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1897. 



REPORT 



OT TH1 



MINISTER OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



UPON THE CONDITION 07 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



ESTABLISHED AITC) MAINTAINED UHDEB THE 



PUBLIC INSTRUCTION ACT OF 1880. 



g$2 Jltiihariig 

SYDNEY : WILLIAM APPLEGATE GULLICK, GOVERNMENT PRINTER 

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1897. 



Report of the Minister of Public- Instruction. 



To His Excellency The Right Honorable Henry Robert, Viscount 
Hampden, Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Colony of 
New South Wales and its Dependencies. 

May it please your Excellency, — 

I have the honor to submit to your Excellency the Report 
of the Department of Public Instruction for the year 1897. 

Schools. 

In 1897 there were 2,577 schools, containing 2,790 departments, 
as compared with 2,574 schools and 2,785 departments open in 1896. 
During the year, 67 schools were established, comprising 26 Public, 
19 Provisional, 9 Half-time, 2 House-to-house Schools, and 11 Evening 
Schools. In addition to these, 17 schools were reopened, 49 Provisional, 
and 12 Half-time Schools, were raised to the rank of Public Schools 
and 20 Half-time Schools and 1 House-to-house School to the Pro- 
visional rank ; while 12 Public and 8 Provisional Schools were reduced 
to Half-time Schools. Eighty-one of the schools in operation during 
the whole or some portion of 1896 do not appear on the list of schools 
open in 1897, and of those actually in operation in that year 66 were 
closed before the last quarter. The number of schools open at the 
close of 1897 was 2,508, containing 2,721 departments. 



Report of the Minuter of Public Instruction. 



The following table shows the classification of the schools open 
in 1897 :— 

1. High Schools : — 

Unclassed 



••• 



2. Public Schools and Half-time Schools :• 



In Class 



»# 

» 
99 
» 
99 
99 



«•« 



•#• 



•• 



I 
II 

in . 

iv ... 

v ... 

vi ... 

VII ... 

VIII ... 

IX ... 

Unclassed 



••• 



•♦• 



••• 



.«• 



••• 



••• 



••• 



••• 



••• 



»•• 



••• 



••• 



••« 



••• 



»•• 



••• 



••• 



••• 



••• 



•#• 



... 



••• 



••• 



••• 



••• 



••• 



••• 



Scfacola. 




Departmental 


5 


••• 


5 


43 


••• 


129 


38 


••• 


104 


29 


••• 


62 


59 


••• 


86 


121 


••• 


125 


226 


••• 


226 


202 


• • • 


202 


362 


••• 


362 


862 


••• 


862 


141 


••• 


141 


126 


... 


126 



8. Provisional Schools : 

Class I 



lass 1 } 

„ nij 



••• 



••• 



4. House-to-house Schools : 



Unclassed 



••• 



•#• 



••• 



•tt 



•• 



. 294 ... 294 



••# 



41 ... 



41 



5. Evening Public Schools ;■ 



Unclassed 



••• 



••• 



••• 



••• 



Total 



... JmD ... 



25 



• •• ••• ••• ••• AjO/# '„••• »;«•'" 



Of the 20 applications for the establishment of new schools 
which were under consideration at the close of 1896, 7 were granted, 
12 were declined, and 1 remained unsettled. In addition to these, 
178 applications were received during 1897, namely, 28 for Public 
Schools, 108 for Provisional Schools, 17 for Half-time Schools, 6 for 
House-to-house Schools, and 19 for Evening Schools. Of these, 89 
were granted, 69 were declined, and 15 were under consideration at 
the end of tho year. The total number of children to be accommo- 
dated in the new schools when established is 2,193. ' 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 3 

The number of applications dealt with, and the action taken 
with regard to them, is shown in the following table : — 

Applications for the establishment of Schools. 



Schools. 


Number 
received. 


Number 
granted. 


Number 
declined. 


Number still 

under 
consideration. 


Pablic Schools ... 

Provisional Schools 

Half-time Schools 

House-to-house Schools... 

Evening Public Schools 


28 

103 

17 

6 

19 


12 

52 

9 

8 

18 


15 

43 

5 

2 

4 


1 

8 
3 

1 
2 


jLoiai... «•• ... 


173 


89 


69 


15 



Pull details respecting these applications will be found in 
Appendices I, II, III, IV, V. 



The number of schools in operation in 1881, the first full year 
during which the Department was under Ministerial control, a& 
compared with the number open in 1897, is given in the following 
table : — 



School*. 


Number of Schools or Department! 
in operation. 


Increase, 
1881-1897. 




1881. 


1897. 


High Schools ... 

Superior Schools 

Primary Public Schools 

Provisional Schools 

Half-time Schools 
House-to-house Schools ... 




5 

248 

1,720 

294 

457 

41 

25 


5 


53 

1,042 

246 

93 


190 
678 

48 
364 

41 


Evening Schools ... 


57 


32* 


x o lax . . . ... . . . 


1,496 


2,790 


1,291 


Scats provided 


98,721 


245,233 


116,562 



• Decrease* 



4 Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 

In addition to the schools established and maintained under 
the Public Instruction Act, the following State supported or aided 
schools are still in operation, namely, the Sydney Grammar School, 
the two Industrial Schools, the School for the Deaf and Dumb and 
the Blind, and the Carpenterian and Shaftesbury Kef ormatory Schools. 

School Premises and Sites. — The number of school sites 
acquired during the year was 84. Of these, 64 were Government 
grants, 16 were resumed under the Public Works Act, 51 Vic. No. 37, 
and 4 were purchased. The cost of the purchased sites amounted to 
£295, and the sum of £742 17s. 8d. was paid on account of those 
resumed. In the case of 2 of the latter no claim was made by the 
original holders for compensation. The balance to be paid on the 
others, when all claims have been settled, is £69 14s. 9d. Pull 
particulars as to the sites will be found in Appendix XX. 

Buildings. — At the close of 1897, existing school premises 
afforded room for 245,283 pupils. Of the school-places counted in 

1896, 3,884 were lost in 1897 by the closing of schools and by the 
giving up of old buildings. The net increase was 5,941. Taking the 
building- work done in the last two years, it may be observed that, in 

1897, 32 new schools and residences were erected under the supervision 
of the Department's professional officers, as compared with 22 built 
in 1896; while the additions numbered 32, as compared with 16; 
the premises repaired, 300, as compared with 261 ; and the places 
provided, 4,869, as compared with 2,383 for the same period. The 
number of small school-buildings and residences erected under the 
Inspectors' supervision was 87, as compared with 78 put up in 1896 ; 
29 school-buildings were enlarged, as against 19 in 1896; the number 
of places provided was 2,945, as compared with 2,771; and the 
buildings repaired numbered 1,053 in 1897, as against 855 in the 
previous year. 

At the close of 1897 the following additional works were in 
progress : — 29 new buildings and 23 additions, the whole to provide for 
about 4,325 children. Three new weather-sheds were in course of 
construction, as well as 7 teachers' residences. Repairs and improve- 
ments were being carried out in 184 existing buildings. 



-Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



Pull particulars respecting the building- work completed in the 

year, and that in progress at its close, are given in the following 

tables : — 

Works completed. 



Number. 



Works under Professional Officers : — 

School-buildings 

Additions , 

Besidences 

Additions to residences.. 

Weather-sheds 

Repairs, &c , 

Worlcs under Inspectors 9 supervision : — 

School-buildings M 

Additions 

Besidences 

Weather-sheds , 

Repairs, &c 



20 
22 
12 
10 
5 
300 



81 

29 

6 

11 

1,053 



Places 
provided. 



Total cost, 

not including cost 

of sites. 



Average cost 
per building. 



Cost per 



ost pei 

seat. 



8,500 
1,369 



2,945 
606 



£ e. d. 

14,747 10 11 

5,792 15 9 

4,355 11 4 

1,881 12 6 

269 8 6 

16,659 4 



5,498 14 9 

1,734 16 3 

1,859 3 6 

222 5 

9,634 4 9 



£ s. d. 

737 7 6 

263 6 2 

362 19 3 

188 3 3 

53 17 8 

65 3 11 



67 17 8J 

59 16 5 

809 17 3 

20 4 1 

9 2 5 



£ s. d. 
4 4 3 
4 4 7 



1 17 4 

2 17 3 



Works in progress. 



Worlcs under Professional Officers : — 

School-buildings 

Additions 

Besidences 

Additions to residences 

Weather-sheds 

Repairs, &c 

Works under Inspectors* supervision .— 

School-buildings 

Additions 

Besidences 

Bepairs, &c 



Number. 


Places 
provided. 


12 


2,385 


17 


1,167 


6 




15 




3 




73 




17 


708 


6 


129 


1 




111 


...... 



Estimated cost, 

not including cost 

of sites. 



Average cost 
per building. 



£ S. d. 

15,670 1 3 

7,065 8 2 

2,743 12 6 

2,963 15 8 

291 19 5 

4,140 17 9 



1,400 12 9 

314 8 

220 

2,259 10 5 



£ s. d. 

1,805 16 9 

415 12 3 

457 5 5 

197 11 8 

97 6 5 

66 14 5 



Cost per 
place. 



82 7 9* 

52 8 

220 

20 7 li 



£ ■. d. 

6 11 4 
6 11 



1 19 7 

2 8 9 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



The amount expended on Public School sites, buildings, furni- 
ture, repairs, rents, and rates during the last five years is shown below. 
The total expenditure on these items since 1880 is £2,709,709. 



1893 


• • • • • • i 


• • • 


• • « 


... £112,856 


1894 


• • • • • • 


> • • 


• • « 


73,791 


1895 


• • • •• • 


• • • 


. • i 


... 104,397 


1896 


• • • • • • 


• • • 


. m i 


56,752 


1897 


• • • ••• 


» • • 


. « 4 


84,9G9 



School Attendance. — The returns for the year show a consider- 
able improvement in school attendance, the gross enrolment at Primary 
schools being 256,996 pupils, as compared with 251,821 in 1896, an 
increase of 5,175. Deducting 12 per cent, on account of multiple 
enrolments, the number of individual pupils under instruction was 
226,157, an increase over the preceding year of 4,551. A correspond- 
ing increase is shown in the average daily attendance, which exceeds 
that of 1896 by 6,188. 

The gross aggregate enrolment and the aggregate enrolment of 
distinct pupils for the last five years appear below : — 



Years. 


Gross Aggregate 
Enrolment. 


Corrected Aggregate 

Enrolment of 

Distinct Pupils. 


Increase. 


Gross Enrolment. 


Corrected Enrolment. 


1893 

1894 

xot?5 ... ... 

1896 . 

lo97 ... ••• 


238,951 
234,392 
245,904 
251,821 
256,996 


210,277 
206,265 
216,396 
221,603 
226,157 


413* 
4,559* 
11,512 
5,917 
5,175 


364* 
4,012* 
10,131 
5,207 
4,554 



* Decrease. 

In addition to the 226,157 pupils enrolled in schools under the 
Public Instruction Act, there were 1,558 in attendance at other State- 
aided Schools, namely : — 

The Sydney Grammar School 532 

The Industrial Schools 737 

The School for the Deaf and Dumb and the Blind 118 

The Beformatory Schools 171 



Total 



••• 



••• 1,558 



Beport of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



Estimating the mean population of the Colony for 1897 at 
1,310,550, the population between 6 and 14 years of age was 246,682. 
Of this number, 195,599, or 79*3 per cent., attended State Schools, and 
51,083, or 20*7 per cent., received instruction in Private Schools or 
Bt home, or else remained altogether untaught. Prom the latest 
returns of Private Schools' attendance it is estimated that the total 
enrolment was 55,000. As of this enrolment 40,800 pupils were 
between the ages of 6 and 14, it will be seen that of the total statutory 
school population of 246,682, 236,399, or 95'8 per cent., were enrolled 
at State and Private Schools, while 10,283, or 4*2 per cent., were 
taught at home, had left school after satisfying the standards of the 
Act, or remained untaught. In addition to pupils of the statutory 
school age, 20,156 under 6 years of age, and 26,158 over 14 years, 
were also enrolled for school attendance — 32,114 at State Schools, 
and 14,200 at Private Schools. Thus, of 347,041 children in the 
Colony between the ages of 4 and 15 years, 227,713 attended State 
Schools, and 55,000 attended Private Schools ; while the remainder, 
64,331, received instruction at home, had completed their education, 
or were untaught. 

The average quarterly enrolment was 201,947, and the average 
attendance 148,381. In the first half of the year 146,523 pupils, and 
in the second half 164,363 pupils, attended the ordinary day-schools 70 
days or more. The percentage of the quarterly enrolment attending 
the compulsory number of days was, in the first half-year, 72*7 per 
ce^t., and in the second, 81*1 per cent. 

The percentages of the net yearly enrolment attending 70 days 
or more in each half-year, since 1892, are as follow : — 



Year. 


70 days or more in 
first half-year. 


70 days or more in 
second half-year. 


JL o«/0 ••• ... ... ••• ••• ... 

XOuiJ a>> (c , »•• a «. ... ••• 

XO«7& ••• ... ... ... ... ... 

lo«D ••• ••• ••• ••• .«? ••• 

•*■ O*/ / ... . . . Ml .». » *» * ••• 


662 
691 
671 
671 
647 


661 
75-8 
72 
724 
72-6 



8 



Bejport of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



The enrolment and average attendance are shown in the 
following tables : — 

(a) Quarterly Enrolment and Average Attendance for 1896 and 1897. 









Average Attendance. 


Quarters. 


Number enrolled. 


Number. 


Percentages. 




1896. 


1897. 


1896. 


1897. 


1896. 


1897. 


March quarter 

June quarter 

September quarter . . . 
December quarter ... 


195,982 
196,948 
198,621 
196,550 


200,902 
201,902 
203,335 
201,652 


137,6193 
141,0803 
145,763*8 
144,306*9 


147,839*4 
147,3563 
151,432-3 
146,896*2 


70-2 
716 
73-3 
734 


73-5 
72-9 

74-4 
72-8 


Tear's average... 


197,025 


201,947 


142,192-5 


148,3810 


721 


734 



(b) Enrolment and Average Attendance for the last five years. 





Year's 
Enrolment. 


Quarterly 
Enrolment. 


Average Attendance. 


Years. 


Number. 


Percentage of 

Year's 
Enrolment. 


Percentage of 

Quarterly 

Enrolment. 


1893 

1894 

1895 ... 

1896 

1897 


210,277 
206,265 
216,396 
221,603 
226,157 


186,327 
181,678 
192,075 
197,025 
201,947 


128,322 
130,089 
139,978 
142,192 
148,381 

9 


6102 
63 06 
64*68 
6416 
6560 


6886 
7160 

72-87 
7217 
73*47 



The main facts relative to school attendance may be summed 
up thus : — 236,399, or 95*8 per cent, of the statutory population, were 
enrolled for school attendance ; 195,599, or 79'3 per cent., at State 
Schools ; and 40,800, or 17*2 per cent., at Private Schools. Of the 
school population between 4 and 15 years — 282,713, or 81*4 per cent., 
were at school; 227,713, or 65*6 per cent., at State Schools; and 
55,000, or 15*8 per cent., at Private Schools. 226,157 children 
attended schools under the Public Instruction Act; 194,922 being 
of the statutory school age, and 31,235 either above or below it. 



Seport of tlie Minister of Public Instruction. 9 

The mean quarterly enrolment was 201,947, or 89*2 per cent, of the 
year's enrolment ; and the average attendance was 148,381, or 73*4 
of the quarterly enrolment. Of the average enrolment, 72*7 per cent, 
attended school 70 days or more in the first half-year, and 81 # 1 per 
cent, in the second half-year. The percentage of the population enrolled 
quarterly and the corresponding percentage in average attendance 
in 1897 were respectively 15*4 and 11'3, as compared with 153 and 
11 in 1896. 

Compulsory clauses of the Act. — 61,727 children between the 
ages of 6 and 14 years failed to complete the minimum attendance of 
70 days during the first half of the year ; but in 738 cases only was 
the law set in motion. The parents of 3,554 were cautioned, while 
in the remaining cases satisfactory explanations were furnished, or the 
circumstances were not such as to render any action necessary. In a 
large number of instances, pupils had obtained certificates by 
examination, and were thus legally exempt. 

w 

For the second half -year, the number between the compulsory 
ages who did not attend 70 days was 45,560. In 856 cases legal action 
was taken, and cautions were sent to parents in 2,543 cases. 

I desire to again place on record my appreciation of the 
valuable assistance rendered to the Department by the Inspector- 
General of Police and his officers in connection with the operation of 
the compulsory clauses of the Act. Despite the grave defects in these 
clauses, effective work has been done in the way of securing regularity 
of attendance. 

School Tees. 

It was found necessary to authorise legal action for the recovery 
of arrears of school fees in 419 cases, but debts to the amount of £2,556 
were cancelled. The amount of fees collected and paid into the Con- 
solidated Revenue was — for Primary Schools, £71,544 3s. 9cL, and 
for High Schools, £2,139 18s., making a total of £73,684 Is. 9d. 
These figures show a decrease in the amount paid in Primary Schools 
of £745 5s. 2d. as compared with 1896, and of £436 5s. 6d. as regards 
High Schools. 



10 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



Inspection. 

After a meritorious service of twenty-nine years as a teacher 
and an inspector of schools under this Department, Mr. G. J. Pitt 
was compelled, on account of continued ill-health, to retire from office. 
Consequent upon his retirement several changes in the staff took place* 
Mr. Inspector Dettmann was appointed to the Parramatta section ; 
Mr. A. D, McKenzie was removed from Hay to Iithgow ; Mr. W. Nolan 
from Braidwood to Hay ; while Mr. G. H. Hunt, who had previously 
served as Acting Inspector, was permanently appointed and employed 
in the Braidwood district. As in 1896, the inspectorial staff comprised 
35 officers, viz,, Chief Inspector, Deputy Chief Inspector, 9 District 
Inspectors, and 21 Inspectors. 

The subjoined table will show how the schools were 
apportioned, and the amount of inspection done in each district : — 



District. 


No. of 
Inspectors. 


No. of 
Schools. 


No. of 

Schools 
inspected. 


No. of 

Schools not 

inspected. 


No. of 

Pupils 
examined. 


Armidale 

Bathurst 

Bowral 

Goulburn 

Grafton ... 

Maitland 

Metropolitan 

Hub-metropolitan 

Waffga Wagga 

Wellington 


4 

8 
8 
4 
8 
8 
4 
2 
4 
8 


862 
269 

261 
396 
326 
243 
206 
160 
336 
250 


361 
267 
269 
386 
824 
242 
206 
1C0 
329 
249 


1 

1 
2 
9 
1 
1 
••• 
••• 
6 
1 


13,019 
10,768 
11,374 
11,677 
12,263 
17,679 
48,938 
12,231 
13,317 
9,027 


Totals 


83 


2,785 


2,763 


22 


160,183 



The inspected and uninspected schools stand thus : 





Public. 


Provisional. 


Half-time. 


House-to-house. 


Evening. 


Total. 


Inspected 

Uninspected ... 


1,966 
4 


291 
8 


446 
10 


39 
1 


21 
4 


2,763 
22 


Totals 


1,970 


294 


456 


40 


25 


2,785 



'Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



11 



Course of Secular Instruction. — The table given below shows 
the results obtained by examination : — 





Estimated Proficiency. 


Subjects. 


Total number 
Examined. 


Number Passed. 


Percentage up to or 
above Standard. 


Beading- 








Alphabet ... ... ... ... 


10,847 


7,978 


73 


Monosyllables 


38,045 


31,870 


82 


Easy Narrative 


48,693 


41,530 


85 


Ordinary Prose 


02,598 


55,514 


88 


Totals 


160,183 


136,442 


85 


Writing — 














On Slates... ... ... ... 


