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44TH NATIONAL FFA CONVENTION 

PROCEEDINGS 

MUNICIPAL AUDITORIUM 

OCTOBER 13-15, 1971, KANSAS CITY, MO 




Youth With A Purpose 



The National FFA Officers, Board of Directors and Na- 
tional Staff take great pride in welcoming you to the 44th 
National FFA Convention. The program has been planned 
with the hope that it will prove meaningful, inspiring and 
helpful to you as you become involved in FFA activities 
this coming year. 

FFA is "Youth With A Purpose." That's our theme for 
next year and we are starting right here at this convention 
to help you prepare to meet the challenges facing members 
of our generation. Let us strive to improve our organization 
of young men and women whose goal is to be a part of the 
dynamic industry of agriculture. 

The FFA is providing activities which are designed to 
supplement the instructional program in agribusiness and 
give each member an opportunity to experience the respon- 
sibility of planning and conducting worthwhile chapter 
activities with a minimum of adult supervision. 

FFA members are youth with a purpose in learning the 
technology of food and fiber production, supply, process- 
ing, distribution and agricultural mechanics. Programs in 
conservation, forestry, wildlife management and commu- 
nity development are just a few activities that help make 
our communities a better place in which to live and work. 

FFA was founded with a purpose — to develop leadership, 
responsible citizenship and cooperation in its members. 
Today's FFA— YOUTH WITH A PURPOSE— uphold a proud 
tradition. 



The National Association of Secondary School Principals has 

placed this program on the Advisory List of National Contests 

and Activities for 1971-72 



1971 PROCEEDINGS 
44tH 

NATIONAL 
CONVENTION 

OF THE 

Future Farmers 
of America 




HELD AT 

MUNICIPAL AUDITORIUM 
KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 

OCTOBER 13-14-15, 1971 



Prepared by the Future Farmers of America in cooperation with the 
Division of Vocational and Technical Education, U. S. Office of Education, 
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Washington, D. C. 20202 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

National Directory iv 

Introduction v 

National FFA Officers vi 

Official Delegates viii 

Band Members '* 

Chorus Members xi 

Minutes of the 44th National Convention: 

Wednesday, October 13 1 

Thursday, October 14 4 

Friday, October 15 8 

American Farmers 11 

Honorary American Farmers 15 

Distinguished Service Awards 19 

National Officer Addresses 20 

National Officers' Yearly Report 34 

Agricultural Career Exhibitors 35 

Committee Reports: 

Nominating Committee 37 

Auditing Committee 37 

National FFA Awards and Contests Committee 38 

National FFA Calendar Committee 38 

Convention Proceedings Committee 39 

National FFA Program of Activities Committee 40 

National Program of Activities, 1971 41 

National Convention Program Committee 47 

Information Program Committee 47 

International Program of Activities Committee 48 

National Leadership Program Committee 49 

National FFA Magazine Committee 50 

Official FFA Manual Committee 51 

National FFA Convention Resolutions Committee 51 

National FFA Supply Service Committee 53 

Program of Activities (Local Guide) Committee 53 

Report of the National FFA Treasurer 54 

National FFA Foundation Awards and Contests: 

Star Farmer of America 57 

Star Agribusinessman of America 58 

National Chapter Awards Program 60 

National Chapter Safety Awards 62 

BOAC National Winners 64 

Agricultural Proficiency Awards 66 

National FFA Public Speaking Contest 68 

National FFA Judging Contests 71 



1970-71 NATIONAL FFA OFFICERS 

President, DAN LEHMANN, Pleasant Plains, Illinois 

Secretary, JOHN McCULLEY, Malin, Oregon 

Vice President, Central Region, WAYNE HUMPHREYS, Crawfordsville, Iowa 

Vice President, North Atlantic Region, GEORGE ALLEN, Schaghticoke, New York 

Vice President, Pacific Region, DAN DOOLEY, Hanford, California 

Vice President, Southern Region, JIM BEARD, Beggs, Oklahoma 

NATION FFA BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

H. N. HUNSICKER, Chairman 

WM. PAUL GRAY, Secretary 

J. M. CAMPBELL, Treasurer 

J. L. BRANCH, State Supervisor, Agricultural Education, Atlanta, Georgia 

J. E. DOUGAN, Assistant Director, Vocational Education, Columbus, Ohio 

H. E. EDWARDS, Program Officer, Office of Education, Chicago, Illinois 

J. W. LACEY, Program Officer, Office of Education, Denver, Colorado 

H. L. NOAKES, State Supervisor, Agricultural Education, Albany, New York 

J. R. PEDDICORD, State Supervisor, Agricultural Education, Carson City, Nevada 

B. F. RAWLS, Program Officer, Office of Education, Kansas City, Missouri 

J. W. WARREN, Program Officer, Office of Education, Philadelphia, Pa. 

M. C. GAAR, Program Officer, Office of Education, Atlanta, Georgia (Alternate) 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES, FFA FOUNDATION, INC. 

H. N. HUNSICKER, President 

WM. PAUL GRAY, Secretary 

J. M. CAMPBELL, Treasurer 

J. L. BRANCH, State Supervisor, Agricultural Education, Atlanta, Georgia 
J. P. CLOUSE, Chairman, Agricultural Education Section, Purdue University, Lafayette, 
Indiana 

A. B. CORDES, State FFA Executice Secretary, Madison, Wisconsin 

L. W. DAVIS, Former Chairman of FFA Foundation Sponsoring Committee, Evergreen, 

Colorado 
J. T. DAVIS, State FFA Executive Secretary, Sacramento, California 
J. E. DOUGAN, Assistant Director, Vocational Education, Columbus, Ohio 
M. H. GUNDLACH, Past National President, NVATA, Montfort, Wisconsin 
JOHN W. LACEY, Program Officer, Office of Education, Denver, Colorado 
G. D. McDOWELL, President, NVATA, Pikeville, Kentucky 
F. G. McCORMICK, Head, Department of Agricultural Education, University of Arizona, 

Tucson, Arizona 
H. L. NOAKES, State Supervisor, Agricultural Education, Albany, New York 
J. R. PEDDICORD, State Supervisor, Agricultural Education, Carson City, Nevada 

B. F. RAWLS, Program Officer, Office of Education, Kansas City, Missouri 
FRED STINES, Publisher, Successful Farming, Des Moines, Iowa 

J. E. STREETMAN, Vice President and Director of Marketing, Allied Mills, Inc., 

Chicago, Illinois 
DAN LEHMANN, National FFA President, Pleasant Plains, Illinois (ex officio) 

NATIONAL FFA STAFF 

H. N. HUNSICKER, National Advisor 
WM. PAUL GRAY, National Executive Secretary 
J. M. CAMPBELL, National Treasurer 
EDWARD J. HAWKINS, Executive Director 

C. COLEMAN HARRIS, Associate Executive Secretary 

LENNIE H. GAMAGE, Manager, International and Special Programs 

A. DANIEL REUWEE, Director of Information 

ROBERT SEEFELDT, Manager, Contests and Awards 

HARRY J. ANDREWS, Acting Manager, FFA Supply Service 

WILSON W. CARNES, Editor, The National Future Farmer 

JOHN M. PITZER, Associate Editor, The National Future Farmer 

RONALD A. MILLER, Associate Editor, The National Future Farmer 

GLENN D. LUEDKE, Advertising Manager, The National Future Farmer 

DUANE LEACH, Regional Advertising Manager, The National Future Farmer 

RICHARD A. WRIGHT, Regional Advertising Manager, The National Future Farmer 

JAY BENHAM, Administrative Secretary, FFA Alumni Association 

ARCHIE HARDY, Photographer 

CATON HALL, Assistant Manager, FFA Supply Service 

LARRY MEADOWS, Supervisor, Shipping Department, FFA Supply Service 

iV 



INTRODUCTION 

The Future Farmers of America (FFA) is the national organization of 
students studying vocational agriculture in public secondary schools, under 
the provisions of the National Vocational Education Acts. Launched at 
Kansas City in November 1928, the organization has continued to develop 
rapidly. The active membership is 427,888 in 7,8^5 chapters. 

The primary aim of the FFA organization is the development of 
agricultural leadership, cooperation, citizenship and patriotism. Other 
purposes include: strengthening the confidence of youth in themselves 
and their work; more intelligent choice of agricultural occupations; im- 
proving the rural home and its surroundings; encouraging cooperative 
effort; encouraging thrift; improving scholarship; providing organized 
recreational activities and supplementing, by means of student-initiated 
and student-directed activities, the systematic instruction offered to stu- 
dents regularly enrolled in vocational agriculture courses. 

The FFA has taken its place with other agencies interested in the 
upbuilding of agriculture and the improvement of country life. National 
headquarters of the FFA is located in the National FFA Center at Alexandria, 
Virginia. 

The 44th National Convention of the Future Farmers of America 
was held in the Municipal Auditorium, Kansas City, Missouri, October 
13-15, 1971. The over 13,600 who registered from fifty chartered associa- 
tions for that youthful exposition of progressive leadership development, 
together with many representatives from foreign countries, must surely 
have returned home with a stronger belief in the future of agriculture. 

The minutes of the convention sessions are included, along with 
certain other important material which is supplementary to or explana- 
tory of the convention activities. Thanks are due many persons whose 
leadership and dedicated efforts made possible one of the most successful 
conventions in the history of the FFA. 

WM. PAUL GRAY 
National Executive Secretary 



NATIONAL FFA OFFICERS, 1971-72 

TIM J. BURKE, National FFA President, of New Hampton, Iowa. Tim lives with his 
parents and seven brothers and sisters on a 220 acre grain and livestock farm. 
His farming enterprises since entering vocational agriculture have included dairy 
cattle, swine, corn, soybeans, oats and hay. At the present time he has ten percent 
interest in 30 grade dairy cows, and ten percent interest in 20 sows and litters. 
He is a junior majoring in agricultural education at the University of Iowa. He is an 
active leader both on and off campus and has been involved in student government, 
representing the College of Agriculture. In high school Tim served as Secretary and 
President of the New Hampton FFA Chapter. He has served as Vice President and 
President of the Iowa FFA Association. 

DENNIS C. SARGENT, National FFA Secretary, of Bradford, Ohio. Dennis lives on a 
130 acre farm. His farming enterprise includes 6200 laying hens, 380 feeder pigs 
and 70 acres of corn, beans and wheat. Dennis enrolled in vocational agriculture with 
a supervised farming program of eight feeder pigs, four acres of oats and a two per 
cent share of a 4100 layer operation. The enterprise has since grown to the present 
50-50 partnership with his father. Dennis plans to become a teacher of vocational 
agriculture. He is active in the Alpha Zeta Fraternity, the Agricultural Education 
Society and several other campus organizations at Ohio State University. He has 
served as chapter Chaplain and chapter President and also Secretary of the Ohio FFA 
Association. He served as class President at the Bradford High School in his fresh- 
man, sophomore and senior years. 

PHILIP H.JOHNSON, National FFA Vice President, Central Region, of Mead, Nebraska. 
Philip has one brother and two sisters. The family operates a 240-acre farm and 
has an 80 cow Holstein dairy herd. Phil owns 35 cows and raises milo and silage 
corn on 80 rented acres. He hopes to continue participation in the family farming 
operation in combination with a career teaching vocational agriculture. Phil lives on 
campus at the University of Nebraska and is able to maintain farming interest at 
home which is only 35 miles away. He has served as Secretary and President of his 
local chapter, and as President of the Nebraska State FFA Association. He was super- 
intendent of the FFA Children's Barnyard at the 1971 State Fair and was President of 
an Explorer Troop in 1968-69. 

KEVIN E. HALL, National FFA Vice President, North Atlantic Region, Keymar, Mary- 
land. Kevin's farming program totals 131 acres and includes 30 acres of corn, 60 
acres of hay and pasture, and 13,000 pine trees on the remaining acreage. He has 
concentrated on building a top quality flock of registered Cheviot sheep. In recent 
years, his breeding stock has won many awards in eastern shows. Kevin served as 
chapter, regional and State FFA President and was winner of the National FFA public 
Speaking Contest in 1970. He is listed among the 1970 Who's Who of American High 
School Students and received the 1971 American Academy of Achievement's Pro- 
mise for Greatness Award. He was a member of the White House Conference Com- 
mittee on Drug Abuse, Aging Americans, and Food, Nutrition and Health. He served 
as a delegate to the National Agriculture Youth Institute and the National 4-H Con- 
ference. He also won the National Farm Bureau Public Speaking Contest and the 
National Youthpower Discussion Meet. Kevin was enrolled at Frederick Community 
College, Frederick, Maryland, majoring in communications. 




(Left to right, Seated) Kevin Ernest Hall, Maryland, North Atlantic Region 
Vice President; Tim J. Burke, Iowa, National President, and Sammy Peebles, 
Alabama, Southern Region Vice President. 

(Left to right, Standing) Clifford Wayne Saylor, Arizona, Pacific Region Vice 
President; Philip H. Johnson, Nebraska, Central Region Vice President, and Dennis 
C. Sargent, Ohio, National Secretary. 

CLIFFORD WAYNE SAYLOR, National FFA Vice President, Pacific Region, Glendale, 
Arizona. Cliff lives on a 1000-acre farm with his parents and one sister. The Saylor 
family raises cotton, alfalfa, and watermelons. Cliff has expanded his livestock 
enterprise from four to 23 steers during his four years in vocational agriculture. He 
served the Peoria FFA Chaper as Sentinel and President, and served as Arizona State 
FFA President. He represented Arizona on the nationally televised AGRICULTURE . . . 
USA program and participated in the National FFA Leadership Conferences in Wash- 
ington, D. C. He was a member of the National Honor Society, the Student Council 
and the Church Youth Group. He was majoring in agribusiness at Arizona State Uni- 
versity, and plans to return to school and complete his education leading to an 
occupation in agribusiness or production agriculture on completion of his term of 
office. 

SAMMY PEEBLES, National FFA Vice President, Southern Region, Brewton, Alabama. 
Sammy's farming program includes 144 acres on which he presently has 11 acres of 
corn, five polled Herefords and ten hogs. He has been President of his local FFA 
chapter and the Alabama FFA Association. In 1970 Sammy was a summer intern for 
the White House Conference on Children and Youth. He also served as a Freshman 
Senator in Student Government at Jefferson Davis College. Sammy has participated 
in the Alabama Junior Cattleman's Association. He is also a member of both the 
American Polled Hereford Association and the American Hereford Association. In 
high school he served as Class President and Class Salutatorian, and was a member 
of the FFA judging team for four years. 



VII 



OFFICIAL DELEGATES 



ALABAMA 

CARLSHEWBART, Danville 
JOHNNIE WOOD, Titus 
JOHN L. PATTERSON, Guntersville 
JOEL ELLIS, Enterprise 

ARIZONA 

DAVID CARMICHAEL, Buckeye 
JULIO GONZALEZ, San Simon 

ARKANSAS 

RODNEY BAKER, Jonesboro 
HARTSELLCRUTCHFIELD, Lamar 

CALIFORNIA 

PAUL MULLER, Woodland 
JON CARRITHERS, Meridian 
JERRY BRADLEY, Modesto 

COLORADO 

MONTE SAMBER, Stoneham 
STEVE FERREE, Livermore 

CONNECTICUT 

JOHN HIBBARD, Fitchville 
RUSSELL KELLY, Bloomfield 

DELAWARE 

BENJAMIN BIGGS, Townsend 
FRANK STAFFORD, Newark 

FLORIDA 

ROBERT HINTON, Sydney 
JIMMY ALVAREZ, Starke 

GEORGIA 

FRANKLIN SPOONER, JR., Fort Gaines 
BARRY GEORGE, Blairsville, 
ROGER BYRD, Hazlehurst 

HAWAII 

CHARLES NAHALE, Captain Cook 
FRED KAAUAMO, Lahaina 

IDAHO 

ZANE HANSEN, Pingree 
CHRIS YAMAMTO, Nampa 

ILLINOIS 

MERCER TURNER, Heyworth 
DENNIS DAZEY, Paxton 
JOELSCHEIDER, Red Oak 

INDIANA 

AL NEIDLINGER, Plymouth 
DAVE CROSBY, Chalmers 

IOWA 

DWIGHTSEEGMILLER, Decorah 
DICK HILSABECK, Pleasantville 

KANSAS 

MARK MAYFIELD, 
CHRIS SCHMIDT, 



Caney 
Oberlin 



KENTUCKY 

DENNIS O'NAN, Sturgis 
ROBERT BAKER, Georgetown 



LOUISIANA 

STEPHEN BAUM, Pollock 
ALFRED STEVENS, Winnfield 

MAINE 

LARRY PERRY, Presque Isle 
BRIAN WILLIAMS, Mars Hill 

MARYLAND 

TIMOTHY BEALL, Germantown 
FRANK ALLNUTT, Barnesville 

MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM D. CASE, Feeding Hills 
TIMOTHY DIVOLL, Royalston 

MICHIGAN 

JOE FABIAN, Coopersville 
RICHARD GRILL, Byron 

MINNESOTA 

STEVE THAL, Watertown 
RODNEY CHRISTIANSON, Halstad 

MISSISSIPPI 

RICHARD HARTLEY, Batesville 
NEIL HITCHCOCK, Grenada 

MISSOURI 

TOM OGLE, Centralia 
JOE CASTLE, Cameron 

MONTANA 

RICK DORN, Hardin 
DAVE KELSEY, Bridger 

NEBRASKA 

EDWARD DUBAS, Fullerton 
NORMAN ANDREWS, Holbrook 

NEVADA 

JEFF GARDNER, Lund 
SAMGUAZZINI, Fallon 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

BRIAN LADD, Colebrook 
JOHN CHESNULEVICH, Hudson 

NEW JERSEY 

CATHERINE MACALLISTER, Bordentown 
RICHARD SMITH, Allentown 

NEW MEXICO 

JIM GILMORE, Elida 
LYMAN GRAHAM, Caprock 

NEW YORK 

RICHARD LAMB, Hamilton 
LARRY RUDD, Mannsville 

NORTH CAROLINA 

RICKEY BUCKNER, Leicester 
NEIL LOYD, Statesville 
BILLMANESS, Biscoe 

NORTH DAKOTA 

DALE ENERSON, Lostwood 
ROSS OLSON, Langdon 



VIII 



OHIO 

GENETAPALMAN, Alexandria 

DAVID BRANHAM, Urbana 

OKLAHOMA 

JERRY GOOLSBY, Guthrie 

RICK THOMAS, Geronimo 

DAVID CASEY, Okmulgee 

OREGON 

GREG LOOK, The Dalles 

MARVIN HARADA, Jamieson 

PENNSYLVANIA 

DOYLE WAYBRIGHT, Gettysburg 

DANIEL E. MELHORN, York 

PUERTO RICO 

VICTOR LINARES, San German 

JULIO O. CASTRO, Maricao 

RHODE ISLAND 

PAULSKALING, Greene 

RUSSELL YEAW, Scituate 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

ROGER D. PORTER, Loris 

THOMPSON SMITH, JR., Piedmont 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

GARY BULLER, Brookings 

ROBERT SMIT, Lennox 

TENNESSEE 

MARK L. McKEE, Castalian Springs 

CHUCK WOOTEN, Millington 

JOHN BROCKWELL, Paris 



TEXAS 

BARHAM FULMER, Nacogdoches 
ALAN JONES, Longview 
MARTY CLAYTON, Lamesa 
CARTER HOUNSEL, Rising Star 
MIKE FIELDS, New Braunfels 
JOHN LEIDNER, Mission 

UTAH 

BILLSORENSON, Axtel 

PHIL PETERSEN, Tremonton 

VERMONT 

EDWARD HIGLEY, Brattleboro 

GORDON BARNABY, Tunbridge 

VIRGINIA 

PAUL S. CRAUN, Mt. Crawford 

CABELCOBBS, Chatham 

WASHINGTON 

JERRY BONAGOFSKY, Eatonville 

DENNIS WALLACE, Toledo 

WEST VIRGINIA 

RAY SHIMP, Liverpool 

CHARLES T. EXLINE, Elizabeth 

WISCONSIN 

DICK PRINE, Hillsdale 
GLENN MOE, Mondovi 
JERRY MEISSNER, Chili 

WYOMING 

DAN KIRKBRIDE, Meriden 
JEFFFUECHSEL, Riverton 



NATIONAL FFA BAND 




The National FFA Band, under the direction of Roger Heath, of Purdue Uni- 
versity, assisted by Leo Vossler, North Dakota, and Leslie F. Crabbe, Ohio, added 
spirit and life to the National FFA Convention. Following is a list of the 1 18 Band 
members, representing 43 States. 



IX 



BAND MEMBERS 



ALABAMA 

Michael Smith 

ARIZONA 

Miss Julie Fenn 
Larry Taylor 
David Whitley 

ARKANSAS 

Elvin Chaney 
Tim Jones 
David Nicewarner 
Sidney Willard 

CALIFORNIA 

Miss Suzanne Butler 
Miss Kristi Silkwood 
Steven Sweet 

DELAWARE 

Donald Campbell 

FLORIDA 

Groover Hudson 

GEORGIA 

Claud Elliott, Jr. 

IDAHO 

Don Cornell 
Charles Miller 

ILLINOIS 

Keith Brown 
Richard Craine 
Donald Eveland 
Dave Juliusson 
Greg Townsend 

INDIANA 

Brian Eager 
David Eley 
Elwood Kauffman 
Howard Reiff 
Kenneth Salkeld 

IOWA 

Michael Biedenfeld 
Brent Huldeen 
Doyle Pleggenkuhle 
Larry Polsley 
Dan Riessen 
Anton Simanek 
Kevin Whitmore 

KANSAS 

Don Garlow 
Ron Heiniger 

KENTUCKY 

Jesse Jones 
Glenn Puckett 
Miss Arlene Smith 

LOUISIANA 

David Briscoe 
Mark Manuel 



MAINE 

Alan Gray 
Scott Williams 

MARYLAND 

Gary Bollinger 
Tommy Tessier 

MICHIGAN 

Roger Anspaugh 
Charles Green, Jr. 
Tim Middleton 
Miss Gwen Rupert 
Fred Wieringa 

MINNESOTA 

Richard Boevers 
Scott Gottschalk 
Paul McKenzie 

MISSISSIPPI 

Michael Carrithers 
Danny Gaines 
Tony Prescott 

MISSOURI 

James Clark 
Jerry Elliott 
Lynn Griffith 

MONTANA 

Robert Jenson 
James Knudson 
Robert Mussetter 

NEBRASKA 

Daniel Davis 
Roy Hofrichter 
Dave Lovelace 
Dennis Reiss 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

David MacLean 

NEW JERSEY 

Christopher Schlaeppi 

NEW MEXICO 

Paul Donisthorpe 
Jimmy Stifler 

NEW YORK 

Lester Mahnke 

Gary Meek 

Miss Patricia Stoecker 

NORTH CAROLINA 

David Childers 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Gary Grinolds 
David Hegstad 
Terry Paulson 

OHIO 

Danny Blanton 
Mark Davis 
Robert Donaldson 



Mark Rutter 
Chris Smith 
Steve Taylor 

OKLAHOMA 

Bruce Hammer 
Tommy Jamison 
John Pursell 

OREGON 

MikeChaffin 
Monte Fusishin 
Peter Mastenbrook 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Craig Mellott 
Leonard Stiffler 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Robert Lewis 
Larry Smith 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Dan Feige 
Tim Harvey 
Gary Mark 

TENNESSEE 

David Wilkerson 
David Williams 

TEXAS 

David Duty 
Danny Fletcher 
Curtis Leonhardt 

UTAH 

Paul Bobo 
Eddie Burt 
Gerald Page, Jr. 

VERMONT 

Howard Longway 

VIRGINIA 

Randy Clark 
Dennis Gochenour 
Donald Sebera 

WASHINGTON 

Miss Kathy Norris 
Greg Kaminski 
Larry Benfield 
Lyle Oberg 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Mike Bennett 

WISCONSIN 

Bryan Anderson 
Tim Sassman 
Clarke Schroeder 
James Wirth 

WYOMING 

Dick McConnaughey 
Bill Whitney 



NATIONAL FFA CHORUS 



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The National FFA Chorus, under the direction of Marvin D. Myers, West 
Lafayette, Indiana, assisted by W. 7. Johnson, North Carolina and Barry Steinman, 
Woodburn, Indiana, played a vital role in the annual FFA Convention in Kansas 
City. Following is a list of 104 FFA Chorus members representing 35 States. 



ARIZONA 

Willard W. Tolman, 



Jr. 



