic yards. . 



Accom- 
plished 
during 
month. 



73,281 

592,911 

2,777 

7,455 

34,298 

132 



Total in 

place, 

November 

30. 



513,048 

5,241,067 

24,320 

13,165 

59,000 

228 



Percent- 
age of 
completion, 



83.0 

8S.4 
84 

3 6 
3 9 
4.0 



MUNICIPAL DIVISION. 

The regular inspection and repair work of the division was carried on as usual 
during the month. In the northern district the greater part of the construction work 
was performed at the Army aviation and submarine bases, principally at the former. 
Work on the relocation of the Mt. Hope road, excavating and grading, was 50 per 
cent completed. During the month 4,110 cubic yards were excavated, and 2,756 
yards graded. With the exception of the construction of a few small drainage ditches in 
the Mindi swamp area, no work was done on this project; neither on the renewal of 
the discharge line from the Colon sewage pump. Road and sidewalk construction in 
the Ancon-Balboa district was confined to work within the Ancon Hospital grounds, 
the road from Ancon post office to the old Administration Building, and various 
pieces of sidewalk construction in this district. The depressed track at Building No. 
5, Balboa, was completed during the month. Practically all the municipal work at 
Punta Mala was completed with the exception of the sinking of the well. Several 
holes were put down to depths varying up to 70 feet without securing water; the 
work is, however, being continued. 

A total of 717,728,500 gallons of water was pumped at the various stations; 
170,218,000 gallons in the northern district, and 547,510,500 gallons in the southern 
district. Panama City consumed 72,115,000 gallons; Colon 44,355,125 gallons; and 
6,631,377 gallons were sold to ships. A total of 432,908,000 gallons was filtered for 
domestic purposes. 

WORKING FORCE. 

Effective November 20, 1918. 



Department or Division. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Total. 


Operation and Maintenance: 

Office 


30 
260 

80 
195 
133 
121 
628 

99 

45 


46 

2,307 

1 ,395 

339 

592 

1,025 

1,707 

348 

478 


76 


Building Division 


2.567 




1,476 


Electrical Division 


634 




725 




1.146 




2,336 




447 


Fortifications 


623 






Total 


1,591 

115 
21 

198 
27 


8,237 

1,803 

452 

1,546 

1,109 


9,828 


8 apply: 


1,918 




478 




1,744 




1,136 








361 


4,910 


6.271 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



243 



Department or Division. 



Gold. Silver. Total. 



Accounting 

Health 

Executive. 

Panama Railroad — 

Superintendent and coaling stations. 

Transportation 

Receiving and Forwarding Agent 



214 

210 



129 
142 

77 



12 
002 
212 

1,226 

244 

2,234 



226 

1,112 

700 

1.355 

386 

2.311 



343 



Total Panama Railroad 

Grand total 3,212 



3,704 



4,052 



17,977 



21,189 



The total gold force is an increase of 28 over the 3,184 employed on October 23; 
the latter total having been incorrectly stated in the October report as 2,846, the 
discrepancy existing in the number of gold employees shown for the Executive De- 
partment, properly 474 instead of 136. The silver force is an increase of 1,313 over 
the 16,664 shown on that date. 

The occupation of Canal quarters, November 30, was as follows: 



Occupants. 


Men. 


Women. 


Children. 


Total. 




3.033 

196 
5,470 


2,026 

25 

2,060 


2.216 

61 

3,472 


7,275 




282 




11,002 








Total 


8,699 


4,111 


5,749 


18,559 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 
The cash balance in Canal appropriations, November 30, exclusive of Fortifica- 
tions, was $15,071,694.89; the balance in Fortifications was $4,117,218.76. Payments 
from appropriations by the Disbursing Clerk, Washington, amounted to $868,643.87, 
and by the Paymaster on the Isthmus to $1,309,849.68. Payment to the Panama 
Railroad Company for commissary books amounted to $285,717.70. Total Panama 
Canal collections on the Isthmus were $1,457,464.67; and collections by the Disburs- 
ing Clerk, Washington $102,980.29. Deposits of $345,863.90 were made with the 
Assistant Treasurer of the United States in payment of tolls and other charges against 
vessels using the Canal. Requisitions for the purchase of material in the United 
States amounted to $458,974.29. Receipts from Canal Zone and miscellaneous 
funds amounted to $203,912.39, and disbursements from the same source, $167,155.84. 

Respectfully, 

W. J. Douglas, 

Acting Governor. 

Executive Order— Sick Leave for Alien Employees. 