63,233 


53,180 


84 


In Copy-books and on Paper ... 


96,655 


82,376 


85 


Totals 


159,888 


135,556 


84 


Dictation ... ... 


128,980 


104,087 


80 


Arithmetic — 

Simple Rules 








95,311 


73,871 


77 


Compound Rules... 


39,437 


27.810 


70 


Higher Rules 


23,078 


16,157 


70 


Totals 

(i rammar — 

Elementary 


157,826 


117,838 


74 


33,285 


24,623 


74 


Advanced... 


30,139 


21,840 


72 


Totals 


03,424 


46,463 


73 


Geography— 














Elementary ... ... ... 


30,667 


23,179 


75 


Advanced... ... ... ... 


32,754 


25,150 


76 


Totals 


63,421 


48,329 


76 


History — 














English ... 


63,325 


43,840 


69 


Australian 


11,120 


7,993 


71 


Scripture and Moral Lessons 


154,526 


120,065 


77 


Object Lessons 


151,295 


118,586 


78 


Drawing ... 


152,480 


124,208 


81 


Music 


146,774 


116,176 


79 


jc rencfi ».. ... ... ... ... 


2,171 


1,562 


72 


Euclid 


7,870 


6,020 


76 


Algebra 


2,047 


1,578 


77 


Mensuration 


5,344 


3,512 


65 


JLiaxin ... ... ... ... ... 


2,005 


1,498 


74 


Trigonometry 


61 


56 


91 


Needlework 


65,891 


49,926 


89 


A-Tlll ... ... ... ... . . 


152,344 


124,382 


81 


Natural Science ... 


7,976 


6,256 


78 



12 



"Report of the Minister of "Public Instruction. 



These results show that the proportion of passes, as compared 
with the work of 1896, is 2 per cent, higher in Latin and drawing, 
and 1 per cent, in dictation, Euclid, and needlework. In reading, 
arithmetic, Scripture, music, and object lessons, the percentage is the 
same for both years, while there is a slight falling off in writing, 
geography, grammar, English and Australian history, Erench, algebra, 
mensuration, drill, and natural science. 

The following table summarises the progress in efficiency made 
in the different classes of schools during the past five years : — 



Class of Schools. 


Percentage up to or above the Standard. 


1893. 


1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


Public 

Provisional 

.Half-time 

House-to-house 

Evening Schools 

All Schools 


95 

84 
84 
78 
100 
92 


96 

88 
87 
80 
100 
98 


97 
82 
89 
91 
93 
94 


97 
86 
89 
95 
93 
95 


98 
92 
91 
77 
95 
96 



It will be noted that as compared with 1896, the percentages in 
the case of Public, Provisional, Half-time, and Evening Schools show 
considerable improvement. 

High Schools. 
The total enrolment at these schools waS 516, and the average 
daily attendance 370, as against 577 and 392 respectively for 1896. 
The attendance at each school is shown below : — 



School. 


Total 
enrolment. 


Average quarterly 
enrolment. 


Average daily 
attendance. 


Sydney (Boys) 

„ (Girls) 
Maitland (Boys) ... 

„ (Girls) 
Bathurst (Girls) 


... ... 

• • • . • • 
... . • • 
... .. • 
... . • • 

... . . • 

... ... 


145 
212 

83 

e2 

14 


114 

155 

67 

50 

13 


1065 

1425 

630 

466 

11-6 


Totals 


516 


399 


370-2 


Totals for 1896 


577 


431 


3920 



367 pupils, or 92 per cent, of the average quarterly enrolment, 
.were present at the annual examination, the percentage of results 



Heport of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



13 



averaging nearly 75 per cent. At the University Examinations these 
schools took a good position, as will be seen from the table following : — 



• 

School. 


No. of Passes 

Junior 
Examination. 


No. of Passes 

Senior 
Examination. 


No. of Passes 
Matriculation 
Examination. 


Sydney (Boys) 

„ (Girls) 

Maitland (Boys) 

„ (Girls) 

Bathurst (Girls) 


29 

28 
10 

8 

1 


7 
5 

• •• 

• •• 


23 

22 

12 

4 

• • • 


jLotais ... ••• ■•• 


76 


12 


61 



Of those who qualified for matriculation, 26 did so at the junior 
and 10 at the senior examinations. Medals were awarded High School 
pupils at the junior examination in arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and 
physics. At the senior examination I\ A. Todd, a pupil of Sydney 
Boys High School carried off the Aitken scholarship, the John West 
and the Graham medals — awarded for general proficiency — and the 
medal for geometry ; while S. A. Smith from the same school secured 
medals for arithmetic and ancient history. 

The total expenditure on High Schools was £6,397 5s. 2d., a 
slight decrease on that of the previous year, and the amount received 
from fees £2,139 18s. The actual cost to the State was, therefore, 
£4,257 7s. 2d., or at the rate of £8 5s. per head of the total enrol- 
ment, as against £6 18s. 9d. in 1896. 

State Scholarships and Bursaries. — At the examinations held 
under the Scholarship and Bursary scheme, 107 candidates were 
successful. Of these, 25 males and 31 females obtained scholarships 
for High Schools and Superior Schools; 18 males and 16 females, 
bursaries for High and Superior Schools ; 7 males, bursaries for the 
Sydney Grammar School; and 6 males and 4 females, University 
Bursaries. 

Of the 56 successful competitors for Scholarships, 15 boys and 
16 girls have since attended the Sydney High Schools, 10 boys and 9 
girls the Maitland High Schools, 4 girls the Bathurst High School, 
and 2 girls attend country Superior Schools. Of the 41 who 



14 Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 

succeeded in gaining State School Bursaries, 9 boys and 9 girls 
attend the Sydney High Schools, 9 hoys and 5 girls the Maitland 
Schools, 7 boys the Sydney Grammar School, and 2 girls- the . Fort- 
street Model SchooL 

This year the whole of the University Bursaries available were 
awarded. Seven were obtained by High School pupils, 3 boys and 4 
girls ; and 3 by male pupils of Fort-street Model SchooL 

The total number of candidates examined for admission to 
the High Schools was 690; of these 570, or 966 per cent., were 
successful. 

Superior Schools. 

There was no addition to the list of Superior Schools ; and, 
owing to the fact that the conditions specified in the regulations were 
not, in its case, fulfilled, the School at Raymond Terrace was disrated 
from the rank of Superior. At the end of the year, therefore, the 
number of Superior Schools was 99, comprising 248 departments; 
The number of pupils enrolled for the December quarter of the year 
was 71,795, the average attendance being 53,143. 

At the University examinations, Superior Schools succeeded in 
passing 229 candidates, viz., 6 seniors, and 223 juniors. 

Evening Public Schools. 
Nineteen applications for the establishment of Public Schools 
were received ; 13 were granted, 4 was refused, and 2 had not been 
finally dealt with at the close of the year. The total number of 
schools in operation was 25, but 8 collapsed before the end of the 
year. On 31st December there were only 17 schools in existence, 
having an enrolment of 481, with an average attendance of 295*8. 

Technical Education in Public Schools. 
Drawing. — 152,480 pupils were examined in this subject, of 
whom 124,208, or 81 per cent., satisfied the standard. In 203 depart- 
ments in the Metropolitan and Sub-metropolitan districts visited by 
the Superintendent of Drawing, 45,746 pupils were present at examina- 
tion. 80'4 per cent* of these were found to reach the standard. 
Detailed information upon this subject will be found in Appendix XIII. 



Beport of the Minister of Public Instruction. 15 

Manual Training. — Eight workshops were in existence in 1897, 
which afforded instruction to the pupils of 24 schools. The total 
enrolment of these classes, including students in training, was 634. 
Of these 415 presented themselves for examination, and 375 passed. 

Cookery. — The number of schools in operation in 1897 was 
12, with an enrolment of 880 pupils. Of this number 773 presented 
themselves for examination, of whom 748, or 97 per cent., were 
successful. 

Needlework. — 55,891 female pupils were examined in needle* 
work, of whom 49,926, or 89 per cent., passed the standard. In the 
Metropolitan district 90 schools, representing 14,539 children,, were 
examined by the Directress, who reports satisfactory progress. [See 
Appendix XV.] 

Public School Savings Banks. 
Ten new Banks were opened during 1897, making the total 
number in operation 649, The amount deposited was £12,989 16s. 10d.^ 
and the sum withdrawn £12,256 19s. 5d., showing, as compared with 
1896, an increase of £1,522 6s. 5d. in deposits, and in withdrawals of 
£1,150 10s. 2d. 

The total amount to the credit of the School Banks on 31st 
December was £7,404 0s. Id., an increase on the previous year in the 
amount to the credit of children of £732 17s. 5d. 

The amount withdrawn for deposit to the credit of pupils in 
the Government Savings Bank was £3,653 2s. 9d. 

Since the establishment of these Banks in 1887 the deposits 
have totalled £124,538 19s. 5d., and the withdrawals £117,134 19s. 4d. 
Of this latter sum, £33,951 15s. 3d. was withdrawn for the purpose of 
being placed to the credit of children's own accounts in the Govern- 
ment Savings Bank. 

Teachers. 

4,626 teachers of all classes were actually employed on 31st 
December, 1897, being 184 more than at the end of the previous year. 
2,911 were classified teachers, 574 unclassified, but certificated for 
small schools, 49 were training-school students, 1,005 pupil-teachers, 
61 work-mistresses, and 26 High School teachers. Of the whole num- 
ber 52*3 are males and 47*6 females ; and of the teachers in charge of 
schools or departments, 70*2 per cent, are males and 29*8 females. As 
regards assistants, the percentages are 292 males and 708 females. 



16 



Report of the Minuter of Public Instruction. 



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Report of the Minister of Fublic Instruction. 



17 



Of the total number of classified teachers 7*3 per cent, are in 
Class I, 36 7 per cent, in Class II, and 56 per cent, in Class III. 
Only 16 per cent, of our teachers are unclassified, and the majority of 
these had, before appointment, served four years at least as pupil- 
teachers. 

The teachers whose connection with the Department ceased 
during the year numbered 174. Of these 151 resigned, 4 retired under 
the Public Service Act, 10 were transferred to other Departments of 
the Service, 1 was dismissed, and 8 died. 

During 1897, 1,265 applicants for appointment to the office of " 
pupil-teacher were submitted to competitive examination, of whom 275 
were accepted. Of those awaiting employment, 347 were appointed to- 
schools. 

Fort-street Training School. — The number of students in 
training was 25. Fifteen held full scholarships, 10 half-scholarships. 

Instruction was given during the year in professional subjects, 
in the principles and practice of teaching and class management and 
in manual training. The examination with a view to the classification 
of the students was held in December and resulted as follows : — 



11 A, 'with Honors. 


II A. 


II B. 


III A. 


Total. 


1 


4 


13 


4 


22* 


* Three students failed to complete examination through illness. 

The results of the examination in manual training were : — 


Honors. 


First Grade. 


Second Grade. 


Total. 


3 


12 


10 


25 



At an examination held under the auspices of the St. John's 
Ambulance Association all the students qualified for the " first aid " 
certificate. 



18 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



Hurlstone Training School for Female Students. — Twenty-five 
students were in residence, of whom 15 held full scholarships, and 10 
half scholarships. One student died early in the year. 

In addition to the usual professional subjects instruction was 
given in needlework, cookery, drill, calisthenics, and physiology (in- 
cluding " first aid" to the wounded. Twenty-four students attended a 
special examination, held in connection with the St. John's Ambulance 
Association, and all obtained certificates. 

The results of the examination for classification, held at the end 
of the year, are given below : — 



II A, with Honors. 


II A. 


II B. 


III A. 


TotaL 




6 


15 


8 


24 







Teachers 9 Examinations. — The total number of examinees of all 
classes during 1897 was 3,085. The percentage of passes of teachers 
was 56*3 and of pupil-teachers 81*8. The total number of pupil- 
teachers reported on was 508, as against 566 in 1896. The male and 
female examinees who obtained the highest number of marks at the 
first-class pupil-teachers' examination for admission to training were 
Mr. George J. Humphreys, of Mudgee Superior School* and Miss 
Olivia L. Yates, of the Public School, Dungog. Each of them will be 
presented with the Jones Memorial Medal. 

In the following table the results of the several examinations 
^are given in detail : — 



Persons examined. 






Results. 
















Passed. 


Failed. 


Total. 


Teachers and Assistant Teachers ... 


»*• ••■ ••• 


231 


181 


415 


For Class I 


17 passed 








II A 


? „ 








II B 


36 „ 






• 


Ill A 


... 122 „ 








IIIB 


38 „ 








IIIC 


14 „ 








Examined in Drawing only, in Music only 


, or in both ... 


72 


44 


116 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



19 











Results. 




Persons examined. 
















Passed. 


Failed. 


Total. 


Ketired from examination ... 


... 


... 






7 


Examination cancelled 


... 


• •• 




••<•/«•>«> 


1 


Examinations of Students in Training Schools 


... 


... 






68 


(a) Males — Recommended for II A, with honors 


1 








II A ... 


... 


4 








II B ... 


••• 


13 








Ill A ... 


••« 


4 








Jtve bireci ••• ... ... . . . 


... 


1 


' 






(5) Females — Recommended for II A 


• a. 


6 


t 






II B ... 


... 


15 




* 




yj JLLJL Jx. ... 


... 


3 








Examined in Drawing onlj 


• a. 


21 








Pupil-teachers 


... 


... 


498 


110 


608 


For Class III 


209] 


passed 








jj a a ... ... ... ... 


180 


» 








jj j- ••• ••• ... ... 


47 


>» 








For Training Schools 


62 


•> 








Examinations in Drawing only 


a • . 


11 






11 


Betired from examination 


• •a 


* • « 






2 


Applicants for office of Pupil- teacher 


aa a 


•*• 


275 


990 


•1,265 


Examined in Drawing or in Music only ... 


a . • 


a . . 


16 




16 


ITigh School Candidates 


a • a 


• •• 


570 


20 


590 



* This examination is now competitive. 

Teachers 9 Mutual Assurance Association. — During tiie year 5 
teachers joined the Association, and 5 died. In the last 10 years 44 
deaths have take place, at the rate of 4- 3 per annum. The average 
amount paid annually by each member has been £1 Is. 6d. For this 
payment a sum of about £70 has been assured, being at the rate of 
£1 10s. 5d. per £100. There is no legacy duty, nor have nominees 
of deceased members to wait for proof of will, but payment is made on 
proof of death. 

Local Supervision. 

Eight sub-districts were formed during the year, and a Public 
School Board appointed in the case of each. The number of persons 
so appointed was 48. In addition, 50 members were added to Boards 
already in existence. The total number of Boards in operation was 
296. On 57 of these, ladies to the number of 118 held seats. The 
resignations of 29 members were accepted, and 21 were reported as 
deceased, or having left the locality. 



20 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



Scientific and Technical Education. 

A comparative statement of the total enrolment of students at 
the colleges and branch schools for the years 1896 and 1897 is given 
below : — 





••• 

• • • 

• • • 
••• 


• •  

• •• 

• • • 


• • • 

• • • 

• • • 

• • • 


1896. 


1897. 


Sydney Technical College 

Suburban classes 

Country classes 

Classes connected with Public Schools 


3,302 
678 

2,285 
954 


3,678 
726 

2,342 
912 




7,119 


7,658 



Deducting from this enrolment all cases where students were 
members of more than one class, the number of individuals attending 
the classes was 5,848, as against 5,396 for last year. The average 
weekly attendance was 3,983, giving an increase over 1896 of 265. 

The total number of classes in operation was distributed as 
shown below : — 





Under salaried 
Teachers. 


Teachers paid 
fees only. 


Total. 


Sydney Technical College 

Suburban classes 

Classes in country towns 

Classes from Public Schools 


58 
13 
88 
19 


5 

12 

8 


63 
25 
96 
19 




178 


25 


203 



The students examined at the end of the year numbered 2,702, 
of whom 1,923, or 711 per cent., were successful ; in 1896 there were 
2,576 examined, 1,822 of whom, or 70*7 per cent., passed. At the 
technological examinations of " The City and Guild of London 
Institute," held in April last, 35 students of the technical colleges 
were examined, of whom 28 passed. Two candidates in plumbing 
and one in telegraphy obtained first-class honours, whilst two in 
plumbing, one in telegraphy, and one in electric lighting obtained 
second-class honors. Seven of the candidates also passed the practical 
examination in plumbers' work. 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



21 



The teaching staff comprises 85 persons, viz., 13 lecturers in 
charge of departments, 5 resident masters in charge of branch schools, 
36 teachers, 12 assistant teachers, and 19 teachers in charge of classes 
remunerated by pupils' fees only. As in former years, lectures upon 
technical subjects have been delivered by the officers of the Depart- 
ment in the various centres of population. Several changes in the staff 
took place during the year. These are detailed in the Superinten- 
dent's report, which will be found as an appendix. 

The new buildings at Bathurst are rapidly approaching com- 
pletion, and it is expected that the College will be ready for the recep- 
tion of students very shortly. 

The Superintendent states that much original and important 
economic work was done during the year in connection with the 
Technological Museum, which, it is anticipated, will lead to the opening 
up of new commercial avenues by the utilisation of our indigenous 
vegetable products. 

Great interest continues to be taken in the country museums, 
as is shown by the large number of specimens received locally. In 
May last the museum at Albury was formally opened by me. 

The Technological Museum was visited by 224,984 persons — 
The appended table gives the attendance in detail, 





1896. 


1897. 


Technological Museum, Sydney ... ... 

Branch Museum, Newcastle ... 

„ Goulburn ... 

,, Jt»atnur8t ... ... ... ... ... 

„ "West Maitland 

„ Albury (since May last) 


99,952 
58,443 
24,211 
19,840 
23,564 


100,680 
49,068 
24,586 
22,278 
24,054 
4,318 






226,010 


224,984 



The total expenditure on technical education during 1897, 
including £3,998 19s. lOd. spent on the Technological Museums, 
amounted to £28,330 18s. 6d. Of this sum £19,752 4s. lid. was a 
Parliamentary grant, £5,357 Os. 8d. represented payments "by the 
Treasury from the Loan Vote for the erection of buildings, and 
£105 5s. 7d. London payments by the Treasury ; while the balance, 
£3,116 7s. 4d., shows the amount paid by the students as fees. 



22 JReport of the Minister of Public Instruction. 

Public School Cadet Force. 

For the last quarter of 1897 the total enrolment of the Cadet 
Force was 3,294. The amount expended for cadet purposes was 
£3,782 8s. lid., as against £3,139 7s. 5d. in 1896. 

Details of the year's work appear in Appendix XVIII. 

Finance. 
The sum available for expenditure under the Public Instruction 
Act was £706,240 10s. 0d., made up as follows : — 

£ s. a. 

Balance from 1896 9,751 16 7 

Do of Petty Cash in hand 10 

Amount received from Treasury on account of Vote 

for 1896-7 320,866 8 

Amount received from Treasury on account of Vote 

for 1897-8 825,000 

Amount received from Loan Vote — (Land) 252 4 7 

Amount received from Loan Vote — (new buildings) 31,000 
Do from Public School Buildings 

Account 18,000 

Amount of Minister's salary ... 1,370 

£706,240 10 ~0 

The total outlay was £692,395 10s. 7d., namely, £84,909 9s. 4d. 
on school premises, £560,391 3s. 6d. on maintenance of schools, and 
£47,094 17s. 9d. on administration, &c. £4,727 3s. 9d., the unexpended 
balance of 1896-7 account, was refunded to the Treasury, leaving a 
balance at the end of the year of £9,117 15s. 8d. 