ARKANSAS 

Bobby Hope 

Tommy Norwood 

Randy Reynolds 

CALIFORNIA 

Miss Christine L. Jacobsen 

Gregory D. Yates 

FLORIDA 

Robert L. Langford 

Mark Murray 

Howard J. Spears 

GEORGIA 

Michael Alan Dekle 

ILLINOIS 

Greg Chatterton 

Mike Dudley 

Jon Gillespie 

Steve Wheeler 

David Yoder 

INDIANA 

Stanley P. Church 

John Cline 

Michael Gene Jones 

Rodney Kelsay 



CHORUS MEMBERS 

IOWA 

Alan Adams 
Bruce H. Epley 
John Hughes 
Kurt Musser 
Rick Twedt 
Dalen P. Wanless 
Keith Winkelmann 

KANSAS 

Dennis William Good 
Joe Haffener 
Bill Hunter 
Alfred Mercer 

KENTUCKY 

Sherley Franklin Kemper 
James Ernest Luttrell 
David Morris 

MICHIGAN 

Don E. Black 

Wayne Poll 

Brian Donald Semelbauer 

Terry Zuhlke 

MINNESOTA 

Doug Ahrenstorff 
Keneth Zoeller 



MISSOURI 

Randy Evans 
Tom Hawkins 
Danny Malan 
Roger Smith 
Lloyd Sybert 
Lyle Sybert 

MONTANA 

Warren Johnson 
Darryl Naugle 
Bernie Lee Satrom 

NEBRASKA 

Scot M. Bonnesen 
Mark Eberspacher 
Forrest Johnson 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Duane Klebe 

NEW JERSEY 

Miss Jeannie Lee Apgar 
Miss Jane Leslie Cabeen 

NEW MEXICO 

Terry Paul Andrews 
Robert Dale Blanton 
Archie Jaramillo 



XI 



NEW YORK 

Gary Cunningham 
William Martin 
Ronald Schofell 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Wayne Jones 
Michael Lanier 
Clarence Powell 
Elbert Powell 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Kevin Braaten 
Carl Allen Brehmer 
Terry J. Geisen 
Dennis Dale Mayer 
Wayne Stoller 

OHIO 

Don Duncan 
Dennis R. Hostetler 
Timothy Jay Pendleton 
Miss Georgiene Ponce 
Frank Mitchell Wells 



OKLAHOMA 

Stephen M. Turner 

OREGON 

Miss Linda Ann George 
Gordon Elling Goschie 
John M. Jones 
Ronald Allen Phillips 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Charles Heim 
Alan Scott Maclay 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Allen Eugene Horsley 
Jim A. Larsen 
Allen Linn 
Gary Alvin Sanborn 

TENNESSEE 

John Wright Bynum 

TEXAS 

Frederick Donald McClure 
Robert Redd 



VERMONT 

Gary Alan Petit 

James D. Wright 

VIRGINIA 

Steve Davis 

Thomas V. Jenkins, Jr. 

Wilton Mortimore Parrish 

WASHINGTON 

Ralph Aiken 

Bryan Clifford Dobbins 

Daniel G. Huffman 

Robert Leonard Stroh 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Paul Lawrence Teets 

WISCONSIN 

Norman Allen Bern 

Thomas Joseph Brunner 

Randy J. Duncanson 

Donald Olson 

WYOMING 

Val D. Eklund 

Rick Edward Robbins 




Dale Evans & Roy Rogers "do their thing" ot the 
convention. 





An outstanding young 
member speaks to the con- 
vention on what the FFA 
means to him. 



Members provide recreation and entertainment to 
add "spice" to the program. 



Minutes of the Convention 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1971 
Morning Session 

The Forty-Fourth National Convention of the Future Farmers of America 
convened in the Municipal Auditorium, Kansas City, Missouri at nine 
o'clock. National President Dan Lehmann, of Pleasant Plains, Illinois, 
presiding. 

Following music by the National FFA Band, under the direction of 
Roger Heath, of Lafayette, Indiana, the Posting of the Colors was presented 
by the Color Guard from Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. The National Anthem 
was sung by Fred McClure, of the Texas FFA Association. 

The Invocation was presented by Harry Birdwell, National FFA Presi- 
dent, 1969-70, after which he was presented with a special appreciation 
plaque. 

The Report of Delegate Credentials was called for and Secretary 
McCulley reported 113 delegates present from 50 chartered associations. 
The seating of delegates followed. 

It was moved by Bradley of California, seconded by Goolsby of Okla- 
homa and carried that the minutes of the 43rd National Convention be 
approved as they appear in the 1970 Convention Proceedings. 

President Lehmann announced the appointment of the Nominating, 
Auditing and Program of Work Committees. He then made a brief address 
of welcome and the candidates for National FFA Office were introduced. 

Following music by the National FFA Chorus, under the direction of 
Marvin Myers, of West Lafayette, Indiana, a special ceremony was pre- 
sented entitled "Torchbearers of FFA." 

The address of welcome was given by the Honorable Charles B. 
Wheeler, Mayor of Kansas City, Missouri. 

Vice President Allen assumed the chair, and organ music was pre- 
sented by Steve Hofing of the Illinois FFA Association. 

Secretary McCulley presented the National FFA Officers' Yearly Re- 
port. Shewbart of Alabama moved the acceptance of this report; motion 
seconded by Dubas of Nebraska and carried. 

National Advisor H. N. Hunsicker, presented the names of the indi- 
viduals who were recommended by the Boards of National Officers and 
Directors to receive the Honorary American Farmer Degree, Distinguished 
Service Award and VIP recognition. 

Lamb of New York moved that the Honorary American Farmer Degree. 
Distinguished Service Award and VIP recognition be conferred upon the 
individuals recommended; motion seconded by Case of Massachusetts and 
carried. 

Vice President Dooley presented an address entitled "Tomorrow's 
Keeper." Carrithers of California moved the acceptance of Vice President 
Dooley's address, and that he be commended on his outstanding year of 
service to the FFA; motion seconded by Gilmore of New Mexico and carried. 



FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 




The National Advisory Council for Vocational Education participated in the 
convention activities by serving as Agricultural Proficiency Judges and attending 
sessions. The interest and support of this prestigious group to agribusiness and 
FFA means much to the organization. 



J. M. Campbell, National FFA Treasurer, presented his report. 
Williams of Maine moved the acceptance of Mr. Campbell's report, and that 
he be commended for a job well done; motion seconded by Hitchcock of 
Mississippi and carried. 

Alvarez of Florida presented the Report of the Auditing Committee 
and moved its acceptance; motion seconded by Sorenson of Utah and 
carried. 

Dewitt Edmonds, of the Georgia FFA Association, presented an ad- 
dress entitled "Involved in FFA with a Purpose," after which he was pre- 
sented a plaque in appreciation for his participation in the national con- 
vention. 

President Lehmann resumed the chair. 

A slide presentation, "FFA in Action" was presented. This presenta- 
tion depicted how the FFA serves members. 

Brief greetings were given by S. Archie Holdridge, President, News- 
paper Farm Editors of America, and Dean Curtiss, President, National 
Association of Farm Broadcasters on behalf of their organizations. Plaques 
of appreciation were then presented to both organizations in appreciation 
for their outstanding service to the FFA. 

John Stearns, Producer of Agriculture . . . USA, presented a speech 
entitled "Let's Create a Positive Image of FFA." 

The meeting adjourned with the closing ceremony at eleven fifty-five 
o'clock. 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 3 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1971 
Afternoon Session 

The second session of the convention was called to order with the 
opening ceremony at two o'clock by President Lehmann. 

Following music by the National FFA Chorus, Craun of Virginia pre- 
sented the report of the National FFA Program of Activities Committee and 
moved its acceptance; motion seconded by Higley of Vermont and carried. 

Olson of North Dakota presented the report of the Manual Review and 
Revision Committee and moved its acceptance; motion seconded by 
Gonzalez of Arizona and carried. 

J. Phil Campbell, Under Secretary of the U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture, addressed the convention on Rural Development. The Honorary 
American Farmer Degree was then conferred upon Mr. Campbell. 

Vice President Humphreys assumed the chair. 

Neidlinger of Indiana presented the report of the National FFA Supply 
Service Committee and moved its acceptance; motion seconded by Lamb 
of New York and carried. 

Jones of Texas presented the report of the National FFA Magazine 
Committee and moved its acceptance; motion seconded by Wood of Ala- 
bama and carried. 

Bonagofsky of Washington presented the report of the official FFA 
Calendar Committee and moved its acceptance; motion seconded by 
Jacobs of Oklahoma and carried. 

Muller of California presented the report of the Program of Activities 
(Local Guide) Committee and moved its acceptance; motion seconded by 
Sorenson of Utah and carried. 

Case of Massachusetts presented the report of the Leadership Pro- 
gram Committee and moved its acceptance; motion seconded by Williams 
of Maine and carried. 

Dubas of Nebraska presented the report of the FFA Information Pro- 
gram Committee and moved its acceptance; motion seconded by Divoll of 
Massachusetts and carried. 

President Lehmann resumed the chair. 

The next item of business was proposed amendments to the National 
FFA Constitution. 

It was moved by Williams of Maine, seconded by Olson of North 
Carolina and carried to amend Article II, Section C, by adding a sixth 
paragraph to read as follows: "Only dues from collegiate and post-secon- 
dary members shall be used to promote activities of collegiate and post- 
secondary chapters." 

It was moved by Clayton of Texas, seconded by Lamb of New York and 
carried to amend Article V, Section C, Paragraph 7, by deleting "$100.00" 
and substituting "$50.00." 

A number of other recommended National Constitutional amend- 
ments were considered by the delegates but not approved. 



4 FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 

It was moved by Muller of California, seconded by Lamb of New York 
and carried that the delegation go on record as putting national emphasis 
on an information program that would be started by the national organiza- 
tion and distributed to the States. 

It was moved by Craun of Virginia, seconded by Fuechsel of Wyoming 
and carried that the National Board of Directors continue to investigate 
redisricting of the States in order to obtain more equal distribution of 
members among the four regions, and that a report be given at the 1972 
national convention. 

The meeting adjourned with the closing ceremony at 4:30 p.m. 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1971 

Evening Session 

The third session of the convention was called to order with the open- 
ing ceremony at seven fifteen o'clock by President Lehmann. 

Following a concert by the National FFA Band, Secretary McCulley 
assumed the chair. An explanation of the Public Speaking Contest was 
given and the final contestants were introduced. After the introduction of 
the judges and timekeepers, and drawing for speaking order the Public 
Speaking Contest followed. 

The Kansas City Advisory Council and Agricultural Career Show ex- 
hibitors were recognized, followed by the presentation of Special VIP Cita- 
tions. Distinguished Service Citations were then presented to the Kansas 
City Star and Agriculture . . . USA. 

Robert H. Finch, Counselor to the President of the United States, was 
introduced and addressed the convention. 

President Lehmann assumed the chair. 

Winners of the National Public Speaking Contest were announced 
and awards presented. The National winner was William J. Cofield, repre- 
senting the Southern Region. 

The meeting adjourned with the closing ceremony at nine thirty 
o'clock. 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1971 

Morning Session 

The fourth session of the cenvention was called to order with the 
opening ceremony at nine o'clock by President Lehmann. 

Following music by the National FFA Band and Chorus, Gold, Silver 
and Bronze Emblem Awards in the National Chapter Awards Program were 
presented by the national officers. 

Vice President Beard assumed the chair. 

Gilmore of New Mexico, presented the report of the National FFA 
Foundation Contests and Awards Committee and moved its adoption; mo- 
tion seconded by Loyd of North Carolina and carried. 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 5 

The national officers presented Gold, Silver and Bronze awards in the 
National Chapter Safety Awards Program. 

Representatives of vocational youth groups and other youth guests 
were introduced and extended brief greetings in behalf of their organiza- 
tion. Each individual was presented with a small token of appreciation, 
and the Distributive Education Clubs of America received special recogni- 
tion for their 25 years of service to youth. Those participating were: 

DECA — Dale Perrymore, Southern Region Vice President for 
High School Division, Oklahoma. FHA — Marsha Bowen, National 
President, Utah. VICA — Judy Messer, Region IV, Vice President. 
Texas. FBLA — Linda Beene, Phi Beta Lambda National Presi- 
dent, Arkansas. OEA — Karen Coutson, Central Vice President, 
Iowa. 4-H — Clayton Taylor, National Leadership Winner, Okla- 
homa. AIC — Glenda Schmeeckle, Miss AIC Youth Scholar, 
Colorado. MISS RURAL ELECTRIFICATION, Sherry McPheeters, 
Willcox, Arizona. 

Vice President Humphreys assumed the chair. 

Vice President Allen presented an address entitled "The Farmer's 
Daughter." Lamb of New York moved the acceptance of this address and 
that Vice President Allen be commended for a job well done; motion 
seconded by Melhorn of Pennsylvania and carried. 

Presentation of the FFA Foundation Agricultural Proficiency Awards 
was made by the national officers in a colorful pageant. 

President Lehmann resumed the chair. 

John G. Veneman, Under Secretary, U. S. Department of Health, Edu- 
cation, and Welfare, addressed the convention. The honorary American 
Farmer Degree was then conferred upon Mr. Veneman for his outstanding 
leadership and support of agribusiness and the FFA. 

Vice President Humphreys assumed the chair. 

The Distinguished Service Award was presented to those individuals 
recommended by the convention delegates. 

President Lehmann resumed the chair. 

Gold, Silver and Bronze emblem awards in the Building Our American 
Communities Program were presented by the national officers. 

The meeting adjourned with the closing ceremony at eleven forty-five 
o'clock. 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1971 

Afternoon Session 

The fifth session of the convention was called to order at two o'clock 
with the opening ceremony by President Lehmann. 

Following organ music Vice President Allen assumed the chair. 

The four regional winners of the Building Our American Communities 
Program were announced. James V. Smith, Administrator of the Farmers 



FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 




mwsnmm 




: M " 



FFA members receive the American Former Degree in on impressive cere- 
mony. This group represents mony who hove earned the degree through off-farm 
work experience programs to prepare themselves to serve those who receive this 
degree through accomplishments in production agribusiness. 

Home Administration, was introduced and made brief remarks. The 
National BOAC winner was announced after a slide presentation of the 
regional winners. 

Secretary McCulley presented an address entitled "We Will." Harada, 
of Oregon, moved the adoption of Secretary McCulley's address and that 
he be commended for his excellent work as a national officer; motion 
seconded by Crosby of Indiana and carried. 

James P. Clouse, Vice Chairman of the FFA Alumni Council, was in- 
troduced and presented State Charters to the following FFA Alumni Asso- 
ciations: Kansas, Louisiana, Indiana, Ohio, Oregon, Texas, Oklahoma, 
Wyoming and Tennessee. 

President Lehmann resumed the chair. 

The Honorary American Farmer Degree was conferred on those can- 
didates approved by the convention delegates on Wednesday. Glen D. Mc- 
Dowell, President of the National Vocational Agricultural Teachers Associa- 
tion, made brief remarks on behalf of the vocational agriculture instructors. 

Service Plaques were then presented to the following outgoing mem- 
bers of the FFA Board of Directors and Foundation Board of Trustees: 

J. T, Davis, California. James P. Clouse, Indiana. Millard Gund- 
lach, Wisconsin. James E. Dougan, Ohio. Harold L. Noakes, New 
York. Frank R. Stover, South Carolina. M. C. Gaar, Georgia. 
Jesse A. Taft, Massachusetts. 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 

Greg Bamford, National FFA President, 1967-68, addressed the con- 
vention, after which he was presented a plaque in recognition of his out- 
standing leadership, achievements in agribusiness and inspiration to the 
FFA. 

Olson of North Dakota moved that the candidates recommended by 
the Boards of National Officers and Directors receive the American Farmer 
Degree; motion seconded by Fuechsel of Wyoming and carried. The cere- 
mony followed. 

The meeting adjourned with the closing ceremony at four-thirty 
o'clock. 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1971 

Evening Session 

(Prior to the opening session the FFA Talent Show, under the direc- 
tion of Don Erickson, State FFA Advisor, North Dakota, was held.) 

The sixth session of the convention was called to order at seven-thirty 
o'clock with the opening ceremony by President Lehmann. 

Following the grand entry and music by the National Band, the Na- 
tional Chorus presented a concert. 

Recognition was given to all sponsors to the National FFA Foundation, 
Inc. and special plaques were presented to the 15 and 25 year sponsors. 

25 Year Sponsor 

Standard Oil Company (Incorporated in Kentucky) 

15 Year Sponsors 

Aetna Bearing Company. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Dana Bennett. 
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railroad Company. Dan- 
user Machine Company. Elanco Products Company, Division of 
Eli Lilly & Company. The E. Kahn's Sons Company. Victor Divi- 
sion — Dana Corporation. 

Recognition was then given to the Industry Chairmen, Regional Coor- 
dinators and members of the Executive Council of the National FFA Foun- 
dation Sponsoring Committee. 

Fred Stines, Publisher, Successful Farming, and 1971 Chairman of 
the Foundation Sponsoring Committee, was introduced and presented a 
special plaque in appreciation for his services. After brief greetings, the 
Honorary American Farmer Degree was conferred upon Mr. Stines by 
President Lehmann. 

J. E. Streetman, Vice President, Allied Mills, Inc. was introduced and 
made brief remarks. Mr. Streetman will serve as 1972 Chairman of the 
Foundation Sponsoring Committee. 

Robert M. Worthington, Associate Commissioner, Bureau of Adult. 
Vocational and Technical Education, U. S. Office of Education was intro- 
duced and extended greetings, after which the Honorary American Farmer 



8 



FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 



Degree was conferred upon him. Members of the National Advisory Council 
on Vocational Education were then introduced and given appropriate recog- 
nition. 

Following the Massing of State Flags by the Star State Farmers, the 
"Stars Over America" pageant was presented. The pageant depicted by 
slides the history of vocational agriculture and the organizing of the FFA. 
It then emphasized the broadening of the instructional program and the 
real meaning of Agribusiness — and how FFA has adjusted its awards pro- 
gram, especially the recognition of "the Stars." The Regional Star Agri- 
businessmen and Regional Star Farmers were introduced. The Honorary 
American Farmer Degree was conferred upon the fathers of the eight 
"Stars" and special certificates presented to their mothers and wives. The 
Star Agribusinessman of America and Star Farmer of America were then 
announced as "Stars over America." 

The meeting adjourned with the closing ceremony at ten-fifteen 
o'clock. 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1971 
Morning Session 

The seventh session of the convention was called to order at nine 
o'clock with the opening ceremony by President Lehmann. 





Regional award winners in fifteen agricultural proficiency areas were recog- 
nized in a colorful pageant. The accomplishments of the fifteen national winners 
were depicted in color slides to "show what has, and can be done" through the 
FFA incentive awards program. 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 9 

It was moved by Branham of Ohio and seconded by Fabian of Michigan 
that authority be given to the Boards of National Officers and Directors to 
edit all committee reports. Motion failed. 

J. M. Campbell, National FFA Treasurer, gave an explanation of the 
1972-73 National FFA Budget. Beck of Oklamoma moved the acceptance 
of this report; motion seconded by Olson of North Dakota and carried. 

Williams of Maine moved that the National FFA Dues remain at $1.00 
per member; motion seconded by Higley of Vermont and carried. 

Gilmore of New Mexico moved that the delegate body go on record 
as encouraging respect for guests and award winners at the national con- 
vention; motion seconded by Dubas of New Mexico and carried. 

Neidlinger of Indiana moved that a song composed by Marvin Myers, 
Director of the National FFA Chorus, be accepted as an FFA song; motion 
seconded by Sorenson of Utah and carried. 

Jones of Texas moved that the coronation of the American Royal 
Queen be discontinued as a part of the convention program; motion 
seconded by Allnutt of Maryland and carried. 

Roy Rogers and Dale Evans were introduced and each gave brief re- 
marks. They were then presented with a special plaque of appreciation, 
which Mr. Rogers indicated would be placed in their museum in California. 

Vice President Dooley assumed the chair. 

Robert Dole, United States Senator from Kansas, was introduced and 
made brief remarks. 

Candidates for the American Royal Queen were introduced by their 
State FFA Presidents. Miss Debbie Lee Carey, of Ohio, was chosen Queen 
of the American Royal, and an impressive coronation ceremony followed. 

Vice President Humphreys presented an address entitled "Who Will 
Answer." Seegmiller of Iowa moved to commend Vice President Humphreys 
on his retiring address and that he be congratulated on the excellent job 
he did as a national officer; motion seconded by Kelly of Connecticut and 
carried. 

Mr. Yoshio Okawara, Minister Extraordinary and Plenipotentary, Em- 
bassy of Japan addressed the convention; he was presented with a plaque 
of appreciation. 

Goolsby of Oklahoma presented the report of the International Activi- 
ties Committee and moved its acceptance; motion seconded by Guizzini of 
Nevada and carried. 

International guests in attendance were introduced and honorary 
membership in the FAA conferred upon them. FFA participants in the FAA 
Work Experience Abroad Tours were introduced and presented plaques. 
David Branham, of Ohio gave brief remarks relative to the Work Experience 
students. 

President Lehmann resumed the chair. 

Vice President Beard presented an address entitled "Here Comes 
Pink." Goolsby of Oklahoma moved the acceptance of this address and 
that Vice President Beard be commended for his outstanding service as 
a national officer; motion seconded by Inman of North Carolina and carried. 



10 FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 

Vice President Humphreys announced the top judging winners in Live- 
stock, Dairy, Poultry, Meats and Dairy Production. 

O'Nan of Kentucky presented the report of the nominating committee 
and moved its acceptance; motion seconded by Seegmiller of Iowa and 
carried. The slate of candidates as submitted by the Nominating Com- 
mittee was unanimously elected. 

The meeting adjourned with the closing ceremony at twelve-twenty 
o'clock. 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1971 
Evening Session 

The final session of the convention was called to order at seven-fifteen 
o'clock with the opening ceremony by President Lehmann. 

Gold, Silver and Bronze awards were presented to talent that partici- 
pated in the national convention. 

Vice President Dooley assumed the chair. 

Seegmiller of Iowa presented the report of the Convention Program 
Committee and moved its adoption; motion seconded by Maca I lister of New 
Jersey and carried. 

Dazey of Illinois presented the report of the Convention Proceedings 
Committee and moved its adoption; motion seconded by Craun of Virginia 
and carried. 

Mayfield of Kansas presented the report of the Resolutions Committee 
and moved its adoption; motion seconded by Muller of California and car- 
ried. President Lehmann presented his retiring address "In Our Hands." 
Turner of Illinois moved the acceptance of this report and that President 
Lehmann be commended for his outstanding service as National President; 
motion seconded by Fabian of Michigan and carried. 

President Lehmann resumed the chair. 

The Honorary American Farmer Degree was conferred upon the 
fathers of the national officers and special certificates presented to their 
mothers. Special plaques were presented to the officers' local advisors. 

The newly-elected officers were installed in a very impressive and 
colorful ceremony. National officer pins and leadership plaques were pre- 
sented to each of the past officers. Tim Burke, newly-elected president, 
presented Dan Lehmann with the gavel he used to open the convention. 
The new president extended greetings. 

The final session of the convention adjourned sine die at nine-fifteen 
o'clock with the closing ceremony by the new officers. 

Following the closing ceremony, special entertainment was furnished 
by the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company. 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 



] 1 



SPECIAL RECOGNITION 

American Farmer Degree 

Each year at the convention, members who have achieved the highest 
degree are recognized in an impressive ceremony. There were 471 who 
received the degree. 