The Panama Canal, Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 9, 1918. 
Circular No. 601 86: 

The Executive Order quoted below is published for the information 
of all concerned. 

Chester Harding, 

Governor. 



Authorizing the G ranting of Sick Leave to Alien Employees in Panama Canal and 

Panama Railroad Service 
By virtue of the authority vested in me by law, the Governor of The Panama Canal 
is authorized to grant to alien employees of The Panama Canal and the Panama 
Railroad Company who are not entitled to leave privileges under the conditions of 
employment now in effect, compensation for time lost due to illness, with such re- 
strictions as to time and rates of pay as may be prescribed by him in regulations in 
regard thereto, which he is hereby authorized to issue. 

WOODROW WILSON 
The White House, 
November 14, 1918. 

Executive Order. 

The names of persons in the competitive classified service with 
unrestricted status who were appointed, either permanently or pro- 
bationally prior to the date hereof, and who have served less than three 



244 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

years, and who are separated from the service because of a reduction 
of force, and who are recommended for further employment by the 
Government because of demonstrated efficiency in the office from 
which they are separated, will, upon request, be entered by the Civil 
Service Commission upon appropriate eligible registers for reappoint- 
ment, eligibility thereon to continue for one year from date of separa- 
tion. 

Such reemployment registers will be separate and apart from the 
registers of the Commission resulting from current examinations, and 
eligibility thereon, and certifications and appointments therefrom, 
shall in all respects conform to the usual practice and procedure, 
except that certifications of persons formerly in the apportioned service 
shall be made without regard to the apportionment. 

The departments in making requisition on the Commission for 
certifications of eligibles shall state whether they prefer certification 
to be made from a reemployment register or from a regular register 
of the Commission. 

It is desirable that the Departments in making requisitions request 
certification from the reemployment registers so far as practicable, 
having in view the efficient performance of Government work. 

WOODROW WILSON 

The White House, 

29 November, 1918. 

[No. 3011.] 



Civil Service Examinations. 

The following examinations are announced by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. Bulletins giving details of the examinations for positions for which 
there are likely to be a number of qualified persons on the Isthmus are posted at Canal 
post offices and clubhouses. In cases where such announcements are not posted, 
persons interested may obtain data on application to the Civil Service Board, Balboa 
Heights (telephone 286): 

Specialist in household science and calorimetry (female); $1,400 to $1,800 a year; February 9, 
1919; form 1312; age, 20 years or over. 

Aid in paleobotany (male and female); $1,200 a year; February 9, 1919; form 1312; age, under 

Tabulating mechanician (male) ; $1,200 to $1,600 a year; No. 512-amended; form 1800; age, 20 
years and over. . 

In the absence of further notice applications for this examination will not be received after Febru- 
ary 26 1919.* 

Truck crop specialist (male) ; Sl,600to $2,400 a year; No. 11; January 26-27,1919; form 1312; 
age, 25 but not 55 years. 

Assistant in agricultural technology, qualified as instrument maker (male); $1,200 to $1,800 a year; 
No 10- April 1,1919; forms 304 and 2029; age, within reasonable age limits.* 

Lithographer (male) ; $1,200 a year; No. 16; February 4, 1919; form 304; age 20 years and over.* 

RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS TO CLOSE DECEMBER 30, 1918: 

No. 1551. issued July 6, 1917. Dairy manufacturing specialist (male); $1,800 to $2,500 a year. 
Assistant dairy manufacturing specialist (male); $1,500 to $1,740 a year. 

No. 572, issued September 19, 1918. Industrial specialist in forest products (male); $1,500 to $3,500 

No. 383, issued May 16, 1918. Industrial examiner in forest products (male); $1,500 to $3,500 a 

No. 206-amended, issued September 4, 1918. Assistant chemist in forest products (male and female), 

No 110-amended, issued October 15, 1918. Engineer in forest products (male); $1,860 to $3,000 
a year. Assistant engineer in forest products (male) ; $1,200 to $1 ,800 a year. 

No 133, issued February 7, 1918. Assistant in direct marketing (male); $1,200 to $1,800 a year. 

No. 332-amended, issued August 3, 1918. Supervising or traveling accountant (male); $2,100 to 
$4,200. Construction cost accounting supervisor (male). 

No 552 issued September 4, 1918. Library assistant (male and female) ; $900 to $1,200 a year. 

No. 89-amended, issued April 13, 1918. Senior statistical clerk (male and female); $1,800 a year. 
Statistical machine operator (male and female); Grades 1 and 2, $1,000 to $1,5C0 a year. 