General Statement of Expenditure for 1897. 
I. On School Premises : — £ s. d- 

For sites, new buildings, additions, repairs, &c., including High 

Schools £773 0s. lOd 81,909 9 4 

II. On Maintenance of Schools, &c. : — 

1. Teachers' salaries and allowances in Primary £ s. d. 

Schools 522,068 12 3 

Other maintenance expenses in such schools ... 29,041 15 10 

2. High School salaries and maintenance expenses 5,624 4 4 
State Scholarships and Bursaries 3,656 11 1 

8. Administration, including Training Schools and 

enforcement of school attendance ... ... 47,094 17 9 

607,486 1 3 



£692,395 10 7 

The amount of school fees collected and paid into the Con- 
solidated Revenue was £73,684 Is. 9d., namely, £71,544 3s. 9d. from 
Primary Schools, and £2,139 18s. Od. from High Schools. Deducting 
this sum from the total expenditure, there will remain £618,711 8s. lOd. 
as the net school expenditure derived from State funds. 



JReport of tlte Minister of Public Instruction* 



23 



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Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



25 



The average cost to the State of a child's education, calculated 

{a) upon the net school expenditure, and (b) upon the expenditure 

exclusive of the cost of school premises, is shown in the succeeding 

tables : — 

(a) Net School Expenditure. 



Cost per child upon the — 

Gross enrolment of pupils 

Year's enrolment of distinct pupils 

Mean quarterly enrolment 

Average attendance 



1893. 


1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


£ 8. d. 


£ s. d. 


£ s. d. 


£ s. d. 


2 13 10} 


2 10 5 


2 11 1} 


2 5 9} 


3 10* 


2 17 2f 


2 18 1 


2 12 0} 


8 8 10} 


3 4 11} 


3 5 5} 


2 18 6 


5 Oi 


4 10 9 


4 9 9} 


4 1 0} 



1897. 



£ b. d. 
2 8 1} 

2 14 8} 

3 13} 

4 3 4} 



(b) Expenditure, exclusive of cost of school premises. 



Cost per child, calculated upon the — 

Gross enrolment of pupils 

Year's enrolment of distinct children ... 

Mean quarterly enrolment 

Average attendance 



1893. 



1894. 



1895. 



1896. 



1897. 



£ s. d. 

2 4 3} 

2 10 8} 

2 16 9} 

4 2 5} 



£ s. d. 

2 4 0} 
2 10 1 

2 16 10} 

3 19 5 



£ b. d. 

2 2 7} 
2 8 5} 

2 14 6} 

3 14 10} 



£ s. d. 

2 1 3} 
2 6 10} 

2 12 9 

3 13 1 



£ b. d. 

2 16} 
2 7 2} 

2 12 10} 

3 11 11} 



Information is furnished in the following summaries respecting 
educational establishments connected with this Department, but not 
carried on under the provisions of the Public Instruction Act : — 



The Sydney University, 

Four hundred and fifty-five students, including 69 women, 
attended lectures during 1897. The total number qualified for 
Matriculation was 291, of whom 87 passed the ordinary Matriculation 
Examination, 138 the Junior Public Examination, 12 the Law 
Matriculation Examination, 46 the Senior Public Examination, and 
8 the Entrance Examination for Medicine and Science. The number 
actually admitted to Matriculation was 97. 

At the Senior Public Examinations, 119 candidates presented 
themselves, and 101 passed. At the Junior Examination, 859 were 
successful out of 1,471. 

The degrees conferred during the year were 88, viz. : — M.A., 
3; B.A., 47; LL.B, 7; M.D., 1; M.B., 11; Ch.M., 8; B.Sc, 2; 
and B.E., 9. 



29 Report of tlie Minister of Public Instruction* 

The University Staff consisted of 14 Professors and 33 
Lecturers, of whom 7 Professors and 5 Lecturers are paid out of the 
Challis Fund ; and 4 Teachers from the P. N. Russell Fund. 

The year's expenditure was £32,786 18s. Id., of which sum 
£11,000 was granted by the Government. £4,895 14s. 8d. was derived 
from private foundations for the payment of scholarships, bursaries, 
prizes, &c, for the Fisher Library, and for maintenance of the P. N. 
Russell School of Engineering. The total income for the year was 
£32,023, 

The Sydney Grammar School. 

The total enrolment of pupils for 1897 was 532, of whom 193 
were under and 339 over the statutory age of 14 years. One hun- 
dred and ninety-five new pupils were admitted, 117 being under and 
78 above 14 years of age. The mean quarterly enrolment was 418*5, 
and the average attendance 401*3. 

The income and expenditure for the year were as follows : — • 

Income. £ s. d. 

From State grants 1,500 

School fees 7,216 13 6 

Special prizes, &c 170 5 9 



99 



£8,886 19 3 
Expenditure. 

By balance due to Bank 182 15 5 

„ expenditure 8,699 15 10 

„ balance in Commercial Bank ... 4 8 



£8,886 19 3 

The cost per pupil in average attendance was £22 2s. 8fd., 
being 16s. 5^d. less than in 1896. The expense to the State was 
£3 14s. 9£d. per head, as against £4 2s. 6^d. in the previous year. 

The Public Library. 

The total number of volumes in the Library at the end of 1897 
was 119,842. During the year new books to the number of 5,839 
were added, and 14,852 books sent out on loan to country libraries, 
174,887 persons visited the reading rooms as against 174,130 in the 



Report of the Minister qf Public Instruction. 27 

previous year ; 154,669 the newspaper room as compared with 161,121 
in 1896; and 81,431 visits were paid to the Lending Branch, an 
increase of 503 over the number in 1896. The total number of visits, 
therefore, paid to the institution during the year was 410,987. 

Thirty-seven persons were employed on the staff of the insti- 

tution. The expenditure for the year was : — 

On buildings, repairs, &c. (under 
Government Architect) 

On books, periodicals, newspapers, 
binding... 

On salaries ... 

On maintenance 



. • . • • . 



••• ••• •«• 



• »• ••• ••• 



£ 


s. 


d. 


25 








2,378 








4,882 








281 








£7,566 









The Australian Museum. 
The number of visitors to the Museum was — On week-days, 
89,907 ; on Sundays, 32,987 ; total, 122,894. Twenty-seven persons 
were employed on the staff of 'the institution. The Trustees report 
that the year's expenditure was as given below :■ 

On salaries and allowances ... 

On specimens (purchase, collection, 
and carriage) 

On books and binding  • 

On catalogues 

On cases and bottles 

Expedition to coral reef — Publica- 
tion of results 

Miscellaneous 



... «•• • . . 



• • . • • • 



• • • 



•*• 



... 



... ... 



£ 8. 

4,482 13 


d. 
4 


241 14 
187 18 
382 17 
637 8 


1 

4 

7 
7 


273 15 
251 7 


1 

5 


£6,457 14 


5 



National Art Gallery. 
During the year 296,410 visits to the Gallery were registered, 
being 80,808 in excess of those paid in 1896. The attendance on 
Sundays averaged 2,144, on week-days, 593. Eighteen additional 
students were admitted, making the total number 266. Eive persons 
were permanently employed, with four extra assistants on Sundays 
and holidays. 



28 Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 

The following is a statement of the year's expenditure :— • 

£ s. d. 
For works of art purchased ... 1,026 

For maintenance (frames, freight, 

fittings, repairs, insurances, &c.) 841 5 7 

For salaries and wages ... ... 1,266 15 10 

£3,134 1 5 

New South Wales Institution fob the Deaf and Dumb 

and the Blind. 

The number of inmates during the year was 118 as compared 

with 109 for 1896. Of these 90 were under and 28 were over 14 years 

of age. The new admissions were 24, of whom 23 were under and 1 

over 14 years. Four inmates were discharged — 2 under 14 years, and 

2 over that age. The income was : — 

£ s. d. 
From State grants 450 

From other sources ... 4,469 17 9 



£4,919 17 9 

The expenditure for the year was as follows : — 

£ s. d.' 

For maintenance 2,017 15 10 

For salaries and wages 2,134 12 8 

£4,152 8 6 

The number of teachers employed was 14, and the average cost 
per pupil £36 16s. 6d. 

Industrial School for Girls, Parramatta. 

The enrolment for the year was 189, of whom 52 were under 
and 137 above the age of 14 years. There were 54 new admissions — 
20 under and 34 over 14 years old. Seventy-six inmates were dis- 
charged during the year, as follows : — 

To Boarding-out Officer 14 

As apprentices ... ... ... ... ... 35 

On attaining age of 18 years ... ... ... 25 

To Shaftesbury Reformatory ... ... ... 2 



'Report of the Minister of Public Inst faction. 29 

The number remaining in the institution on 31st December was 
113. Compared with 1896, there were an increase of 14 in the 
enrolment, of 20 in the discharges, and a decrease of 1 in the new 
admissions. 

The expenditure for the year was : — 

£ s. d. 

For maintenance 1,720 11 4 

For salaries 945 15 2 



£2,666 6 6 



Calculated on the enrolment, the cost per inmate was £14 2s. Id. 
A comparison with the figures of 1896 shows that a saving has been 
effected in the cost per head of 13s. 4d. 

In his report, the Superintendent states : — 

"Special attention has been directed to the teaching and training 
of the girls in the different branches of industrial labour likely to 
prove of great use to them when they leave to be apprenticed, or upon 
attaining the age of 18. As far as practicable, all the girls are system- 
atically taught cooking (plain), dressmaking, laundry work, and the 
rudiments of horticulture, and all the girls are taught mending clothes, 
as also patching and darning. 

" In the school excellent work is being done, and the pupils — 
many of whom are very backward upon enrolment — strive earnestly 
to excel. Due attention is paid to proper mental and physical 
development. The health of the girls has been very good during the 
year. No deaths occurred. 



"The industrial work carried out during the year was of a 
practical and useful character. The laundry class dealt with over 
170,000 pieces of clothing, and the value of the work done might be 
estimated at £1,260. These articles were washed, and either ironed 



or mangled. 



30 Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 

"The work of the sewing classes comprised plain sewing, cutting- 
out, dressmaking, darning, and patching. All the dresses and under- 
garments worn by the inmates were made in the institution, and the 
estimated value of the work done was about £125. Every girl in the 
institution is taught plain sewing." 

Nautical School-ship "Sobraon." 

In this institution, 548 toys were enrolled, 284 of these being 
under and 264 over 14 years of age ; the new admissions numbered 
215, of whom 144 were below and 71 above the age stated. The 
number discharged was 229, made up as follows : — 

For apprenticeship 
On attaining 18 years of age ... 
Transferred to Boarding-out Officer ... 
Discharged to mercantile marine service 
By order of the Governor-in-Council 
Illegally committed 



• . • 



• • . 



... ... 



155 
12 
34 

5 
22 

1 



229 

Three hundred and twenty-one hoys remained on the "Sohraon" 
at the end of the year. As compared with 1896, a decrease of 6 is 
shown in the enrolment, an increase of 6 in the discharges, and of 41 
in the numher of new admissions. 

The total expenditure was £8,984 10s. 2d., viz. : — 

£ s. d. 

For maintenance ... 6,128 7 4 

Tor salaries , 2,856 2" 10 



£8,934 10 2 
Deducting parents' contributions 

to the Treasury 1,572 6 2 

Net cost to the State ... £7,412 4 

Calculated on the net expenditure, the cost to the State per head of 
the enrolment was £13 10s. 6d., which is £1 19s. 4d. less than the 
cost per inmate in 1896. 



Report of the Minister of Pufilic Instruction. 81 

Carpenterian Reformatory. 

At this institution the enrolment for the year was 147, 43 of the 
inmates being under and 99 over 14 years of age. The new admissions 
numbered 55, while 65 were discharged : 

By order of Governor-in-Council 34 

By expiry of time 31 

Of the 55 admissions, 19 were under and 36 above the age of 14. 
Eighty-two boys remained in the institution at the expiration of the 
year. 

At the end of April, the institution lost the services of the 
Superintendent, Captain Murray, through his resignation of office. 
The vacancy thus caused was filled by the appointment of Mr. Frederick 
Arthur Stayner, Lieutenant of the Nautical School-ship " Sobraon." 

The conduct and the health of the boys are reported to have 
been very satisfactory. 

Shaftesbury Reformatory. 

At the commencement of 1897, there were 15 girls enrolled at 
this institution. During the year, 9 were admitted, and 6 discharged 
through the expiry of the term of their sentences. On 31st December, 
the number of inmates was 18, of whom 6 were under and 12 over the 
age of 14 years. 

J. GARRARD, 
Minister of Public Instruction. 

Department of Public Instruction, 

Sydney, 30th March, 1898. 



32 



Report of tlie Minister of Public Instruction. 



APPEN 
Applications for the establishment of Public 



Name of Place. 



Post Town. 



§i 
is 



Number of Children residing in the locality. 



Boya •Girls. 



TotaL C.E. 



R.C. 



Pres. 



Wes. 



Alexander Yale 

Beacon, The Gold Mines 

Bluey Camp 

Bobadah 

Bolah Gap .„.. 

Braeficld 

Brocklesby 

Broken Dam 

Brushwood 

Cooper's Creek 

Copper Creek , 

Coramba 

Homestead Selection Ko. 74 ... 

Homestead Selection 

Lcura 

Lockhart 

Mair Jimmy '.. 

Marsflell ...» 

Moor Creek Water "Works 

Mount Dayid 

Oakvillo 

Peak, The 

Sandy Creek 

South Corowa 

Spring Yale 

Teven Creok 

Tucklan 

Wagga Experimental Farm 



Candelo 

Bacca Creek ... 
Stewart's Brook 

Bobadah 

Quirindi , 

Willow Tree ... 

Brocklesby 

Broken Dam ... 

Coolamon 

Bexbill 

Captain's Flat 

Coramba 

Tenterfield 

Merriwa 

Leura 

Ferriers 

Jerilderie 

Byde 

Moonbi 

Mount David ... 

Mulgrave 

The Tea 1 ! 

Dubbo 

South Co.'owa... 

Moree 

Tintenbar 

Tucklan 

Bomen 



miles. 
3 

4 

2i 

••• 
3* 
6 
3* 

20 
3, 

U 
2k 

2* 
3 

H 

5 
12 

2i 
12 

3 

31 

21 

4 

••• 

If 
3 



19 
15 
17 
16 



13 
13 
11 
14 
19 
21 



3 or 4 



13 
22 
22 
18 
14 
11 
20 
18 
18 
8 
17 
17 
15 
20 
11 
13 
13 



12 



23 

9 
12 
10 
16 



14 
25 

• • • 

17 
25 
17 
15 
20 
16 
22 
.18 
13 
13 
16 
28 
19 
28 
20 
11 
20 



31 4 

 

22 16 
40 18 



25 
25 
23 
27 
21 
33 
46 
100 
30 
47 
80 
33 
31 
27 
42 
36 
31 
21 
33 
45 
34 
48 
31 
24 
33 



7 
15 
10 

9 
16 

9 
19 



18 
15 
24 
26 
18 
11 
15 
16 
14 
14 
27 
23 
26 
25 
5 
... 
25 



11 


8 


2 


4 


3 


7 


12 


• • • 


4 


• • • 


11 


2 


• •• 


8 


• •• 


... 


7 


2 


6 


13 


• •  


••• 


6 


... 


31 


1 


9 


... 


 •  


1 


7 


... 


3 


13 


11 


• • • 


7 


7 


14 


3 


7 


... 


6 


••• 


22 


... 


2 


... 


7 


11 


4 


5 


• • • 


•  • 


•  • 


• • • 



8 



6 



8 

3 

15 

7 



6 
6 
2 



16 



6 
5 

10 



8 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



33 



DIX I. 

Schools received during the year 1897. 



Number of Children promised to attend. 


Number of Parents or Guardians 
undertaking to send Children. 


^W* . • _ A t _ ^^. - - t — f 




























Ministers Decision. 


JoysJ 


Qirls. 


Total. 


C.E. 


R.C. 


Pros. 


Wee. 


On. 


C.E. 


R.C. 


Pres. 


Wcs. 


Ors. ' 


rotal 




I 

19 


12 


31 


4 


11 


8 


8 


• • • 


1 


2 


2 


2 


tee 


7 


Granted, 29th April. 


15 


7 


22 


16 


2 


4 


• •• 


• •• 


8 


1 


2 


• • • 


• • • 


11 


Granted, 2nd June. 


17 


23 


40 


18 


3 


7 


9 


3 


6 


1 


2 


3 


1 


13 


Declined, 3rd July. 


16 


9 


25 


7 


12 


• •• 


6 


• • • 


3 


5 


• • • 


2 


• • • 


10 


Granted, 29th May* 


IS 

13 


12 
10 


25 
23 


15 
10 


4 
11 


• • • 

2 


6 


• •• 
••* 


6 
3 


2 
4 


1 


4 

••• 


• • • 

• • • 


12 

8 


Declined. Aid offered to Provisional 

School, 13th April. 
Provisional School granted, 4th May. 


11 


16 


27 


9 


• • • 


8 


8 


2 


3 


Ml 


3 


2 


1 


9 


Granted, 3rd July. 


14 
19 


7 
14 


21 
33 


16 
9 


••• 
7 


2 


3 

15 


2 

• « • 


6 
3 


• •• 

3 


••• 
1 


1 
5 


1 

• • • 


8 
12 


Declined, Half-time School offered, 

18th May. 
Granted, 28th April. 


21 


25 


46 


19 


6 


13 


7 


1 


6 


1 


4 


2 


1 


14 


Declined, 29th April. 


••• 


•«» 


•«• 


••• 


* • • 


• • • 


••• 


• • • 


• • • 


••• 


a • t 


••• 


• • • 


34 


Declined, 16th November. 


13 


17 


30 


18 


6 


• • • 


6 


• •• 


6 


3 


• • • 


1 


... 


10 


Granted, 29th May. 


22 


25 


47 


15 


31 


1 


i • • 


i • • 


6 


9 


1 


••• 


• •• 


16 


Declined, 15th June. 


22 


17 


39 


24 


9 


• • • 


6 


• • • 


8 


3 


••• 


2 


• • • 


13 


Declined, 20th December. 


18 


15 


33 


26 


••• 


1 


6 


« • • 


8 


■•• 


1 


2 


• . • 


11 


Declined, 8th April. 


14 

i 


20 


34 


18 


7 


• •• 


2 


7 


4 


2 


••• 


1 


2 


9 


Granted, 9th June. 


i 
11 

20 


16 
22 


27 
42 


11 
15 


3 

11 


13 
1 


• • • 

16 


t • • 
• •• 


3 

7 


2 
5 


3 

• • • 


• • • 

5 


• • # 

• •• 


8 
17 


Provisional School granted, 30th 

November. 
Declined, 16th August. 


18 


18 


36 


16 


7 


7 


••• 


6 


7 


3 


2 


t • • 


2 


14 


Granted, 4th August. 


18 


13 


31 


14 


14 


3 


• • • 


• . • 


6 


5 


2 


• • • 


••• 


13 


Declined, 17th December. 


8 


13 


21 


14 


7 


• • • 


• • • 


• • > 


5 


2 


• • • 


• •  


••• 


7 


Under consideration. 


17 


16 


33 


27 


6 


• • • 


• • • 


••• 


8 


3 


 • • 


• • « 


••• 


11 


Declined, 15th October. 


17 


28 


45 


23 


22 


t • • 


••• 


••• 


9 


7 


i • • 


fee 


• •• 


16 


Granted, 26th April. 


15 


19 


34 


26 


2 


i •• 


6 


••• 


10 


1 


2 


• t • 


••* 


13 


Granted, 24th June. 


20 


28 


48 


25 


7 


11 


5 


... 


8 


2 


4 


1 


••• 


15 


Declined, 7th September. 


11 


20 


31 


5 


4 


5 


10 


7 


2 


1 


2 


4 


2 


11 


Granted, 20th July. 