ALABAMA 

Steven Keith Adams, Albertville 
William Ellis Bailey, Bessemer 
Danny R. Childress, Clanton 
Mike Cotton, Black 
James Eddie Dillard, Black 
John Bert East, Leesburg 
Dickie E. Fowler, Crossville 
Joseph Stacey Hatcher, Hartford 
John David Johnson, Graham 
William Harvey Kyles, Reform 
Roger McWaters, Coffee Springs 
Rodney Moon, Harvest 
John Dale Parker, Seale 
Jackie D. Parmer, Louisville 
Sammy R. Peebles, Brewton 
Hoyt Gerald Penn, Cullman 
Dennis Steve Pepper, Ardmore 
Billy Don Rowe, Falkville 
Gaylord Britt Smith, Jr., Chunchula 
Billy Thompson, Brent 
Curtis York Thompson, Geneva 
Charles Philip Walton, Killen 
Billy Ray Whisenhunt, Vinemont 
David Harris Whitten, Centre 
Edward Eugene Woerner, Elberta 

ARIZONA 

Don Kimble, Rodeo, New Mexico 
Clifford W. Saylor, Glendale 
Roger D. Thomas, Willcox 

ARKANSAS 

Leslie Jay Adams, Sheridan 

John Eric Ball, Scott 

John Stephen Brown, Lowell 

Paul Cate, Fayetteville 

Terry Cole, Branch 

James Thomas Dickson, Barber 

Duane H. Foote, Barber 

Eric Gibbs, Barber 

Richard Huck, Branch 

Jerry Floyd Hunton, Prairie Grove 

Billy Don Johnson, Des Arc 

Randy Ladd, Leachville 

Mike Law, Cecil 

Kenneth James Reynolds, Rogers 

CALIFORNIA 

Darryl L. Armstrong, Cuttler 
Larry G. Bowman, Modesto 



Jerry Warren Bradley, Modesto 
Jiggs A. Briggs, Lancaster 
Joel E. Briggs, Lancaster 
Randall Lee Broughton, Modesto 
Raymond D. Chavers, Lucerne Valley 
Andrew Richard Clark, Bishop 
John Henry De Ruiter, Hanford 
Mark Long, Mariposa 
Allen Edwin Mintz, Rio Oso 
Wayne Robert Morris, Fullerton 
William E. Parker, Carpinteria 
Mark Parreira, Los Banos 
Lee Pitts, Santa Paula 
Thomas E. Pombo, Tracy 
Jim C. Santos, Riverdale 
Dorvin Elroy Stockdale, Reedly 

COLORADO 

James Kent Bamford, Haxtum 
James T. Blackford, Rocky Ford 
Everett Kissler, Kersey 
Kalvin Tupps, Watkins 

CONNECTICUT 

Barry Griffiths, Sterling 
John R. Russin, Millerton 

FLORIDA 

Wayne Dale Boyett, Clermont 
William E. Cellon, Jr., Alachua 
Johnnie Franklin Copeland, Jr., Alachua 
Ion Dennis Coulter, Venus 
John Elliot Crews, Fort Meade 
Randall Gregory Eddy, Gainesville 
Charles Allan Fowler, High Springs 
Norman Charles Freel, Lake Wales 
Tim Hatcher, Bascom 
Myron Hudson, Westville 
Alvin A. Price, Micanopy 
Grady Ercelle Watson, Jr., Trenton 
William Mark Woodard, 
Lake Panasoffkee 

GEORGIA 

Andrew Avery, Jr., Camilla 
Charles F. Bruce, Moultrie 
Don Copeland, Tifton 
Charles H. Dixon, Bristol 
Marlin Durden Gibson, Colquitt 
Samuel L. Green, Savannah 
Carl W. Hall, Valdosta 



12 



FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 



Lee Ivey, Lakeland 
Johnny Jones, Ellijay 
Cary L. Moore, Ashburn 
Charles W. Morgan, Lyons 
Stacy Poitevint, Bainbridge 
Roger K. Presley, Meigs 
Robert Donathan Rawlins, Rebecca 
David O. Ritch, Patterson 
Murray C. Roberson, Chula 
Rodney D. Sellers, Pelham 
John Earl Strickland, Mershon 
James Charles Thompson, Lenox 
Donald O. Turner, Jr., Pavo 
Bennet Whitfield, Twin City 

HAWAII 

H. Dale Sato, Pahoa 

IDAHO 

Calvin W. Baird, Shelley 
Dee Vernal Parsons, Victor 
Thomas George Roland, Payette 
Paul M. Tew, Shelley 

ILLINOIS 

Richard Britton, Caledonia 
Craig Allyn Buhrow, Sterling 
Gary Michael Dierolf, Orion 
Tommy Odell Henson, luka 
Larry Dean Hill, Pleasant Hill 
Robert Lee Laning, Mt. Sterling 
Clem Leaver, Rossville 
Chris Clayton Massie, Mt. Erie 
John Edward Rich, Sycamore 
Douglas N. Scheider, Red Oak 
James David Serven, Prairie City 
Lyle Lee Serven, St. Augustine 
Gaylord J. Spilker, Altamont 
Mercer Turner, Wapella 
David Marc Van Orman, Forest City 
Pat White, Lewistown 
John L. Wise, Bethany 

INDIANA 

Joe Creager, Butler 

Roger Dean Foulks, Wolcott 

Ralph E. Haggard, Berne 

Joe W. Harker, Flat Rock 

Wayne N. Houin, Argos 

Jackie Irvin, Wingate 

Robert G. Kissel, New Palestine 

Robert L. Niewedde, Brownstown 

Gary Alan Lancaster, Trafalgar 

Robert Allen Schembs, Remington 

Bob J. Smith, Greenwood 

IOWA 

Larry L. Adams, Mount Ayr 
James Edwin Asmus, Osceola 
Timothy J. Burke, New Hampton 
Teddy Rex Cary, Bloomfield 
Donovan H. Ellis, Humeston 



Wayne L. Fredericks, Osage 

Larry Lee Haas, Portsmouth 

Leslie Lee Luitjens, Ashton 

William F. Palmersheim, New Hampton 

Lyle W. Riggan, West Liberty 

Kenneth D. Ross, Charles City 

Jim Allen Sampson, Lyle, Minnesota 

KANSAS 

Paul Owen Cully, South Haven 

Gregory Joe Hands, Garden City 

W. Benson Keil, Concordia 

Byron Moberly, St. Francis 

Ronald Roth, Green 

Glenn Stucky, Galva 

J. W. Twombly, Severance 

KENTUCKY 

Richard Boyd, Jr., Hardyville 
Donald Ray Burdette, Owensboro 
Michael Wayne DeArmond, Greenville 
Dale C. Emmons, Hillsboro 
Robert A. Engler, Eddyville 
Donald Wayne Gooch, Stanford 
Larry Hardesty, Brandenburg 
Randall W. Heath, Mayfield 
Rodney Dale Kelly, Georgetown 
Mike Millikan, Eddyville 
Thomas Pierce Moorman, Glen Dean 
Jack Rudy, Barlow 
Philip Simon, Bowling Green 
Dickie Joe Turner, Hampton 
David H. Wood, Princeton 

LOUISIANA 

Walter Sidney Brock, Jr., Franklinton 
Keith Dison, Saline 
Ronald Lane Dobson, Saline 
Daniel Joseph Guidroz, Lockport 
Fredrick B. Jenkins, Amite 
Michael Joseph Juneau, Moreauville 
Johnnie Mayeux, Cottonport 
James E. Melton, Jr., Oak Grove 
William Glen Melton, Winnfield 
Cornelius Mark Richard, lota 
Jerry D. Simmons, Franklinton 
Paul Norman Stewart, Greensburg 

MAINE 

Paul C. Durepo, Limestone 
Larry Alton Perry, Presque Isle 

MARYLAND 

Joseph E. Ayers, Rising Sun 
John Ray Dulin, Ridgely 
Kevin Ernest Hall, Keymar 

MICHIGAN 

Thomas Albertson, Clifford 

Keith Lamarr Eisenmann, Blissfield 

William D. Ives, Rockford 

Fred Krumm, Allegan 

Gary A. Leininger, Waldron 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 



13 



Joseph A. Malburg, Romeo 
Michael Jay Martindale, Corunna 
Dwight H. Nash, Lyons 
John Gerald Oakley, Stockbridge 
Robert A. Peterson, Fenwick 
Edward Sergent, Vassar 

MINNESOTA 

Robert Abbe, Owatonna 
John Almendinger, Faribault 
Larry H. Anderson, Clinton 
George J. Bakeberg, Waverly 
Bradley E. Berkner, Sleepy Eye 
James R. Dick, Mountain Lake 
Lonney Eastvold, Hartland 
Roger A. Gilland, Morgan 
Larry E. Greden, Minneiska 
Bill Hoberg, Ortonville 
Larry Kramer, St. James 
Steven Melzer, Courtland 
Barry Rink, Byron 
James L. Rowekamp, Lewiston 
Dennis H. Tyrrell, Browerville 

MISSISSIPPI 

Marshall Cooper Beard, Morton 
James Michael Boyle, Duck Hill 
Joe M. Coleman, Corinth 
Keith Courson, Hickory Flat 
Alfred M. Pud Dennis, Lawrence 
Robert Taylor Gordon, Jr., Duck Hill 
Edward Patton Hodum, Walnut 
James Arthur Huddleston, Booneville 
Jack N. Williams, Learned 

MISSOURI 

Robert Duane Barton, Maysville 
James Halley Brackenridge, 

El Dorado Springs 
Bill W. Buehler, Verona 
Gary Bunnell, Spickard 
Arnold Lynn Burditt, Hunnewell 
Mike Burkeybile, Spickard 
John Hudson Clay, Jamestown 
Kenny H. Degraffenreid, Bolivar 
William F. Dewert, Union 
W. G. (Billy) Fieth, Bolivar 
Gary M. Flehmer, Pierce City 
Sterling E. Garr, Rothville 
Harley S. Greer, Adrian 
Mike Henderson, Purdy 

MONTANA 

Rickey E. Arnold, Absarokee 
Helmut Teichert, Sun River 
Myles J. Watts, Ismay 

NEBRASKA 

Richard Brown, Taylor 
Ronnie L. Drews, Yutan 
Alan Kent Kjeldgaard, Tekamah 
Gary Wayne Leach, Ainsworth 



Robert G. Timblin, Alvo 
Gary Traeger, Fairbury 

NEVADA 

Larry E. Goicoechea, Elko 
Lloyd Allen Torell, Jackpot 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Allan J. Quigley, Hudson 

NEW JERSEY 

Bernard S. Beatty, Asbury 
Vernon Elliott Dancer, New Egypt 

NEW MEXICO 

Charles Bennett, Jr., Rogers 
Burl Brown, Des Moines 
Jimmy Dwight Joy, Artesia 
Jim R. Purcell, San Jon 

NEW YORK 

Robert R. Cady, Boonville 
Dennis A. Carlberg, Frewsburg 
Donald Allen Hatfield, Moravia 
James A. Knapp, Preble 
William T. Randolph, Jr., Moravia 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Robert Elton Barefoot, Dunn 
Joseph Henry Brantley, Mooresville 
Gary Eugene Britt, Mt. Olive 
Fred Wilson Burt, Fuquay-Varina 
Norman Lee Byerly, Clemmons 
Paul Gene Copeland, Tyner 
Alan James Corriher, Mooresville 
Benjamin Cuip Dobson, Statesville 
Henry Beaver Hampton, Mt. Ulla 
Charles Ronald Hedrick, Lexington 
Eric Johnson, Asheville 
Gregory Neil Loyd, Statesville 
Wayne Lucas, Godwin 
Bobby Ray Outlaw, Dudley 
William Peter Rabon, Fair Bluff 
Joseph Wade Reece, Waynesville 
John Benjamin Reeves, Leicester 
William Rodney Royal, Clinton 
Donald Ross Smart, Clyde 
Frederick Foster Vernon, Blanch 
Ronald Everett Walker, Reidsville 
Jack Ray Woodward, Wade 
George Richard Wright, Reidsville 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Paul W. Backstrom, Maddock 
Carl Lester Berger, Brinsmade 
Richard Reid Frith, Devils Lake 
Jay M. Olson, Devils Lake 
Carlyle S. Stenberg, Watford City 

OHIO 

H. Charles Bachman, Johnstown 
Larry Lee Berner, Springfield 
James A. Case, Delaware 



14 



FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 



Bruce Edward Cron, Fletcher 
Joseph T. Delaplane, Greenville 
Robert A. Geissman, New Washington 
Carl W. Hurley, Somerville 
David E. Kruckeberg, Greenville 
Jon Leatherman, Delta 
Russell M. Miller, Urbana 
William G. Owens, Hamilton 
John Thomas Poorman, Somerset 
Harold L. Schafer, Greenville 
Lanny Showers, Caledonia 
Charles R. Wood, Wooster 

OKLAHOMA 

Phillip Lee Berkenbile, Dover 
Larry W. Caldwell, Thomas 
Russell G. Cassody, Covington 
Chris Cole, Altus 
Leroy Crawford, Ames 
Rex Diel, Burlington 
Glen T. Ferris, Ada 
Randy Griswold, Ninnekah 
Randy Wayne Harrel, Elgin 
Rockne Ray Maxson, Welch 
Larry Eugene Naumann, Boynton 
Robert Tollie Nunn, Midwest City 
Sam Ott, Burlington 
Terry Lee Peach, Mutual 
Larry Joseph Regnier, Marland 
William B. Thomason, Stillwater 
John Earl Westfall, Wynnewood 
Donald Ray Wyckoff, Marland 

OREGON 

Billy C. Bellamy, Heppner 
Ronald L. Cook, Canby 
Charles Gilles, Aurora 
Craig C. Latham, McMinnville 
David Alan Roberts, Dundee 
Fred S. Schilling, Nyssa 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Clair Edward Brown, Lewisburg 
Thomas A. Colpetzer, Tyrone 
Larry L. High, Lancaster 
Elwood Wayne Keefer, Lewisburg 
Leslie Melvin McBride, Enon Valley 
Thomas G. Meehl, North East 
William George Smith, Wyalusing 
Richard R. Troutman, Jr., Richland 
Lloyd John Wenger, Myerstown 
Daniel Jay Will, Berlin 

PUERTO RICO 

Juan Antonio Gonzalez Gonzalez, 
Quebraillas 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Nolan Keith Barnett, Duncan 
Ollie Terry Beverly, Conway 
William King Bomar, Duncan 
John Ryal Bowen, Westminster 



Louis Corley Holleman, Westminister 
Calvin Cain Martin, Mullins 
Alfonsa Reynard Ragin, Rimini 
James Irvin Rast, Bowman 
Charles Edwin Smith, Jr., Greer 
Johnny D.Wells, Murrells Inlet 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Philip R. Carley, Rapid City 
Delbert Glanzer, Carpenter 
Kevin Oehler, Milbank 
Francis Van Lith, Big Stone City 

TENNESSEE 

William Forrest Boreing, Jonesboro 

Joe Cope, Greenback 

Venus Jefferson Dodson, Jr., Crossville 

Roy Vaughn Graves, Jr., Maynardville 

Ray Harris, Luray 

Charles William Inman, Ten Mile 

Roddy Jewell, Dayton 

John C. Jones, Paris 

Douglas Masengill, Jr., Morristown 

Johnny C. Ottinger, Greenville 

Charlie Oliver Reagan, Cleveland 

Michael M. Richardson, Culleoka 

Robert Jackson Tallman, Bristol 

James Franklin Tallman, Bristol 

David Mack Waters, Decatur 

Toby Stone Woodmore, Lebanon 

Jim Thompson, Trenton 

Terry Thomas Thompson, Lebanon 

TEXAS 

James Abbott, Jacksonville 
Robert Earl Bishop, Hearne 
Dwight Allen Brannon, Diana 
Billy James Carberry, Pendleton 
Curtis G. Crouch, Jr., Madisonville 
Medardo De Leon, Jr., Mission 
David R. Denison, Quanah 
Billy Wayne Dyer, Mabank 
Michael Eder, Wallis 
Clint Fancher, Anahuac 
Bill David Farr, Seymour 
Pat Allen Foster, Sterling City 
Jerry William Fritts, Jr., Fort Worth 
Barham Fulmer, Nacogdoches 
Gregory Alois Gerig, Bartlett 
Roman D. Griffin, Jr., San Augustine 
Ronald A. Groves, Hale Center 
Lonnie Harris, Hico 
Herman Hartl, Elmendorf 
Joseph Paul Horlen, Marble Falls 
Carter C. Hounsel, Rising Star 
Dick Hudgins, Hungerford 
Tim Hutcheson, Princeton 
Dudley David Keng, Cleveland 
Marvin W. Koehne, Hallettsville 
John Leidner, Mission 
Thomas K. Louthan, Hale Center 
John Gerard Marino, Bryan 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 



15 



Kenneth Matheson, Mathis 

Barney McClure, Cleburne 

Eric Nolan McCorkie, Gatesville 

Joe McFerrin, Cotton Center 

Weldon E. Moeller, Brenham 

Albert Thomas Morris, Colorado City 

Gaylon Frank Odom, Sulphur Springs 

Glenn Ray Parr, Grandview 

Mike Parsons, Arthur City 

Michael Joseph Patranella, Caldwell 

Marvin Pelham, Tatum 

Charles E. Real, Converse 

Louis A. Rothe, Hondo 

Donms Lynn Rushin, Sulphur Springs 

Randy Schott, Helotes 

Ronnie Smith, Grapevine 

James E. Stone, Weatherford 

Curtis Sugarek, Skidmore 

Robert C. Tiller, Elysian Fields 

Timothy N. Titsworth, Cameron 

Jerry Pat Trotter, Olton 

Stephen Keith Warminski, White Deer 

Irby Davis Weaver, Hamlin 

Rickie Yowell, Brownfield 

UTAH 

Steven Boyer Bearnson, Spanish Fork 
Paul E. McPherson, Nephi 
Clark O. Petersen, Tremonton 
Clair Thomas Yardley, Gunnison 

VERMONT 

Leon C. Graves, St. Albans 

Glenn Eugene Fuller, South Rygate 

VIRGINIA 

Gerald William Garber, Weyers Cave 

James Banister Gregory, Jr., Java 

L. C. Harold, Ararat 

Lloyd E. Heatwole, Bridgewater 

Dwayne Edward Hill, Hillsville 

William McCray Johnson, Pittsville 

Lewis Earl Lamb, Rochelle 

Jerry Wayne Mundy, McGaheysville 

John Thomas Paulett, Blackstone 

Charles Philip Robertson, Axton 



Wayne Saufley Rodeffer, Port Republic 
Beverley Randolph Roller, Weyers Cave 
James D. Shields, Danville 
Louis Ray Sink, Chatham 
Kenneth Wayne Tate, Ruther Glen 

WASHINGTON 

Clayton Steven Bloomer, Enumclaw 

Clark E. Bromiley, Wenatchee 

Tom Dechenne, St. John 

Scott Hamilton, Chehalis 

Vernon Alvin Huhta, Rochester 

Larry Inman, Bow 

Richard B. Lefever, Goldendale 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Ronald Glenn Childs, Terra Alta 
James Lewis Dennis, III, Elizabeth 
Bruce Arlington Linton, Martinsburg 
John Rodgers Garton, Jane Lew 
Frederick M. Okes, Daniels 

WISCONSIN 

Roger E. Bark, Bloomington 
Clarence L. Boettcher, Fairchild 
Bradley Luis Dietsche, Bloomer 
Daniel Dale Fritz, Plymouth 
Thomas Earl German, Van Dyne 
John C. Hart, Alma Center 
Frederic S. Hartel, Jr., Mishicot 
Linus R. Hellenbrand, Verona 
Edward Lee Krueger, Shawano 
David A. Kruschke, New Richmond 
Larry Kuhl, Amery 
Jerry Allen Leister, Prairie du Sac 
Patrick J. Mitchell, Lyndon Station 
David C. Orchard, East Troy 
Daniel Gregory Retzke, Manawa 
James R. Seefeldt, Granton 
Bernard C. Traun, Durand 

WYOMING 

Jim Brown, Powell . 
Steven J. Engle, Newcastle 
Irvin Joe Petsch, Meriden 



Honorary American Farmer Degree 

Local advisors are often the "motivating force" behind FFA members 
who achieve high goals in the organization. Advisors are selected by the 
State Associations on a criteria that encompasses the entire instructional 
program. Those men receiving this honor were: 

M. E. Ekstrom, Curry High School, Jasper, Alabama 
James Carter Horton, Haleyville High School, Haleyville, Alabama 
M. D. Thornton, Montevallo High School, Montevallo, Alabama 
William Donald Strickland, West Point High School, Cullman, Alabama 
Page Bakarich, Willcox High School, Willcox, Arizona 



16 FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 

John R. Watson, Delight High School, Delight, Arkansas 

Sidney E. Koon, Jr., Poudre-Fort Collins High Schools, Fort Collins, Colorado 

T. A. Cochrane, Fort Meade High School, Fort Meade, Florida 

John L. Stephens, South Sumter High School, Bushnell, Florida 

B. H. Claxton, Jeff Davis County High School, Hazlehurst, Georgia 

I. B. Johnson, Effingham County High School, Springfield, Georgia 

Thomas C. Weaver, Jackson County High School, Braselton, Georgia 

H. Dean Jensen, Pleasant Plains High School, Pleasant Plains, Illinois 

Delmer D. Launius, Triad High School, St. Jacob, Illinois 

Loren E. Mills, Belvidere High School, Belvidere, Illinois 

Charles L. Schettler, Wapella Community Unit No. 5 School, Wapella, Illinois 

Marshall F. Grosscup, Jesup Community School, Jesup, Iowa 

Virgil T. Lake, Marysville High School, Marysville, Kansas 

Ben R. Damron, Stanford High School, Stanford, Kentucky 

Jim C. Wilds, Woodford County High School, Versailles, Kentucky 

William T. Black, Pioneer High School, Pioneer, Louisiana 

Harvey Robichaux, Central Lafourche High School, Mathews, Louisiana 

David Arthur Miller, Gaithersburg High School, Gaithersburg, Maryland 

Russell Johnson, Lakeview Community Schools, Lakeview, Michigan 

Russell Miller, Leslie Public High School, Leslie, Michigan 

Jacob G. Venema, Blissfield Community High School, Blissfield, Michigan 

Frank H. Dalke, Fairfax Public School No. 649, Fairfax, Minnesota 

Ray Erwin, Senior High School, Stillwater, Minnesota 

E. Curtis Stillwell, Fergus Falls Public Senior High School, Fergus Falls, Minnesota 

B. Oscar Brown, Salem Public Schools, Salem, Missouri 
Vencil G. Mount, Republic High School, Republic, Missouri 

Donald J. Tucker, Willard High School, Willard, Missouri (Posthumously) 

Dean Jochem, Ainsworth High School, Ainsworth, Nebraska 

Jim Turnbough, Clovis High School, Clovis, New Mexico 

Richard C. Hampton, South Rowan Senior High School, China Grove, North Carolina 

Clifford Nygard, Bismarck High School, Bismarck, North Dakota 

Glenn H. Griffith, Westerville High School, Westerville, Ohio 

Henry C. Horstman, Anna Local School, Anna, Ohio 

Odell C. Miller, Marysville High School, Marysville, Ohio 

Carl E. Nagy, Hillsdale High School, Jeromesville, Ohio 

Charles Hathaway, Tahlequah High School, Talequah, Oklahoma 

Jim Hazelwood, Mooreland High School, Mooreland, Oklahoma 

Robert L. Mitchell, Ripley High School, Ripley, Oklahoma 

Harold Williams, Cushing High School, Cushing, Oklahoma 

William Sawyer, Hillsboro High School, Hillsboro, Oregon 

J. Ray Bickel, Northern Lebanon High School, Fredericksburg, Pennsylvania 

Lee Mohney, Lakeview High School, Stoneboro, Pennsylvania 

Charles A. Smith, New Oxford Area High School, New Oxford, Pennsylvania 

C. G. Hutchinson, Conway High School, Conway, South Carolina 
G. S. McKenzie, St. Johns High School, Darlington, South Carolina 
Fred Morgan, Wren High School, Piedmont, South Carolina 
Clarence R. Hall, Watertown High School, Watertown, South Dakota 
Nolan Alders, Nacogdoches High School, Nacogdoches, Texas 
Weldron R. Holbrooks, Stamford Public Schools, Stamford, Texas 
Gilbert Kuretsch, Pleasanton High School, Pleasanton, Texas 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 17 

Edwin E. Smith, Cleveland High School, Cleveland, Texas 

Leslie Ben Winter, Spanish Fork High School, Spanish Fork, Utah 

S. C. Broyles, Culpeper High School, Culpeper, Virginia 

I. W. Diehl, Broadway High School, Broadway, Virginia 

Gilbert R. Kinzie, Buffalo Gap High School, Swoope, Virginia 

Charles L. Clark, Walla Walla High School, Walla Walla, Washington 

Hilding C. Nelson, Mount Vernon High School, Mount Vernon, Washington 

Lacy E. Cochran, Mathias High School, Mathias, West Virginia 

Roy R. Koss, Algoma High School, Algoma, Wisconsin 

Virgil O. Martinson, Marshfield Senior High School, Marshfield, Wisconsin 

LaVerne Stuckey, Sauk Prairie High School, Prairie du Sac, Wisconsin 

Robert B. Meredith, Shoshoni High School, Shoshoni, Wyoming 



Honorary American Farmers 

Honorary Membership is awarded to adults who have helped to ad- 
vance agribusiness and the FFA, and who have given outstanding service 
on a national level. Those receiving this recognition were: 

Norman E. Borlaug, Director of the Wheat Program of the International Center for 
Maize and Wheat Improvement Center, Rockefeller Agricultural Institute, Mexico 
City, Mexico 

Donald D. Brown, District Supervisor of Vocational Agriculture, Stillwater, Oklahoma 

Herbert H. Burlingham, Head, Agricultural Education Department, California State 
Polytechnic College, San Luis Obispo, California 

J. Phil Campbell, Undersecretary, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

Federico E. Carbonell, State Department of Education, Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, 
Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 

James P. Clouse, Chairman, Agricultural Education Section, Purdue University, West 
Lafayette, Indiana 

Robert S. Corless, Program Supervisor, Agricultural Education, Coordinating Council 
for Occupational Education, Olympia, Washington 

Jack M. Crowner, Farm Director, WAVE and WAVE-TV, Louisville, Kentucky 

Dean Curtiss, (President NAFB) Farm Service Director, KDHL Radio, Faribault, Min- 
nesota 

J. T. Davis, Supervisor, Bureau of Agricultural Education, State Department of Educa- 
tion, Sacramento, California 

James E. Dougan, Assistant Director, Vocational Education, State Department of 
Education, Columbus, Ohio 

Charles C. Drawbaugh, Chairman, Department of Vocational-Technical Education, 
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 

J. E. Edmondson, Professor, College of Agriculture, University of Missouri, Columbia, 
Missouri 

Myron Floren, c/o Tele-klew, Inc. Santa Monica, California 

Lennie Gamage, Manager, International Programs, The National FFA Center, Alexan- 
dria, Virginia 

David C. Haney, Vice President, Farm Equipment Division, International Harvester 
Company, Chicago, Illinois 

Harold W. Homann, Springfield, Illinois (Retired Supervisor of Agricultural Education) 

W. T. Loften, Chairman, Department of Agricultural and Extension Education, Uni- 
versity of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 

George Logan, Farm Director, WIBW-TV and Radio, Topeka, Kansas 



18 FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 

C. O. Loreen, Professor, Agricultural Education, Washington State University, Pullman, 
Washington 

Gene Love, President AATEA, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 

Manny Marget, Radio Station KVOX, Moorhead, Minnesota 

J. W. Matthews, Professor, Vocational Agriculture Service, University of Illinois, 
Urbana, Illinois 

Austin A. McBride, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania (Retired District Supervisor, Vocational 
Agriculture) 

Glen D. McDowell, President, NVATA, Pikeville, Kentucky 

Bob Nance, Farm Service Director, WMT Radio and Television, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

George F. Neiley, Director, Public Relations, Deere and Company, Moline, Illinois 

Paul W. Newlin, State FFA Executive Secretary, Stillwater, Oklahoma 

Virginia A. Nicholson, Administrative Assistant, Division of Vocational and Technical 
Education, U. S. Office of Education, Washington, D. C. 