No. 464, issued July 16, 1918. Auditing clerk. Internal Revenue Service (female); $1,200 to $1,400 

a No. r i486-amended, issued May 11. 1918. Index and catalogue clerk (male and female); $1,000 to 

$1,200 a year (for duty in Washington, D. C). _ ,„. 

No. 1514-amended, issued August 13, 1918. Schedule clerk (male and female); $1,400 to $1,600 
a year (for duty in Washington, D. C.)- 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



245 



No. 2147-ainendcd, issued September 16, 1918. Statistical expert (male); $1,800 to $4,500 a year. 
Statistician (male and female) ; $1,800 to $3,000 a year. Clerk Qualified in statistics (male and female) 
$1,000 to $1,800 a year (for duty in Washington. D. C). 

No. 2246-amended. issued January 31, 1918. Passenger rate clerk; freight rate clerk; tariff clerk 
(male and female); $1,200 to $1,500 a year. 

♦Nonassembled. Date given for nonassembled examinations is the last day for filing applications, 
and they must be in the hands of the Commission at Washington prior to the hour of closing business 
on that date. 



Deceased Employees. 

The estates of the following deceased employees of The Panama Canal or the Panama Railroad 
Company are now in process of settlement, and any claims against these estates, or any information 
which might lead to the location of heirs, or to the recovery of property, bank deposits, postal savings 
or postal money order deposits, or any other moneys due them, should be presented at the office of 
the Administrator of Estates at once in order that the estate may be settled as soon as possible. All 
claims should be itemized, sworn to before a notary public, or other public officer having a seal, and 
submitted in duplicate. These names will be published but once: 



Name. 


Check 
No. 


Native of — 


Isthmian 
residence. 


Employed by- 


Date of death. 


Thomas Brown 


24453 


Jamaica 


Panama 


Panama Railroad. . . . 


December 8, 1918. 


Percy Carter 


86289 


Barbados 


Colon 


Panama Railroad. . . . 


December 22, 1918. 


James Hughes 


1.36682 


Anguilla 


Panama 


Dredging Division. . . 


December 17, 1918. 


Robert Kelly 


96061 


Jamaica 


Panama 




December 11, 1918. 


Samuel Lynch 


166283 




Colon 


Municipal Eng 


December 11, 1918. 


Walter Mitchell 


158690 


Grenada 


Colon 


Commissarv DJv. 


December 16, 1918. 


Charles Robinson 


140077 


Jamaica 


Colon 


Building Division. . . 


December 26, 1918. 


Nathaniel Thompson.. 


170719 


Jamaica 


Panama 


Supplv Department.. 


December 19, 1918. 


Donato Argrasol 


169080 


Panama 


Panama 


Supply Department. 


December 19, 1918. 


Henry George 


38926 


St. Vincent 


Panama 


Supply Department. 


December 29, 1918. 


George Goldson 


158791 


Jamaica 


Colon 


Supply Department. . 


December 24, 1918. 


George Thelwell 


142433 


Jsnnica. 


Colon 


Fortifications 


December 21,1918. 



Official Circulars. 

Use of Gatun Lake by Small Boats. 

The Panama C\nal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 27, 1918. 
Circular No. 6.^3-3: 

1. Effective this date Circular No. 683-1, 
prohibiting the operation of privately owned 
power boats on Gatun Lake and its tributaries 
between the hours of 6p.m.and6a. m.. is revoked. 

2. This does not modify the provisions of 
Paragraph 94, Circular No. 601-17, prohibiting 
the operation of privately owned craft in Gaillard 
Cut. , 

W. J. Douglas, 
Acting Governor. 



Acting Auditor. 

The Panama Canal, 
# Executive Office, 

Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 30, 1918. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

Effective this date, and during the absence of 
Mr. H. A. A. Smith on leave, Mr. Elwyn Greene 
will act as Auditor of The Panama Canal. 
W. J. Douglas, 
Acting Governor. 



Purchase of Half-rate Mileage Books for 
Cash. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights. C. Z., December 18, 1918. 
Circular No. 608-6: 

1. Effective at once Panama Railroad station 
agents will accept photo-met al checks as authority 
to sell mileage books to employees. This does 
not cancel the privilege of using commissary 
authority cards as a means of identification, 
provided for in Circular No. 608-4. 

2. Photo-metal checks may also be used as a 
means of identification to purchase the $1.50 
round-trip Sunday and holiday tickets. Account- 
ing Department cirular No. RA 603 is modified 
accordingly. 

W. J. Douglas, 
Acting Governor, Thi Panama Canal. 
Second Vice President, Panama Railroad Co. 



Publications Concerning Fortifications. 