13 
13 


11 
20 


24 
33 


••• 
25 


• • • 
••• 


••• 
••• 


• • • 

8 


• • i 

• • • 


• • * 
8 


• •• 

• • • 


• •• 
■• • • 


• • • 
2 


« • • 
• • • 


15 
10 


Declined. Aid offered to ProvisoL al 

School, 10th March. 
Granted, 15th June. 



c 



34 



Beport of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



APPEN 

Applications for the establishment of Provi 



Name of Place. 



Post Town. 



*- 2 
°J 
2oo 

«g so 

« p 

S 



Number of Children residing in the locality. 



Boys. Girls.! Total. 

I 



CLE. 



K>C. 



Pre*. 



Wes. 



Ob, 



Acacia Creek Bridge. 

Ardnaclach.. 

Argenton 

Armidale Creek 

Aahley.. 

Ballengarra 

Bargong ; 

Beacon .*. 

Berendale 

Bilambil Creek » 

BoganGate 

Boggabri North 

Bondo 

Botobolar, Upper .... 

Bredbo North 

Brightling Park 

Broadwater 

Brookong Settlement 

Buckaio , 

Burradoo 

Caoura  

Carwell 

Chanie Ponds 

Clarence Siding ....... 

Clifton Ten-mile .... 

Collengullie South . 

Combo 

Cooridigbee 

Cross Creek , 

Cumborah 

Dangelong 

Dickerton 

Dighton 

Duck Creek 

Edinglassie 



Eaerton 

Elsiedale..... , 

Elswick 

Eulah Creek, Upper ., 

Everitt 

Eerndale 

Five-mile Creek 

Ford's Springs 

Fountaindale 

Ganoo 

„ (renewal) 

Glenview 

Gobbagaula 

Goolmangar 

Gulgo « 

Gungal 

Gurrundah, Central .. 
Havilah 



Aeacia Creek , 

Galong 

Cockle Creek 

Armidale 

Holland's Piains!!! 

Tambaroora 

Coramba 

Berendale 

Bilambil 

Bogan Gate 

Boggabri 

Tumut. 

Botobolar, Upper 

Bredbo 

Gulargambone . . . 

Maclean 

Lockliart 

Candelo 

Burradoo 

Barber's Creek ... 

Cudgegong 

Nullamanna 

Clarence Siding ... 

Tenterfield 

Collengullie 

Maryvale 

Yass 

Braidwood 

Walgett 

Nimity belle 

Wellington.. 

Albury 

Temora 

Muswellbrook 



Asbford ........ 

Tumbarumba .. 

Condobolin 

Narrabri 

Everitt 

Inrerell 

Gundagai 

Hobby's Yards 

Robertson 

Walmer 



n 

Bombala 

Narandera .. 
Goolmangar 
Condobolin.. 

Gungal 

Gurrundah.. 
Havilah 



miles. 

6* 

4 
••• 

4 
11 

5 

5 

4* 
6 

61 
14 
4 
8 

• • • 

8 
10 

4 

6 

5 

2 

9 

5 

5 

6 

6 

8 

4 
14 

6 
30 

7 

8 

6 

7 

4i 

7 

7 
15 
14 

5 

4 

5 

• • • 

6 

5* 

7 

4 

5 

13 
. • . 

41 

71 



6 
15 
10 
21 

8 
10 

7 
18 

8 
11 
10 
10 

9 
10 

7 
11 
12 
13 
12 
12 

7 
13 
10 
10 
10 

9 
14 

7 
11 

7 
14 

7 
10 
13 



12 

9 

9 

15 

10 

11 

18 

6 

13 

7 

13 

9 

21 

10 

14 

9 

16 

12 



9 

12 

11 

13 

11 

7 

9 

7 

12 

10 

11 

8 

8 

7 

9 

9 

3 

12 

9 

11 

4 

12 

12 

10 

9 

11 

14 

8 

8 

9 

7 

13 

10 

7 

7 

10 

8 

8 

10 

11 

13 

13 

16 

7 

7 

13 

10 

13 

12 

7 

10 

17 

6 



15 

27 
21 
34 
19 
17 



4 


11 


2 


13 


13 


2 


16 


6 


14 


4 


7 


• •• 



16 


12 


4 


25 


19 


2 


20 


15 


• • • 


21 


• • • 


3 


21 


9 


4 


18 


10 


8 


17 


12 


5 


17 


3 


14 


36 


18 


2 


20 


13 


7 


15 


4 


10 


25 


11 


2 


21 


6 


12 


23 


18 


5 


11 


11 


 •• 


25 


21 


• • • 


22 


8 


12 


20 


16 


4 


19 


5 


12 


20 


13 


4 


28 


18 


5 


15 


11 


4 


19 


5 


6 


16 


12 


3 


21 


11 


10 


20 


7 


13 


20 


20 


• • • 


20 


9 


4 


14 


10 


• • • 


22 


19 


3 


17 


17 


• • • 


17 


9 


•  • 


25 


14 


6 


21 


16 


• • • 


24 


18 


• •• 


31 


15 


3 


22 


11 


5 


20 


14 


2 


14 


9 


• • t 


26 


17 


• •• 


19 


16 


2 


34 


16 


• • • 


22 


3 


19 


21 


17 


4 


19 


14 


5 


33 


8 


25 


18 


10 


4 



8 
1 

1 

• • 

4 



4 



2 

>• • 
« t 

3 



8 
1 



1 

• • 

4 

• • 

5 

6 



1 
14 



2 

4 



5 
15 

8 

... 
••• 
••• 
... 



5 
4 



« • 1 

Ml 

• •I 

• • • 



4 

1 • • 

• • 

2 
2 



• • • 
«*• 

• •• 

• •• 



8 
Z 



• •• 

• •• 



7 
5 

 • • 

6 
8 

* • • 

4 
5 
9 



... 
••• 

■•• 
... 



4 



••• 
••• 



..I 
..« 
• • t 
»•• 
>•• 
»>• 
»•• 
•■• 
••• 
••■ 

Ml 



J&eport of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



35 



MX II. 

sional Schools, received during the year 1897. 



Number of Children promised to attend. 


Number of Parents or Guardians 
undertaking to send Children. 


























Minister's Decision. 


1 
Boys. Girls. 

1 


' Total. 

i 
i 


C.E. 


R.C. 


Pres. 


Wes. 


Ore. 


C.E. 


R.C. 


Pres. 


Wes. , Ore. 

i 


Total 


6 


1 
9 


1 

15 


4 


11 


• •  


• • • 


« • • 


1 


3 


• • • 


• • • i 


• • 


4 


Declined, 7th October. 


15 


12 


27 


2 


13 


7 


• •• 


5 


1 


4 


2 


• • 


1 


8 


Granted, 23rd April. 


10 


11 


21 


13 


2 


••• 


2 


4 


7 


1 


V • • 


2 


2 


12 


Public School granted, 6th Feb. 


21 


13 


34 


16 


6 


8 


4 


 • • 


6 


1 


2 


1 


•  


10 


Declined, 22nd July. 


8 


11 


19 


14 


4 


1 


• • • 




» • • 


4 


1 


1 


• • • 


» • • 


6 


Granted, 23rd September. 


10 


7 


17 


7 


• • • 


1 


9 




•  


3 


• • t 


1 


3 


• • 


7 


Declined, 26th April. 


7 


9 


16 


12 


4 


 • • 


•• • 




• • 


3 


1 


• t « 


•  • 


• • 


4 


Granted, 11th February. 


18 


7 


25 


19 


2 


4 


••• 




• t 


11 


1 


3 


• • • i 


• t 


15 


Granted, 2nd June. 


8 


12 


20 


15 


» • • 


• • t 


5 




• • 


5 


• • • 


• • • 


1 . 


• • 


6 


Granted, 13th September. 


11 


10 


21 


• • • 


3 


3 


15 




• • 


•• • 


2 


1 


4 , 


»•• 


7 


Granted, 7th September. 


10 


11 


21 


9 


4 


• • • 


8 




• • 


8 


3 


• • • 


4 . 


• • 


10 


Granted, 22nd February. 


10 


8 


18 


10 


8 


i • • 


• • • 




• • 


8 


2 


• • • 


• •• 


 • 


5 


Declined, 18th February. 


9 


8 


17 


12 


5 


• • • 


• « t 




• • 


3 


2 


• •• 


 • • i 


*• 


6 


Declined, 4th June. 


10 


7 


17 


3 


14 




• • • 




• • 


1 


6 


• • • 


•   4 


»• • 


6 


Declined, 27th October. 


7 


9 


16 


13 


2 


1 


• • • 




» • • 


8 


1 


1 


t •• 1 


• • 


5 


Granted, 16th November. 


11 


9 


20 


13 


7 


• •• 


• • • 




• • 


4 


1 


t  • 


• • • 


• • 


5 


Declined, 28th July. 


12 


3 


15 


4 


10 


 • • 


1 




• • 


2 


2 


• • • 


1 . 


»•• 


5 


Declined, 11th August. 


13 


12 


25 


11 


2 


4 


• •• 


8 


3 


1 


1 


• •• 


3 


8 


Under consideration. 


12 


9 


21 


6 


12 


• •  


• • • 


3 


4 


4 


• t • 


• •• 


I A • 


8 


Granted, 2nd December. 


12 


11 


23 


18 


5 


• • • 


• • • 


• •i 


8 


2 


• • • 


t • • 1 


• • 


10 


Declined, 24th February * 


7 


4 


11 


11 


• • • 


# • • 


• •» 




 • 


3 


• • • 


• • « 


 • • 


« • 


3 


Declined, 16th August. 


13 


12 


25 


21 


• * • 


• •  


4 




• • 


6 


• • • 


• • • 


1 


» • • 


7 


Granted, 12th July. 


10 


12 


22 


8 


12 


2 


•>•• 




i • • 


2 


3 


1 


• * • 


• • 


6 


Under consideration. 


10 


10 


20 


16 


4 


• • • 


• •• 




• • 


5 


2 


• • • 


 • • 


1 • • 


7 


Declined, 28th October. 


10 


9 


19 


5 


12 


• • • 


2 




»•• 


2 


5 


1 


• • • 


»•• 


8 


Under consideration. 


9 

4 j 


11 


20 


13 


4 


3 


•  • 




► • • 


5 


2 


1 


• • • 


1 • • 


8 


Granted, 6th September. 


14 


14 


28 


18 


5 


• • • 


2 




3 


6 


1 


• • • 


1 


1 


9 


Granted, 14th December. 


7 


8 


15 


11 


4 


• • • 


t • • 




>•« 


4 


1 


t • • 


• •• i 


»•• 


5 


Declined, 17th December. 


11 


8 


19 


5 


6 


8 


• • • 




» • • 


2 


1 


2 


t • • 


1 • • 


5 


Under consideration. 


7 
14 


9 


16 


12 


8 


1 


• •  




i • t 


4 


1 


1 


• » • 


t • • 


6 


Declined, 27th September. 


7 


21 


11 


10 


# • • 


• • • 




i • • 


4 


2 


• • • 


• t fl 


► • • 


6 


Granted, 13th September. 


7 

4 sv 


13 


20 


7 


13 


• • • 


• • • 




»• • 


3 


4 


• • • 


• ■€ 1 


k • • 


7 


Granted, 26th April. 


10 

4 A 


10 


20 


20 


• • • 


•  • 


• • • 




 » • 


7 


• • t 


t •• 


• • • 


1 •  


7 


Granted, 27th July. 


13 

to 


7 


20 


9 


4 


•  • 


• • • 


7 


3 


1 


• •  


• • • 


4 


8 


Declined, 18th February. 


7 


7 


14 


10 


• • • 


2 


• •• 


2 


3 


••• 


1 


• • • 


1 


6 


Declined. Aid offered to Half-time 
School, 20th December. 


12 


10 


22 


19 


3 


• •• 


» • • 


• • • 


6 


1 


« • • 


• • • 


• • 


7 


Under consideration. 


9 


8 


17 


17 


* • • 


• • • 


• • • 




► • • 


8 


• • • 


• •• 


• • • 


» • • 


8 


Granted, 25th October. 


9 

4 ap 


8 


17 


9 


• • • 


1 


7 




» t • 


2 


• • • 


1 


2 


• • 


6 


Granted, 6th October. 


15 

1 sv 


10 


25 


14 


6 


• • m 


5 




• • 


4 


2 


«•• 


1 


► • • 


7 


Declined, 28th April. 


10 


11 


21 


16 


 •  


4 


• • • 




1 


6 


«• t 


1 


• • • 


1 


8 


Granted, 16th November. 


11 

1 o 


13 


24 


18 


• • • 


•  • 


6 




i • # 


6 


• • • 


••• 


2 


>•• 


8 


Declined, 6th September. 


18 


13 


81 


15 


8 


5 


8 




i* • 


4 


2 


2 


2 


i • • 


10 


Granted, 5th November; 


6 
13 

7 

1 A 


16 


22 


11 


5 


6 


•• • 




i • • 


2 


2 


3 


• • a 


• • 


7 


Declined, 6th September. 


7 


20 


14 


2 


t • • 


4 




i • • 


4 


1 


• •• 


2 


• • 


7 


Declined, 18th February. 


7 


14 


9 


• • • 


• • • 


5 




»•% 


8 


• • • 


• • • 


1 


IDS 


4 


Declined, 11th February. 


13 


13 


26 


17 


• • • 


• • • 


9 




i •  


7 


• • • 


•  • 


3 


Iflfl 


10 


Under consideration. 



21 


10 


19 


16 


2 


1 


•  • 




»•• 


6 


1 


1 


• •• 


»••» 


8 


Granted, 22nd Ootober. 


13 


34 


16 


• • t 


14 


4 




»•• 


4 


• • • 


3 


2 


• fl 


9 


Granted, 29th April. 


10 


12 


22 


3 


19 


• •i 


• •• 




 • • 


1 


6 


• St 


• t • 


»• • 


7 


Under consideration. 


14 


7 


21 


17 


4 


• •• 


• •• 




» • • 


4 


1 


• • • 


• • • 


► •1 


6 


Granted, 28th Septemtcv 
Granted, 21st July. 


9 
16 
12 


10 


. 19 


14 


5 


• • • 


• •  




»•• 


6 


1 


• • t 


• • • 


i • • 


7 


17 


33 


8 


25 


• •• 


*•» 




• • • 


3 


7 


• •• 


• « • 


»• • 


10 


Declined, 28th September. 


6 


18 


10 


4 


• •• 


4 


• • • 


4 


1 


 • • 


1 


• • 


6 


Granted, 27th October. 



36 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction* 



APPENDIX 



Name of Place. 



Post Town. 



o 
3« 



Number of Children residing in the locality. 



Boys. Girls. 



Total. 



C.E. 



R.C. 



Pres. 1 Wes. 



On 



Homestead Area, No. 74 

Ingebyra 

Jellore 

Jilliby. 

Xockibitoo 

Langunyah 

Leaning Oak 

Limbri 



Lintondale 

Little Billabong 

Littleham 

Long Flat 

Lo w er To wamba .... 
Lower Webb's Creek 
Mangrove Junction . 
Martindale Creek 

Megalong 

Milker's Flat 

Millie 

Moonbah 

Murranumbla ....... 

Naradhun 

Numbugga 

Oban Vale 



Oppo8sum Creek 

Pejar 

Pinnacle Beef .. 
Querra Creek 



• •«••••••••« ••• ■•« 



Quambone 
Bingwood 



Bocks 



Bock Abbey 

•Sam's Creek 

Shades, The 

Suburban Armidale (East End). 

Summer Glen 

Summerrille 

Taradale 

Trinkey 



TJarbry .... 
Ulamambra 
Wakefield . 
Wallace .... 



Warregal , 

Wellington Vale 

Woodford 

Yahoo 

Yanko North...., 
Yarragong , 



Tenterfield 

Jindabyne , 

Mittagong , 

Little Jilliby , 

Ganmain , 

Tocumwal , 

Merrendee 

Moonbi 

Temora , 

Little Billabong 

Berridale 

Inverell 

Towamba 

Wiseman's Ferry ... 
Gentleman's Halt ... 

Denman 

Megalong 

Freemantle 

Millie 

Moonbah 

Buckley's Crossing 

Hillston 

Bega 

Singleton 

Bangalow 

Pejar 

Forbes 

Wandsworth , 

Quambone 

Exeter South , 

St. Clair (Singleton) 

Armidale 

Cobargo 

Molong 

Armidale 

Corowa 

Kantucky 

Taradale 

Collie Blue 

Uarbry 

Coonabarabran 

West Wallsend 

Mulgoa 

Tichbourne 

Deepwater 

Lawson 

Warne 

Narandera 

Forbes 



miles. 
4 
14 

• a • 

5 

10 

9 

10 

10 

61 
12 

4* 

4 

4i 

2 
12 

8 

8 
12 
36 

5 

6 

7 

5 

H 

4 

4* 

20 

7* 

40 
5* 



35 
4 
4 
2 

10 
8 
6* 

4* 

7 
8 
3* 
3 

4 

6 

6 
12 
10 
11 



23 


18 


7 


13 


9 


9 


8 


10 


9 


12 


9 


10 


8 


8 


11 


6 


11 


17 


7 


12 


9 


10 


9 


1 13 


9 


10 


7 


9 


8 


5 


15 


14 


12 


7 


11 


7 


7 


9 


7 


7 


7 


12 


10 


9 


10 


9 


9 


21 


14 


8 


8 


11 


19 


12 


9 


7 


11 


8' 


8 


8 


8 


11 


15 


3 


9 


12 


8 


15 


25 


11 


5 


8 


12 


8 


7 


8 


18 


17 


8 


14 


10 


8 


9 


15 


6 


14 


11 


12 


9 


14 


9 


5 


12 


13 


12 


10 


9 


8 



41 
20 
18 
18 
21 
19 
16 
17 

28 
19 
19 
22 
19 
16 
13 
29 
19 
18 
16 
14 
19 
19 
19 
30 
22 
19 
31 
16 

19 
16 

19 

18 
21 
23 
36 
13 
20 
15 
35 

22 
18 
24 
20 

23 
23 
14 
25 
22 
17 



9 

5 

15 

18 

21 

3 

8 

5 

10 
3 

11 
5 
9 

• • • 

5 

20 
12 
10 

5 

• • • 

17 
17 
13 
12 

t • • 

7 

8 

16 

17 
12 

12 

10 
16 
4 
16 
10 
12 
15 
11 

10 
6 
9 

16 

8 

17 

3 

18 

4 



30 


... 


12 


3 


••• 


• • • 


... 


• • • 


... 


• •• 


12 


4 


2 


• • • 


10 


2 


12 


6 


3 


9 


8 


••• 


5 


12 


10 


•c* 


1 


5 


8 


• •• 


9 


• • • 


5 


2 


4 


4 


11 


• • • 


10 


4 


2 


• • • 


2 


* • • 


• •• 


3 


14 


4 


12 


7 


7 


• • • 


23 


• • • 


• • • 


• •• 


2 


• • • 


4 


• • • 


• • • 


7 


4 


• • • 


5 


• •• 


8 


2 


6 


10 


3 


••• 


• •• 


8 


 • • 


 • • 


14 


7 


8 


4 


5 


7 


3 


3 


1 


... 


4 


... 


6 


... 


3 


1 


3 


4 


13 


... 


••■ 


... 



2 



6 



• •• 



10 



• *• 

• •• 

• •• 

• •• 



3 

2 



5 

4 



••• 



7 
3 

5 

•• 
2 

>•• 
5 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



37 



II— continued. 



Number of Children promised to attend. 



J 



Number of Parents or Guardians 
undertaking to send Children. 



toys. Girls. 



Total. C.3.R.C. Pres. 



Wes. 



Ors. 'C.E. 