Glenn W. Nicklas, Administrative Consultant, Agricultural Education, State Depart- 
ment of Education, Lincoln, Nebraska 

Harold L. Noakes, Chief, Bureau of Agricultural Education, State Education Depart- 
ment, Albany, New York 

Roman C. Pucinski, United States House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. 
(Illinois) 

C. E. Richard, Associate Professor, Agricultural Education, Virginia Polytechnic Insti- 
tute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 

Fred Stines, Publisher, Successful Farming, Meredith Corporation, Des Moines, Iowa 

Robert P. Simon, Superintendent, Eastern Lancaster Co. School District, New Holland, 
Pennsylvania 

Edwin St. John, Chief, Occupational Skills Program, Vocational Education Services, 
State Department of Education, Lansing, Michigan 

Frank R. Stover, State Supervisor, Agricultural Education, State Department of Edu- 
cation, Columbia, South Carolina 

Harold K. Street, Farm Editor, American Banker, Washington, D. C. 

Kenneth Thatcher, Executive Director and Secretary, Iowa Farm Bureau Federation, 
Des Moines, Iowa 

John G. Veneman, Under Secretary, U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Wel- 
fare, Washington, D. C. 

Earl Wineinger, Assistant Supervisor, Agricultural Education, State Department of 
Education, Topeka, Kansas 

Robert M. Worthington, Associate Commissioner, Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and 
Technical Education, U. S. Office of Education, Washington, D. C. 

John W. Lehmann, Pleasant Plains, Illinois 

Charles E. McCulley, Malin, Oregon 

J. Leslie Humphreys, Crawfordsville, Iowa 

Norman W. Allen, Schaghticoke, New York 

Richard Dooley, Hanford, California 

James Beard, Beggs, Oklahoma 

Trygve Eastvold, Hartland, Minnesota 

Alfred Carlberg, Frewsburg, New York 

Iver Crawford, Ames, Oklahoma 

Irvin W. Petsch, Meriden, Wyoming 

Walter E. Morris, Fullerton, California 

Harold W. Timblin, Alvo, Nebraska 

Carl I. Wenger, Myerstown, Pennsylvania 

Lloyd Stone, Weatherford, Texas 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 19 

Distinguished Service Awards 

To appropriately recognize those adults who have given outstanding 
service to the FFA on a State or Regional and in some cases National, level 
are awarded the Distinguished Service Award at the national convention. 
Those receiving the award were: 

Robert Ashby, Farm Consultant, Maine Public Service Company, Presque Isle, Maine 

Dutton Brookfield, Lone Summit Ranch, Lee's Summit, Missouri 

Bill Brown, Stage Manager, Municipal Auditorium, Kansas City, Missouri 

Reagan Brown, Extension Sociologist, Texas A & M University, College Station, Texas 

Orville Cox, Kansas City Stockyards Company, Kansas City, Missouri 

Jonathan Davis, Davis Farms, Sterling Junction, Massachusetts 

Earl V. Evans, Public Relations Representative, Gulf Oil Corporation, Kansas City, 

Missouri 
Barret Heddens, Jr., First National Bank of Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri 
William J. Jensen, Vice President, Agriculture Products Division, Butler Mfg. Co. 

Kansas City, Missouri 
Francis E. Kirkley, Associate Professor, Department of Agricultural Education, Clem- 
son University, Clemson, South Carolina (Retired) 
William J. Kuhfuss, President, American Farm Bureau Federation, Chicago, Illinois 
Frank E. Laderer, Safety Education Specialist, Nationwide Insurance Company, Colum- 
bus, Ohio 
William J. Marshall, U. S. D. A. Livestock Market News, Kansas City, Missouri 
Alfred Neuberger, Order Buyer, Kansas City Stockyards Company, Kansas City, Mis- 
souri 
Juan Robles, Professor and Head, Department of Agricultural Education, University of 

Puerto Rica, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 
Edward A. Roche, Sound Engineer, Municipal Auditorium, Kansas City, Missouri 
Vernon Schneider, President, American Institute of Cooperation, Washington, D. C. 
Edwin M. Wheeler, President, The Fertilizer Institute, Washington, D. C. 



Special Citation 

There are many individuals who from the beginning of the FFA, have 
continued to give support to the organization "over and beyond the call of 
duty." This year marks the second year that long-time friends and great 
supporters of the FAA have been recognized with a "VIP Award." The three 
distinguished gentlemen were: 

HARRY DARBY, Chairman of the Board, The Darby Corporation, Kansas City, Kansas 
RAYMOND C. FIRESTONE, Chairman of the Board, Firestone Tire and Rubber Com- 
pany, Akron, Ohio 

GEORGE W. CATTS, Former Manager of the Kansas City Chamber of Commerce, 
Kansas City, Missouri 



20 



FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 



National Officer Addresses 




&t*i /«.'*•'. :«*»«■■ 



IN OUR HANDS 

DAN LEHMANN, National President 

Would you for a moment please observe this flame carefully, watch 
it in every detail and picture it in your mind's eye. Now close your eyes 
and still you should be able to see the flame because it has left an image 

on our mind. Tonight at the close of this 44th 
annual convention, as we walk out of this Audi- 
torium, we should still be able to see this flame. 
But, also then everyone of us will be different, 
not because of this speech or any single speech, 
but because of the total impact of this conven- 
tion on us and our lives. From the sounding of 
the opening gavel three days ago, the thousands 
of FFA members watching, the excitement of our 
national band playing, and the chorus singing, 
the challenge of national leaders speaking, and 
the enthusiastic anticipation of award recipients 
winning have all left an indelible picture etched 
on our minds. Every one of us will be different, 
and when we return to our homes, our newly 
felt excitement and purpose of youth will not let 
us rest. We will want more than ever before to 
get involved in activities and gain the abilities 
we've seen in other FFA members. This flame that you see tonight repre- 
sents that electrifying excitement and that increased desire that has been 
ours. We have felt it here this week and we can feel it again every day of 
every week, of every year, if we can imagine in our mind's eye this flame 
and come to know that which it represents. 

A philosopher once said, "God left challenge in the earth. He could 
have finished it, but He didn't." God also left a challenge in the FFA. He 
could have finished our organization and made it perfect to fulfill all of its 
purposes, but He didn't. He left that challenge for us. To make FFA more 
finished, to make it better, I believe that we need a special group of mem- 
bers — members that are dynamic and dedicated and forward looking. 
Members that understand and know the youth in our organization, and the 
purpose of our organization, and this group that I am speaking of must be 
impressive. Greenhands in the organization must look up to them. 

Can you remember when you were a Greenhand and attended your 
first chapter meeting? Wasn't there a group there who impressed you, who 
got you excited about FFA, who turned you on? But, most of all this group 
that I am speaking about must know and believe and understand that the 
real strength of FFA lies in attitude and leadership development. Leader- 
ship development that encompasses teaching members how to make deci- 
sions, that will more committees to action, and strengthen the type of 
attitude to let all of us realize that it's not too important to take a trip, 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 21 

or to win an award. Instead, the important thing is that we as young 
people can grow and develop, and that serving others and helping others 
can give us great personal satisfaction. The group that I'm speaking of 
must also have fantastic captive energy. Energy within them to make FFA 
more finished. Tonight, I believe more than ever before during my years as 
an FFA officer that we have that group in FFA. We have that dynamic group 
and that dynamic group is the six chapter officers in 7,845 chapters across 
the nation. I am speaking about 47,070 young people in this nation that 
can become directly responsible for finishing FFA, making our organization 
better. 

It wasn't long ago that I was working on the farm and I put on a coat 
that I hadn't worn for some time. When I put the coat on I dug into my 
pocket and I pulled out a shoe repair slip, I had taken that pair of shoes to 
the shoe shop a year ago. I read it and I put in back in my pocket, but I 
couldn't quit thinking about it. That afternoon I was driving to Springfield, 
and stopped by that shoe repair shop in Springfield. I laid the slip down on 
the counter, realizing full well as the repairman picked it up and went into 
the back room that he probably had taken the shoes, fixed them, sold 
them, and it was my fault because I had left them there. Well, a few minutes 
later he came back, laid the ticket down on the counter and said "yo ur 
shoes will be ready a week from Friday." There may be humor involved. 
Yes. But, the point is, are we already a week from Friday late. Are we 
already a year late as FFA officers in leading this movement of leadership 
and attitude development of all members? 

This past summer while in Washington, D. C, I met a very interesting 
young man who told me of an experience he had when he was a chapter 
sentinel. He walked into his ag teacher's office and picked up a booklet 
that was laying on the table. It was about Building Our American Com- 
munities. He got very interested in it and after reading the booklet, thought 
"Gee, this is wonderful, I wonder if there is anything that our chapter can 
do in this gigantic program since we have never done anything this 
large before." As he put down the book and left the office, Jerry felt a 
challenge he wanted to act. So he talked to the other FFA members, the 
chapter officers specifically, and the enthusiasm spread. As a team, as a 
group, as one they decided that this year their chapter would carry on a 
Building Our American Communities program. 

As they began work on it they first had that willingness to learn about 
rural development, about motivating others, and they accepted the great 
challenge as a team of officers to encourage other FFA members to par- 
ticipate along with them. 

The chapter members soon found the sacrifices and work were tre- 
mendous. Like many FFA members, they had very close knit families. They 
discovered that some of the activities that they would participate in as a 
family would have to be reorganized or replanned because the week ends 
and evenings were reserved for BOAC. Jerry told me he likes to fish, but 
fishing had to take a back seat to the BOAC program. And then, there were 
times when they were carrying on activities in that chapter when the energy 
began to fade of the chapter members. This affected the officers, but after 
the chapter advisors told them that what they were doing was good and 



22 FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 

worthwhile, their interest and energy were renewed. Jerry says that a lady 
stopped him on the street and told him that the shrubbery they planted in 
the park was excellent and she complimented all of FFA, and their stymied 
energy was felt no longer. They went back to the chapter with increased 
efforts, increased action and succeeded. 

The chapter whose officers learned of the willingness to learn about 
rural development, and sacrifices and work and encouragement of other 
members, is the Berrien County FAA Chapter of Nashville, Georgia, the 
national winner in the BOAC program. You saw slides depicting their efforts 
in their community and how excellent it was. But, the greatest part about 
this program in Berrien County is that it helped to finish FFA, it made it 
better. It made it better because the numerous activities that were carried 
on, required that all members participate. New attitudes and leadership 
were developed to a degree in every member, and it was motivated and 
encouraged by the chapter FFA officers. That group, they "pushed it up," 
they made it succeed, they made it win here in Kansas City and you can do 
the same for your chapter. 

One question that I have been asked most often as a national officer 
by FFA members is, "How do I become a chapter president, or how do I 
become a chapter vice president?" And, I think Jerry Baldree had the 
answer to that question because, and I remind you once again, that he was 
chapter sentinel when BOAC started — the chapter recognized his efforts 
and this year Jerry is serving as chapter president. The same thing can be 
told of a committee chairman who becomes elected. If any of you have any 
aspirations at all of being a district or a state or a national officer in this 
organization, always remember that at first you have to be a leader in your 
home community. There is one other thing about Jerry that I think is par- 
ticularly interesting. This past year as a junior in high school he ran for a 
State office. Unfortunately, he did not get an office, but knowing Jerry and 
knowing that very important human characteristic that he has, that of self 
motivation, I'm sure that he will return next year better prepared and 
more experienced, and at that time he may be called upon to serve on be- 
half of other members in our organization. 

Almost a year ago I was visiting a chapter officers' leadership con- 
ference where I observed the the Creed Speaking Contest. I watched an 
FFA member do an outstanding job, yet, he missed going to the State con- 
test by one place. He did a good job of reciting the Creed, but made a few 
major errors by mispronouncing a few words. It seemed as though he 
couldn't pronounce the "t" sound — the "tun". After the contest I visited 
this member and by the sparkle in this young man's eye, I knew that he 
could make an FFA speaker, so I encouraged him to continue in public 
speaking. During our conversation it didn't take many words for me to 
become aware of how shy he was. This young man's problems did 
not only lie in not being about to make the "t" sound, I discovered there 
were other words that he couldn't pronounce because this member had been 
tongue-tied! I thought back to the FFA Creed that he recited and how he 
pronounced so well the words in that Creed, and then I realized that it must 
have taken him more energy and more man hours of preparation to learn 
to say the sounds of the words in the Creed correctly than it would take 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 

you or I to say the entire Creed. And, I have seen this every place I have 
gone, young people like you or I working to improve themselves — and I 
often wondered why. Most cases have not been with handicaps as in this 
one, but then I realize God could have made us finished but He didn't. You 
see not only do we have an unfinished FFA, we are also unfinished people, 
and if we would return to this convention 2, 10 or 20 years from now, we 
would still be unfinished, because there has only been One finished Person, 
One Perfect Man in history. We spoke of Him the other night in our Vespers 
Program. He is Jesus, and we use Him as an example today of what it is 
to be finished. 

The first step that all members have to take is having that ability to 
dream, and then to delve deep enough into those dreams to see the steps 
that we must take in order to reach our aspirations. 

I was speaking to a former member of the FFA who told me of an 
experience he had when he was in the 8th grade. After a 30 mile trip to 
a doctor's office to be treated for what he thought was a pulled hip, he was 
told he would spend the next two years in bed, because of a severe bone 
disease. When the doctor told him, he thought the world had come to an 
end because he loved sports, yet would not be able to participate. During 
the next two years he spent in bed he found a great companion in the radio, 
which he listened to for hours. 

Because he couldn't start school in his freshman year his ag teacher 
came to his home and brought his assignments to him. One day he told his 
ag teacher that he thought he would like to become a radio broadcaster. 
The ag teacher encouraged him to participate in the FFA public speaking 
program. By his junior year he was walking with crutches, he was doing 
much speaking and at that time decided for sure that his dream was to be- 
come a broadcaster. He continued the following year in public speaking. As 
a senior he won the chapter contest, the district contest and went to the 
State contest. Did he place 1st, 2nd or 3rd? No, he placed 4th! But did 
that stop him? No! The dream was planted. It was there. He knew what he 
must do. He could see those steps. After he graduated from high school, 
he started college, but dropped out within 30 days, because he wanted to 
be before a microphone. He knew his dream. It was a gigantic dream. This 
man that I am speaking of is one of the most outstanding farm broad- 
casters in America today. He is past President of the National Associa- 
tion of Farm Broadcasters, and he has been recognized on this stage by 
receiving the Distinguished Service Award. This man has been to this 
convention for the past eleven years. His name is Orion Samuelson of 
WGN, Chicago — a farm program, but he has the largest urban listening 
audience of any farm show in the nation. I was talking to him on the phone 
and he told me, "Dan it is great to have the ability to dream and to see 
deep enough into your dreams, but it takes something else, you have got 
to have something more, that something more is that you must never stop 
dreaming. It doesn't matter if you are 15 and a sophomore in high school 
or 37, you have got to continue to dream, and to see deep into those 
dreams." 

Fellow FFA members and guests, if you can accept that we are un- 
finished people and if you can accept that we have an unfinished FFA you 



24 



FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 



have got to believe in opportunity. Opportunity to grow as individuals and 
better ourselves. Opportunities to build and make your FFA better. Thomas 
Edison once said, "The reason most people do not recognize opportunity 
is because it always goes around wearing coveralls looking like hard work." 
And, often it does. When we return home from this convention, the 
challenge and the work are going to be there. They'll be waiting for us. Also 
when we return home from this convention, every one of us will want to 
rest and relax, but we can't. 

You may have noticed in the examples I used this evening, that one 
young man is a sophomore this year in high school, one is a senior this 
year in high school, the other is in a career of broadcasting. Each one of 
these gentlemen are FFA members. They aren't superior academically or 
physically, they're average people just like you and I. The difference is 
that these people felt a challenge and didn't wait to act. Within themselves 
they found the time, the energy and the willingness to work in order to 
make their dreams a reality. Are they finished — no — because these are 
people who will have new dreams, new horizons to conquer, just like it can 
be for you and I. 

And now we are back to where we began. If you would allow me to go 
and put this torch in my hands for a second. It has been a mere torch but 
its flame symbolizes the real strength of FFA, that of leadership and atti- 
tude development of all people. This flame symbolizes the electrifying 
excitement that has been ours at this convention. It was made to burn by 
mortal hands and it can be extinguished by mortal hands. It can also be 
made to glow and burn brighter by hands just as it is for all of us in this 
room. If we want FFA to be better, that too is in our hands, and if we want 
ourselves as individuals to be better, that too is in our hands. May God 
bless all. 



"WE WILL" 

JOHN McCULLEY, National Secretary 

The earth shakes as a blast rips concrete and steel from a bank build- 
ing in one of our large cities. Blood stains the soil on an American university, 
a grim reminder of the student confrontation with police only a few mo- 
ments ago. Tears stream down the faces of two 
parents as they stand over the body of their 
sixteen year old daughter, asking themselves 
why she used the heroin that killed her. 

These events and many more like them, 
are happening in every part of this country, 
every day. They demonstrate the unguided efforts 
of many of our contemporaries who are attemp- 
ting fo force inevitable change. Few of us can 
disagree that change must exist if we are to pro- 
gress, but we can vehemently disagree with the 
methods used to spawn innovation. Everyone 
within earshot of my voice must ask himself 
right now, "How do I want change to occur?" 
If you believe forceful modification to be un- 
required and even detrimental, you had better 
stand up right now and decide what you are 
going to do about it. 




FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 25 

I was fortunate this year to hear Dr. Carl Winters of the General 
Motors Speaker's Bureau as he provided strategy we could apply to our in- 
dividual concepts of what form change should take. He outlined four basic 
alternatives that we as youth have to cope with in our world. 

First, we can drop out of society, turn away from things that pressure 
us. This more often than not takes the form of drugs. Need more be said? 

Second, we can flee from whatever disturbs us. The problem with 
trying to hide comes in finding the place. With the speedy pace of the 
world, the rapidity with which news travels and short time required to 
ramble from one locality to another, there is no sanctuary for the escapist. 

Alternative number three is referred to as revolution. This espouses 
the idea that people think and respond better as buildings burn and rocks 
fly. Employing this tactic we substitute muscle for mind, terror for thought, 
rampage for reason, power for persuasion, and yes, eventually, failure for 
fortune. 

Lastly, we could choose to utilize discretionary change — meaning that 
we would use all that we possess as young people, working within the pre- 
scribed system to foster advancement. Before subscribing to alternative 
four, we would have to recognize that not only is change essential but in- 
escapable. Acknowledging this fact would prompt us to plan vigorously 
for the future, using our unique talents as ingredients for success. 

To those of us with a rational way of thinking, little question remains 
as to which course of action we should pursue. 

Now, if we are going to stand up, let us stand up for something 
positive and approach each invitation to excel with the attitude Theodore 
Roosevelt expressed: 

Succeed? Of course we shall succeed! How can success fail to 
come to a race of masterful energy and resoluteness which has a 
continent for the base of its domain and which feels within its 
veins the thrill that comes to generous souls when their strength 
stirs in them and they know that the future is theirs. 

Fellow FFA members, that future is indeed ours, but it doesn't start 
with the next session of this convention, or tomorrow, or any other time 
in the future. It begins this very second when you resolve that you will be 
counted, that you will not be afraid to assert yourself, and that you will 
express the undying attitude of "We will." 

The late Senator Robert Kennedy said something in 1968 that people 
quote as much today as anything else, "Some people see things as they 
are and ask, 'Why?' I dream of things that have never been and ask. 'Why 
not' " As we embark upon our journey into tomorrow let us no longer 
demand, "Why?" Instead, let us assume a fresh spirit of adventurism, 
asking as each new dream is envisioned, "Why not?" 

If we can gear our minds to this method of thinking and develop a 
fervor for the untried and unexplored, many golden sunrises will lie before 
us. The time has come for us as young men and women to exhibit en- 
thusiasm for positive progress. It has to start with us. And isn't it logical, 
because no other group of young Americans is better prepared to step 



26 



FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 



forward than we are. Representing the basis of all mankind — agriculture — 
and practicing practical leadership that is unparalleled, we would be de- 
priving this country and this world if we failed to advance to the front and 
say, "We will strive for the best and we will endure." 

Choosing to follow this path we exemplify the idea that President John 
Kennedy once expressed as he said, "The energy, the faith, the devotion 
we bring to this endeavor will light our country and all who serve it — and 
the glow from that fire can truly light the world." 

We, my fellow FFA members, are that fire that has to radiate through- 
out the world. It is our challenge. We must. We will. 



"TOMORROW'S KEEPER" 

DAN DOOLEY, National Vice President, Pacific Region 

One day 300 years ago a new born calf wobbled through a wooded 
thicket and left behind him a crooked trail. The next day a stray dog 
passed that way, then a flock of sheep followed; 150 years later, the auto- 
mobile rolled along that path. Today, 300 years 
after that date, that which was originally a calf 
path, is the central street of a major metropolitan 
city and each day 100,000 people go that way. 
They travel three miles in one all because of that 
silly little calf that wobbled when he walked. 

We can look to the past and see that the 
quickest way to a goal is generally the one with 
the least number of didoes and curves to ob- 
scure the vision of our destination. Abraham 
Lincoln is a case in point. He had the philoso- 
phy that hitting the task straight ahead with 
honesty and hard work would normally prevail. 
Although he lost more times than he won while 
striving for public office, his approach suc- 
ceeded making him president of the United 
States. We can see so many people today walk- 
ing the streets who have no sense of direction. 
They seem to wobble like that calf and even though they possess those 
human capacities to reason and logically define goals and objectives, a 
blessing no calf will ever know, many people still fail to recognize the 
future implications of their actions. 