Corrected Copy. 
General Orders 1 Headquarters, 

No. 48} J Panama Canal Dept., 

Ancon, C. Z., November 18, 1918. 
Memorandum No. 1, these headquarters, c. 8., 
is revoked, and in lieu thereof commanding 
officers of posts and stations will cause strict 
compliance with Paragraph 348, Army Regula- 
tions, which reads as follows: 

"The taking of photographic or other views 
of permanent works of defence will not be per- 
mitted. Neither written nor pictorial descriptions 
of these works will be made for publication with- 
out the authority of the Secretary of War, nor 
will any information be given concerning them 
which is not contained in the printed reports and 
documents of the War Department." 
By command of Brigadier General Blatchford, 
Hugh T. Johnston, 
Major, A. G. Dept., 
Acting Department Adjutant. 



Restricted Area Permits. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Office, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z„ January 3, 1919. 
To all concerned— -By authority of the com- 
manding general restricted area permits authoriz- 
ing admission to fortifications and fortification 
posts on official business during the year 1918 
will be continued in force for the year 1919. 
W. J. Douglas, 
Acting Governor. 



Army Transportation. 
Panama Railroad Company. 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., January 3, 1919. 
Circular No. 203: 
Conductors and Collectors: 

Circular No. 1147 of October 9 is amended as 
follows: 

1. When the Army is furnished a special train 
for the transportation of troops, an official Army 
passwill be issued to cover the men to be trans- 
ported. If others want to ride on such trains they 
must have the same kind of transportation as 
required on regular trains, except that officers 



246 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



accompanying the troops will not be required 
to have any form of transportation. The con- 
ductor will simply show on his trip report card 
the number thus carried. 

2. Officers accompanying men transferred on 
regular trains will be furnished regular Army 
transportation requests. 

3. Officers furnished complimentary or other 
kinds of Panama Canal or Panama Railroad 
passes, independent of the Army, will be allowed 
to ride on such passes without the application of 
the rules regarding annual and Army official 
passes. 

W. F. Foster, 
Master of Transportation. 
Approved: 
S. VV. Heald, 
Superintendent. 

Changes in P. R. R. Organization. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Panama Railroad Steamship Line, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., January 7, 1919. 

All concerned — The following changes in the 
organization and personnel of the Panama Rail- 
road Company, effective on Monday, January 
6, 1919, are announced: 

Mr. C. H. Mann, having reported for duty, 
has resumed his former position as Receiving and 
Forwarding Agent in charge of both the Atlantic 
and Pacific terminals. 

Mr. R. B. Walker is transferred to his former 
position as Local Agent, Panama. 

Mr. A. B. Goodenow is transferred to his for- 
mer position as Local Agent, Balboa. 

Mr. VV. M. White is ttansferred to the Trans- 
portation Department. 

Effective on the same date Mr. R. B. Walker is 
granted a leave of absence, during which period 
Mr. A. B. Goodenow will act as Local Agent, 
Panama, and Mr. W. M. White as Local Agent, 
Balboa. 

S. W. Heald, Superintendent. 

Animal and Motor Transportation. 

The Panama Canal, 
Supply Department, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 31, 1918. 
All concerned — Effective January 1, the follow- 
ing rates for animal and motor transportation 
furnished by the Supply Department will be 
charged against departments and divisions of 
The Panama Canal: 

animal transportation. 

Per Per 
day. hour. 

Team service $4.86 $0.54 

Cart service 4. OS .45 

Saddle service 1.26 .16 

motor transportation. 

Per hour. 

Jitneys $0 . 75 

Ford $-ton delivery truck 60 

Ford and Form A 1-ton truck. . . 75 

Kelly-Springfield, White, and Velie li-ton 

truck 2 .00 

Kelly-Springfield 3$-ton truck 2.50 

Ford trucks without chauffeur, deduct 25 cents 

per hour. 
Others, deduct 75 cents per hour. 

R. K. Morris, 
Approved: Chief Quartermaster. 

VV. J. Douglas, 

Acting Governor. 

Annual Passes. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 26, 1918. 
Circular No. 1199: 

Conductors and collectors — Annual passes for 
the year ending December 31, 1918, will be hon- 
ored thereafter until further notice. 

W. F. Foster, 
Master of Transportation. 



Motor Vehicle Tags. 