18 

13 

9 

10 

12 

10 

8 

6 

17 
12 
10 
13 
10 

9 

5 
14 

7 

7 

9 

7 
12 

9 

9 
21 

8 
11 
12 

7 

8 
8 

11 

,3 
12 
15 
11 

8 

8 

8 
17 

14 

8 

15 

14 

12 
14 

5 
13 
10 

8 



41 
20 
18 
18 
21 
19 
16 
17 

28 
19 
19 
22 
19 
16 
13 
29 
19 
18 
16 
14 
19 
19 
19 
30 
22 
19 
31 
16 

19 
16 

19 

18 
21 
23 
36 
13 
20 
15 
35 

22 
18 
24 
20 

23 
23 
14 
25 
22 
17 



R.C. 



Pres. 



Wes. j Ore. Tot 1 



Minister's Decision. 



9 


30 


• • • 


2 


• • • 


4 


5 


12 


3 


• •• 


• •• 


2 


15 


• • • 


• • • 


3 


• • • 


6 


18 


• • • 


... 




• • • 


5 


21 


• • • 


• • • 


••• 


• * • 


7 


3 


12 


4 


... 


• • • 


1 


8 


2 


... 


6 


• • • 


2 


5 


10 


2 


... 


• • • 


1 


10 


12 


6 


• • • 


• •• 


3 


3 


3 


9 


4 


• • • 


1 


11 


8 


• • • 


• •• 


»•• 


4 


5 


5 


12 


• • • 


• • • 


2 


9 


10 


 • • 


• • • 


• • • 


2 


• • • 


1 


5 


10 


• • • 


1 


5 


8 


• • • 


• t • 


• • • 


1 


20 


9 


• •• 


• • • 


• • • 


8 


12 


5 


2 


• • • 


• • t 


3 


10 


4 


4 


• • • 


» • • 


3 


5 


11 


• • • 


• • • 


• • • 


2 


• • • 


10 


4 


• • t 


• • • 


• • • 


17 


2 


 • • 


• •• 


• •• 


5 


17 


2 


• • • 


• • • 


• • • 


7 


13 


• • • 


3 


3 


• • • 


4 


12 


14 


4 


• • • 


• •• 


4 


• • • 


12 


7 


3 


• • • 


• • • 


7 


7 


• • • 


2 


3 


5 


8 


23 


• • • 


• •• 


• • • 


5 


16 


••• 


• • • 


• • • 


• •• 


4 


17 


2 


• • • 


• •• 


i«t 


7 


12 


4 


• • • 


• • • 


• •  


4 


12 


• • • 


7 


• • • 


• •  


5 


10 


• • • 


4 


• • • 


• • • 


3 


16 


5 


• • • 


• • • 


• • • 


5 


4 


8 


2 


5 


4 


2 


16 


6 


10 


4 


• •• 


6 


10 


3 


• • • 


• •• 


• •• 


4 


12 


• • • 


8 


• • • 


• •• 


6 


15 


• • • 


• • • 


• •• 


• • • 


6 


11 


14 


7 


1 


2 


4 


10 


8 


4 


• • • 


• • • 


4 


6 


5 


7 


• •• 


Ml 


2 


9 


3 


3 


7 


2 


3 


16 


1 


• • • 


3 


••• 


6 


8 


4 


• •• 


5 


6 


3 


17 


6 


• •  


• • • 


• • • 


6 


3 


3 


1 


2 


5 


2 


18 


3 


4 


• •• 


••• 


5 


4 


13 


• • • 


5 


• • • 


2 


• t • 


• •» 


• • • 


• •♦ 


• » • 


• • • 















6 
1 
3 

3 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
3 
3 
2 
2 
3 
4 
1 
1 

3 
6 
5 
9 



1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 



5 
2 
1 
1 

1 
2 

1 
1 

4 



8 
4 



••• •»• 



2 

•• 
1 

2 
3 



1 
1 



1 
1 



2 



••• 
• •• 
••• 



2 

1 
2 



1 
1 



1 

•• 
1 



2 



2 



1 
2 



3 
1 



3 
2 

1 

> • • 

1 

> • • 

1 






2 



• • • 
••• 



13 
7 
7 
5 
7 
9 
5 
5 

8 
6 
6 
7 
4 
6 
4 
11 
6 
6 
5 
5 
6 
8 
6 
8 
8 
13 
14 
4 

8 
5 



5 
7 
9 

10 
5 
8 
6 

12 

10 
6 
9 
9 

7 
8 
7 
7 
7 
4 



Under consideration. 

Granted, 19th November. 

Granted, 3rd November. 

Declined, 4th August. 

Declined, 2nd December. 

Declined, 30th September. 

Granted, 18th August. 

Decl ined . Aid offered to Half-time 

School, 30th August. 

Declined, 24th August. 

Granted, 25th July. 

Declined, 16th November. 

Under consideration. 

Granted, 30th August. 

Declined, 13th September. 

Under consideration. 

Granted, 18th May. 

Granted, 5th October. 

Granted, 6th February. 

Declined, 6th September. 

Declined, 18th November. 

Granted, 16th November. 

Granted, 18th August. 

Granted, 6th August. 

Declined, 5th November. 

Granted, 28th December. 

Declined, 21st October. 

Granted, 19th January. 

Declined. Half-time School granted, 15th 
October. 

Granted, 13th September. 

Declined. Aid offered to Half-time School, 
31 st December. 

Declined. Aid offered to Half time School,. 
6th April. 

Granted, 5th May. 

Declined, 23rd April. 

Under consideration. 

Declined, 5th November. 

Declined, 9th June. 

Half- time School , granted, 29th July. 

Declined, 29th April. 

Granted in lieu of existing Half-time 
School, 9th October. 

Granted, 9th June. 

Declined, 9th October. 

Granted, 29th June. 

Declined. Aid offered to Half -time School, 
10th March. 

Granted, 29th May. 
Granted, 16th August. 
Declined, 15th September. 
Granted conditionally, 20th December. 
Granted, 15th October. 
Granted, 6th April. 



Report of tlie Minister of Public Instruction. 



Hums of Place. 



APPEK 
Applications for the establishment of Half -time 



Boys. GHrb. Total. C.E. B.C. P™. Wei On 



Back Yamma 

Bwrill Lake 

Little Forest 

Burm Burrs 

Calabash 

Coorangoora 

Upper Whitlow 

Cooringooni 

Currabuugla 

Dun-as Lake 

Garland 

Thonitntmd . . . . . 

Norongo 

RockVallc; 

Snodgrass ~\ 

Tiogiringa ) 

Spring Creek 

Hawarden 

Tharwa 

Thompson's Creek 

Trareller's Best 

Wamberal 

Wjan 



Cookamirtgera 

MUton 

Moruya 

Marengo 

Bingara 

Middle Aim ..,. 
Benanderali .... 

Lyndhurst 

Handnrama . . . 
Captain's Flat 
Tharwa 

Delegate 

Manilla 

Wamberal 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction, 

DIX III. 

Schools, received during the year 1897. 

Smaller ol Children promtaad to attend. | "S SjSli ^'IlSrSSS!!^ | 



 


io 


■' 


" 








• 


* 








» 


s 


11 


3 


3 


2 




3 


2 


I 


1 




1 


6 


9 


19 






19 










9 






9 


9 


16 


1 






14 




1 






5 




6 


i 


10 


6 


5 








1 


2 








3 


8 
3 


12 

10 


6 


7 

10 








1 


3 
3 








4 
8 


11 


20 


20 










7 










7 


8 


11 


14 










4 










4 


13 


22 


BO 


2 








7 


1 








8 


8 
3 


16 
10 

IE 


6 


16 
ft 

2 


5 

8 






1 


4 

1 


1 

4 






4 
2 

G 


4 


13 




11 


2 








S 


1 






6 


7 


16 


12 


4 








2 


2 








4 


B 


12 


4 


8 








1 


2 








3 


2 


7 


4 


3 








1 


1 








S 


7 
5 

7 


13 

10 
14 
13 


10 
6 
14 

8 


3 
5 

5 








3 

4 
3 


1 
1 

1 








4 
2 
4 

4 


8 


17 


14 


3 








5 


2 








7 


7 


16 


S 


8 








5 


4 




... 




7 


7 


13 


6 






2 


5 


3 






1 


1 


ft 



f drantod, 27th September. 

\ Granted, 22nd October. 
Granted, 25th June. 
r Under consideration. 

{ Declined, 22nd October. 

Declined, 22nd October. 
Granted, 29th April. 
Granted, 21th November. 



Provisional School granted, 16th 

November. 
Granted, 23rd September. 

(Declined, 22nd October. 



\ Granted, 25th November. 



Granted, 23rd September. 



Under consideration. 



40 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



M 

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Beport of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



APPEff 
General Abstract of School Attendance 



Mabch Quabteb. 

High Schools 

Public Schools 

Provisional Schools ... 

Half-time Schools 

House-to-house Schools 
Evening Schools 

Total 

Juke Quabteb. 

High Schools 

Public Schools 

Provisional Schools ... 

Half-time Schools 

House-to-house Schools 
Evening Schools 

Total ••«...... 

September Quabteb. 

High Schools 

Public Schools 

Provisional Schools ... 

Half-time Schools 

House-to-house Schools 
Evening Schools , 



XObol <•>•••<.••••••. 



December Quarter. 

High Schools 

Public Schools 

Provisional Schools ... 

Half-time Schools 

House-to-house Schools 
Evening Schools 

Total 



Number of Children on the Rolls. 



Boys. 



Girls. 



Totafl. 



C.E. 



18S 

97,601 

3,293 

3,614 

562 

529 



105,682 



178 

98,181 

2,970 

3,596 

524 

557 



106,006 



184 

99,006 

2,984 

3,507 

466 

576 



106,723 



182 

98,232 

2,972 

3,398 

477 

513 



105,774 



238 

88,211 

3,114 

3,163 

486 

8 



95,220 



219 

89,167 

2,918 

3J142 

450 



95,896 



215 

90,018 

2,909 

3,057 

413 



96,612 



203 

89,408 

2,924 

2,920 

423 



95,678 



421 

185,712 

6,407 

6,777 

1,018 

537 



200,902 



397 

187,348 

5,888 

6,738 

974 

557 



201,902 



399 

189,024 

5,893 

6,564 

879 

676 



203,335 



385 

187,640 

5,896 

6,318 

900 

513 



201,652 



201 

95,839 

3,351 

3,630 

550 

250 



103,821 



180 

96,919 

3,023 

3,686 

500 

248 



104,556 



189 

97,742 

8,102 

3,534 

430 

275 



106,272 



181 

97,056 

3,103 

3,390 

455 

227 



104,412 



R.g. 



Pres. 



W6S. 



Others. 



Total 



25 

25,672 

1,809 

2,148 

296 

74 



80,024 



24 

25,710 

1,728 

2,046 

288 

89 



29,885 



24 

26,122 

1,659 

2,057 

289 

104 



30,255 



22 

25,861 

1,637 

1,983 

277 

94 



29,87* 



80 

19,720 

569 

525 

131 

76 



21,101 



80 

20,051 

631 

584 

126 

93 



21,415 



76 

20,224 

677 

508 

97 

80 



21,562 



76 

20,309 

581 

485 

104 

74 



21,628 



41 

23,927 

487 

343 

43 

38 



24,879 



41 

24,056 

449 

349 

37 

36 



24,968 



39 

24,253 

450 

320 

45 

48 



25,155 



24,810 



74 

20,554 

191 

131 

28 

99 



21,077 



72 

20,612 

157 

123 

23 

91 



21,078 



71 

20,683 

105 

145 

13 

69 



21,091 



37 


70 


23,891 


20,523 


447 


128 


336 


124 


47 


17 


52 


66 



20,928 



421 

185,712 

6,407 

6,777 

1,048 

537 



200,902 



397 
187,348 



6,738 

m 

557 



899 
189,024 



6,564 

879 
576 



203,335 



385 

187,640 

5,896 

6,318 

513 



201,652 



Beport of the Minister of Public Instruction* 



43 



MX VI. 

'or each Quarter of the year 1897. 



Average Daily Attendance. 


Amount of 
School Fees paid. 


Amount of School 
Fees in arrear. 


Free Pupils 


Number of 

State 
Children. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


TotaL 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 


1703 


218*2 

64,1609 

2,345*8 

2,435*4 

3916 

5-7 


388*5 

136,273*5 

4,823-4 

5,210*3 

846* 

2977 


£ B. d. 
561 15 
15,310 14 1 
500 17 6 
298 2 7 
40 2 8 
107 3 6 


£ B. d. 


13,019 

450 

306 

52 

30 


12,271 

431 

268 

60 

8 


25,290 

881 

574 

112 

38 




72,112*6 

2,4776 

2,7749 

454*4 

292- 


2,128 8 

39 11 9 

36 10 10* 

2 3 6 

7 14 


2,023 

110 

87 

63 






78,281*8 


69,557*6 


147,839*4 


16,818 15 4 


2,214 8 1* 


13,857 


13,038 


26,895 


2,283 


165*8 

72,1605 

2,219-0 

2,719-7 

413-6 

281*6 


201*3 

64,230-6 

2,216-0 

2,399*4 

348-8 


> 

3671 

186,391-1 

4,435*0 

5,1191 

762-4 

281*6 


544 19 
17,104 4 5 
519 7 9 
336 1 6 
39 15 Hi 
129 14 6 


2,088 5 

30 4 9 

27 19 7 

1 15 3 

10 19 


13,729 

424 

327 

41 

25 


13,018 

424 

272 

46 


26,747 

848 

599 

87 

25 


2,007 

102 

90 

59 








77,960-2 


69,396*1 


147,356*3 


18,674 3 1* 


2,159 3 7 


14,546 


13,760 


28,306 


2,258 


173*7 


1975 

66,234-5 

2,254*9 

2,375*9 

3516 


371-2 

140,3560 

4,544*6 

5,079*6 

752*7 

328*2 


529 4 
17,024 14 8 
499 12 10* 
315 13 10* 
37 1 11* 
139 16 6 




13,955 

407 

319 

24 

34 


13,076 

421 

266 

33 


27,031 

828 

585 

57 

34 




741S1-5 

2,289*7 

2,703*7 

4011 

328*2 


2,284 12 6 

30 12 3 

37 5 11* 

1 12 

19 7 


2,071 
90 

79 
4 


80,017*9 


71,414*4 


151,432*3 


18,546 3 10* 


2,373 9 8* 


14,739 


13,796 


28,535 


2,244 


168-5 


186*2 

64,9230 

2,195*3 

2,208*8 

352-8 


354-7 

136,415*3 

4,356-1 

4,731*8 

746-8 

291*5 


504 
19,122 14 1 
556 17 
347 11 10* 
41 15 4* 
125 2 6 




14,485 

424 

322 

22 

43 


••• ••• 

13,657 

436 

255 

32 


28,142 

860 

577 

54 

43 




71,492-3 

2,160-8 

2,523-0 

3940 


2,162 3 
29 14 
24 16 0* 
1 17 4* 
19 18 9 


2,007 
82 
83 


291*5 










77,0301 


69,806*1 


146,896*2 


20,698 10 


2,238 6 5 


15,296 


14,380 


29,676 


2,262 



Heport of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



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108 Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 

APPENDIX XTT. 

THE CHIEF INSPECTOR'S REPORT WITH ITS ANNEXES. 

The returns for the year 1897 show solid progress, especially in the number of pupils. Of the 2,569 
schools in operation in 1890, 81 were closed during that year, or were allowed to lapse in December, so 
that 2,488 were carried on to 1897. These, with 84 new schools, and 2 new departments brought into 
Operation, gave 2,572 schools, representing 2,785 departments, as the record for 1897. 

The following is the return of schools for the last five years : — 

Year. Public. ProrotooaL Half-time. Hotne-to-faoose. ETening. Total. 

1893 1,700 347 369 90 9 2,515 

1894 1,667 302 449 71 14 2,503 

1895 1,685 317 483 57 16 2,558 

1896 1,698 310 497 44 30 2,569 

1897 1,755 294 457 41 25 2,572 

Arranged in classes according to the average attendance at the end of the year, they are : — 
Year. Claw I. II. III. IV. V. VL VIL VIII. IX. X. Unc ^^ed. TotaU 

1893 38 37 24 53 116 205 208 322 724 227 561 2,515 

1894 38 36 23 64 116 209 206 311 762 209 529 2,503 

1895 39 36 27 64 124 198 214 370 796 165 525 2,558 

1896 40 36 26 62 127 198 185 335 860 193 507 2,569 

1897 43 38 29 59 124 226 202 362 862 141 436 2,572 

This return shows the large increase of 57 in the number of public schools, and a corresponding 
decrease in the number of provisional and half-time schools, and indicates that closer settlement is 
taking place in several parts of the colony. 

BttUdings. 

As overcrowded, badly lighted, and imperfectly lighted school-rooms not only cause much of 
the teachers' work to be fruitless, but must seriously injure the children's health, all that is practicable 
is done to ensure that the work in the schools is carried on under the most favourable conditions. With 
this object much has been done in the way of erecting new buildings, and enlarging or repairing old 
ones. Under the supervision of the Chief Clerk of Works, the following has been effected : — 

New school buildings 20 

School buildings enlarged 24 

School buildings repaired.. 299 

New residences 12 

Additions to residences 9 

Under the supervision of the inspectors, the works carried out were : — 

New school buildings 81 

School buildings enlarged 29 

School buildings repaired 1,053 

New Residences. 

In connection with the works under the inspectors, the sum of £9,604 4s. 9d. has been expended. 

The Chief Clerk of Works attends principally to the buildings in the metropolitan area and the 
larger country towns ; the inspectors look after those in country districts. Some of the buildings 
recently put up by the Chief Clerk of Works are model school buildings. They are of presentable 
appearance, without elaborate or costly ornamentation, are well lighted and ventilated, and are 
arranged that every facility is offered for carrying on the school work with order and despatch. 
Among these may be mentioned Neutral Bay Girls', Glebe Boys', Goalburn Boys', Annandale Infants', 
Drummoyne Primary, and the High School at West Maitland. 

The inspectors' work, with a few exceptions, is restricted to small buildings, where their local 
knowledge enables them to get works carried out more cheaply and expeditiously than by any other 
means. There are seven or eight inspectors who cannot be too highly commended for the industry 
and ability they have displayed in dealing with building matters. They prepare plans and specifications 
and look after contractors like tradesmen, and by their care and efficiency in this direction save the 
department thousands of pounds per annum. 



'Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



109 



A ccommodation. 

At the close of 1896 the accommodation in our schools was 239,354 places. Daring 1897, after 
making good the loss caused by closing schools, and abandoning old buildings, 5,929 additional places 
were provided, raising the number of places to 245,283. 

The following table shows the accommodation in each district : — 



District 



Number of places at end of 

1897, reckoned at 8 square feet 

for each child. 



Number of places at end of 

1807, reckoned at 100 cubic feet 

of air space for each child. 



Armidale 

Bathurst 

Bowral 

Goulburn 

Grafton 

"Maitland ... 

Metropolitan 

Sub-metropolitan . . . 

Wagga Wagga 

Wellington 

Totals 



237,943 



19,825 


18,162 


16,898 


16,814 


19,937 


19,212 


19,803 


17,549 


19,562 


19,389 


25,934 


27,553 


57,791 


69,792 


17,923 


16,837 


25,274 


24,898 


14,996 


15,077 



245,283 



As the highest quarterly enrolment was 203,335 it is evident that the aggregate accommodation 
is ample. It must, however, be admitted that in some instances the school buildings are too large for 
present needs, and that in some it is insufficient ; but cases of serious overcrowding are rare, and are. 
remedied as soon as possible. We have only a limited supply of money, and a limited number of 
officers, and hence Borne delay is unavoidable. 

It is not uncommon for gross misrepresentation to be made as to the urgency for more accom- 
modation or for new buildings. Some mining syndicates seem to think that a good school building 
gives an appearance of prosperity and permanency to their speculations, and worry the Department in 
order to secure one. 

Play-grounds. 