Every morning, I rise and thank God that I am an American, and I 
know that it was the foresight of men like Washington, Jefferson, Paul 
Revere, Teddy Roosevelt, John Kennedy, and Martin Luther King that made 
this America, of which I am thankful, possible. Simultaneously, I can 
say that we have a multitude of problems which seem to be invincible 
and that they are the result of the insensitive, the irresponsible, and the 
apathetic. All these people lacked a concern and interest in the future of 




FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 27 

their country and world. Talking about the dishonest, the apathetic and 
uninterested that have created this unbalance of problems sometimes can 
retard the notice of 10,000 reasons for change sitting in this auditorium. 
That now is your decision to make. 

It will take idealism and enough courage to stand up for those ideals, 
to change that which is wrong. Many, many people today scream how the 
glorious goals of youth do nothing but fade into confusion. Nathaniel 
Hawthorne said, "At almost every step in life we meet with young men 
from whom, we anticipate wonderful things, but of whom, after careful 
inquiry, we never hear another word. Like certain chintzes, calicoes, and 
ginghams, they show finely on their first newness, but cannot stand the sun 
and rain, and assume a very sober aspect after washing day." Our ideal- 
isms will last only if we can withstand the pressures and influences of 
society. At that point we will be respected. We will carry on. 

So much for the past and present. Let us now look to the future, and 
let me ask you this question. Who will build the foundation, construct the 
vehicle, and maintain or create the organization that will give the youth 
of the year 2001, the same kind and quality of opportunity that we have 
had. We must splash ourselves in the face with the icy reality that it will be 
you and I who will beat the path, smooth the road, and construct the 
foundation for the growth and development of these young men and women 
of the future. Yes, Future Farmers, not only are you the future, you have 
the responsibility to shape and mold the future of all those who shall follow 
you in time. 

You are the engineers 

You are TOMORROW'S KEEPER 

We must realize that the future is upon us. We cannot shirk the 
responsibility. We must make our path a testimonial to the value of hard 
work, enthusiasm, and cooperation. So many future lives depend upon 
that road being straight and true. 

As we look at our organization and country, let us endeavor with 
determination to renew those values and truths that are worthy and good. 
When we consider good things that have never been, let us accept the re- 
sponsibility and make it our purpose to create and establish these things 
as commonplace for all Americans and citizens of the world regardless of 
their race, creed, or color. As individuals and as youth let's forthrightly 
pursue the belief that the rights of man come not from the generosity of 
the state or the gift of other men, but from the hand of God. And finally, 
let this determination, responsibility, purpose, and belief become the 
trademark of not only the FFA but all youth of 1971. These ideals I chal- 
lenge you. 

I will close now and continue my life's journey. But I leave behind 
these challenges with the hope that they become everlasting in the hearts 
of all FFA members. 

God speed and thank you for a wonderful opportunity provided me as 
a national officer to serve you. 



28 



FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 




HERE COMES PINK 

JIM BEARD, National Vice President, Southern Region 

Fifteen thousand dollars is exposed as the massive steel chambers 
crumble. The bank president is wounded, three tellers and a deputy are 
dead and those witnessing helplessly surrender as six outlaws deplete the 

townspeople's savings. 

But hope prevails. Approaching town, a 
white horse rears and nickers, a masked man 
loads silver bullets and an Indian encourages 
"Go Kimosabe." A sigh of relief, for everyone 
knows the outlaws shall be apprehended, sub- 
dued, and law and order restored. 

Fifteen million young people just rode into 
town, gunned down notorious outlaws, returned 
the townspeople's savings and restored law and 
order. Every one of them used the style of the 
Long Ranger, all because the Long Ranger was 
someone good people needed, bad people 
feared and all respected because he was a hero. 
The Lone Ranger, man is he cool, I wanna 
be just like him. He has power, he is needed, 
he is an individual. Much are the ambitions and 
goals of young Americans. Young people feel 
powerless and useless in a vast and complex society, they have lost sense 
of belonging, they feel society has destroyed their identity by turning them 
into a number. These feelings may lead to apathy, passivity, alienation, and 
all the various forms of dropping out. Because of this insecurity, young 
people need a Long Ranger to identify with. But who? At one time Mighty 
Mouse was sufficient. Later the Lone Ranger, Superman and Batman were 
the sweeping crusaders of identity, only to be replaced by Mickey Mantle, 
Wilt Chamberlain and Johnny Unitas. 

Now we've matured. These massive physical "Do'ers of justice" are 
inadequate. We now accept heroes who are mentally aware, Thinkers. 
Many young people think actively but don't actively think. But all young 
people worry about what they should do, what they should be and who they 
should believe. 

Five of our heroes are active thinkers. They know what they should do, 
what they should be and who they should believe. 

Dan Lehmann thinks about self-improvement, self-adjustment and 
self-attainment, much as our industrial leaders. Wayne Humphreys thinks 
about financial stability, economic growth and business involvement same 
as our country's economists. George Allen thinks about developing educa- 
tional advancement, vocational satisfaction and future projections in agri- 
culture much as our head educators. Dan Dooley thinks about politican in- 
volvement, youthful moods and international understanding same as our 
law making officials. John McCulley thinks about purposeful instruction, 
youthful guidance and constructive activation much as our civic leaders. 
All five think, evaluate and declare positive, constructive youthful move- 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 29 

merits. All have been heard, but were they believed? The most impenetrable 
defense is deafness — not anger, not punishment, just inability to hear. 

American tradition dictates a society of deafness. Thomas Jefferson 
thought of freeing slaves in the eighteenth century. He was heard but not 
believed. Seventeen Seventy-Six found America founded on individual 
rights and freedom, endorsing the buying and selling of human lives. 
Abraham Lincoln thought of equality in 1865. He was heard but not be- 
lieved. Nineteen Seventy-One finds America, 100 years later, still suffering 
racial strife. 

Americans have a countless list of heroes to hear and to believe. Some 
have 16 notches on their guns, some ride white horses, some hit 50 
home runs, some gallop for five touchdowns, but then some use reality 
for game plan, use leadership for ammunition and attempt improving 
America through constructive measures. But to change America, heroes 
need to know what they want America to be. 

America has young radical heroes who reject the world as it is, but 
can't specify the kind of world they want. Yet they assemble groups of 
listeners and believers. They promise salvation through violence and coer- 
cion. They mask themselves as saviors yet maintain a satanic gleam in 
their eyes. They believe that hatred will cure, and violence will pave the 
road to peace, understanding and unity. They too gather listeners and some 
are believers. 

The "average citizen" is somebody's hero when he fattens on the 
yield of our prosperous society but will not turn a hand or make a sacrifice 
or risk discomfort to solve America's problems. He is angry at the way 
things are going but will not help to make them better. This hero's apathy 
is the heaviest burden this free society must face, yet he is heard and 
sometimes believed. 

Another hero is an escapist. He worries more about people identifying 
with him than he worries about his identity. John and I saw a drunk in 
Grand Central Station who thought he was Joe Louis. He displayed some 
exotic footwork, a few quick jabs and hooks and told us his flattering 
knockout record. He had pretended Joe Louis, the hero, until he actually 
believed he was Joe Louis. He gathered a few listeners and possibly a few 
believers 

Nineteen Seventy-one finds America's scroll of heroes plagued by 
extremists, by chiselers, by apathetical citizens and by escapists, but that 
scroll also includes 430,000 FFA members who can motivate and activate 
America's youth power. But what classification do FFA heroes represent? 
Dan, Wayne, George, Dan and John have been referred to as "straight 
arrows," "good Johnnies," "idealists," they've been challenged if America 
still needs and loves an honest, clean, hard-hitting hero. 

They positively tell you that America needs physicians, not execu- 
tioners in its troubling times. They believe the road to happiness is paved 
with understanding, love and devotion, yet they recognize obstacles of 
envy, jealousy and bigotry. 

The sun is high noon, the Acme mechanical, supersonic, ultra- 
equipped rocket is triggered, all signals are "go." Now the wait. He hears 



30 



FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 



it. It's nearing. It's the distinct beep beep of our hero bird, the Road-Runner. 
The coyotes muscles become tense, his hair stands tense. With precise 
timing he releases the trigger. The rocket sputters, reverses and splatters 
one brown defeated coyote against one rugged canyon wall as one arrogant 
Road-Runner escapes one drastic, earthly fate while twenty-million young 
people cheer their hero bird for once again evading the grasps of the 
treacherous Wylie Coyote. But another jealous, self-centered group wishes 
that the coyote would defeat our hero bird. This is an identical thought 
that many hold for you FFA heroes. They smile at your success and oppor- 
tunities, but hold an inborn desire to see you defeated. 

Americans hunger for a hero-type image. America's wailing hour 
cries for a responsible, dedicated and honest hero. He must be pink, 
using the combination of purity of white in service and the strength of red 
in resistance. He must walk an arrogant, yet attainable road of progression. 
He must have convictions that reflect in a "society of deafness." He must 
have the constitution of a panther to withstand jealousy and temptation. 

You needn't go to college, let your hair grow to your waist, stone the 
dean's office and picket the Selective Service System to be a hero. Adore 
God, cherish your parents, love your neighbors as yourself and your coun- 
try more than yourself. Be just, be true, believe. Listeners and believers 
are waiting on you. They will hear you and they will believe you. They need 
you because they love you. And, when you approach, someone may faintly 
whisper, "Here Comes Pink." 



WHO WILL ANSWER 

WAYNE HUMPHREYS, National Vice President, Central Region 

F. W. Woolworth, founder of the five and dime chain, was once hired 
as janitor for fifty cents a day by a retail store owner who didn't think 
Woolworth had enough business sense to wait on customers. . . . but, He 

answered! 

When Zane Grey was still an unknown try- 
ing to sell his book manuscripts, a publisher 
told him he had no ability for writing fiction; 
and Louisa May Alcott, author of "Little Women" 
and other famed works, was a tomboy, marked 
by her fellow townspeople as a girl who would 
never amount to much. A publisher once told 
her to give up the idea of writing. . . .but, They, 
answered! 

The first time George Gershwin ever played 
the piano on the stage, he was laughed out of 
the theater by both the audience and his fellow 
actors. He answered. 

Albert Einstein's teachers classified him 
as a dunce, and even his parents thought him 
backward. He answered! 

When Thomas A. Edison was in school, he 
was always at the foot of his class because he couldn't remember his three 




FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 31 

R's. His teachers called him stupid and doctors predicted that he might 
have serious brain trouble. He answered! 

There was once a man who had an idea that India rubber could be 
made useful. People laughed at him, but for eleven years he struggled with 
hardships to make his dream come true. He pawned his clothing and the 
family jewels to buy for his children. His neighbors called him insane. But, 
he still insisted that India rubber could be made of practical use. The man 
was Charles Goodyear. He answered! 

Norman Borlaug was born and raised on one of the smallest farms in 
the country during the depression. He had to work an extra year just to 
finish schooling, but he was an outstanding student of vocational agri- 
culture and is being recognized at this year's convention by the Honorary 
American Farmer Degree. A laboring farmer by nature. A Nobel Prize win- 
ner — agriculture by profession. Dreams do come true, if you make them. 
He answered! 

These are men, real men who did not ask for a map through life. Men 
who did not ask why. Can someone else? Men who did not ask when or 
where. Men who did not ask, but answered! Believe if you can, and you can; 
believe if you will, and you will. See yourself achieving, and you will achieve. 

I have been blessed with many great experiences and acquaintances 
this year, and during this time I have been appalled by some men who have 
succumbed to the frightening incapacity for independent action. Hearing 
statements of "why me," "why now," "that isn't my responsibility" has 
driven me to the point of sharing a secret with you. 

ANSWER AND BEGIN: 

Everywhere you turn in the business world, on the road, on the stage, 
at home, there is a need for your talent. Duty whispers low, "thou must." 
You reply, "I can!" 

I have been so many times perplexed by young men and women who 
have great talent, yet their talent is lost to the world. Their call is never 
answered. Timidness, often used as a mask for fear, has prevented many 
talented youth from making that first effort. Begin now, and you will have 
climbed the first rung of the ladder of success. You will probably be 
famous. 

History is often a great teacher. In 1898, war had broken out between 
Spain and the U.S. During this time, President McKinley suddenly realized 
it was very necessary to communicate quickly with the leader of the Insur- 
gents. Garcia, its leader, was somewhere in the mountain fortresses of 
Cuba. No one knew where. There was no mail, and no telegraph message 
could reach him. The President had to secure Garcia's cooperation and do 
it quickly. Many said this was impossible, but — 

WHAT TO DO: 

An aide said to the President, "I know a fellow by the name of Rowan 
who will find Garcia for you if anybody can." Rowan was sent for. When 
given the letter to be delivered to Garcia, he took it. sealed it up in an oil- 
skin pouch, strapped it over his heart and in four days landed by night off 



32 



FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 



the coast of Cuba in an open boat. He disappeared into the jungle, and in 
three weeks came out on the other side of the island, having traveled a 
hostile country on foot. But, he delivered the President's letter to Garcia! 
When the President gave the letter to Rowan, he took the letter and did not 
ask "Where is he?" "Can someone else do it?" "Is there any hurry?" 
"Why?" "Take it yourself!!" DUTY CALLED he answered! 

Our convention theme — and, it will guide our efforts next year is 
"Youth With A Purpose" . . . indeed. We have a call to answer. It is in- 
correct to talk about the years of FFA experiences as preparation for life, 
because these years are as much a part of our life as any years will ever be. 

Therefore, my challenge to you is answer not what you have done or 
what you will do, but what are you doing. 

One second before the end. ... I look out, I see miles. I see smiles. 
I see frowns. I see crowns. I see yawning. I see dawning. I see YOU. 



THE FARMERS' DAUGHTER 

GEORGE ALLEN, National Vice President, North Atlantic Region 

Discussion of change has charged the atmosphere of this national 
convention of the Future Farmers of America. It is about this I speak. 
Likewise, there has been much discussion about change in the FFA. For 

my last FFA speech, I want to be a little selfish, 
I would like all of you to put aside all the world's 
problems for just a moment and, with me, look 
at what we can do for the FFA. 

Today and yesterday I have been a Future 
Farmer — a real, a true Future Farmer, because 
tomorrow I shall be just that, a farmer. An 
American farmer, a farmer — you all know the 
facts — who will feed over 50 people — alone — 
almost — except for the 13 other individuals in 
related occupations who help in this tremendous 
task and thus are nearly as essential as that 
farmer himself. 

Yet, there are those who have tried to 
maintain that agriculture, agricultural educa- 
tion, and the FFA should be kept separate from 
these related occupations — "A fortress unto our- 
selves," they say — that rural and urban agri- 
cultural interest can not and will not mix, that we cannot have quantity 
and quality both in FFA, that we in agriculture should ignore the very thing 
that was created to assist us in producing food in such quanity that less 
than five per cent of the population has to be so engaged — to ignore, 
simply, the agribusiness industry, the offspring of agriculture. 

There is, I think, just one answer to all these points. It is: Given any 
of these problems, we can find the solution — if we want to. More than that, 
I say we must. In these troubled times, we must find ways to come together 




FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 33 

rather than spend all our effort and time to maintain our differences. For 
43 years, we have waited with anticipation for "The Dawn of a New Day in 
Agriculture when . . . all . . . have learned to cooperate." Way back as 
Greenhands, you and I pledged to work toward that new day. It's time now 
to renew our efforts. Only this time, let's try it together, like it really is, as 
an entire industry. And, for those who still consider this impossible, per- 
haps the example of that labor giant AFL-CIO organizing seventeen mil- 
lion workers will help them take courage. Not only do we need to cooperate; 
in the future, we will have to. 

The time has come when we are not best serving agriculture unless we 
serve agribusiness as well, as much in reality as in definition. Like many of 
you, I aspire to be counted among the best farmers on the face of this 
earth. But I have come to realize, after seven years of travel with the FFA, 
that you can't do it unless the people who provide services for you — 
dealers, veterinarians, mechanics, technicians, researchers, are all at their 
absolute best, too, and furthermore, all are informed of the needs of the 
production level. 

It can't be done with each potential little interest group undermining 
the next; a lesson we can easily learn from our parallel adult organizations. 
We can only do it with everyone, black, white, rural, urban, people well off, 
and those not so well off, every student who has a genuine interest in the 
productive phase and related careers of agribusiness working together in 
unison under the roof of one organization. 

Looking around at the alternatives, the FFA, I believe, can and should 
be that youth organization, if only for the reason that we are the most ex- 
perienced at that crucial production level — the level that provides the 
energy to make the rest of the world go 'round. Looking deeper, there 
really is no one but us to take up the responsibility created by the rise of 
agribusiness. It is a strange thing that agribusiness, a product, an off- 
spring of agriculture has been left, until very recently, an orphan in educa- 
tional circles. 

An orphan. Now that is strange to me because I think of agribusiness 
as something like the Farmer's Daughter, of whom, no doubt, you have all 
heard about via sultry stories and jokes, all of us always paying less atten- 
tion to good qualities than bad. Only the largest industry in America is no 
joke, and the prospect of trying to decide which 50 million U. S. citizens 
should be the first to go hungry is not spectacularly humerous. That's the 
difference, though, between an agriculture with all its needed services 
provided and modern technology applied and an agriculture without its 
related occupations. The difference is agribusiness; and, as the only high 
school program training students for this industry, the difference is us. 

The difference could be provided by this organization working toward 
getting greater participation in present programs. It could be provided 
with a flexible education program shaped to fit the students, not the other 
way around. By making available to all who will one day work with us the 
benefits each of us has received as FFA members, we can still uphold the 
proudest tradition of FFA and the only tradition that counts, that of being 
outstanding in our field, whatever that field may be, instead of being out — 
standing — somewhere alone. 



34 FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 

In saying these things, I speak not only as a Future Farmer, but as a 
farmer of the future. I speak not only to the national delegates, but to 
every single responsible FFA member in this convention hall. And, I speak 
with hope. Let's all reach out for Agribusiness, the Farmers' Daughter. 



NATIONAL OFFICERS' YEARLY REPORT 

JOHN McCULLEY, National Secretary 

Almost a year ago, we six national officers stood on this stage, 
shrouded in a veil of disbelief that we had finally reached our highest goal 
in the FFA. That disbelief quickly became a reality as we began the most 
exciting and meaningful year of our lives. Because you made our terms of 
office such an unforgettable experience, it is only right that we share some 
of our highlights with you. 

First, we offer our thanks to God for providing us the chance to serve 
as national officers and for His making our many journeys safe and suc- 
cessful. 

To the entire national FFA staff we proclaim our deepest appreciation, 
not only for their personal assistance to the six of us, but also for their 
dedicated service to the FFA. To our National Advisor, H. N. Hunsicker, 
our National Executive Secretary, Wm. Paul Gray, and Coleman Harris, 
National Associate Executive Secretary our gratitude is extended. Few men 
show as much concern for the FFA as you do. A special thanks also goes 
to the Board of Directors for their vision on behalf of the FFA. 

And, to our fellow FFA members, well, we just wish there was a better 
word than thanks to give you for what you have done to make these past 
twelve months so rewarding. 

Our year began as we led the American Royal Parade through the 
streets of Kansas City. After a few days of officer orientation we went our 
separate ways. Wayne got things started by representing the FFA at the 
Safety Congress in Chicago. 

Before the first of the year we had the great opportunity to travel 
to many States and talk with hundreds of FFA members. Wayne visited 
Kansas, Indiana, Ohio and Michigan. Dan Dooley was in Arizona, Nevada 
and California, while George was speaking at chapters in Vermont, New 
Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. Jim spoke with FFA members in Texas 
and Oklahoma. Dan Lehmann was in Michigan, North Dakota and Iowa, 
and I travelled through Washington. 

Before Christmas, Dan Lehmann attended the American Farm Bureau 
Federation Convention in Houston and the National Farmers' Organization 
convention in Louisville. Jim was at the AVA meeting in New Orleans and 
the National Young Farmers' Convention in Wichita, while I was present 
for the National Grange Convention in Boise, Idaho. 

With the advent of a new year, we six met in Washington, D. C. for 
leadership training and the Board of Directors meeting. A real highlight 
of our year was the 24th Annual National Officer Tour which started in 
February. On this we travelled to 29 cities in 16 States visiting over 110 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 35 

businesses that support the ideal of American free enterprise and citizen- 
ship developed in the FFA. We took every opportunity to demonstrate ho// 
FFA members are involved in America's future. 

Upon completion of the tour we departed in different directions and 
had the privilege of attending all 50 State conventions where we saw the 
FFA in action. Between conventions, George was a guest of the Junior 
Young Farmers of Ontario, Canada; Dan Dooley appeared at the Triumph 
of Agriculture meeting in Omaha; and Dan Lehmann spoke at the OEA 
Convention in Indianapolis. 

During June and July, we worked with FFA officers on all levels as 
leadership sessions were conducted throughout the United States. Some 
of our most memorable moments occurred at the several Washington con- 
ferences, one being the State Officers' Leadership Conference at which 
time we visited President Nixon at the White House. 

The FFA was represented at two vocational youth organization meet- 
ings during the summer, with Wayne at VICA and me at the FHA conven- 
tion. 

Before coming to the national convention, the two Dans' were FFA's 
representatives at the AIC and the American Feed Manufacturers Assicia- 
tion meeting. Dan Lehmann and George also toured the Northeast before 
participating in the impressive ceremonies at the Eastern States Exposi- 
tion, and Jim was at the Mid-South Fair in Memphis. 

All in all, we travelled about 500 thousand miles carrying the spirit 
and enthusiasm of FFA to over 325 chapter meetings, 115 FFA banquets 
and 30 service organizations. 

In all our travels and meeting people we have developed and recon- 
firmed a philosophy that we would like to share with you, hoping you will 
be able to employ it in your FFA careers and lives. . . . 

Take time to think — it is the source of power 

Take time to play — it is the secret of perpetual youth 

Take time to laugh — it is music to the soul 

Take time to read — it is the foundation of wisdom 

Take time to be friendly — it is the road to happiness 

Take time to give — it is too short a day to be selfish 

Take time to pray — it is the greatest power on earth. 



AGRICULTURAL CAREER EXHIBITORS 

Agricultural Relations Council 

American Agricultural Editors' Association 

American Association of Agricultural College Editors 

American Association of Nurserymen & National Landscape Association 

American Fisheries Society 

American Meat Institute 

American Seed Trade Association 

American Society of Agricultural Engineers 

American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society 

of America 
Amercan Society For Horticultural Science 
Edison Electric Institute 



36 



FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 



Farm Electrification Council 

Farm Equipment Manufacturers Association 

Farm and Industrial Equipment Institute 

Institute of Food Technologists 

Kansas Agribusiness Student's Association 

National Agricultural Advertising & Marketing Association 

National Association of Animal Breeders, Inc. 

National Association of County Agricultural Agents 

National Farm & Power Equipment Dealers Association 

National Association of Farm Broadcasters 

National Grain and Feed Association 

National Society of Live Stock Record Associations 

National Vocational Agricultural Teachers' Association, Inc. 

Peace Corps 

Sales & Marketing Executives International 

Society of American Florists 

Society of American Foresters 

Soil Conservation Society of America 

Weed Science Society of America 

The Wildlife Society 




FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 37 

Committee Reports 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

We, the Nominating Committee, do hereby submit the following can- 
didates for National FFA Office for the year 1971-72. After having given 
careful and deliberate consideration to all applications, we offer the follow- 
ing slate of candidates for the delegates' consideration: 

President TIM J. BURKE, New Hampton, Iowa 

Secretary DENNIS C. SARGENT, Bradford, Ohio 

Vice President, Central Region .. PHILIP H. JOHNSON, Mead, Nebraska 
Vice President, North Atlantic Region KEVIN ERNEST HALL, 

Keymar, Maryland 

Vice President, Pacific Region CLIFFORD WAYNE SAYLOR, 

Glendale, Arizona 
Vice President, Southern Region SAMMY PEEBLES, Brewton, Alabama 

Treasurer J. M. CAMPBELL, Richmond, Virginia 

Executive Secretary WM. PAUL GRAY, Washington, D. C. 