The Panama Canal, 
Executive Department, 
DrvisiON of Civil Affairs, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., December 31, 1918. 
To all concerned — Due to the late arrival of the 
motor vehicle tags for the calendar year 1919, 
tags for the year 1918 will be honored for a period 
of 7 days after December 31, 1918. Police officers 
will not molest cars running under 1918 license 
tags prior to January 8, 1919. 

C. H. Calhoun, 
Chief, Division of Civil Affairs. 



Small Vessels in Limon Bay. 

The Panama Canal, 
Office of the Captain of the Port, 
Cristobal, C. Z., January 1, 1919. 
To all concerned — -Referring to the restriction 
issued at this office under date of February 5, 
1917, which reads as follows: 

"Effective Monday, February 5, no small 
vessels will be allowed to navigate the waters 
of Limon Bay or Cristobal Harbor, the American 
or French canals between the hours of 6 p. m. 
and 6 a. m. Any small vessels that contemplate 
making movements or shifts will do so during 
daylight." 

"This order will be strictly enforced and any 
violation may possibly result in serious damage 
to the boat and injury to the occupants." 

The above restriction is hereby canceled, 
effective this date. 

John G. Fels, 
Captain of the Port. 



Stops at Bohio and Rio Grande. 

The Panama Railroad Company, 

Office of Master of Transportation, 
Balboa Heights, C. Z., January 3, 1919. 
Transportation Bulletin No. 573: 

Conductors and engineers — Transportation Bul- 
letin No. 569, dated December 7, directing that 
trains Nos. 7 and 8 stop at Bohio siding Saturdays 
and Sundays is canceled. 

Effective Saturday, January 4, and until 
f urthei notice, t he following arrangement will be 
in effect: 

Trains Nos. 5 and 6 stop at Bohio siding on 
Saturdays. 

Trains Nos. 7 and 8 stop at Bohio siding on 
Sundays. 

Train No. 35 stop at south end Rio Grande 
bridge on Saturdays. 

Trains Nos. 36 and 38 continue stopping at 
south end Rio Grande bridge, Sundays, as at 
present. 

W. F. Foster, 
Master of Transportation. 



Band Concert Schedule. 

16th Band, Coast Artillery Corps. 
Army and Navy Club, Cristobal — January 2, 

9, 16, 23, and 30. 
Fort Sherman movies — January 7, 14, 21, and 28, 
Fort Randolph movies — January 1, 8, 15, 22, 

and 29. 
Fort de Lesseps, afternoon — January 1, 8, 15, 

22, and 29. 

Fort Randolph, afternoon — January 2, 9, 16, 

23, and 30. 

Enlisted men's dance at Fort Sherman or Fort 

Randolph — January 4 and 18. 
33d Infantry Band. 
Cristobal bandstand — January 7, 14, 21, and 28. 
New Gatun — January 6, 13, 20, and 27. 
Gatun Clubhouse — January 3 and 17. 
Sibert's Curve — January 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29. 
Officers' Club dance — January 10 and 24. 

Porto Rican Infantry Band. 
Corozal — January 7, 14, 17, 21, and 28. 
Empire movies — January 1, 6, 8, 13, 15, 20, 22, 

27, and 29. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



247 



Camp Otis movies — January 2. 9, 16. 23, and 30. 
Officers' dance. Camp Gaillard — January 10 

and 24. 

5th Band, Coast Artillery Corps. 
Quarry Heights — January 1, 8, 15. 22, and 29. 
Fort Amador, concert — January 2. 9. 16, 23, 

and 30. 
Fort Amador movies — January 3, 7, 10, 14, 17, 

21, 24, 28, and 31. 
Officers' dance — January 3. 
Enlisted men's dance — January 4 and 18. 

U. S. Naval Air Station and Submarine Band. 
Cristobal bandstand — January 17. 

Stages of the Chagres and the Lakes. 
The maximum elevations of the Chagres River, 
Gatun Lake, and Mirafiores Lake, in feet above 
mean sea level, during the two weeks ending at 
midnight of Saturday, January 4, were as fol- 
lows: 



'Chagres River 



Date 



Sun., Dec. 22... 
Mon., Dec. 23 . 
Tues., Dec. 21 
Wed., Dec. 2.5 
Thurs., Dec. 26. 
Fri., Dec. 21 .... 
Sat.. Dec. 28... 
Sun., Dec. 29 . . , 
Mod., Dec. 30.. 
Tues., Dec. 31... 
Wed.. Jan. I..... 
Thurs., Jan. 2. ., 

Fri., Jan. 3 

Sat., Jan. 4 



Height of low water 126.0 91.0 
to nearest foot. 