An important adjunct to every school is a good play-ground. I regret that in this particular our 
large schools are badly equipped. Many in the Metropolitan and Newcastle districts have barely sufficient 
ground for effective drill instruction, and anything like active play is impossible. This is the more to be 
deplored from the fact that in the localities named there are very few open spaces where boys can play at 
such games as cricket and football. Shelter for the pupils is afforded by weather-sheds, verandahs, and 
shade trees. Teachers generally are to be commended for the care they bestow upon the school-grounds 
and for their attention to tree culture. 

Furniture. 

The expenditure on account of furniture has been very heavy during the year. This expenditure 
has been incurred mainly for country schools, the old cumbrous, locally-made desks and forms have 
been removed and replaced by those of the pattern used in Sydney. Experiments have been made from 
time to time with desks and forms of various designs. For ordinary use, the long desks and form have 
been proved to be the cheapest as well as the most serviceable ; for infants, the Department's dual desk 
is the best, while for fifth-class pupils the Canadian single-seated desk, recently imported, appears to be 
specially appropriate. 

Enrolment and Attendance. 

The gross enrolment of pupils at all schools in 1897 was 256,996. 

Deducting 12 per cent, for multiple enrolments, the number of individual pupils on the books of 
the schools was 226,157. 



no 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



The following table gives the enrolment and average attendance for each quarter of 1897, 
together with the rates of increase : — 



Quarter. 



Enrolment Enrolment 



in 
1896. 



in 
1897. 



Increase 

for 

1897. 



Average 

daily 

attendance 

for 1896. 



Average 

daily 

attendance 

for 1897. 



Increase in 

average daily 

attendance 

for 1897. 



Per- 
centage of 
increase 
of 
enrolment. 



Per- 
centage of 
increase of 

average 
attendance. 



March 

Jane 

September... 
December ... 

Average 



195,982 
196,948 
198,621 
196,550 


200,902 
201,902 
203,335 
201,652 


4,920 
4,954 
4,714 
5,102 


197,025 


201,947 


4,922 



137,6193 
141,0803 
145,763-8 
144,306*9 



142,1925 



147,8394 
147,356-3 
151,4323 
146,896*2 



148,381-0 



10,2201 
6,276 
5,668*5 
2,589-3 



6,188*5 



2-5 
2-5 
2-3 
2-5 



24 



7-4 
4-4 
3-8 
1'7 



4-3 



The percentage for each quarter was : — 




Quarter. 


Enrolment. 


Average Attendance. 


Number. Percentage. 



March , 

June 

September 

December 

Year's average 



200,902 
201,902 
203,335 
201,652 




147,839-4 
147,356 3 
151,432-3 
146,896-2 



148,3810 



73-5 
72-9 
74-4 

72-8 



73-4 



Compared with 1896, there is an increase in the gross enrolment of 5,175, on the average 
quarterly enrolment of 4,922, and on the average daily attendance of 6,188. 

These results, the best yet accomplished by the department, are very gratifying, inasmuch as 
they show that the department is more than keeping pace with the growth of population, and is 
steadily getting a greater hold upon the children of the colony. It is surprising that in view of the 
fact that the Statistician reports a decrease in the population of the metropolitan area, the schools of 
the same district show an increase both in enrolment and attendance of more than 1,000 pupils. 

The manner in which the provisions of the Health Act are being enforced will, in future, seriously 
interfere with the regularity of attendance, and with the continuity of the instruction. Small schools 
are closed for indefinite periods, and in others the teachers are kept out of their schools for weeks and 
even months, but are at liberty to travel in trains, trams, &c, and visit places of public resort, while 
the department is put to the expense of paying substitutes to do their work. 

Compulsion, 

Of the children who failed to attend school for the seventy days each half-year, as prescribed by 
law, it was found necessary in the first half-year to caution the parents or guardians of 3,554, and in 
the second half those of 2,543. Prosecutions on account of 1,594 defaulting children were authorised. 
In carrying out the compulsory provisions of the Public Instruction Act, the department has been 
loyally supported by the police authorities, but too frequently finds that the presiding magistrates side 
with the offending parents. The statements, " I teach my boy at home," " He was too sick to go to 
school," are too often accepted as sufficient excuse for children's non-attendance at school. Even in 
flagrant cases, the nominal fines inflicted are so paltry that parents are practically encouraged to go on 
violating the law by utilising children of a tender age as wage-earners. It is to be hoped that the Acts 
regulating labour and industry will mitigate, if not altogether remove, the evil. 

The defects in the compulsory clauses of the Public Instruction Act that have repeatedly been 
pointed out still exist. The department is blamed for the number of children haunting the public 
thoroughfares in school hours, but, as the law stands, is powerless. 



School Fees. 

The total amount of school fees collected and paid into the consolidated revenue was £73,684 Is. 9d. 

Cautions to pay were issued during the year to 1,311 debtors, and it was found necessary to 
prosecute in 419 cases, with the result that the sum of £197 9s. 8d. was recovered. 

Free education was granted to 312,000 pupils as against 28,420 free scholars upon the returns for 
1896. In addition to the grants for free education the sum of £2,556 lis. 6d., arrears of fees, was 
cancelled. In all these cases full inquiry was made, and concessions were granted as the circumstances 
warranted. 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



Ill 



Inspection, 

The following changes in the inspectoral arrangements were made during the year : — Mr. Pitt 
was removed from Parramatta to Braid wood ; Mr. Nolan, from Braidwood to Hay ; Mr. Mackenzie, 
from Hay to Lithgow ; and Mr. Dettmann, who had been doing relieving work, was placed in charge 
of the Parramatta district. Several of the inspectors suffered from serious illness. Mr. Bradley and 
Mr. Thompson were compelled to leave off work for months. Mr. Rooney was unable to complete his 
inspections, and in the middle of the year mental disease brought Mr. Pitt's official career to a premature 
close. In order that the work should not fall hopelessly behindhand, Mr. G. H. Hunt was again 
employed as acting inspector, and was entrusted with inspections in the Metropolitan, Armidale, and 
Braidwood districts. In August, Mr. Hunt's appointment was made permanent. 

I am deeply indebted to Messrs. Cooper, Baillie, Beavis, Blumer, and Parkinson for the promp- 
titude with which they came to my assistance and took up work that the inspectors responsible for 
could not attend to on account of illness. 

The inspections were not less rigid and searching than in previous years. The forms of report 
are so constructed that not a point connected with the school grounds and buildings, the teacher and 
bis work, can be overlooked. The teacher who gets a good report has earned it, and it is creditable 
to our teachers that so many schools come out of the ordeal of mspection with good results. 

The number of schools inspected was 2,763, exactly the same as in 1896, but the number of pupils 
examined was 160,183, an increase of 5,315. 

* The uninspected schools numbered 22, four of them evening. The non-inspection of these schools 
was unavoidable. Most of them were so small that their continuance was not justified, and opportunity 
offering for the removal of the teachers, the schools were unexpectedly closed. 

The amount of inspection work has now become so great that the staff is very heavily taxed. 
The inspectors are compelled to devote their evenings and Saturday afternoons to official duties, and 
some are breaking down under the incessant strain. The appointment of an additional inspector is a 
pressing necessity. 

The following are the details of inspection : — 



Year. 


No. of 
schools. 


No. of schools 
inspected. 


No. of schools 
not inspected. 


No. of pupils 
examined. 


No. of 
Inspectors. 


1895 
1896 
1897 


2,771 

2,780 
2,785 


2,757 
2,763 
2,763 


14 
17 
22 


153,116 
154,868 
160,183 


34 
33 
33 



The particulars for each district stand thus : — 



District. 



No. of 
Inspectors. 



No. of 
schools. 



No. of schools 
inspected. 



No. of schools 
not inspected. 



No. of pupils 
examined. 



Armidale 

Bathurst , 

Bowral , 

Goulburn , 

Grafton , 

Maitland 

Metropolitan .... 
Sub-metropolitan 
Wagga Wagga . 
Wellington 

Totals . 



4 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
4 
2 
4 
3 



33 



352 
258 
262 
395 
325 
243 
206 
159 
335 
250 



2,785 



351 
257 
260 
386 
324 
242 
206 
159 
329 
249 



2,763 



1 
1 
2 
9 
1 
1 



6 
1 



22 



13,019 
10,758 
11,374 
11,577 
12,263 
17,679 
48,938 
12,231 
13,317 
9,027 



160,183 



The inspected and uninspected schools 


were : — 












Public. 


Provisional 


Half-time. 


House-to- 
house. 


Evening. 


Total. 


Inspected 


1,964 
4 


291 
3 


447 
10 


40 
1 


21 
4 


2,763 


Uninspected 


22 






Totals 


1,968 


294 


457 


41 


25 


2,785 







Of the 2,763 schools inspected, 2,660 reached the standard or exceeded it. This is about 96 per 
cent, of the whole, and is an advance upon all previous records. 



112 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



The following tablet show the proficiency of mD schools inspected : — 



Public- 

1. In operation a full year at time of inspection 

2. Not do do do 
Provisional— 

1. In operation a full year at time of inspection 

2. Not do do do 
Half-time— 

1. In operation a full year at time of inspection 

2. Not do do do 
House-to-house — 

1. In operation a full year at time of inspection, 

2. Not do do do 
Evening— 

1. In operation a full year at time of inspection, 

2. Not do do do 
Totals— 

1. In operation a full year at time of inspection. 

2. Not do do do 

Totals 



Bekwr 
8taad*nL 


Up to 
8taadanL 


Above 
Standard. 


28 
5 


90 
5 


1,814 
22 


10 
11 


25 
5 


219 
21 


32 

7 


34 
1 


363 
10 


9 


• • • -, • • 


25 
6 


1 


2 
2 


8 
8 


80 
23 


151 
13 


2,429 
67 


103 


164 


2,496 



Total. 



1,932 
32 

254 

37 

429 

18 

34 
6 

11 

10 

2,660 
103 

2,763 



Or summarised — 



Class of School. 



Above 
Standard. 



Up to 
Standard. 



Below 
Standard. 



TotaL 



Publio 

Provisional 

Half-time 

House- to- house 
Evening 

Totals .. 



1,836 

240 

373 

31 

16 



2,496 



95 


33 


30 


21 


35 


39 




9 


4 


1 


164 


103 



1,964 

291 

447 

40 

21 



2,763 



Percentajre 

up to 
Standard in 

1897. 



98 
92 
91 

77 
95 



96 



Percentage 
up to 

Standard in 
1S96. 



97 

86 
89 
95 
93 



95 



The details included under the head organisation are nearly always reported upon in terms of 
commendation. Teachers, as a rule, pay great attention to the appearance of the schoolroom, and to 
the arrangements for the health and comfort of the pupils. The records are kept neatly and correctly, 
and tho returna are furnished at the proper time. The few Teachers who disregard the directions 
about records and returns give so much trouble to the inspectors and to the head office, and cause so 
much delay in carrying out the business of the Department, that, if warning or censure fails to bring 
them to a souse of thoir duty, they must be severely punished. The improvement in matters pertaining 
to the classification and occupation of pupils still goes on. The provisions of the Standard of Proficiency 
are carefully studied and observed. Badly constructed time-tables and programmes of lessons are not often 
seen, When they are met with the cause is idleness, not ignorance. The worst case that came under 
my own notice was in a first-class school under a I A teacher. It was necessary, therefore, to impress 
upon this Teacher that if he failed to do first-class work he would lose both classification and position. 

Tho very good disciplinary condition of our schools is well maintained. The pupils are invariably 
oloan in person and neat in attire, respectful in demeanour, orderly in conduct, and attentive to instruc- 
tion. As has repeatedly been pointed out, most points of school discipline depend upon the Teacher's 
own habits and character. If he is thoroughly acquainted with his duties, and determined to perform 
them diligently and faithfully, neglecting no matter, though apparently trivial, and so arranges the 
school work that every pupil is fully and profitably employed, there will be little in the school that 
the most captious can find fault with. 

The govern men t is usually mild but firm : authority is enforced by moral suasion, or by corporal 
punishment, or by a combination of the two. In my opinion the time has not arrived when corporal 
puui&hmeut can he altogether dispensed with. The influences of the street, and sometimes of the home, 
are not on the side of good conduct. Some Teachers use detention after school hours as a mode of 
punishment : but this needs to be exercised with very great care, as the home arrangements may be 
interfered with, and tho sympathy of the parents thus lost. 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



113 



Attainments of Pupils, 

The following table gives the number of pupils examined in each subject, and the number and 
percentage of passes : — 



Subjects. 



Reading — ^ 

Alphabet ; 

Monosyllables 

Easy narrative 

Ordinary prose 

Totals 

Writing — 

On slates 

In copy books and on paper 

Totals 

Dictation 

Arithmetic — 

Simple rules 

Compound rules 

Higher rules , 

Totals 

Grammar- 
Elementary 

Advanced 

Totals 

Geography — 

Elementary 

Advanced 

Totals 

History — 

English , 

Australi an 

Scripture and moral lessons 

Object lessons 

Drawing 

Music 

French 

Euclid....; 

Algebra 

Mensuration 

Latin 

Trigonometry 

Needle-work 

Drill 

Natural science 





Estimated Proficiency 


V 


Total number 
examined. 


Number passed. 


Percentage up to or 
above Standard. 


10,847 


7,978 


73 


38,045 


31,370 


82 


48,693 


41,580 


85 


62,598 


55,514 


88 


160,183 


136,442 


85 


63,233 


53,180 


84 


96,655 


82,376 


85 


159,888 


135,556 


84 


128,980 


104,087 


80 


95,311 


73,871 


77 


39,437 


27,810 


70 


23,078 


16,157 


70 


157,826 


117,838 


74 


33,285 


24,623 


74 


30,139 


21,840 


72 


63,424 


46,463 


73 


30,667 


23,179 


75 


32,754 


25,150 


76 


63,421 


48,329 


76 


63,325 


43,840 


69 


11,120 


7,993 


71 


154,526 


120,065 


77 


151,295 


118,586 


78 


152,480 


124,208 


81 


146,774 


116,176 


79 


2,171 


1,562 


72 


7,870 


6,020 


76 


2,047 


1,578 


77 


5,344 


3,512 


65 


2,005 


1,498 


74 


61 


56 


91 


55,891 


49,926 


89 


152,344 


124,382 


81 


7,976 


6,256 


78 



The percentages given in this table are substantially the same as those of last year ; what little 
difference there is is on the side of progress. Improvement by leaps and bounds should not be looked for ; 
in fact the results for years past have been so good that anything like a big advance is impossible. The 
teachers work on steadily from year to year doing the best they can for the children committed to their 
pare, and in most instances attain very good results. The most satisfactory feature disclosed in the table 
is the high percentage of passes in the essential subjects, Reading, Writing, Dictation, and Arithmetic. 
A comparison of the results with those of 1896 will show a decrease in the number of pupils examined in 
the higher subjects, viz., — French, Euclid, Algebra, Mensuration, Latin, and Trigonometry. I am 
pleased at this, for I do not look upon it as retrogression, but as an evidence on the part of the teachers 
to more faithfully follow the standards and to teach on sounder principles. Advancing pupils to the 
fifth-class when they are not qualified to take up the prescribed lessons, though, perhaps, gratifying to the 
pupils and their parents, is a great evil, and has not been stopped a day too soon. Knowledge is imparted, 

H 



— !*•■* t-y-v', 



■ie Lutneiim. 









v^v^ 






JUtWl > 



114 



Beport of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



not merely for its own sake, or on account of its presumed utility, but because it ministers to the growth 
and expansion of the intellect. I have shown in former reports that the premature promotion of pupils 



pupils 



expansion of tne intellect. 1 nave snown in lormer reports 
leads to a system of cram and to an excessive amount of home work. 

Scripture teaching has been specially brought under review during the year. It is, therefore, 
important to note that 154,526 children were examined on the contents of the authorised lesson books, 
and that 120,065 acquitted themselves creditably. At several conferences of the churches it has been 
stated that the biblical knowledge acquired in public schools has formed a good foundation upon which 
more strictly religious instruction can be built. Moral lessons, too, are given in our schools, and every 
child is taught its duty towards God, towards its parents, its neighbours, and itself. The facilities 
afforded to clergymen of all denominations and duly accredited teachers to give special religious 
instruction are increasingly taken advantage of. The desirableness of making the instruction as 
practical as possible is constantly kept in view. 

The directions issued by the Board of Health as to •' Treatment in Cases of Snake-bite," 
" Resuscitation of the Apparently Drowned, &c," are displayed in schools, and are regularly used by 
teachers for special object lessons. 

In order to assist teachers in giving lessons upon the Natural History of our own country, a 
remarkably well got up diagram on the snakes of Australia, showing very clearly the points of difference 
between the venomous and non- venomous snakes, was supplied to all schools above the ninth class. 

At all inspections pupils in the fourth and fifth classes, and those who have completed two 
years' attendance in the third class, are examined for certificates of exemption from compulsory 
attendance. In 1897, 14,779 pupils were examined, and 9,077, or 61 per cent., passed. This is an 
■advance upon last year's work. The best results are gained in the Maitland district. 



Superior Schools. 

No school was raised to superior rank, but one, Raymond Terrace, being unable to comply with 
the conditions, dropped out of the list. These 99 schools distributed throughout the Colony continue 
to do good work, and bringing within reach of country children the means of preparing for the Public 
Service or University Examinations. From these schools 223 pupils passed the Junior Examination of 
1897. This is a great decrease upon the number passing in previous years. The decrease is accounted 
for by the fact that the Junior certificate has lost its specific value as a qualification for certain positions 
in the Public Service. The schools attaining distinction at the University Examinations were : — 

Fort-street 68 Junior, 6 Senior, 24 Matriculation passes. 

Leichhardt 11 ,, 

Stanmore 9 ,, 

Braidwood 7 „ 

Petersham 7 ,, 

Newcastle 7 „ 

Glen Innes 6 ,, 

The Fort-street Schools again show the greatest number of passes gained by any school. 



Infant Schools and Kindergarten. 

The Infant Schools increase in popularity and efficiency. In Sydney and suburbs the demand 
for admission is so great that in most schools a limit has been put upon the enrolment. These schools 
are " happy places " for young children, a judicious selection of Kindergarten work being introduced 
into the ordinary school instruction. As pupil-teachers trained in Kindergarten work are now 
employed in all parts of the Colony, arrangements have been made to supply " gifts" wherever they 
can be properly used. 

High Schools. 

The High Schools in operation in 1896 were carried on through 1897. They are very well con- 
ducted, and are maintained in a high state of efficiency, but do not meet with adequate support. The 
comparatively high fees charged and the excellence of the instruction given in many of the Superior Public 
Schools appear to be the chief agents in keeping the numbers down. The attendance is given below :— 



School. 



Total 
enrolment. 



Average quarterly 
enrolment. 



Average daily 
attendance. 



Fees received. 



Sydney (Boys) 

„ (Girls) 

Maitland (Boys) 

(Girls) 

Ba-thurst (Girls) 

Total 

The figures for 1896 were 



145 

212 

83 

62 

14 



516 



577 



114 

155 

67 

50 

13 



399 



431 



106-5 

142 5 

63 

46 6 

11-6 



3702 



£ 8. <L 

627 18 

1,064 14 

264 12 

166 19 

15 15 



392 



2,139 18 



2,576 3 6 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



115 



Scholars and Bursars. — The number of Scholars and Bursars in attendance at each High School 
during December quarter is given below : — 

School. Scholars. Sonars. 

Sydney (Boys) 36 27 

„ (Girls) 38 22 

Maitland (Boys) 19 28 

(Girls) ^... 22 13 

Bathurst (Girls) 7 4 

Totals !... 122 94 

Each school was represented at the University Examinations. The following table shows the 
number of passes : — 



School. 


Junior. 


Senior. 


Matriculation. 