Advisor H. N. HUNSICKER, Washington, D. C. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DENNIS O'NAN, Kentucky (Chairman) 

ZANE HANSEN, Idaho 

DOYLE WAYBRIGHT, Pennsylvania 

GARY BULLER, South Dakota 

TOM OGLE, Missouri 

RUSSELL KELLY, Connecticut 

DAN KIRKBRIDE, Wyoming 

RODNEY BAKER, Arkansas 

ROGER D. PORTER, South Carolina 

AUDITING COMMITTEE 

We, the members of the Auditing Committee, after careful examina- 
tion of the Certified Public Accountant's report of the FFA Organization's 
finances for the fiscal year July 1, 1970 through June 30, 1971, make the 
following recommendations: 

1. That the audit report of Stoy, Malone and Company be accepted as being true 
and accurate. 

2. That both Mr. Julian Campbell, National Treasurer, and his secretary, Mrs. Pauline 
Coiner, be commended for their untiring efforts on behalf of the FFA Organization. 

Respectfully submitted: 

JIMMY ALVAREZ, Florida (Chairman) 
MARK McKEE, Tennessee 
BARHAM FULMER, Texas 
BRIAN LADD, New Hampshire 
NORM ANDREWS, Nebraska 
JEFF FUECHSEL, Wyoming 
ALFRED STEVEN, Louisiana 
DANIEL E. MELHORN, Pennsylvania 



38 FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 

NATIONAL FFA AWARDS AND CONTESTS COMMITTEE 

On behalf of the National FFA Organization, we the National FFA 
Awards and Contests Committee of the 44th National Convention, wish to 
express our gratitude to the Foundation sponsors for their contributions 
to our organization. 

We extend a most sincere thanks to Mr. Fred Stines, Publisher, 
Successful Farming Magazine, and 1971 Chairman of the Foundation Spon- 
soring Committee: Mr. Donald N. McDowell, Executive Director of the 
National FFA Foundation Sponsoring Committee; and Mr. Robert Seefeldt, 
Manager of Contests and Awards of the FFA. 

We submit the following recommendations to the National FFA Foun- 
dation Board of Directors and/or Board of Trustees: 

1. That we endorse a National Ornamental Horticulture and Ag. Mechanics Judging 
contest. 

2. That we endorse the plan of the National Awards and Contests Committee to 

update all national judging contests. 

a. Encourage increased participation for Agricultural Proficiency awards. 

b. Broaden the publicizing facets of our awards program. 

c. Encourage advisors to make Proficiency Awards, packets available to all stu- 
dents. 

3. That the national staff look into the possibilities of a Proficiency Award to include 
small animal husbandry areas such as, minks, dogs, etc. 

4. That an award be made available to parallel the Star Chapter Farmer Award on 
the chapter level called the "Star Chapter Agribusiness Award." 

5. That we support the allocation of National Foundation cash awards as is. 

6. That the national staff explore the possibilities of a state that receives $1,400.00 
or less from the National Foundation for the 15 different proficiency areas, being 
able to divide this money equally to proficiency winners. 

7. That state and local officers continue to work closely with Farmers Home Ad- 
ministration in strengthening the BOAC Program. 

a. Each chapter should survey the local community as to its rescources in relation 
to this program. 

b. Each state be encouraged to develop a program for aquainting chapters with 
the BOAC program. 

c. We strongly suggest that each chapter do at least one project during 1971-72. 

8. We commend the national organization for developing special projects. We urge 
further development of such programs in other needed areas. 

9. We recommend that the national staff explore the possibilities of developing a 
brochure containing information of all Foundation Awards and Contests. 

Respectfully submitted: 

JIM GILMORE, New Mexico (Chairman) 

GREG LOOK, Oregon 

JERRY BRADLEY, California 

MIKE FIELDS, Texas 

JOHN BROCKWELL, Tennessee 

DICKPRINE, Wisconsin 

STEPHEN BAUM, Louisiana 



NATIONAL FFA CALENDAR COMMITTEE 

We the Calendar Committee of the 44th National FFA Convention wish 
to commend Jack Pitzer and the entire Calendar staff for their work in 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA V* 

developing and promoting the Calendar Program. After reviewing the 1970 
Calendar Committee Report we recommend the following: 

1. Institute ways to inform chapters of our Calendar Program. 

a. State officers explain the Calendar Programs during chapter visits. 

b. Individual chapters obtain information about the National Calendar Programs 
at the following address: 

Calendar Department 

The National Future Farmer Magazine 

P. 0. Box 15130 

Alexandria, Virginia 22309 

c. Information be sent out to local chapters concerning calendars. This to be 
followed up by a postcard to secure the intent of the chapter. 

2. Institute national and state recognition for chapters that participate in the 
Official FFA Calendar Program. 

a. Present a national recognition certificate signed by the National President and 
National Advisor to each chapter. 

b. Provide in the respective state newsletters recognition for chapters participat- 
ing in the Official Calendar Program. 

3. Encourage that the Calendar Programs reflect the new image of FFA. 

a. Include in the Calendar pictures such as FFA's involvement in Building Our 
American Communities and in being involved in America's future. 

4. Encourage each member to have an Official FFA Calendar. 

5. Propose an incentive program to chapters to participate in the Official Calendar 
Program. 

a. Provide plastic pocket calendars with the purchase of a minimum order. 

b. Provide desk type appointment calendars with the purchase of a minimum 
order. 

6. All chapters strive to provide quality 4x5 color transparencies for possible 
publication in the FFA Calendar and in the National Future Farmer Magazine. 

7. Chapters should be encouraged to place orders in the spring. To insure pre- 
holiday delivery, orders should be received no later than December 1. 

Respectfully submitted: 

JERRY BONAGOFSKY, Washington (Chairman) 
ROBERT SMIT, South Dakota 
RAYSHIMP, West Virginia 
SAM GUAZZINI, Nevada 
RICHARD GRILL, Michigan 



NATIONAL FFA CONVENTION PROCEEDINGS COMMITTEE 

We the National FFA Convention Proceedings Committee for 1971. 
having reviewed the 43rd National Convention Proceedings, recommend 
the following: 

1. That the Proceedings include a group photograph of past and newly elected 
national officers, appearing after the Call to Convention. 

2. That a brief biographical sketch of each of the newly elected officers follow the 
previously mentioned picture. 

3. That the names and photographs of the band and chorus be updated to the 
44th National Convention. 

4. That a photograph of the Agriculture Career Show accompany the list of Agri- 
cultural Career Exhibitors. 

5. That the photographs, included in the highlights of the convention portray the 
diversity of the convention. 

6. That photographs of guest personalities be positioned throughout the Pro- 
ceedings booklet. 



40 FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 

7. That the list of Honorary American Farmers, American Farmers, and Distin- 
guished Service award recipients appear after the treasurer's report and not 
in the minutes. 

8. That a complete approved budget for the 1971-1972 year accompany the Na- 
tional Treasurer's report. 

9. That a list of the "Building Our American Communities" award winners along 
with a resume of the activities of the winning chapter be included in the Na- 
tional FFA Foundation Awards and Contests section. 

10. That a brief description of the Star Farmer and Star Agribusinessman pageant 
be included with the names of the Regional winners in each area. 

11. That a brief resume of the projects of the National Star Farmer and the National 
Star Agribusinessman follow the group photographs of the winners. 

12. That the National Center continue to send a copy of the Proceedings to each 
chapter along with a letter stressing the importance of the National Program of 
Activities and other important items and uses of the Proceedings booklet. 

13. That additional copies of the Proceedings booklet be made available through 
the National FFA Supply Service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DENNIS DAZEY, Illinois (Chairman) 
STEVE FERREE, Colorado 
PAUL SKALING, Rhode Island 
JON CARUTHERS, California 
ROD CHRISTIANSON, Minnesota 
RICKEY BUCKNER, North Carolina 



NATIONAL FFA PROGRAM OF ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE 

We the members of the National Program of Activities Committee 
have carefully reviewed and inspected the proposed 1972 National Pro- 
gram of Activities and submit the following recommendations to the Boards 
of National Officers and Directors for their consideration: 

1. That the present format of the National Program of Activities be retained. 

2. That '"Goals" be made measurable and specific using definite figures or numbers 
as often as possible. 

3. That the Report of Accomplishments of the National Program of Activities be 
expanded in all areas and that more factual and in-depth information be given 
where possible. We further recommend that the goals of the previous year be 
included in this report and that the entire report be printed in the National 
Convention Proceedings. 

4. That each committee review the National Program of Activities and Report of 
Accomplishments before making recommendations regarding their respective 
committees. 

5. That the recommendations of all National FFA Convention Committees be re- 
viewed and considered before revising the annual National Program of Activities. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PAUL S. CRAUN, Virginia (Chairman) 
JOHN HIBBARD, Connecticut 
CHRIS SCHMIDT, Kansas 
CHARLES EXLINE, West Virginia 
JOHN L. PATTERSON III, Alabama 
GENETAPALMAN, Ohio 
DAVE CASEY, Oklahoma 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 



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FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 47 

NATIONAL FFA CONVENTION PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

We, the 1971 Convention Program Committee, after reviewing the 
44th annual convention of the Future Farmers of America wish to com- 
mend the National Officers and Board of Directors for one of the best con- 
ventions ever held. 

To improve the excellence we have attained, however, we make the 
following recommendations: 

1. That a special effort be made to reduce noise, especially when addresses are 
being delivered. 

2. That convention programs be made available prior to the convention. 
3 That the Wednesday night session be shortened. 

4. That the public address system be improved: 

a. Have all microphones working all of the time. 

b. Place more microphones around delegate floor. 

5. That guest speakers be limited to subjects pertinent to FFA, and the speechs 
be no longer than 20 minutes. 

6. That celebrities be added to the program for added interest. 

7. That standing ovations be used only when sincerely deserved. 

8. That a slide of a guest speaker be shown while he is speaking so that those in 
the rear of the auditorium can see his face. 

9. That a slide presentation be made on the national officers activities. 

10. That practice sessions for pageants begin on time. 

11. That the Vespers Service be moved to larger facilities. 

12. That slide presentations like "FFA in Action" be continued with the use of 
improved slides. 

13. That the use of a pertinent and contemporary theme be continued. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DWIGHT SEGMILLER, Iowa (Chairman) 

MONTE SAMBER, Colorado 

JOE CASTLE, Missouri 

NEIL LOYD, North Carolina 

DAVID CROSBY, Indiana 

JOHN LEIDNER, Texas 

JOEL ELLIS, Alabama 

FRANK STAFFORD, Delaware 



NATIONAL FFA INFORMATION PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

We, the National FFA Information Program Committee of the 44th 
National Convention present the following: 
1. Public relation programs need organization. 

a. Chapter, state and national officers need to be better trained to conduct FFA 
public relations programs. 

b. Chapter, state, and national officers need to meet soon after their election to 
plan their public relations programs. 

c. Chapter and state advisors need better training in the aspect of public rela- 
tions. 

d. Chapter advisors need public relation aids to help them conduct public rela- 
tion programs and teach agricultural communications. 

e. Chapters and states need to use all available public relation media. 

f. Chapter and state advisors need to be willing to conduct public relation pro- 
grams. 



48 FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 

2. Public relation programs should increase membership. 

a. Chapter Officers and Advisors should explain the total program of FFA to 
potential FFA members. 

b. Chapters must create a favorable image by conducting a complete program 
of activities. 

c. State and National Officers should work more closely with younger members. 

d. FFA members should dress and conduct themselves appropriately. 

3. The general public, especially the urban population, needs to know more about 

FFA and the broad field of agriculture. 

a. Chapter, State and National Officers should tell about the FFA. 

b. FFA members can explain and clarify just what agribusiness is. 
This Committee has one last point of special interest. 

The Advisor plays a main role in the public relations program of any chapter. 
Only with his encouragement and involvement will public relations work with a 
definite result. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD L. DUBAS, (Chairman) 
BILL MANESS, North Carolina 
GLENN MOE, Wisconsin 
EDWARD D. HIGLEY, Vermont 
MERCER TURNER. Illinois 



INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM OF ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE 

We, the International Program of Activities Committee, for 1971, 
submit the following goal: 

To provide an exchange of ideas with agriculturally oriented groups 
abroad and at home, to exchange organizational ideas in order to further 
our mutual goals in agricultural education, and to promote international 
understanding and cooperation. 

We suggest the following objectives to achieve this goal: 

1. Continue the publication of the Future Farmer Globe, an international magazine 
about the FFA. 

2. Expand and improve "Work Experience" programs, with all countries willing to 
participate. 

3. Encourage State Associations and local chapters to undertake international 
programs and exchanges, and to promote said programs by providing financial 
aid through State and/or local scholarships. 

4. Work closely with Foreign Ministries of Education in exchange programs. 

5. Prepare a tentative program (to be ready by the 1972 convention) leading to 
the feasibility and reality of an International Agricultural Youth Conference for 
the year 1976. 

6. Especially encourage the NVATA to undertake agricultural teacher exchanges with 
foreign countries. 

7. Utilize American representatives and organizations (U.S. Diplomatics, church 
groups, industries, private firms, bank associations, youth organizations, civic 
clubs, etc.) located and operating in foreign countries more efficiently to help 
develop the definite and necessary contacts needed and wanted with those 
agriculturally oriented youth groups in other countries. 

8. Cooperate with foundations and organizations with common objectives and goals 
on youth exchanges (such as AFS, American Field Service; Rotary International; 
ICYF, International Christian Youth Fellowship; International Farm Youth Ex- 
change, etc.) 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 49 

9. Continue to explore and seek new areas for financing of international programs 
through national, state and local civic organizations, agricultural clubs and in- 
ternational agriculturally related companies and foundations. 

10. Utilize exchange visitors and past exchangees by including them in chapter state 
and national activities in order to stimulate more interest in international pro- 
grams. 

11. Commence a promotional program on all state and local levels covering the 
various international programs by utilizing the following suggestions: 

a. Produce a film about the programs. 

b. Make slide sets available for distribution to State and local levels. 

c. Provide promotional literature. 

d. Have the National FFA Magazine publish articles of an informational and 
promotional nature, written particularly by exchangees in EACH issue of the 
magazine for promotion of the exchange program. 

e. Promote and utilize educational exchange program booths at livestock shows 
and fairs on the local, state and national levels. Develop display materials 
to be furnished upon request to states. 

12. Provide an International Work Experience Abroad program during one session 
of the national convention and/or an all-day gathering place for members and 
exchange visitors to visit and relax with the opportunity and ability to make plans 
for future exchanges and to obtain information about the WEA program. 

13. Look into possibilities of holding regional or state-wide meetings of the Inter- 
national Chapter members at state or regional functions of the FFA. 

14. Involve past and present FFA members who have participated in other interna- 
tional exchange programs in promoting the FFA International Program. 

15. Extend a standing invitation to the FFA and national diplomats of three foreign 
countries to our national convention and send personal invitations to these 
people from the national staff. 

16. Move toward translation and publication of FFA materials and current agri- 
cultural knowledge for those countries involved in the exchange program. 

At a time in history when two-thirds of the world goes hungry, when 20% of the 
people own and control 80% of the resources, when the gap between "developing" 
nations widens each day, the FFA should commit itself to provide encouragement 
and assistance wherever possible to help improve agricultural conditions, and make 
the world a better place in which to live. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JERRY D. GOOLSBY, Oklahoma (Chairman) 

DAVID BRANHAM, Ohio 

DENNIS WALLACE, Washington 

RUSS YEAU, Rhode Island 

BENJAMIN BIGGS, Delaware 

FRANK ALLNUTT, Maryland 

HARTSELLCRUTCHFIELD, Arkansas 

DAVE KELSEY, Montana 

NATIONAL LEADERSHIP PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

We, the members of the 1971 National Leadership Program Com- 
mittee realize that leadership is an important segment of involvement in 
the FFA. In order to further leadership development on all levels, we do 
hereby recommend the following: 

1. To continue the State Presidents' Conference, using the same basic format as 
in 1971, and utilize the leadership of the national officers to the fullest at the 
conference. 

2. Continue the Washington Conference Programs for all chapters members. 

3. Encourage all members to participate in the Washington Conference Programs. 

4. Involve all FFA members at the chapter and state level in Leadership Training 
Programs. 



50 FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 

5. Encourage all states to have a leadership training camp and/or conference for 
chapter officers. 

6. Involve all states to participate in the sub-regional Leadership Training Con- 
ference. 

7. Have the national organization explore the possibility of having parliamentary 
procedure contests at the regional and national levels. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM D. CASE, Massachusetts (Chairman) 
MARVIN HARADA, Oregon 
BARRY GEORGE, Georgia 
ROBERT BAKER, Kentucky 
CATHERINE MACALLISTER, New Jersey 
DICK HILSABECK, Iowa 
JERRY MEISSNER, Wisconsin 
DALE ENERSON, North Dakota 

NATIONAL FFA MAGAZINE COMMITTEE 

We, the members of the National FFA Magazine Committee for 1971, 
submit the following recommendations for more effectiveness and improve- 
ment of the Magazine: 

1. Increased articles concerning former FFA members who have succeeded in their 
respective fields, with special emphasis placed on covering a broader range of 
occupational fields. 

2. More articles concerning: 

a. All National contest winners. 

b. Technical information which is unique in order to provide information not 
available in other farm magazines. 

c. A monthly article by each national officer (on a rotating basis) with emphasis 
on inspiring and becoming better known to the members, and encouraging 
the national officer to relate to his travel expediences. 

d. More and expanded questions to encourage reader response and the printing 
of a cross section of these responses. 

3. Equal coverage of the important events of each region, but not to the extent of 
sacrificing quality in the articles. 

4. More articles on "behind the scene" workings of our national organization, (Con- 
vention committees, Board meetings, etc.) to greater inform the members relating 
to national organization business. 

5. All subscriptions to the magazine, except for those of the members, be sent 
directly to the magazine, leaving only members names and addresses on the 
membership rosters. 

6. Encourage local chapters to include the complete mailing address, including zip 
code of each member on the membership roster. 

7. Encourage members to submit more articles, editorials, and pictures of a higher 
quality to the magazine. 

8. That this convention go on record as commending The National Future Farmer 
and its personnel for the improvements they have made in the magazine and 
for their constructive attitude toward suggestions for its improvement. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALAN JONES, Texas (Chairman) 
BOB HINTON, Florida 
GORDON BARNABY, Vermont 
ROGER BYRD, Georgia 
FRED KAAUAMO, Hawaii 
DAVID CARMICHAEL, Arizona 
RICHARD SMITH, New Jersey 
RICHARD HARTLY, Mississippi 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 51 

OFFICIAL FFA MANUAL COMMITTEE 

The 1971 FFA Manual Committee met and reviewed the report of the 
1970 committee. We recommend the following changes in the 1972 edition: 

1. Update the photographs on pages, 4, 20, 21, 34, 47, 48, 58, and 93. These 
pictures should be chosen to represent the entire scope of FFA activities and 
membership, for example, female membership. 

2. In the section on banquets page 95 under "Who Should Be Included", add an 

item number 9, whjch should read, "Local representatives of sponsors to the 
National FFA Foundation. A list of National FFA Foundation Sponsors is sent 
to chapters each year." 

3. All statistics in the 1971 edition should be checked and updated where necessary. 

4. On pages 46 and 47, move the title "Calendar of Activities" from its present 

position on page 47 to a position immediately after sub-paragraph 10 on page 46. 

5. That the Manual be further revised as needed with regard to business transacted 
at this convention. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ROSS OLSON, North Dakota (Chairman) 
MARTY CLAYTON, Texas 
JIM MIDKIFF, Kentucky 
FRANKLIN SPOONER, Georgia 
THOMPSON SMITH, South Carolina 
JOHNNIE WOOD, Alabama 
JULIO GONZALES, Arizona 
TIMOTHY DIVOLL, Massachusetts 
LARRY PERRY, Maine 



NATIONAL FFA CONVENTION RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE 

We, the members of the Resolutions Committee of the 44th annual 
National Convention recommend that the Future Farmers of America com- 
mend and extend sincere appreciation to the individuals and groups who 
have devoted their time and money in making this convention a tremendous 
success: 

1. The members of the National Board of Directors, National staff, State staffs 
and advisors for their untiring efforts and continuing assistance to members of 
the FFA. 

2. The 1970-71 national officers for providing all the characteristics and traits of 
inspiration and leadership, and the united effort of these six men who con- 
tributed to the success of this convention. 

3. Fred Stines, 1971 Chairman of the FFA Foundation Sponsoring Committee, for 
his excellent job done and leadership portrayed in that organization. 

4. All members of the President's National Advisory Council for serving as judges 
and for attending & participating in the convention program. 

5. The Lilly Endowment, Inc. and the Farmers Home Administration for their faith 
in the FFA and support of the Building Our American Communities Program. 

6. The Honorable Charles Wheeler, Mayor of Kansas City, Missouri; the Kansas 
City Police Force; and the residents of Kansas City for their fantastic hospitality 
and loyalty to the FFA. 

7. All the members of the FFA Band and Chorus, and a special thank you to Fred 
McClure; the Oak City Quartet; Steve Hofing, the convention organist; arid 
Dennis Good, convention pianist. We also wish to express our thanks to Mr. 
Roger Heath, Mr. Marvin Myers, Mr. Don Erickson and their loyal assistants, for 
rendering their services to the music aspect of this convention. 



52 FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 

8. The Kansas City FFA Convention Advisory Committee, the Kansas City Chamber 
of Commerce and the management and staff of the Kansas City Municipal 
Auditorium for their continuance to believe in our purposes and their unselfish 
loyalty in serving the FFA. 

9. Robert Finch, Special Consultant to the President of the United States, for bring- 
ing us in view with the President's ideas and representing him here at this con- 
vention, with his timely and inspiring remarks. 

10. The outstanding guest speakers featured in our programs: Greg Bamford, J. Phil 
Campbell, John G. Veneman, Dewitt Edmonds, John Stearns, Yoshio Okawara, 
Robert Worthington, Roy Rogers and Dale Evans. 

11. The Wurlitzer Organ Company for loaning us the electric organ which added 
pleasure to the convention. 

12. The directors and the assistants of the Courtesy Corps, Ushers, Stage Crews. 
Arena Crews and all others who assisted in the smoothness of the convention. 

13. All companies, civic clubs and individuals who sponsored and made possible 
the many meal functions and activities for the FFA members. 

14. The trade and professional associations, exhibitors of the informative and 
worthwhile Agricultural Career Exhibits; and all the State Associations for their 
important and dynamic exhibits. 

15. R. M. Hendrickson, Charles J. Martin, James V. Smith, Dean Curtiss and S. 
Archie Holdridge for serving the FFA by selecting the National Public Speaking 
winner, and to all respected officials and participants who took part in the 
various contests, awards programs and other special events. 

16. The people of the American Royal for providing the FFA a day of festivities that 
were educational and entertaining as well. 

17. The Firestone Tire and Rubber Company for once again climaxing our convention 
with their program. 

18. The Color Guard from Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, under the direction of Sgt. 
Crigan, for presenting our National Colors. 

19. All organizations of the press, TV and radio that have let the nation know about 
this convention, and our appreciation to Mr. Dan Reuwee for his publicizing 
efforts. We also wish to show our gratitude to the Newspaper Farm Editors of 
America and the National Association of Farm Broadcasters. 

20. Harry Birdwell, vocational youth leaders and other youth guests, J. E. Streetman 
and other individuals who spoke or played a role in the 44th convention, we 
wish to give our best wishes and luck. 

21. To all officials of the National Judging Contests and to the American Royal for 
their contributions in helping make the contest a success and providing a 
means of recognition for vocational agricultural students. 

22. To all organizations, companies and sponsors for their generous support through 
providing fellowship and outstanding meal functions. 

23. All chapter and state delegates for their attentiveness and cooperation in the 
functioning of this convention. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARK MAYFIELD, Kansas (Chairman) 
STEVE THAL, Minnesota 
JOEL SCHEIDER, Illinois 
JIM JENKINS, Oklahoma 
RICHARD LAMB, New York 
JEFFGARNDER, Nevada 
CABELCOBBS, Virginia 
LARRY RUDD, New York 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 53 

NATIONAL FFA SUPPLY SERVICE COMMITTEE 

The National FFA Supply Service Committee hereby recommends: 

1. That all FFA members support the National FFA Supply Service at Alexandria, 
Virginia, since this is an integral part of our organization. 

2. That the corduroy overseas style cap be deleted from the catalogue. 

3. That a small officers' notebook be added to items supplied. 

4. That the Supply Service investigate putting a windbreaker on sale. 

5. That the Supply Service look into the possibility of producing a public relations 
kit, and that a public relations section be added to the official catalogue. 

6. That the Supply Service report progress made at the 1972 National FFA Conven- 
tion. 

The Committee would like to express its appreciation to the National 
FFA Supply Service for their devoted and efficient effort in serving the 
Future Farmers of America. 