, Alha- 
V'S* juela 



126 9 

127.05| 

127.05 

127.25 

127.25 

127.15 

127.05 

127.15 

127.00 

126.90 

120.85 

US.vV 

126.80 

126.75 



91. 70 

91.90 

91.88 

92.00 

92.00 

91.9i' 

91 

91.00 

91.80 

91.69 

91.66 

91.60 

91 .57 

91.61 



Gatun Lake 



Gam- _, 
boa Gatun 



87.00 
87.00 
86.97 
86.92 
87.00 
87.00 
87.01 
86.91 
86.94 
86.94 
86 .92 

SO .92 
86.94 



86.96 
86.92 

86.91 
86.86 
86. 85 
86. 8t 
86.8; 
86.86 
86.88 
86.86 
86.84 
86.82 
86.80 
86.80 



Mira- 
fiores 
Lake. 



53.20 
53.20 
53.30 
53.27 
53.22 
53.23 
53.65 
53.68 
53.90 
53.86 
53.73 
53.68 
53.60 
53.51 



Additions to Commissary Stock. 

Soap, Life Buoy, 12-oz. twin bar $0.19 

Cigarettes, Princesses, Haitian, pkg 10 

Chambray, Imperial, yd 42 

Purses, leather, ea 1 .05 

Sheeting, bleached, Pequot, 90". yd 93 

Suiting: 

Drill, white union, 27", yd 79 

Drill, brown linen, 26", yd 63 

Drill, brown linen, 26", yd 71 

Ties, white silk, batwing, ea 45 

Ties, black batwing, ea 28 

Yarn : 

Khaki, hank 1 .15 

Dark Oxford, hank 1 .15 

Cases: 

Cigarette, ea 2 .05 

Cigarette, ea 2 .05 

Cigarette, ea 1 .85 

Mats, straw, Haitian, ea 32 

Community Plate: 
Spoons, berry or preserve, Patrician, ea 1 .10 
Spoons, berry or preserve, Sheraton, ea 1.10 
Child's gun metal ankle tie, sizes 8$ to 

11, pr 2.45 



Child's tan kid button boot, sizes 8 J to 

11. pr $2.85 

Theo ties: 

Misses', black kid, sizes 12 to 2, pr . . . 1 .70 

Misses', patent, sizes 12 to 2, pr 2.20 

Women's black kid, pr 2 . 50 

Women's patent, pr 2 .35 

Laces, shoe, brown or black, Cordo-Hyde: 

27", pr 07 

36". pr 09 

Blouses, Middy, plain white, ea 1 .50 

Dress goods: 

Suiting, cotton, tropical, fabric, 32", yd .54 
Voile, colored, novelty, large plaid, 36" 

yd 75 

Dyes, Tintex, assorted colors, box 19 

Hose: 

Men's silk, black 67 

Men's silk, white 67 

Children's white mercerized, pr 51 

Knickerbockers, boys': 

Khaki, pr 1.35 

Tweed, pr 2 .00 

Lace, cotton, tatting, assorted colors, yd. . .05 

Petticoats, white, ea 1 .45 

Ribbon: 

Black, with white edge, width No. 2, yd. .0 

Wash, width No. 1 J, yd 00 

Wash, width No. 2, yd 00 

Shirts, men's negligee, Madras, plain, ea.. 1 .85 

Thread, linen, olive drab, 560-yd, spool.. . .72 

i ies. silk, batwing, assorted patterns, ea . . .52 

Automobile and motorcycle accessories: 

Cement, rim gasket, 2-oz. bot 14 

Inside parts of valve, Schrader's, ea 06 

She'.lac, liquid, 2-oz. bot 14 

Beaters, egg, wire, ea 05 

Collanders, aluminum, ea 1-50 

Fishing tackle: 

Brakes, leather, thumb, No. 3, ea 37 

Drag handles — 

Pflueger- Williams, J", ea 5 .05 

Rabbot. }", ea 5.05 

Spoons, Pflueger Record — 

No. 5. ea 32 

No. 6, ea 41 

No. 7, ea 50 

Swivels, connecting link barrel — 

No. 1/0 for 3/0, ea 03 

No. 2/0 for 3/0. ea 04 

No. 1/0 for 3/0, ea 03 

No. 2/0 for 3/0, ea 04 

Japalac — 

Gloss, white, J-pt. tin 43 

Mahogany, 1-pt. tin 68 

Mahogany, }-pt. tin 41 

Gold. i-pt. tin 29 

Knives: 

Bread. 9", ea 68 

Pocket, 2 blades, stag handle, ea 93 

Mats, straw, Haitian, ea 32 

Pans: 

Dish, aluminum, 12-qt., ea 2.20 

Double roasting, aluminum, 10 x 14 J, ea. 3.20 

Pipes, Briar, ea 1 .50 

Strainers, soup, ea 09 

Traps, rat. E. Z. Ketch, ea 09 

Oil, Pompeian Virgin Peanut: 

i-pt. tin 22 

Qt. tin 80 



COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Butter. 