Sydney (Boys) 


29 

28 

10 

8 

1 


7 
5 

• •  

• « • 

• • • 


2S* 


,, (Girls) 


22t 


East Maitland (Boys) 


121 


West Maitland (Girls) 


4§ 


Bathurst (Girls) 






Total 


76 


12 


61 







* Of these 13 matriculated at the Junior, and 7 at the Senior Examination, 
t Of these 7 „ „ 3 „ 

% Of these 4 „ „ Examination. 

§ Of these 2 



t» 



»» 



»» 



n 



a 



The following particulars may prove of interest :— 

Number of candidates who attended Eutrance Examinations in 1897... 
Number of Scholarships awarded 



Number of Bursaries awarded 



590 
56 
41 



Cookery, 

The number of cookery schools in operation during the year was 12, a decrease of 3 on the 
number for 1896, but this decrease was due to the fact that the term of instruction in 1897 was longer, 
being six months instead of four. New cookery schools were established at Parramatta, Inverell, 
Kiama, Tenterfield, and Liverpool, in place of those at Bowral, Glen Innes, Rockdale, Arm i J ale, and 
Albury. Eight hundred and eighty girls attended the cookery classes ; of these 773 were examined 
at the end of a term of instruction, and 748 passed the applied tests. The examinations were again 
conducted by committees of ladies outside the department, whose gratuitous and valuable services 
continued to deserve the thanks they have received from the Minister. 

The alteration of the cookery terms into two half-yearly ones co-existent with the school terms, 
as intimated in last year's report, has worked satisfactorily, and, taking into account the improved 
course of lessons introduced, the increased scope for steady, continuous work, and the removal of all 
cause of friction between the ordinary school arrangements and the cookery classes, the change may be 
relied upon to give solid benefit in the future. The number of teachers of cookery (8) remains 
unaltered. Miss Lance, the senior teacher, resigned her position in the service in May last, and was 
succeeded at Fort-street by Miss Sarah Gelding. The vacancy in the staff was filled by the 
appointment of Miss Leona Mallarky as a teacher of cookery. 

The following is a list of the schools in operation during the year : — 



Place. 



Remarks. 



Hurlstone Training College... Open all the year. 
Parramatta Industrial School 

Fort-street *: 

Petersham 

Paddington 

Parramatta ,... 



»* 
j> 
>» 
»» 
t» 



H 

ft 
J» 
l> 



Place. Remarks. 

Newcastle Open all the year. 

Bathurst ,, ,, 

Inverell Closed June, 1897. 

Kiama ,, 9i 

Tenterfield Opened July, 1897* 

Liverpool. ,, ,» 



116 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



The present course of instruction is as follows : — 

Programme. — Cookery Classes for Public School Pupils. 
Lesson Course of twenty-one lessons in plain cookery. 

1. Practical cleaning. 

2. Roasting and baking meat, Yorkshire, pudding, clarified fat and caramel. 

3. Grilling : Chop and steak. Boiling : Mutton, corn beef. 

4. Vegetables : Potatoes, cabbage, peas, beans, cauliflower, &c. 

5. Stewing : Tripe and onions, Irish stew, stewed steak, stewed ox-tail. 

6. Puddings : Urney, currant, rice, boiled fruit, steak and kidney. 

7. Pastry : Meat and fruit pies, turnovers, jam tart, Cornish pasties. 

8. Soups : Stock, vegetable soup, pea soup, cottage broth. 

9. Tea, coffee, porridge, toast, boiled eggs, poached eggs, eggs and bacon, steak and onions. 

10. Cakes : Plain, sponge, currant cakes, scones, milk loaves. 

11. Fish : Boiled, baked, fried, and stewed fish. 

12. Mutton broth, beef tea, gruel, arrowroot, rice water, toast and water. 

13. Liver and bacon, pancakes, cutlets (piquante sauce), fritters. 

14. Blanc mange, custard, apple dumplings, stewed fruit- custard. 

15. Tomato, onion, ox- tail soups. 

16. Gingerbread, seed cake, jam roll, buns, Yorkshire tea-cakes. 

17. Boiled fowl, egg sauce, roast fowl, bread and celery sauce, grilled chicken. 

18. Date, lemon, bread and butter, plum puddings. 

19. Braised steak, rissoles, brawn. 

20. Salads : Mixed, potato, tomato, chicken, fruit. 

21. Bottled fruits, tomato sauce, pickles. 

Manual Training. 
The Manual Training Schools were exactly the same as in 189G. The workshops, 8 in number, 
were attended by pupils of 24 schools. 634 pupils were enrolled in the various classes ; 415 of these 
attended the examination, and 375 were credited with a pass. 

Teachers, 

The number of teachers employed in the department's service on the 31st December, 1897, was 
4,626, an increase of 184 upon the record of the previous year. Teachers have increased by 144, pupil- 
teachers by 46 ; but work-mistresses are 6 fewer. 

The new arrangements for appointing pupil-teachers have proved of great advantage. Exami- 
nations are now held only as vacancies occur, and only those applicants who are likely to receive 
appointment within a reasonable time are accepted as eligible for employment. As the tests are severe, 
and there is no waiting, a very desirable class of youths of both sexes, good in attainments, and with 
unmistakable aptitude for teaching, 13 secured. It is a hopeful sign for the future that vacancies in the 
service are filled in this way, for it is of the first importance for a system of public instruction to have 
and to maintain an abundant and a well-trained supply of teachers. 

Of the teachers generally, I can only repeat what I have stated in former reports. They are 
persons of good moral character, earnest about their work, attentive to every duty, and well fitted for 
the responsible positions they fill. I regret that in so many cases their remuneration is so small, and 
that promotion is so slow in coming ; but in the present circumstances of the Colony there is no remedy. 



Total Number of Teachers employed 


on 31st December, 


1897. 










I A. 


IB. 


II A. 


II B. 


III A. 


IIIB. 


inc. 


Unclassi- 
fied. 


Totals. 


SB 

1 




• 


• 

•a 
g 


• 

*3 


6 

■a 

c 

0) 


• 

1 


• 

15 

a 

fa 


• 




4 

s 

fa 


• 

© 
-3 

3 


• 

© 

■a 
s 

« 

fa 


© 

-3 

3 


• 

*3 

a 

© 

fa 


• 
© 

■a 


• 
© 


• 
© 

1 


© 

a 

© 

fa 


• 

© 

•a 


• 

© 

a 

© 
fa 


O 

H 

•0 

a 

g 



Principal Teachers 


40 

• • 



46 


2! 
30 | 
1 


75 
18 




41 




304 1 5 i*a 


G ! n7-7 


127 
2 

307 

436 


176 
*6 

182 ' 


83 


58 

141 


75 

 • 

3 

78 


58 



18 

70 


241 

e 


244 
1 

82 


1,742 

293 
25 


525 

215 

710 

24 


2,267 

215 

1,003 

49 


Mistresses of Departments . . 
Assistants 


.. 137 
132 132 

.. | .. 


si 


4 
112 

122 


47 
719 


Students in Training School 


Totals 


33 


93 | 41 


436 '274 ' 


■?<M 


•247 


327 J2,060 


1.474 '3-5S4 




> 1 


J-y-Zf-Z 


, 




Class I. 


Class II.] ClassIII. 


Class IV. Ly™^- 
J tioncrs. 




347 

.. 
14 


658 

61 
12 






• 

-a 

3 


• 



"3 

a 


• 

3 


• 

a 
B 


• 

*3 
3 


m 

*3 
S 

fa 


• 

© 

1 


• 
© 

a 

s 

0) 

1 fa 


* 

© 

3 


• 



-a 

B 

© 

fa 






24 


233 


39 


38 


103 116 

1 


145 


210 


36 


61 


1,005 


















61 








26 












Total Teachers of all rans 




2,421 


2,205 1 4,62G 




















I 



'Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 117 

Nearly all the teachers returned as unclassified have served for four or more years as pupil-teachers, 
and are waiting for the two years that must elapse before they can be examined for classification. These 
young teachers, trained in our best schools, have taken up work in bush schools with great enthusiasm* 
and have raised not a few of the small schools in out of the way places to a high standard of efficiency. 

The arrangements of the Training Schools have not been altered. Fort-street was attended by 
25 students, and Hurlstone by 24. 

The various lecturers have worked with praiseworthy diligence, and the students have done 
their best to profit by the instruction afforded them. 

One very gratifying fact connected with the Training Schools is that all the students have gone 
through a course of •' First Aid " instruction, and have succeeded in gaining the certificates issued upon 
passing the qualifying examination. 

Cadet Fotxe. 

The new arrangements bringing the cadet officers into touch with the ordinary school work have 
produced good results. The movements in drill, and the physical exercises, are executed with more 
precision than formerly ; the teaching is more systematic, and the pupils manifest more interest in the 
work. The Cadet Corps, too, shows greater vitality, and now has 3,294 members enrolled, an increase 
of 130 on last year's record. All boys not physically disqualified are put through the full course of 
military drill ; but only Cadets in uniform are allowed to practise at the butts. 

Instruction classes in drill and physical exercises for the benefit of teachers are held weekly in 
Sydney and Newcastle. These classes are largely attended, not only by junior- teachers, but by the 
headmasters and mistresses of important schools. 

The Public Schools Demonstration was one of the distinguishing features of the Queen's Diamond 
Jubilee Celebration. On that occasion, as well as at the various annual gatherings of Schools' Athletic 
Associations, the evolutions of the Cadets, the physical drill, and the displays by the younger boys and 
girls, were unstintedly praised by the crowds of spectators. 

Technical Education Branch, 

The work of the Technical Education Branch has been successfully carried on. The buildings 
of the Sydney Technical College, notwithstanding their magnitude, are not now large enough for the 
requirements of the various classes. Want of accommodation has rendered it necessary to refuse 
admissions to the Fitting and Turning, the Mechanical Drawing, the Electrical Engineering, the 
Plumbing, and the Wool-training classes, and most of the class-rooms are overtaxed. Details of the 
operations of the Branch are given in the Superintendent's report, but the following summary of 
statistics is interesting : — 

No. of classes , 211 

No. of enrolments of students ,., 7,658 

No. of individual students 5,848 

Students examined 2,702 

Students passed examination 1,923 

Visitors to Technological Museum 100,680 

Visitors to Branch Museums in country 124,304 

Athletic Associations. 

I cannot conclude this report without acknowledging the great amount of good that has been 
done by the various Public Schools Athletic Associations. These organisations established in most of 
the centres of population have warmly taken up what may be termed the out of school educational 
work. They have not only made the physical training more interesting, and therefore more effective, 
but they have been the means of bringing much brightness and pleasure into poor children's lives. It 
has been aptly remarked the love of games among boys is a healthy instinct, and there can be no ques- 
tion that cricket, football, running, swimming, &c. , are not only among the greatest pleasures, but are 
. the best medicine for boys. 

The teachers, and there are many, who cheerfully give their time, their energy, and their money 
to carrying out the objects of these Associations prove their deep interest in the welfare of their pupils 
and their loyalty to the department. 

Herewith I forward 

Reports of District Inspectors and Inspectors. 

Reports of Principals of Training Schools. 

Reports of Superintendents of Drawing, Music, and Needle-work. 

Report of Officer Commanding Cadet Force. 

F. BRIDGES, 

Chief Inspector of Schools, 



118 Jleport of the Minister of Public Instruction. 

ANNEX A. 

Inspector Dawson's Report. 

At the end of 1896 1 had under my supervision 19 Public Schools and 6 Evening Public Schools. Burwood 
Superior was transferred to Inspector Skillman's supervision at the beginning of 1897, so that daring 
1897 my schools numbered 18 Public Schools, with 45 departments and the 6 Evening Schools. 

The quarterly enrolments and average attendances at these schools were — March quarter, 15,798 
and 12,002; June quarter, 15,894 and 11,824; September quarter, 15,997 and 12,152; December 
quarter, 15,710 and 11,755. 

The gross accommodation provided is sufficient ; but in particular cases additions have been 
found necessary. A new Infants School has been built at Camden ville ; Croydon Infants' department 
has been enlarged ; and additions are in progress at Leichhardt, Manly, Mosman, and Petersham. 

The material condition of the schools is satisfactory. Repairs and improvements have been 
made where needful. 

All schools were fully inspected once during the year. No time could be spared for ordinary 
inspections, and very little for incidental inspections. 

The total number of pupils examined was 12,692. The percentage of passes in the important sub- 
jects was — Reading, 81 percent. ; writing, 78 percent. ; dictation, 83 per cent. ; arithmetic, 70 per cent. 

The schools are carefully organised, and well disciplined. The teachers, 285 in all, have 
discharged their laborious duties in an effective manner. J. DAWSON, 

Sydney, 3rd January, 1898. Inspector. 

ANNEX B. 

Inspector Thompson's Report. 

The schools in the section of the Metropolitan District under my supervision during the year 1897 
numbered 25, viz., 22 public schools and 3 evening public shools, comprising in all 51 departments. 
At the beginning of the year Camperdown Public School was transferred to Mr. Inspector Skillman. 

Accommodation. 

^ The accommodation provided in this section of the district may be regarded as generally 
sufficient, and additional accommodation where necessary is in contemplation. During the year a 
separate department for infants was organised at. Gardener's Road, and at Glebe the boy's department 
was practically rebuilt, and was completed in December, whereby ample provision was made for the 
attendance in this department. 

The material condition of the schools may be regarded as generally satisfactory. 

Attendance. 

The gross enrolment of pupils for the year was 19,972 ; the multiple enrolment, 2,462 ; the 
actual enrolment therefore was 17,510. 

The annual average attendance was 10,752. 

Inspection, 

During my temporary absence at the beginning of the year certain inspections were conducted 
by Mr. Acting-Inspector Hunt. 

In the course of the year all schools and departments received regular inspection, the total 
number of pupils examined being 11,924. 

No department was below the standard of proficiency required, viz., 50 per cent. ; two depart- 
ments were up to that standard, and the rest above it. The proficiency of the pupils was therefore 
very satisfactory. 

The number of " certificates " issued was 905. 

The total number of teachers of all ranks employed in this section of the district during the 
year was 270. 

The schools, as a whole, were well organised, the government was effective, and the teachers 
assiduous and earnest in the fulfilment of the duties of their office. 

W. F. THOMPSON, 
31st January, 1898. Inspector. 

ANNEX C. 

Inspector Willis's Report. 

At the close of the year 1896, in this section of the Metropolitan District, there were 24 schools in 
operation, namely, 22 Public Schools, 1 Evening School, and the school on board the " Sobraon.V 

Before the teachers returned to duty in 1897, the Schools at Willoughby, Five Dock, and 
Drummoyne were transferred from this to the Parramatta section, so that, during the year just closed, 
I had under my supervision 19 Public Schools, 1 Evening School, and the " Sobraon " School. 



'Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 119 

The buildings are suitable, and they are kept in good repair by the Chief Clerk of Works and 
his staff. During the year a new Infant's School at Kogworth, and another at Annandale, have been 
erected, and a large class-room has been added to the School premises at Naremburn. The schools of 
this section afford accommodation for 15,502 pupils. This has been ample for existing requirements, 
for, though the aggregate enrolment of the pupils for the year reached 17,993, the average attendance 
was 12,216. 

The whole of the schools, comprising in all 50 departments, received the requisite inspection. 
The Evening School was found to be below standard, the other 49 departments above it. 

The total number of pupils examined was 13,714. In testing the attainments of this large 
number of pupils, my time has been so fully occupied that I have not been able to revisit the schools 
as often as a thorough knowledge of their general management and efficiency renders necessary. The 
course of instruction prescribed includes 29 subjects. In three only of these did the percentage of 
passes fall below 60 per cent. , viz. : —Advanced grammar, 59 per cent. ; elementary geography, 56 
per cent. ; and mensuration, 52 per cent. There were 1,513 pupils specially examined for certificates, 
and of this number 831 were successful. This result is an improvement upon last year's record, but is 
still much lower than it ought to be. 

There are 301 teachers under my supervision, viz., 20 principals, 28 mistresses, 132 assistants, 

113 pupil- teachers, and 8 workmistresses. With a few exceptions, these officers have discharged their 

important duties in a manner creditable to themselves and heneficial to their pupils, and the sound 

work done by them during the year just closed promises well for the efficiency of my schools during 

the year 1898. 

M. WILLIS, 
6th January, 1898. Inspector. 

ANNEX D. 

Inspector Skilluax's Report. 

At the end of 1896 I had under my supervision 27 schools, comprising 48 departments. 

In January last Burwood and Camperdown Schools were transferred to my section, and in July 
an Infants' department was opened at Dulwich Hill. 

There are, therefore, now under my charge 29 schools (55 departments). 

The school- buildings provide places for 14,074 pupils. 

Additions which are urgently needed will shortly be erected at Hurstville and Kogarah, and 
new buildiDgs have been authorised for Hurlstone and Riley-street, to take the places of the existing 
temporary schoolrooms. 

The quarterly enrolments and average attendances were : — March quarter, 13,0S8 and 9,671 ; June 
quarter, 13,219 and 9,519 ; September quarter, 13,089 and 9,744 ; December quarter, 12,870 and 9,308 
respectively. 

All the schools received regular inspection, and 1 was fully inspected a second time. Fifty 
schools were found to be above the standard, 3 satisfied it, and 2 failed to secure a tolerable mark 
for proficiency. 

The percentages of passes in the important subjects were : reading, 84 ; writing, 81 ; dictation, 
75 ; and arithmetic, 68. 

10,991 pupih were present at inspection. The re3ult of the special examination for certificates 
again proved unsatisfactory, only 513 children securing certificates out of 1,064 examinees. 

The teachers of all ranks employed in this section during the year numbered 246. They have 
performed their duties honestly and well, and doubtless they will continue to give satisfaction during 
189S. 

H. SKILLMAN, 
30th December, 1897. Inspector. 

ANNEX E. 
District Inspector W. Dwyer's Report. 

The number of schools in operation during last year was 128, containing 160 departments — 142 Public,. 
5 Provisional, and 13 Half-time. These were all examined in accordance with the standards ; and the 
results show that 97 per cent, are above the mark prescribed, while only 4 schools fall below it. 

The number of places available at the close of the year, according to the authorised scales of 
measurement is, floor space, 17,293 ; air space, 16,837 ; and the enrolment of pupils for last quarter was 
15,093. The school accommodation is, therefore, ample, and distributed in fair accordance with present 
requirements. 

Two new schools, I (Public) at Beecroft, and 1 (Provisional) at Noraville on Tuggerah Lake, 
were established during the year. 

The number of pupils present at examination was 12,231. The tabulated returns already 
furnished show the estimated proficiency of these pupils, both in actual numbers and in centesimal 
proportion, and the knowledge evinced is generally high and well distributed. 



120 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction* 



The Teaching Staff contains 332 individuals, of whom 143 are principal teachers, 15 mistresses 
of departments, 80 assistants, 90 pupil-teachers, and 4 work-mistresses. The rank of each is shown in 
a tabular statement, already furnished for the information of the Department ; and nearly all maintain 
respectable characters and becoming social positions. 

The schools examined during 1897 manifest, for the most part, a satisfactory degree of progress 
and proficiency, and judging from the indications evinced during the past year and previous years I 
am fully convinced that their efficiency for the year now entered upon will be generally well sustained. 



Sydney, 8th January, 1898. 



WM. DWYER, 

District Inspector. 



ANNEX F. 

Inspector Dettmann's Report. 

The Parramatta section of the Sub-metropolitan District was placed under my supervision at the 
beginning of the year, when it embraced 88 schools, not including the Industrial School for Girls at 
Parramatta. 

Three of these schools, Carlingford, Ermington, and Pennant Hills Public were transferred to 
the District Inspector's Section, and one, St. Mary's Public, was attached to the Bowral District ; 
while Regentville and Llandilo Public Schools from the Bowral District, and Drummoyne, Five Dock, 
and Willooghby from the Metropolitan District, were added to the Parramatta Section. 