Respectfully submitted, 

AL NEIDLINGER, Indiana (Chairman) 
EARL SHEWBART, Alabama 
CHARLES NAHALE, Hawaii 
LYMAN GRAHAM, New Mexico 
CHUCK WOOTEN, Tennessee 
PHIL J. PETERSEN, Utah 
VICTOR LINARES, Puerto Rico 



PROGRAM OF ACTIVITIES (LOCAL GUIDE) COMMITTEE 

Upon reviewing the Guide for local chapters to use in developing a 
Program of Activities, the Committee feels that the present Guide as 
printed in the 1971 Official FFA Manual is complete and accurate except 
for recommendations in the following divisions: 

1. Delete the first paragraph on page 46 and substitute the following: "Continuous 
and periodic evaluation of the chapter's activities are desirable throughout the 
chapter year in order to measure progress and to identify factors contributing 
to success, or a lack thereof. Final measurement of achievements in the 
chapter's Program of Activities should be conducted at the conclusion of the 
school year. Every member involvement in the evaluation of programs com- 
pleted, and in the identification of the desirable Program of Activities for the 
coming year is essential to the development of member interest and leadership 
ability, and thereby achieve success of the total program of chapter activities." 

2. In paragraph 2, page 46, add the word "new" so that it reads: "The new execu- 
tive, etc." 

3. In paragraph 6, page 46, add the word "regularly" so that it reads: "Have com- 
mittee reports regularly, etc." 

4. In paragraph 9, page 46, add the words "as an ex-officio member of all com- 
mittees" so that it reads: "The vice president, as an ex-officio member of all 
committees, etc." 

5. In the bottom paragraph, delete the words "early in the spring," "this is usually 
in April or May," so that it reads: "Many chapters find it advantageous to 
develop a tentative outline of a Program of Activities as soon as the new officers 
are elected." 

6. Move the title "Calendar of Activities" to the beginning of the previous para- 
graph. 

7. On page 55, Div. IX, delete "FFA Publicity and Information," and substitute 
"Public Relations." 



54 FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 

8. On page 48 change Section V to "Earnings, Savings, and Investments" and the 
same on page 53 under Div. 5. 

9. Revise, under Div. 3, Section 2 and 3 in accordance Mr. Schmidt's proposal. 

10. Under Goals for Div. 2, Section 1 have "Chapter strive for national recognition." 

11. Under Division 5, Ways and Means, add "h. Encourage all chapter members to 
keep accurate records." 

12. Delete Item 6, in Div. 10, concerning American Royal. 

13. On page 56, add the word "final" so that it reads: "Plan the final program of 
activities early in the school year." 

Respectfully submitted, 

PAUL MULLER, California Assn. (Chairman) 

JOE FABIAN, Michigan 

CHRIS YAMAMTO, Idaho 

JOHN CHESNULEVICH, New Hampshire 

TIMOTHY BEALL, Maryland 

BRIAN WILLIAMS, Maine 



REPORT OF THE NATIONAL FFA TREASURER 

We have distributed in the delegates' section, mimeographed material 
which you may review at your convenience. This material includes a state- 
ment of revenues and expenditures of the FFA for the fiscal year ended 
June 30, a report on the FFA Foundation for the period January 1 through 
September 30 of this year, and a summary of the financial status of the 
total organization. 

In the interest of time, I will not go into detail concerning the entire 
program. Rather than reciting a lot of figures, I would like at this time to 
give you a brief summary of the financial status of your organization and 
bring you up to date in regard to some changes which have taken place in 
connection with the financial structure. 

As you are probably aware, there are four major divisions of the total 
FFA program; namely, The National FFA Office, The National FFA Founda- 
tion, Inc., The National FFA Supply Service, and The National Future 
Farmer Magazine. 

The FFA Supply Service and the National Future Farmer Magazine 
are owned by the FFA Organization and operate under the general direction 
of the FFA Board of Directors. They are housed at the National FFA Center 
near Mt. Vernon, where our National FFA Office is also located. 

Income of the FFA is derived from dues of members, royalties on 
merchandise bearing the FFA emblem, rent on the FFA building from the 
Future Farmers Supply Service and National Future Farmer Magazine, and 
interest earned on funds held in reserve. (The major portion of royalties 
received is paid by the FFA Supply Service). National FFA dues include 
the cost of subscription to the Future Farmer Magazine. 

Expenses consist primarily of travel of the national officers and Board 
of Directors, national office expense, cost of operating the national con- 
vention, maintenance of our FFA building, and also the cost of your 
magazine subscription which is transferred to the Future Farmer Magazine. 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 55 

The FFA Foundation receives its income from contributions of more 
than 500 sponsors, and interest on some reserve funds. Some years ago 
it was suggested by some of our sponsors, that we build up a reserve fund 
which would cover one year's operation, in the event of financial reverses. 
This we have attempted to do and this money has been invested to the very 
best advantage for the best rate of interest and safety of the funds. 

During 1971 more than $286,000.00 has been received in contribu- 
tions from some 550 sponsors. Some 188 of these are contributing for 
the first time this year. Since the FFA Foundation was organized in 1944, 
more than $4,421,000.00 has been contributed by business organizations 
and individuals. This manifestation of interest in your organization from 
year to year, is something of which you can be very proud. 

The greater part of the FFA Foundation budget is expended in con- 
nection with our incentive awards program, recognizing vocational agri- 
culture student members of the FFA for outstanding achievement in agri- 
cultural and leadership activities. This awards program is being expanded 
and up-dated from year to year. 

The FFA Supply Service receives its income from merchandise sold 
to FFA members, and its expenses consist of the cost of merchandise, 
operation of the Supply Service, and rent of the FFA Building. 

The National FUTURE FARMER magazine's income is derived from 
advertising and subscriptions. Its expenses consist of editing, printing, 
mailing of the magazine and rental of space in the FFA Building. 

The total net worth of your organization, including the FFA, the FFA 
Foundation, the Future Farmers Supply Service, and the National Future 
Farmer Magazine, is well over $2,000,000.00. 

Since your last convention some changes have been made in the total 
set-up of the FFA Organization. After careful study by the FFA Finance 
Committee and the Board of Directors, and on the recommendations of our 
auditors, the Board of Directors took action to consolidate the FFA Organi- 
zation, the FFA Magazine and the FFA Supply Service into a central ac- 
counting system at the FFA Center in Alexandria. 

In the re-organizational structure, provisions were made for a comp- 
troller to coordinate all of the FFA Organization's finances of the three 
divisions, each division to be identified within the financial structure. This 
new procedure went into effect July 1st of this year. 

The FFA Foundation accounts will continue to be handled, as in the 
past, out of the Woodstock, Virginia office, and separate from the FFA Or- 
ganization account. 

The Board of Directors has authorized the appointment of a standing 
Finance Committee who will assist with the preparation of the budget and 
make recommendations in connection with financial matters of the organi- 
zation. 

Reserve funds, operating capital and other available FFA funds are 
invested from time to time on a short term basis in banks and other finan- 
cial institutions. Our investment program for the FFA as of September 30. 
1971 totaled $469,532.00. 



56 



FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 



Both Mrs. Coiner and I are bonded to assure protection of the funds 
in our care. A separate audit of each account is made annually by Certified 
Public Accountants, Lybrand, Ross Bros. & Montgomery. Copies of these 
audits are presented to the Boards of Student Officers, Directors and 
Trustees of the FFA and the FFA Foundation, for review in detail during 
Board meetings. The records are also reviewed by your FFA Auditing Com- 
mittee, and are available for examination by any individual member. 

A combined audit of all funds is also made annually and submitted to 
Congress as required by law. In closing this report, I would like to say that 
your organization is in a sound financial condition and that we exercise 
every safeguard in handling the funds of your organization. 




FFA Talent add variety and entertainment to the Program, thus offering an 
opportunity for involvement of members in the Convention. 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 



57 



National FFA Foundation 
Awards and Contests 



This year, FFA members received more than $265,000 in awards that 
were provided by the National FFA Foundation, Inc. Approximately 90,000 
members received medals. These awards are given to encourage FFA mem- 
bers toward the goals of establishment in agricultural occupations, de- 
velopment of leadership and the practice of good citizenship. 

STAR FARMER OF AMERICA 

Since 1929, Star Farmers have been selected from the American 
Farmer candidates who receive the degree at the time of the National FFA 
Convention. A check for $1,000 went to the Star Farmer of America, and 
checks of $500 were awarded to each of the other three regional "Stars". 
The Star Farmer of America was: 
Lonney Eastvold, Hartland, Minnesota. 

The Regional Stars were: 

Dennis A. Carlberg, Frewsburg, New York, Star Farmer, North Atlantic 
Region 

Leroy Crawford, Ames, Oklahoma, Star Farmer, Southern Region 
Irvin Joe Petsch, Meriden, Wyoming, Star Farmer, Pacific Region 




For the first time both groups were recognized in a colorful pageant "Stars 
Over America" in which the history of vocational agriculture and the FFA was 
depicted by slides along with the accomplishments of all eight award winners. 
The theme of the pageant emphasized the relationship of non-production pro- 
grams to the efficiency of production agriculture. 



58 



FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 



STAR AGRIBUSINESSMAN OF AMERICA 

Beginning in 1959 the Star Agribusinessman of America has been 
selected from the American Farmer candidates. He received a $1,000 
award from the National FFA Foundation, Inc. Each of the other regional 
"Stars" received $500. The Star Agribusinessman of America was: 
Wayne Robert Morris, Fullerton, California 

The Regional Stars were: 
Robert G. Timblin, Alvo, Nebraska, Star Agribusinessman, Central Region 
Lloyd John Wenger, Myerstown, Pennsylvania, Star Agribusinessman, 

North Atlantic Region 
James E. Stone, Weatherford, Texas, Star Agribusinessman, Southern 

Region. 















STAR FARMER OF AMERICA JUDGES— 1971 

Seated, left to right — Dr. Duane Acker, Dean, South Dakota State Univer- 
sity, Brookings, South Dakota; Dr. Robert M. Worthington, Associate Commis- 
sioner, U.S. Office of Education, Washington, D.C.; William J. Kuhfuss, President, 
American Farm Bureau Federation, Park Ridge, Illinois; Roderick Turnbull, Director 
of Public Affairs, Kansas City Board of Trade, Kansas City, Missouri; John E. Street- 
man, Vice President, Allied Mills, Inc., Chicago, Illinois; David C. Haney, Vice 
President, International Harvester Company, Chicago, Illinois; A Malcolm McVie, 
President, Elanco Products Company, Indianapolis, Indiana; Edwin L. Kirby, Ad- 
ministrator, Extension Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. 

Standing, left to right — James V. Smith, Administrator, Farmers Home Ad- 
ministration, USDA, Washington, D.C; W. H. Getz, Vice President, Keystone Steel 
and Wire Company, Peoria, Illinois; Wallace E. Wilson, Vice President, General 
Motors Corporation, Detroit, Michigan; Henry Danuser, President, Danuser Ma- 
chine Company, Fulton, Missouri; James L. Ketelsen, President, J. I. Case Company, 
Racine, Wisconsin; E. W. Ukkelberg, Senior Vice President, Deere and Company, 
Moline, Illinois; Wallace Hope, Marketing Manager, Consumer-Commercial, 
American Oil Company, Kansas City, Missouri; Richard Waybright, R.D. #2, 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania; Robert Walston, Vice President, Funk Bros. Seed Com- 
pany, Bloomington, Illinois. 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 



'/) 




STAR AGRIBUSINESSMAN OF AMERICA JUDGES— 1971 

Seated, left to right — Honorable Donald E. Wilkinson, Secretary of Agri- 
culture, Madison, Wisconsin; Lawrence F. Davenport, Chairman, National Ad- 
visory Council on Vocational Education, University of Michigan, Flint, Michigan; 
Richard T. Lindgren, General Manager, Agricultural Equipment Division, Allis- 
Chalmers, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; R. M. Hendrickson, Vice President and General 
Manager, Pfizer, Inc., New York, New York; D. D. Walker, President, Funk Bros. 
Seed Company, Bloomington, Illinois; Edward F. Carter, Vice President, Firestone 
Tire & Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio. 

Standing, left to right — George C. Delp, Chairman of the Board, New Hol- 
land, New Holland, Pennsylvania; Willian J. Jensen, Vice President, Butler Manu- 
facturing Company, Kansas City, Missouri; R. C. Leary, General Operations Man- 
ager, Tractor & Implement Operations, Ford Motor Company, Birmingham, Michi- 
gan; Joseph F. Jones, President, The Central Soya, Inc., Fort Wayne, Indiana; 
Darwin G. Kettering, Vice President, Sales, Massey-Ferguson Inc., Des Moines, 
Iowa; Melvin E. Sims, President, FS Services, Inc., Bloomington, Illinois; Forest L. 
Goetsch, President, Doane Agricultural Service, Inc., St. Louis, Missouri; Charles 
Dana Bennett, Special Consultant, Foundation for American Agriculture, Wash- 
ington, D.C.; Dr. Edwin M. Wheeler, President, The Fertilizer Institute, Washington, 
D.C. 

(Also serving as Judges but not present for the photograph were Mr. Fred 
Stines, Publisher, SUCCESSFUL FARMING, Des Moines, Iowa; and Mr. Glen D. 
McDowell, President, National Vocational Agricultural Teachers' Association, 
Pikeville, Kentucky.) 



60 FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 

NATIONAL CHAPTER AWARDS PROGRAM 

The National FFA Chapter Awards Program, conducted annually by 
the national organization, is designed to encourage and reward chapter 
effort, stimulate group action among members, and encourage improve- 
ment in local chapter programs of activities. The awards program has 
been a valuable aid in stimulating both individual and cooperative effort, 
and in crystallizing chapter programs of work into a series of worthwhile 
activities. 

Chapters were grouped into Gold, Silver and Bronze Emblem classifi- 
cations, according to their record of accomplishments in supervised farm- 
ing, cooperative activities, community service, leadership activities, earn- 
ings and savings by members, conduct of meetings, scholarship of mem- 
bers, recreation and participation in State and National activities. 

The top "Gold Emblem" rating was awarded to 57 local chapters. 
"Silver Emblem" ratings went to 51 chapters and "Bronze Emblem" rat- 
ings to 27 chapters. 

Alabama Section Chapter, Section, gold emblem; Fairhope Chapter, Fairhope, 

bronze embiem, Sparkman Chapter, Toney, bronze emblem. 

Arizona Douglas Chapter, Douglas, silver emblem; Coolidge Chapter, 

Coolidge, bronze emblem. 

Arkansas Leachville Chapter, Leachville, gold emblem; Conway Chapter, 

Conway, silver emblem; County Line Chapter, Ratcliff, silver em- 
blem; Mansfield Chapter, Mansfield, bronze emblem. 

California Escalon Chapter, Escalon, gold emblem; Modesto Chapter, Mo- 
desto, gold emblem; Grace M. Davis Chapter, Modesto, silver em- 
blem; Ceres Chapter, Ceres, bronze emblem. 

Colorado Fort Collins Chapter, Fort Collins, gold emblem; Fort Morgan 

Chapter, Fort Morgan, gold emblem. 

Connecticut Housatonic Valley Chapter, Falls Village, gold emblem; Storrs 

Regional Chapter, Storrs, gold emblem. 

Florida Santa Fe "Senior" Chapter, Alachua, gold emblem; Bartow Chapter, 

Bartow, silver emblem; South Sumter Chapter, Bushnell, Silver em- 
blem. 

Georgia Berrien Chapter, Nashville, gold emblem; Jefferson Chapter, Jeffer- 
son, gold emblem; Perry Chapter, Perry, gold emblem; Douglas 
County Chapter, Douglasville, silver emblem; Moultrie Chapter, 
Moultrie, bronze emblem. 

Idaho Fruitland Chapter, Fruitland, silver emblem; Payette Chapter, Pay- 
ette, bronze emblem. 

Illinois Sycamore Chapter, Sycamore, gold emblem; Warren Chapter, Mon- 
mouth, gold emblem; Paxton Chapter, Paxton, silver emblem; 
Belvidere Chapter, Belvidere, bronze emblem. 

Indiana Clinton Central Chapter, Michigantown, gold emblem; Brownstown 

Central Chapter, Brownstown, Silver emblem; Prairie Heights Chap- 
ter, La Grange, bronze emblem. 

Iowa Bloomfield Chapter, Bloomfield, silver emblem; Waverly-Shell Rock 

Chapter, Waverly, silver emblem; St. Ansgar Chapter, St. Ansgar, 
bronze emblem. 

Kansas Arkansas City Chapter, Arkansas City, gold emblem; Atchison 

County Chapter, Effingham, gold emblem. 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 61 

Kentucky Bullitt Central Chapter, Shepherdsville, silver emblem; Lone Oak 

Chapter, Paducah, silver emblem; Lowes Chapter, Lowes, silver em- 
blem; Metcalfe County Chapter, Edmonton, silver emblem. 

Louisana Hessmer Chapter, Hessmer, gold emblem; Saline Chapter, Saline, 

gold emblem; Slidell Chapter, Slidell, gold emblem. 

Maine Limestone Chapter, Limestone, gold emblem; Mars Hill Chapter, 

Mars Hill, silver emblem. 

Maryland Gaithersburg Chapter, Gaithersburg, silver emblem; Oakland Chap- 
ter, Oakland, silver emblem. 

Massachusetts Wachusett Chapter, Holden, bronze emblem. 

Michigan Corunna Chapter, Corunna, gold emblem; Ovid-Elsie Chapter, Elsie, 

gold emblem; Cassopolis Chapter, Cassopolis, silver emblem. 

Minnesota Faribault Chapter, Faribault, gold emblem; Ortonville Nature 

Builders Chapter, Ortonville, gold emblem; Stillwater Chapter, 
Stillwater, silver emblem; Forest Lake Chapter, Forest Lake, bronze 
emblem. 

Mississippi Morton Chapter, Morton, gold emblem; Ethel Chapter, Ethel, bronze 

emblem; Walnut Chapter, Walnut, bronze emblem. 

Missouri East Prairie Chapter, East Prairie, gold emblem; Francis Howell 

Chapter, St. Charles, silver emblem; Wellsville Chapter, Wellsville, 
silver emblem; Nodaway-Holt Chapter, Graham, bronze emblem. 

Montana Columbus Chapter, Columbus, silver emblem. 

Nebraska Kimball Chapter, Kimball, silver emblem; St. Edward Chapter, St. 

Edward, silver emblem. 

Nevada Ruby Mountain Chapter, Elko, gold emblem. 

New Jersey Belvidere Chapter, Belvidere, gold emblem; North Hunterdon 

Regional Chapter, Annandale, silver emblem. 

New Mexico Clovis Chapter, Clovis, gold emblem; Bloomfield Chapter, Bloom- 
field, silver emblem. 

New York Hamilton Chapter, Hamilton, gold emblem; Walton Chapter, Walton, 

silver emblem. 

North Carolina Fuquay-Varina Chapter, Fuquay-Varina, gold emblem; North Iredell 

Chapter, Olin, gold emblem; Southern Wayne Chapter, Dudley, gold 
emblem; East Montgomery Chapter, Biscoe, silver emblem; West 
Columbus Chapter, Cerro Gordo, bronze emblem. 

North Dakota Bottineau Chapter, Bottineau, silver emblem; Williston Chapter, 

Williston, silver emblem. 

Ohio Big Walnut Chapter, Sunbury, gold emblem; Greenville Chapter, 

Greenville, gold emblem; Loudonville Chapter, Loudonville, gold 
emblem; Riverview Chapter, Warsaw, gold emblem. 

Oklahoma Thomas Chapter, Thomas, gold emblem; Freedom Chapter, Free- 
dom, silver emblem; Broken Arrow Chapter, Broken Arrow, bronze 
emblem; Holdenville Chapter, Holdenville, bronze emblem. 

Oregon Silverton Chapter, Silverton, gold emblem; Canby Chapter, Canby, 

bronze emblem. 

Pennsylvania Chestnut Ridge Chapter, Fishertown, gold emblem; Northern Leb- 
anon Chapter, Fredericksburg, gold emblem; Mifflinburg Chapter, 
Mifflinburg, silver emblem. 

Rhode Island Scituate Chapter, North Scituate, gold emblem; Chariho Chapter, 

Wood River Junction, bronze emblem. 



62 FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 

South Carolina James F. Byrnes Chapter, Duncan, silver emblem; Greenville Chap- 
ter, Greenville, silver emblem; Woodruff Chapter, Woodruff, silver 
emblem. 

South Dakota Menno Chapter, Menno, gold emblem; Hoven Chapter, Hoven, 

bronze emblem. 

Tennessee ..Bradley Chapter, Cleveland, gold emblem; Dayton Chapter, Dayton, 

gold emblem; Dyersburg Chapter, Dyersburg, gold emblem; Meigs 
County Chapter, Decatur, silver emblem. 

Texas Cal Farleys Boys Ranch, Boys Ranch, gold emblem; Floydada Chap- 
ter, Floydado, gold emblem; Anahuac Chapter, Anamuac, silver em- 
blem; Hearne Chapter, Hearne, silver emblem; Midway Chapter, 
Henrietta, silver emblem; New Braunfels Chapter, New Braunfels, 
silver emblem; Sherman Chapter, Sherman, silver emblem; DeKalb 
Chapter, DeKalb, bronze emblem; East Central Chapter, San An- 
tonio, bronze emblem; Godley Chapter, Godley, bronze emblem; 
Tatum Chapter, latum, bronze emblem. 

Utah Springville Chapter, Springville, gold emblem; Spanish Fork Chap- 
ter, Spanish Fork, silver emblem. 

Vermont ..Brattleboro Chapter, Brattleboro, silver emblem; Vergennes Chap- 
ter, Vergennes, bronze emblem. 

Virginia Appomattox Chapter, Appomattox, gold emblem; C. T. Smith Chap- 
ter, Ladysmith, gold emblem; Montevideo Chapter, Penn Laird, 
silver emblem; Richlands Chapter, Richlands, silver emblem. 

Washington Deer Park Chapter, Deer Park, gold emblem; Eatonville, silver em- 
blem. 

West Virginia Shady Spring Chapter, Shady Spring, gold emblem; Ripley Chapter, 

Ripley, silver emblem. 

Wisconsin Bloomer Chapter, Bloomer, gold emblem; Monroe Chapter, Monroe, 

gold emblem; Granton Chapter, Granton, silver emblem; Westby 
Chapter, Westby, bronze emblem. 

Wyoming Albin Chapter, Albin, gold emblem; Frontier Chapter, Cheyenne, 

silver emblem. 



NATIONAL CHAPTER SAFETY AWARDS 

The National Chapter Safety Awards Program is designed to stimulate 
activities by local chapters which will result in the more widespread use of 
safety rules, thus lessening the tremendous suffering and loss of life, time 
and property that is caused each year by preventable farm accidents and 
fires. 

The best applications from each State on the basis of one chapter 
per 5,000 members or major fraction thereof, were sent to their various 
regional offices where a panel of experts ranked them in the Gold, Silver 
and Bronze Emblem awards. 

There were 30 Gold Emblem Chapters, 25 Silver Emblem Chapters 
and 17 Bronze Emblem Chapters. 

The winning chapters are as follows: 

Alabama Randolph County Chapter, Wedowee, gold emblem; Section Chap- 
ter, Section, gold emblem; Citronelle Chapter, Citronelle, bronze 
emblem; Millry Chapter, Millry, bronze emblem. 

Arizona Amphitheater Chapter, Tucson, bronze emblem. 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 63 

Arkansas County Line Chapter, Ratcliff, silver emblem; Magnet Cove Chapter, 

Malvern, bronze emblem; Mansfield Chapter, Mansfield, bronze 
emblem. 

California Ceres Chapter, Ceres, bronze emblem. 

Colorado Eaton Chapter, Eaton, gold emblem. 

Florida Santa Fe "Senior" Chapter, Alachua, gold emblem; South Sumter 

Chapter, Bushnell, gold emblem. 

Georgia Pelham Chapter, Pelham, gold emblem; Berrien Chapter, Nashville, 

silver emblem. 

Idaho Payette Chapter, Peyette, silver emblem. 

Illinois Sycamore Chapter, Sycamore, gold emblem; Warren Chapter, Mon- 
mouth, gold emblem; Salem Chapter, Salem, silver emblem; Tonica 
Chapter, Tonica, silver emblem. 

Indiana Brownstown Central Chapter, Brownstown, silver emblem. 

Iowa Belle Plaine Chapter, Belle Plaine, gold emblem; New Hampton 

Chapter, New Hampton, gold emblem. 