Colombian butter is now being packed in 1-pound cartons and is on sale at all 



stores 



Minton. 

Due to the greatly increased prices of Minton china, it has been decided to cancel 
all outstanding orders and not to reorder any items until a decided reduction in price 
is effected. For those patrons who desire, however, to complete their sets or obtain 
certain pieces in the meantime, orders will be accepted if accompanied by a deposit. 
Latest advices indicate that on all shipments made after November 1, an increase of 
from 80 per cent to 100 per cent will obtain. 



248 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 



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250 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

COMMISSARY NOTES. 



Coffee. 

Authoritative advices from the United States indicate that despite a total of 
approximately 23,000,000 bags of coffee, exclusive of the 1919-20 crops now growing, 
awaiting shipment to the consuming countries, the coffee trade finds itself facing 
higher prices than any prevailing since December, 1911, and previous to that, 1895. 
Various reasons are given for the increased prices, among them being scarcity of 
transportation but the main reason is said to be the reduction of stocks brought about 
by the regulations of the Food Administration. While there is a strong demand, 
buyers are unable to secure coffee in needed amounts. Prices, while high, are irregu- 
lar and there is little chance of their declining for the next 60 days, while it is possible 
that they may advance still further. 

Woolen Situation. 

The situation in the United States as regards woolens is, of course, greatly improved 
with the cessation of hostilities. Whereas but a few months ago there was an alarming 
shortage of woolens for civilian requirements, large stocks are now being released and 
sold at public auction by the Government. In addition to these, a large stock has 
also been offered at auction by one of the largest woolen manufacturers in the country. 

While some manufacturers believe that this will mean reduced prices on clothing 
of all kinds, this opinion is not held by the War Service Committee of the clothing 
industry. This body expresses their belief that prices will continue as their present 
level on the fact that the releases by the Government will be limited in quantity for 
some time to come and will be released only as they can be absorbed by the market. 
This will mean that sufficient quantities will be available only for immediate and 
urgent requirements and any reduction in price made possible thereby will be offset 
by the greatly increased cost of labor. 

Ice Cream Manufacture. 

A brief description of the work of the ice cream plant at Cristobal follows: 
The custard is mixed in batches of 100 gallons each, which is composed of 
equal amounts of milk and cream together with 15 dozen eggs, four pounds of gelatin 
and 70 pounds of sugar. Extracts and crushed fruits are added to make the different 
flavors in accordance with standard formulas. The eggs, cream, and sugar are first 
mixed together and cooked into a custard. The custard is then placed in the motor- 
driven mixer and mixed thoroughly, It then flows from the mixer into the ice 
cream freezers on the first floor where it takes about 10 minutes to freeze 40 gallons 
of ice cream. The cream is drawn from the freezers in a semi-frozen condition into 
molds and containers, and placed in the hardening room with a temperature of 
abdut 8 degrees below zero, where it remains for 24 hours. It is then taken out and 
cut into quart, pint, and half-pint bricks, wrapped in tissue papers, packed in paste- 
board cartons and placed in containers for shipment to the line stores. 

During the month of November there was consumed 14,227 gallons of bulk ice 
cream, 41,139 half-pint bricks, 4,674 quart bricks of ice cream. A stock of about 3,000 
gallons of ice cream is maintained at all times, to take care of any unusual demand. 

Milk. 

In addition to ice cream, the Cristobal ice cream plant pasteurizes and bottles all 
the milk from Mindi dairy farm, less than an hour after milking. The milk is received 
from the farm in 10-gallon cans and is poured from them into the receiving tank; 
it flows by gravity through the clarifier into the pasteurizer where it is heated 
to about 145 degrees F. This temperature is maintained for about 20 minutes. At 
the end of this period it is pumped from the pasteurizer over a cooler where the 
temperature is reduced to 38 degrees F., and from there the milk flows on down in 
the bottler where it is bottled and capped automatically. The milk is not exposed 
to the air after leaving the receiving vat until opened by the customer. 

Sheffield Farm milk is also handled at the ice cream plant being received from the 
States in 10-gallon cans in a frozen condition. This milk is handled in the same manner 
as the milk from the dairy farm with the exception of the pasteurizing. 