Kansas Eskridge Chapter, Eskridge, silver emblem. 

Kentucky Temple Hill Chapter, Glasgow, bronze emblem. 

Louisiana Saline Chapter, Saline, gold emblem; Hessmer Chapter, Hessmer, 

silver emblem. 

Maine Limestone Chapter, Limestone, gold emblem. 

Maryland Walkersville Chapter, Walkersville, gold emblem. 

Michigan Montague Chapter, Montague, silver emblem; Ovid-Elsie Chapter, 

Elsie, silver emblem. 

Minnesota Faribault Chapter, Faribault, gold emblem; Eagle Bend Chapter, 

Eagle Bend, bronze emblem; Stewartville Chapter, Stewartville, 
bronze emblem. 

Mississippi Stone Chapter, Wiggins, gold emblem; Walnut Chapter, Walnut, 

silver emblem. 

Missouri East Prairie Chapter, East Prairie, silver emblem. 

Montana Columbus Chapter, Columbus, silver emblem. 

Nebraska St. Edward Chapter, St. Edward, gold emblem. 

Nevada Ruby Mountain Chapter, Elko, silver emblem. 

New Hampshire Colebrook Chapter, Colebrook, silver emblem. 

New Jersey BelvidereChapter, Belvidere, silver emblem. 

New York Salem Chapter, Salem, bronze emblem. 

North Carolina Southern Wayne Chapter, Dudley, gold emblem; Zebulon Chapter, 

Zebulon, silver emblem, Robersonvilie Chapter, Robersonville, 
bronze emblem; Sun Valley Chapter, Monroe, bronze emblem. 

North Dakota Williston Chapter, Williston, gold emblem. 

Ohio Big Walnut Chapter, Sunbury, gold emblem; Loudonville Chapter, 

Loudonville, gold emblem; Taiawanda Chapter, Oxford, gold em- 
blem. 

Oregon Canby Chapter, Canby, silver emblem. 

Pennsylvania Cloister Chapter, Ephrata, gold emblem; Chestnut Ridge Chapter, 

Fishertown, silver emblem. 

Rhode Island Scituate Chapter, North Scituate, bronze emblem. 

South Carolina Bowman Chapter, Bowman, gold emblem; Conway Chapter, Con- 
way, bronze emblem. 

South Dakota Hoven Chapter, Hoven, silver emblem. 

Tennessee Greenback Chapter, Greenback, gold emblem. 

Texas Van Vleck Chapter, Van Vleck, gold emblem; Midway Chapter, 

Henrietta, silver emblem; Trent unapter, Trent, bronze emblem. 

Utah Box Elder Chapter, Brigham City, silver emblem. 



64 



FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 



Vermont Newbury Chapter, Newbury, bronze emblem. 

Virginia Shorthorn Chapter, Saltville, gold emblem; C. T. Smith Chapter, 

Ladysmith, gold emblem; Franklin County Chapter, Rocky Mount, 
silver emblem. 

Washington Deer Park Chapter, Deer Park, gold emblem. 

West Virginia Ripley Chapter, Ripley, gold emblem. 

Wisconsin Beaver Dam Chapter, Beaver Dam, silver emblem; Cadott Chapter, 

Cadott, silver emblem; Green Bay East Chapter, Green Bay, bronze 
emblem. 

Wyoming Frontier Chapter, Cheyenne, gold emblem. 

BUILDING OUR AMERICAN COMMUNITIES 

A contemporary, exciting and challenging program was recognized at 
this year's convention. The FFA-BOAC program is designed to provide 
total involvement of FFA members in meaningful programs designed to 
meet the determined needs of every community. It provides opportunities 
for FFA chapters to organize for action to make their community a better 
place in which to live and work, and to take pride in telling about their 
accomplishments. 

Chapters were rated National Gold, Silver and Bronze. Four Regional 
winners were selected, and appropriately recognized at the national con- 
vention, where one was awarded the "National Citation" as national winner. 
Berrien Chapter, Nashville, Georgia, National Winner 
Big Walnut Chapter, Sunbury, Ohio, Central Regional Winner 
Silverton Chapter, Silverton, Oregon, Pacific Regional Winner 
Newbury Chapter, Newbury, Vermont, North Atlantic Regional Winner 



BOAC NATIONAL WINNERS 



Gold Emblem 

Holyoke Chapter, Holyoke, Colorado 
Weldon Valley Chapter, Weldon, 

Colorado 
Berrien Chapter, Nashville, Georgia 
Farmer City Chapter, Farmer City, 

Illinois 
Sycamore Chapter, Sycamore, Illinois 
Prairie Heights Chapter, La Grange, 

Indiana 
Eskridge Chapter, Eskridge, Kansas 
Fulton County Chapter, Hickman, 

Kentucky 
East Montgomery Chapter, Biscoe, 

North Carolina 
Big Walnut Chapter, Sunbury, Ohio 
Greenville Chapter, Greenville, Ohio 
Silverton Chapter, Silverton, Oregon 
Chestnut Ridge Chapter, Fishertown, 

Pennsylvania 



Lorena Chapter, Lorena, Texas 
Newbury Chapter, Newbury, Vermont 
James Wood Chapter, Winchester, 

Virginia 
Deer Park Chapter, Deer Park, 

Washington 
Bloomer Chapter, Bloomer, Wisconsin 
Devil's Tower Chapter, Hulett, Wyoming 
Snowy Range Chapter, Laramie, 

Wyoming 

Silver Emblem 

Marbury Chapter, Marbury, Alabama 
Section Chapter, Section, Alabama 
Kofa Chapter, Kofa, Arizona 
Yuma Chapter, Yuma, Arizona 
Magnet Cove Chapter, Malvern, 

Arkansas 
Bradford Chapter, Starke, Florida 
Vernon Chapter, Vernon, Florida 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 



65 



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Berr/en Chapter representatives receive the "National Citation" from James 
V. Smith, Administrator of the Farmers Home Administration. The BOAC is a 
National FFA Foundation program sponsored by Lilly Endowment, Inc. 



Crothersville Chapter, Crothersville, 

Indiana 
Belmond Chapter, Belmond, Iowa 
Oakland Chapter, Oakland, Maryland 
Ubly Chapter, Ubly, Michigan 
Le Center Chapter, Le Center, 

Minnesota 
Nodaway-Holt Chapter, Graham, 

Missouri 
St. Edward Chapter, St. Edward, 

Nebraska 
Des Moines Chapter, Des Moines, 

New Mexico 
Thoreau Chapter, Thoreau, New Mexico 
Hamilton Chapter, Hamilton, New York 
Chase Chapter, Forest City, North 

Carolina 

Bellwood-Antis Chapter, Bellwood, 

Pennsylvania 
Bowman Chapter, Bowman, South 

Carolina 

Greenville Chapter, Greenville, South 

Carolina 
Ripley Chapter, Ripley, West Virginia 
Montello Chapter, Montello, Wisconsin 
Bronze Emblem 
Mansfield Chapter, Mansfield, Arkansas 



Storrs Regional Chapter, Storrs, 

Connecticut 
Woodbury Chapter, Woodbury, 

Connecticut 
Marsh Valley Chapter, Arimo, Idaho 
Williamsburg Hawkeye Chapter, 

Williamsburg, Iowa 
Limestone Chapter, Limestone, Maine 
Cedar Springs Chapter, Cedar Springs, 

Michigan 
New Richland Chapter, New Richland, 

Minnesota 

Stone Chapter, Wiggins, Mississippi 

Belvidere Chapter, Belvidere, New 
Jersey 

Alex Chapter, Aiex, Oklahoma 

Thomas Chapter, Thomas, Oklahoma 

Lebanon Chapter, Lebanon, Tennessee 

Trent Chapter, Trent, Texas 

Springville Chapter, Springville, Utah 

Brattleboro Chapter, Brattleboro, 
Vermont 

Appomattox Intermediate Chapter, 
Appomattox, Virginia 

Shady Spring Chapter, Shady Spring, 
West Virginia 



66 



FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 



AGRICULTURAL PROFICIENCY AWARDS 

Sixty regional winners of the fifteen Agricultural Proficiency Awards 
(front row) met for a luncheon with persons from government, business 
and industry who served as judges. The judging of each of the 15 areas 
was done on the basis of interviews and information submitted to the FFA 
by Regional winners. Each National winner received a check in the amount 
of $250.00 from the National FFA Foundation, Inc., and Regional winners 
a check for $200.00. Following are National Proficiency Award Winners 
who were recognized at the 1970 National FFA Convention: 



AGRICULTURAL ELECTRIFICATION 



Name Chapter 

STANLEY V. BREHON Eaton 

ROBERT LELAND GOSSETT Pell City 

TERRELL LEE SCHULTZ Tappen 

DEAN GIBSON Kingwood 



State and Region 

Colorado, National Winner 
Alabama, Southern Region 
North Dakota, Central Region 
West Virginia, North Atlantic Region 



CARL HINTHORN 
WILLIAM M. SKELLEN 
MICHAEL RAY TOBLER 
CASEY F. EPLER 



AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS 

Normal Illinois, National Winner 

Kendall New York, North Atlantic Region 

Bokchito Oklahoma, Southern Region 

Hillsdale-Burns Wyoming, Pacific Region 



CROP PRODUCTION 

VERNON LOUIS ROHRSCHEIB Jamaica Illinois, National Winner 

TIMOTHYS. EDGECOMB Limestone Maine, North Atlantic Region 

SCOTT W. HAMLIN Corvallis Oregon, Pacific Region 

JOHN CAVITT SIMS Rutherford Tennessee, Southern Region 



RICHARD SILVA 
LARRY BUSH 
GERALD PARRY 
JAMES E. COFFEEN 



DEAN A. ANDERSON 
GREGORY E. BELL 
ROY A. HAINES 
KIM E. NOWELS 



DAIRY PRODUCTION 

Hilmar California, National Winner 

Mary Persons Georgia, Southern Region 

Sherburne-Earlville New York, North Atlantic Region 
Chilton Wisconsin, Central Region 



FISH AND WILDLIFE 

Eaton 
Limestone 
Stone County 
Loudonville 



MANAGEMENT 

Colorado, National Winner 
Maine, North Atlantic Region 
Mississippi, Southern Region 
Ohio, Central Region 



VAN SMITH 

MERLE GREGG 

BILL C. WESTERGREEN 

H. B. CHRISTIAN 



RON LUCAS 

DAVID BEISWANGER 

GEORGE FLINT 

RONNIE CARSON DELANEY 



FOREST MANAGEMENT 

Billingsley Alabama, National Winner 

Triad Ohio, Central Region 

Nooksack Valley Washington, Pacific Region 
Greenbrier East West Virginia, North Atlantic Region 

HOME IMPROVEMENT 

Riverton Wyoming, National Winner 

Prairie Heights Indiana, Central Region 
Salem New York, North Atlantic Region 

Greenville South Carolina, Southern Region 



JEFF FUECHSEL 
DONALD ADAMS 
NEIL HERNAN 
MICHAEL SCOTT SISLER 



LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION 

Riverton Wyoming, National Winner 

Thomson Georgia, Southern Region 

St. Ansgar Iowa, Central Region 

Aurora West Virginia, North Atlantic Region 



FUTURE 


FARMERS OF AMERICA 










67 




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Fifteen groups of leaders of business and industry, and representatives of 
agribusiness areas took time to judge the Agricultural Proficiency Awards in Kansas 
City. 



DAVID E. PLUMMER 
H. DALE SATO 
JERRY TURNER 
LARRY C. SMITH 



ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE 

Bloom-Carroll Ohio, National Winner 

Pahoa Hawaii, Pacific Region 

Oak Grove Louisiana, Southern Region 

Linganore Maryland, North Atlantic Region 



DANNY TOLKA 

JACK ROSE 

DANIEL TOSS DERREBERRY 

STEPHEN S. SHAW 



OUTDOOR RECREATION 

Patoka Illinois, National Winner 

Ruby Mountain Nevada, Pacific Region 
Owen North Carolina, Southern Region 

Limestone Maine, North Atlantic Region 



PLACEMENT IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION 

DAVID ROBERTS Sheridan Oregon, National Winner 

WALTER THOMAS GRAHAM South Sumter Florida, Southern Region 

ALVIN L. SCHLOUCH Grassland Pennsylvania, North Atlantic Region 

DENNIS NASS Merrill Wisconsin, Central Region 

PLACEMENT IN PROCESSING 

JOHN CRUM SESSIONS Evergreen Alabama, National Winner 

SANDY KONKOL Madera California, Pacific Region 

JAMES R. HARRISON, JR. Caesar Rodney Delaware, North Atlantic Region 
KENNETH W. McMILLIN Rushville Indiana, Central Region 

PLACEMENT IN SALES AND OR SERVICE 

DELMAS EUGENE CARSON Chestnut Ridge Pennsylvania, National Winner 

Santa Fe Senior Florida, Southern Region 
Corunna Michigan. Central Region 

Stillwater Valley 



GROOVER HUDSON 
DENNIS MATTHEWS 
HENRY L. LANNEN 



Montana, Pacific Region 



68 



FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 



POULTRY PRODUCTION 

MELVIN FRANCIS HOPPENJAN Cuba City Wisconsin, National Winner 

MARVIN WILLIAM HUFFAKER Mingus Union Arizona, Pacific Region 

STANLEY RAPP Lenape New Jersey, North Atlantic Region 

NELSON EARL HELMS II Sun Valley North Carolina, Southern Region 



SOIL, 

GEORGE WARREN SAMUEL 
JAMES E. ANDERSEN 
MIKE A. POPPENWIMER 
RICHARD CHRISTENSEN 



WATER, AND AIR MANAGEMENT 

C. T. Smith Virginia, National Winner 

El Dorado Springs Missouri, Central Region 
Bellwood-Antis Pennsylvania, North Atlantic Region 
Millard Eagle Utah, Pacific Region 



NATIONAL FFA PUBLIC SPEAKING CONTEST 

The National FFA Public Speaking Contest is held in Kansas City. It 
is the final elimination of a nationwide contest that started in local chapters 
with winners progressing through area or federation competition, then 
State contests, and four Regional contests. 

Each of the four members who participated in the national contest 
already had won a medal at the local chapter level and a $100 prive at the 
State level. The winner of the national contest received $300. Other awards 
are $275 for second, $250 for third, and $225 for fourth. All awards and 
travel funds are provided by the Future Farmers of America Foundation. 

Each contestant spoke from 6 to 8 minutes on an agricultural subject 
of his own choosing, then was subjected to five minutes of questioning by 
the judges. Scoring was done on the basis of speech delivery, manuscript, 
and answers to questions. 

JUDGES: 

R. M. Hendrickson, Vice President, General Manager, Chas. Pfizer and Company, New 

York, New York 
Charles J. Martin, Regional Commissioner, U. S. Office of Education, Atlanta, Georgia 
James V. Smith, Administrator, Farmers Home Administration, Washington, D. C. 

TIMEKEEPERS: 

Dean Curtiss, President, National Association of Farm Broadcasters, Faribault, Min- 
nesota 

S. Archie Holdridge, President, Newspaper Farm Editors of America, Madison, Con- 
necticut 




FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 69 

SPEAKERS: 

First Place — William J. Cofield, Woodland, Alabama, Chapter — 

A MIRACLE IN OUR TIME $300.00 

Second Place — Allan Lee Kaiser, Cherry Creek, Colorado, Chapter — 

A NEW LOOK 275.00 

Third Place — Jack W. Ingstad, Valley City, North Dakota, Chapter — 

THE COUNTDOWN HAS BEGUN 250.00 

Fourth Place — Jeannie Apgar, Belvidere, New Jersey, Chapter — 

THE AYRSHIRE COW 225.00 

A MIRACLE IN OUR TIME 

WILLIAM J. COFIELD, National Winner Public Speaking 

A miracle is something that does happen that is out of the ordinary, 
unusual, and often considered impossible. Let us start-here-and-now — to 
see if we can discover a new dimension in our thinking and in our lives-in 
short-a miracle in our time! I realize this is a difficult assignment for we 
live in an age of superlatives, of pressure, of rush, and excitement. National 
and world events are harshly thrust upon us by the all-seeing eye of tele- 
vision. New discoveries and products come at us from every direction. For 
those of us who were born in the automobile age, today's rocket age is 
overwhelming and overpowering. The thunder of the blast-off at Cape 
Kennedy crackles and roars in our ears. We are reduced to head-shaking 
wonder as we watch men orbit the moon and ponder — how is it all possible? 
But, if we look and listen we will hear and see the results of countless 
billions of blast-offs that are of far greater significance to mankind and his 
future. 

The greatest blast-off in the world today is still the blast of a tiny 
seed — touched by the finger of God — putting forth a tiny green shoot that 
powers its way up, through, and out of the crusty soil. Some scientists 
estimate that on a comparative basis, more brute power is exerted by the 
first thin, fragile stem as it thrusts up through a heavy, dense soil than 
was used to get Apollo 11 off the launching pad. 

In any case, so far as mankind is concerned, the blast-off of an 
awakening seed and its food potential is far more important to mankind 
than any rocket launch. Why — because the one single question most often 
asked at NASA or any other place is "When and what do we eat?" 

I suggest to you that there is as much excitement in the fields and in 
the laboratories of Agriculture as there is anywhere else in the world. Con- 
sider these facts: 

1. That plants and animals are now biting bugs. 

2. That we now have weed-destroying chemicals that can tell the difference 
between plant cousins. 

3. That we are near the point in being able to decide before breeding whether 
a cow will give birth to a bull or a heifer. 

4. That we are using the sex life of insects to induce them to breed themselves 
out of existence. 

Yes, indeed! A miracle in our time! 

Think of it — 5% of the U. S. population produces enough food and 
fiber for the other 95% — and still has enough left over to share with many 



70 FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 

of the less fortunate nations of the world. The U. S. today is the one and 
only nation to ever live in a "Economy of Abundance." This is being done 
at less cost to the consumer than ever before in recorded history of man- 
kind. 

The sheer abundance of food and fiber we have is a blessing enough, 
but we are even more fortunate than that. It takes fewer minutes of work 
today to buy television sets, boats, cars, swimming pools, and dishwashers. 
This is the American secret and the strongest secret weapon we possess. 
While it is unknown and certainly not acknowledged or appreciated by the 
average American, "Foodpower U. S. A." is studied and envied by every 
other nation in the world today. 

Need I suggest to you that the balance of power in the world today 
and certainly in the future will depend on who can and will feed the masses 
of people? 

How is it that we are allowed to live in the "Age of Abundance" in the 
United States when most of the world exist in the "Age of Scarcity"? 

I do not profess to know the whole answer. But, I do know this: This 
great country and its private enterprise was not built by people who felt 
sorry for themselves; by people who staged sit-ins, riots, and burned and 
wrecked college campuses and homes, or by gutless and traitorous draft 
dodgers and flag burners. 

This country is what it is by faith — by faith in man's ability to profit 
from work; by pride in family, country, and flag — and will prove it by fight- 
ing for it if necessary. America did not just happen as a part of a backlash. 
It was built by people who took pride in building — not in wrecking. A por- 
tion of the creed accredited to Abraham Lincoln put it so well over a century 
ago: 

"You cannot help the poor by destroying the rich. 
You cannot strengthen the weak by weakening the strong. 
You cannot help men by doing for them what they could 
and should be doing for themselves." 

Through scientific research and improved farming methods the blast- 
off of seeds and its food potential grow louder and stronger each year. With 
this as a secret weapon, the United States holds a corner on the bid for 
world power. Along with our free enterprise system and man's desire to 
better himself there is no reason why America cannot continue to be the 
miracle of the world — A Miracle in Our Time. 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 



71 













I 



Several hundred members participate in National Judging Contests as part 
of the National Convention. Major emphasis is placed upon the areas of agri- 
business covered by the instructional program. Students who participate have 
earned the right through outstanding achievement in State contests in their par- 
ticular area of competition. 

NATIONAL FFA JUDGING CONTESTS 

An important part of each National FFA Convention is the National 
FFA Judging Contests. All five National Contests — Livestock, Meats, Poul- 
try, Dairy Cattle and Dairy Products — are conducted in Kansas City. The 
winning teams and the high scoring individuals receive special trophies. 
The contests and the national winners are listed below: 



LIVESTOCK JUDGING — 47 State Teams Participated 

First Place — OKLAHOMA. The team was composed of Arliss Jordan, William 
Shenold and Larry Vanzandt, and coached by George Provence, vocational agriculture 
instructor, Stillwater High School, Stillwater, Oklahoma. 

The five high scoring individuals were: 

1. Arliss Jordan, Stillwater, Oklahoma 

2. Larry Vanzandt, Stillwater, Oklahoma 

3. Mark Schroeder, West Point, Nebraska 

4. Mark Zorn, Chatsworth, Illinois 

5. Ralph T. Anderson, Gait, California 



72 FORTY-FOURTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 

MEATS JUDGING— 35 Teams Participated 

First Place — TEXAS. The team was composed of Charles Ray Lange, Gary Jen- 
ning, and Randy Stockbridge, and coached by Jay Lee Marek, vocational agriculture 
instructor, Mason High School, Mason, Texas. 

The five high scoring individuals were: 

1. Dale Hedrick, Warsaw, Ohio 

2. Randy Stockbridge, Mason, Texas 

3. Louis Kuster, Stanley, North Dakota 

4. Rodney Meyers, Spring Mills, Pennsylvania 

5. Charles Ray Lange, Mason, Texas 

POULTRY JUDGING— 35 Teams Participated 

First Place — TEXAS. The team was composed of Rick Berry, Jack Jones and 
Jim Price, and coached by Floyd James Collins, vocational agriculture instructor, 
Snyder Public Schools, Snyder, Texas. 

The five high scoring individuals were: 

1. Bill Ogg, Worland, Wyoming 

2. Jim Craft, Assumption, Illinois 

3. Virgil Jordan, Stillwater, Oklahoma 

4. Jim Price, Snyder, Texas 

5. Jack Jones, Snyder, Texas 

DAIRY CATTLE JUDGING— 45 Teams Participated 

First Place — CALIFORNIA. The team was composed of Robert LaSalle, Patricia 
LaSalle and Gerald LaSalle, and coached by Alfred DeRose, Jr., vocational agriculture 
instructor, Atascadero High School, Atascadero, California. 

The five high scoring individuals were: 

1. Robert LaSalle, Atascadero, California 

2. Tony Seykora, Owatonna, Minnesota 

3. Marvin Pangborn, Tillamook, Oregon 

4. David Head, Brookland, Arkansas 

5. Lee Paulmier, Flemington, New Jersey 

DAIRY PRODUCTS JUDGING— 31 Teams Participated 

First Place — MISSOURI. The team was composed of Steve Buckner, Stanley 
Floyd and Paul Smith, and coached by Melvin E. Barnes, vocational agriculture in- 
structor, Licking High School, Licking, Missouri. 

The five high scoring individuals were: 

1. Steve Buckner, Licking, Missouri 

2. Steve Boyle, Duck Hill, Mississippi 

3. Jerry Harper, Brigham City, Utah 

4. Carl Hartwig, Montello, Wisconsin 

5. Jackie Baker, Mansfield, Texas 






The FFA Creed 



I believe in the future of farming, with a faith born 
not of words but of deeds — achievements won by the 
present and past generations of agriculturists; in the 
promise of better days through better ways, even as 
the better things we now enjoy have come up to us 
from the struggles of former years. 

I believe that to live and work on a good farm, or to 
be engaged in other agricultural pursuits, is pleasant 
as well as challenging; for I know the joys and discom- 
forts of agricultural life and hold an inborn fondness for 
those associations which, even in hours of discourage- 
ment, I cannot deny. 

I believe in leadership from ourselves and respect 
from others. I believe in my own ability to work effi- 
ciently and think clearly, with such knowledge and skill 
as I can secure, and in the ability of progressive agri- 
culturists to serve our own and the public interest in 
producing and marketing the product of our toil. 

I believe in less dependence on begging and more 
power in bargaining; in the life abundant and enough 
honest wealth to help make it so — for others as well 
as myself; in less need for charity and more of it when 
needed; in being happy myself and playing square with 
those whose happiness depends upon me. 

I believe that rural America can and will hold true 
to the best traditions in our national life and that I can 
exert an influence in my home and community which 
will stand solid for my part in that inspiring task. 

The creed was written by E. M. Tiffany, and adopted at the 3rd 
National Convention of tlie FFA. (Revised at the 38th Convention.) 



The FFA Motto . 

Learning to Do 

Doing to Learn 

Earning to Live 

Living to Serve