All milk bottles are washed in an automatic bottle-washing machine where the 
bottles are put through an alkali solution, and are then rinsed in hot water of 160 
degrees; then they are sterilized with live steam at a heat of 210 degrees. 

All empty bottles are inspected before being placed in the bottling machine and 
all full bottles go over the inspection table when they come out. All machines used in 
connection with milk bottling andjce-cream making are washed and sterilized twice 
each_day^with hot water and live steam. 



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL. 

Subscription rates, domestic, $1.00 per year: foreign, $1.50: address 

The Panama Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, or 

The Panama Canal, Washington, D. C. 

Entered as second-class matter, February 6, 1918, at the Post Office 

at Cristobal, C. Z., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





Volume XII. Balboa Heights, C. Z., January 15, 1919. No. 22. 

Theodore Roosevelt. 

Theodore Roosevelt, in whose administration as President of the 
United States work was begun by the American Government on the 
Panama Canal, and carried far toward completion, died at his home 
at Oyster Bay, Long Island, on January 6, 1919. 

On January 8, 1919, the following cable message was sent to Mrs. 
Roosevelt: 
Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt. 

Oyster Bay, New York. 

The employees of The Panama Canal send to you and your family their deep 
sympathy in your bereavement. Colonel Roosevelt's great services in connect ion 
with the building of the Canal assure him an enduring place in our affectionate 
memory. 

Acting Governor Douglas. 

On January 9, the following cable message was received by the 
Acting Governor: 

Mrs. Roosevelt sends her thanks for the sympathy of those employed on that 
great work so loved by Colonel Roosevelt. 

A. B. Roosevelt, 

Captain, Infantry. 

On Sunday afternoon, January 12, memorial servicer were held at 
the Masonic Temple in Cristobal under the auspices of the Veterans 
of Foreign Wars. 

On Sunday night, at Balboa Stadium, memorial ?ervices were held 
at which 2,000 Canal men and women were present. Addresses were 
made by the Acting Governor, Mr. W. J. Douglas; by the Hon. Frank 
Feuille, Special Attorney for The Panama Canal; and the Hon. 
William J. Price, the American Minister to Panama. 

Cable Service to Philippines and China. 

The following telegram has been received from the Central and South 
American Telegraph and Cable Company under date of January 11 : 

Communication with Philippines and China via Commercial Pacific interrupted. 
Messages may be sent via Eastern at rates quoted in tariff book or via British Pacific 
at following rates in addition to the rate to Australia: 

Philippines to Manila $0.86 

To other places on Luzon 90 

Iloilo, Bacalod, Cebu '.'. .96 

To other islands 1.14 

China to Hongkong 70 

Macao 76 

Shanghai, Amoy, Foochow, Canton, Chefoo, Kiouchow, Weichow, VVeihai- 

weo, Swatow 80 

To other places 90 

Delivery of Radiograms to Residents of the Canal Zone. 

The Canal Zone radio stations have at timss experienced consider- 
able difficulty in delivering radiograms addressed to employees of The 
Panama Canal and other residents on the Canal Zone, due to in- 
sufficient address, 



252 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 

Prompt delivery of radiograms addressed to persons on the Canal 
Zone will be insured if messages are properly addressed. Persons 
expecting radiograms from friends or relatives on incoming or out- 
going ships, which they desire to have delivered promptly, should 
previously inform the officer in charge of Colon or Balboa radio 
stations of their address and vessel from which message is expected. 
This information should be given in writing, and is only required in 
case of messages received with insufficient address. 

Hotel Aspinwall. 
A dance will be held at Hotel Aspinwall, Taboga, on the night of 
January 18. 

Information as to rates and launch service follows: 

Employees: Dinner, lodging, and breakfast $1 . 75 

Employees per day.. 2.25 

Children under 12 years of age per day . . 1 .00 

Servants of employees per day . . 1 25 

Employees for stay of 7 days per day . . 1 . 75 

Reduction of 10 per cent for employees on above rates for stay of 30 days. Reduc- 
tion of 10 per cent for families of four or more for over 7 days' stay. 

Nonemployees per day . . 3 00 

Children of nonemployees per day . . 1.25 

Servants of nonemployees per day . . 1 . 50 

Meals without room: 

Breakfast 75 

Luncheon 1 . 00 

Dinner 100 

Patrons desiring to send trunks should arrange to have them delivered at the launch 
landing by 9.30 a. m., addressed to themselves, care of Hotel Aspinwall. Freight will 
be tran