The only other changes during the year were the conversion of Berowra Half-time into Berowra 
Public in July, and the closing of Yongala Half-time school at the same time. 

These several changes resulted in there being 89 schools in operation at some time or other during 
the year, and 88 in operation at its close. No new schools were opened. 

The following table shows the summary of the quarterly abstract of returns for these schools : — 



Quarter. 



Enrolment. 



Average 
attendance. 



Percentage 

of 
attendance. 



School Fees. 



Free Pupils. 



State 
Children. 



March .. .. 

June 

September 
December 



7,136 
7,244 
7,177 
7,100 



5,388 6 
5,314 
5,365 3 
5,248-5 



75 
73 
74 
73 



£ s. d. 

593 7 2i 

663 18 2£ 

647 1 9 

726 13 li 



1,236 
1,293 
1,252 
1,258 



360 
360 
347 
344 



All the schools were fully inspected, and one received a second regular inspection. 

The inspection results show that the majority of the schools are well organized and well 
disciplined, and that the instruction is sound. 

With the exception of 4 small schools, all exceeded the standard. 

The teachers, who number 162, are as a rule well qualified for the work in which they are 
-engaged, and apply themselves to their school duties with zeal and intelligence. 

Great attention is paid to the appearance of the school premises, which are kept clean and tidy, 
while in many cases the grounds are improved by the cultivation of ornamental trees and flowers, in 
which both teachers and pupils are interested. 

There are unclassified teachers in the district, but these are mostly ex-pupil-teachers who are 
awaiting departmental permission to attend examination. 

The previous training of these young people as pupil-teachers in the large schools is being 
utilised to advantage in the small country schools in which most of them are now engaged. 

The keen competition in the school service, and the knowledge which the teachers have that 
advancement is fully dependent on their success as teachers, are making their influence felt in the 
character of the teaching in the schools, and there is, therefore, a general desire on the part of the 
teacher, more particularly the younger ones, to qualify for promotion by successful schoolwork and 
their own examinations. 

There is undoubtedly a good working spirit prevailing among them, and they are, as a rule, 
•contented with their lot. 

The district is well provided with schools, which are properly distributed. 

The seating accommodation in the schools is in excess of the demands (see statistics furnished). 

In conclusion, it may fairly be said that existing conditions fully meet the educational require- 
ments of the district, that the results of the year's work are satisfactory, and the prospects of the 
district are good. 

JOHN DETTMANN, 

Inspector. 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 121 

ANNEX G. 

District Inspector Bradley's Report. 

For the year 1896, or part of it, the total number of schools in effective operation was 356 ; but 14 of the 
number having lapsed through low attendance were not opened during any part of 1897. Ten new 
schools have been established, and the list for the year stands at 352, classified as follows : — 

Public 215 

Provisional 50 

Half-time 77 

House-to-house 9 

Evening Public 1 

No marked increase or diminution in these numbers is, for some time to come, probable. Some 
8 or 10 new provisional or other small schools may be established in the earlier part of the coming 
year; but quite as many with low and precarious attendances are likely to be closed. 

A new and commodious brick building has been erected at Hillgrove, and a new wing at Narrabri, 
while additional accommodation on a smaller scale has also been provided at Duri and Warialda. The 
erection of a separate building of a superior description for the Girls' Department at Armidale is in 
progress, and the work will probably be completed in a few months 1 time. These improvements have 
been carried out under the direction of the Chief Clerk of Works. 

The works arranged for by the staff of Inspectors, and carried out under their supervision, have 
been of an extensive character. They comprise (1) the erection of 10 small school buildings, and 
enlargement of 4 others, giving increased accommodation for about 400 pupils ; (2) the repair of 77 
schoolrooms and 23 teachers' residences ; and (3) the erection of 4 weather-sheds or verandahs with 
simple lavatory accommodation. The total expenditure thus involved has been slightly over £1,800. 
Except in a few cases where the permanency or the school has seemed doubtful, all necessary repairs 
and renovation have been effected ; and, in their general appearance and in the degree of convenience 
and comfort afforded, the condition of the smaller schools has materially improved. 

By the closing of schools and the giving up of old school buildings, there have been lost 766 
seats, calculated at the rate of 8 square feet per child, and 583 places at the rate of 100 cubic feet. 
The gain from new schoolrooms and additions has been 868 and 786 respectively, and the total accommo- 
dation now stands at 19,825 seats, or 18,162 places— provision fully adequate to existing requirements. 

Practically, every school in the district has received full inspection. The one school returned 
as uninspected — a defunct Half-time School in the Tarn worth section — should not have been reopened ; 
but the teacher in charge did not receive notice of his removal in time, and work was carried on for 
one day, when the school was closed. Protracted illness necessitated my withdrawal from duty during 
the greater part of the September quarter, and Mr. Inspector Hunt was appointed temporarily to carry 
on the work. With generous help afforded by my colleagues Messrs. Beavis and Blumer, who each 
examined 8 of the smaller schools, the inspections of the Armidale section were kept well in hand, 
and their completion was thus rendered easily practicable after my return to duty, and while still in 
a feeble state of health. 

The general efficiency of the schools as summarized from the Inspectors' reports shows substantial 
improvement as compared with the results of former years, and the numbers satisfying and exceeding 
the requirements of the standard are the highest yet recorded. Of 351 schools examined, 319 (91 per 
cent.) exceeded standard requirements, 13 (4 per cent.) just met them, and 19 (5 per cent.) failed to 
reach them. 

Exemption certificates were gained by 712 pupils of the upper classes out of 1,084 examined. 
This represents 34 per cent, of failures as against 40 per cent, for the previous year ; and, while a fair 
degree of improvement is thus apparent, the results in the abstract cannot be regarded as fully satis- 
factory. The percentage of passes in the several sections of the district is as follows : — 

Glen Innes Section 73 per cent. 

Armidale ,, 63 ,, 

Quirindi ,, 64 ,, 

Tamworth ., 59 



>» • • ••• v,/ »> 



The disparity in these results is less than formerly, but is still sufficiently marked to furnish food 
for reflection in the direction indicated in my last report. 

The success attending the operations of the cookery schools held daring the year at Tenterfield 
and lnverell has been very gratifying, and justifies the belief that their extension among all of the 
larger centres in the district would prove both acceptable and beneficial. 

Branches of the Public Schools Amateur Athletic Association are now established at Armidale, 
Glen Innes, lnverell, and Tamworth, and very successful meetings have been held during the year at 
each place. These gatherings have exercised a mo3t salutary influence in many directions : the schools 
have been thereby to a larger extent popularised, good fellowship and community of aim and interest 
have been developed amongst the teachers ; the physical training of the pupils has most sensibly. 



122 Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 

improved, and the stimulus begot of healthy rivalry between schools, teachers, and children has made 
itself manifest in the better disciplinary condition apparent, and in all that, directly or indirectly, is 
its outcome. 

The total number of teachers employed in the district is 415 ; of these, 86 are yet unclassified, 
but most have been trained as pupil-teachers, and, almost without exception, do creditable work 
One teacher was dismissed during the year for a gross offence, otherwise the record for exemplary 
conduct and faithful and efficient discharge of duty remains unchanged. 

J. D. BRADLEY, 

District Inspector. 



ANNEX H. 

Inspector Blumer's Report. 

At the close of last year ninety-three (93) schools were under my supervision. Since then, seven (7) 
have been closed and two (2) established. There are, therefore, now in operation in this section of the 
district eighty-eight (88) schools :— Fifty-eight (5S) Public, twelve (12) Provisional, and eighteen (18) 
Half-time ; three (3) others will be opened at the beginning of next year. 

New schools were granted at Big Leather Public, Moor Creek Waterworks Public, and Meugun 
Greek Provisional ; and requests to reopen schools temporarily closed at North Cuerindi Provisional, 
and Spring Creek and Hawarden Half-time were favourably entertained. Applications for new schools 
were declined at Spring Vale (Moree) Public, Limbri Provisional, Spring Creek (Bingara) Provisional, 
Upper Dungowan Half-time, Cooringoora, and Upper Whitlow Half-time. 

Every application for establishment of a school receives the most careful, yet generous, consider- 
ation. In some instances, where the maintenance of the required minimum attendance was uncertain, 
and where there was a disused building a few miles off, the Department offered to give a school a trial, 
provided the residents removed and re-erected the building at their own expense. The ungracious 
manner in which this offer, involving at most a few days' labour on the part of persons with apparently 
plenty of spare time, was rejected, leads one to believe that the education of their children is not always 
the chief motive actuating applicants for schools. 

Although the present requirements of the district are fairly met by existing provisions, yet there 
is no doubt that the early arrival of new settlers in certain localities will necessitate establishment of 
new schools in the immediate future. Under my directions new schoolrooms have been erected at Big 
Leather and Moor Creek Waterworks, and a temporary schoolroom secured rent free at Upper Moor 
Creek in place of one burnt down. Under the supervision of the clerk of works, additional accommo- 
dation has been provided at Duri and Warialda, and a new residence erected at Moree. A residence is 
in course of erection at Bundarra, and tenders for one at Duri are under consideration. A judicious, 
though rather increased, expenditure on repairs and improvements has placed the school premises 
generally in such a condition as will obviate any great outlay for a considerable time. The aggregate 
number of seats provided is more than sufficient for the total number of children on roll for the year. 

Ninety-two (92) schools were open during the whole or some portion of the year, and all but one 
received a regular inspection. The uninspected school (Spring Creek Half-time) should not have 
re-opened ; but on account of delay in receipt by teacher of his notification of removal, the school was 
in operation one day. Three (3) ordinary inspections were held, and numerous incidental inspections 
were made as opportunities offered. 

Except in a few cases, where the permanency of the school is uncertain, the buildings are suit- 
able, in good repair, and properly furnished. In one or two instances the accommodation is inadequate ; 
but the necessary steps have been taken to remedy this defect. Tree-planting and gardening have been 
seriously retarded by the prolonged drought. The records are correctly, and, as a rule, neatly kept, 
and increased care and skill are evinced in connection with Time-table and Programmes. The forma- 
tion of school libraries is slowly but steadily progressing. With very few exceptions the school govern- 
ment is vigilant and firm, yet kindly, and the pupils promptly and cheerfully obedient. 

Of the ninety-one (91) schools inspected, eighty-six (86) were up to or above standard— a per- 
centage of 94 *5, as against 84 per cent, for the former year. As a matter of fact, four (4) of the five 
(5) schools returned as below standard had to be formally so regarded solely because no third class, 
or higher, was in operation — a circumstance beyond the teacher's control, but which will in due time 
rectify itself. 

The highest efficiency was shown in Tamworth Girls' School, and then, in order of merit, in 
Tarn worth Boys', Walcha, Manilla, Warialda, and West Tamworth. 

The results in the several subjects of instruction are quite equal to those of 1S96, and surpass 
those of any previous year. Two hundred and thirty-seven pupils were examined for Exemption 
Certificates, and 139, or 59 per cent., were successful. 

The practical value, and the thoroughness of the instruction in Elementary Physiology, given in 
several schools, but more especially in Tamworth, West Tamworth, Nenvngha, and Cockbuni River, 
were ably demonstrated by " First Aid," rendered by teachers and pupils in various ways during the 
year. 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction; 123 

Since my last report one teacher has been dismissed for gross misconduct ; but, as a body, the 
teachers continue to discharge their duties faithfully and efficiently, and to merit the respect of the 
community. The steadiness and zeal of ex-pupil teachers in charge of small schools in lonely places, 
where they are frequently subjected to considerable discomfort, and exposed to great temptations, 
deserve more than passing comment. 

In conclusion, the present educational requirements of the district are fairly met ; the general 
efficiency of the schools is very gratifying ; and the outlook for next year is most encouraging. 

L. BLUMER, 
Tamworth, 16th December, 1897. Inspector. 

ANNEX I. 

Inspector Beavis' Report. 

Four schools which were in operation in the Glen Innes Section at the end of 1896 were not reopened 
after the Christmas vacation, viz., Mount Russell Public, and the Half-time schools at Airlie Brake, 
Willow Grove, and Paradise : Fieldside which had been associated with Paradise was re-established 
as Provisional. The new year commenced with 88 schools in operation, viz. , 67 Public, 16 Provisional, 
4 Half-time, and. 1 House-to-house. Of these, Fieldside Provisional and Rivertree Provisional have 
since been permanently closed ; the Provisional School at Dundee Railway Station has also been closed 
since October, but will be resumed immediately. Four new schools (3 Provisional — Swan Peak, 
Yarrow, and Bukkulla, and 1 Evening School at Inverell) have been established, and one school, 
Tarban, formerly Provisional, has been promoted to Public. Thus, after accounting for the several 
changes mentioned, there have been in operation during the year 92 schools, viz., 68 Public, 18 
Provisional, 4 Half-time, 1 House-to-house, and 1 Evening. 

Probably the Clearbank Provisional School, where the attendance has for some time been very 
small, will not be continued next year ; but 89 schools will be maintained, and this number will be 
augmented by the establishment of a Provisional School at Wellington Vale, near Deepwater. Home- 
stead Selection Area No. 74, Clifton, Ten-mile, and Acacia Creek Bridge— all near Tenterfield ; Egerton, 
near Ashford ; and Chain of Ponds, near Nullamanna, are other localities where schools are desired. 

The school buildings are generally sound, but several need renovation. Comparatively little 
has been done during the vear to improve the character of the accommodation ; nevertheless, the 
number of places is ample, and the comfort of pupils and teachers has been furthered in small 
particulars. The schools are well supplied with the more immediate requisites ; but there is a deficiency 
of those appliances which teach by suggestion. At Goonoowigall the teacher, who is an amateur 
photographer, has adorned the walls of his schoolroom with suitable pictures. 

Every school was regularly inspected, and 3 ordinary inspections were made, besides incidental 
visits. Eighty-five schools (92 per cent.) satisfied the standard, and 7 were below it : the results are 
almost identical in value with, those of last year. Special merit attaches to the work done at Glen Innes, 
Inverell, Deepwater, Elsmore, and Little Plain ; the Glen Innes School stands first in numbers and 
efficiency. 3,460 pupils (last year, 3,430) were examined ; the estimates of proficiency in the several 
subjects of the school course are very similar to those of the previous year, the percentage of passes- 
varying from 70 to 90. Of 281 pupils examined for exemption certificates, 204 passed (73 per cent., viz., 
6 per cent, more than last year). The improvement in this particular shows that the teaching of the three 
R s has been more sound ; 145 pupils who had previously gained certificates were present at inspections. 

The teachers take increasing interest in providing their pupils with healthful exercise and 
amusement. Cricket and football are, of course, the favourite pastimes for the boys ; but other games 
suitable for girls are likewise encouraged. Tennis-courts have been formed in the playgrounds at Glen 
Innes, Inverell, Deepwater, Emmaville, Elsmore, Tingha, and Graman. Local school picnics, in which 
frequently several schools combine, are invariably seized as occasions for promoting out-door exercise ; 
but recently a stronger stimulus in this direction has been created by the formation at Glen Innes and 
Inverell of branches of the Public Schools Amateur Athletic Association. At the sports meetings held 
physical exercise is organised and directed, and is made to have a bearing on school discipline. The 
parents regard these gatherings with evident sympathy. 

During the year cookery classes were in operation, under Miss A. Kirby, at Inverell and Tenter- 
field— a six months' term in each case. At both towns the keenest interest was taken by the students 
and the general public. The full complement of pupils (60 at each centre) was under instruction ; 
most of the girls were from the town schools, but about a third of the number came from outlying 
country schools, several attending from distances of 10 and 12 miles. At the close of each course the 
pupils were examined by a committee of ladies locally chosen ; 83 pupils were examined, 48 at Inverell 
and 55 at Tenterfield ; at each examination one pupil failed, but most of the cooking was of high merit. 
The popularity of the classes was evident from the regularity of the attendance ; the enthusiasm shown 
during the term, and at the examinations, and the final prize-giving by residents to the more successful 
pupils. The examining committees performed their voluntary duties with zeal and discrimination. 

The teachers of the district (111 of all ranks) have, as in previous years, worked faithfully; it is 
scarcely necessary to allude to their moral character and influence which are so uniformly good. 

Summary. 

There is little of educational development to record for the year ; the conditions have been rather 
stationary, though associated with pleasing features indicative of sound work and favourable prospects. 

W. BEAVIS, 
Glen Innes, 30th December, 1897. Inspector. 



124 Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 

ANNEX J. 

Inspector Parkinson's Report. 

At the close of 1896 there were 95 schools in operation in theQuirindi Section of the Armidale District. 
All of these re-opened this year. Two Half-time Schools which were closed for a time last year com- 
menced work again in January, and during the year 4 new schools have been established. I have, 
therefore, had supervision of 101 schools during 1897. One Half-time and 2 House-to-house Schools 
have lately been closed, and 4 schools, formerly Half-time, are now classed as House-to-house. There 
are, therefore, on my list at present 96 schools. Although I expect a few others to be unable to main- 
tain the average required to keep them in existence, yet population is spreading in other places, and 
I anticipate that during 1898 the number in this district will be about 100. 

Beckoning 100 cubic feet of air for each pupil, the buildings last December provided accommodation 
for 4,621 pupils, and this number has been increased to 4,718. As the gross enrolment for the district is 
little more than 4,000, it will be seen that there is ample room for all the children in attendance. A Dew 
wing has been added to the buildings at Narrabri, and this will be occupied immediately after the vacation, 
New schoolrooms are required at Gunnedah, West Narrabri, Stewart's Brook, andBraefield ; but, taking 
the district as a whole, the buildings are suitable and in good repair. Four new buildings have been 
erected, and 29 other schools and 7 teachers 1 residences have been repaired, at a cost of upwards of £800. 

Each of the 101 schools in operation during the year received a regular inspection, and 96 were 
found to be up to or above standard. Last year 10 per cent, of the schools were in an unsatisfactory 
condition, so that there has been an improvement for the twelve months of 5 per cent. Nine of the 
schools examined gained more than 70 per cent, of marks ; 50 others ranged between 60 and 70 per 
cent. ; 37 had marks between 50 and 60 per cent. ; and only 5 were below 50 per cent. Compared with 
last year's work these numbers exhibit an improvement, and show also more even results. The most 
efficient schools were Gunnedah Superior, Quirindi Superior, Boggabri, Narrabri Boys' Superior, West 
Narrabri, Parkville, Jacob and Joseph Creek, Quipolly, and Moonan Brook. 

This year I examined 3,593 pupils in reading, writing, and arithmetic— an increase of 319 on the 
number for last year. The lowest number of pupils examined was in French, only 29 ; this subject is 
taught to the girls enrolled in the fifth classes of the Superior Schools at Quirindi, Gunnedah, and 
Narrabri. In reading, writing, Australian history, Scripture, object lessons, drawing, French, needle- 
work, drill, and natural science, the percentages of pupils up to or above standard ranged between 90 
and 100. From 80 to 90 per cent, of passes were obtained in arithmetic, grammar, geography, English 
history, music, Euclid, Algebra, and Latin. The passes in dictation were 75 per cent. , and in men- 
suration 61. In most of the subjects these results are somewhat higher that those obtained last year. 
373 pupils were examined for exemption certificates, and 238 were successful. This is an increase of 
30 on the number examined last year, and the percentage of passes is 64 as against 58. Most of the 
failures were in arithmetic. 

The number of teachers employed in this district at the present time is 115. Of these 84 are in 
charge of schools, 11 are assistants, and 20 are pupil* teachers. The number of unclassified teachers is 
annually decreasing ; nominally there are 30 under my supervision, but 17 of these are ex-pupil teachers. 
The conduct of the teachers as a whole continues to bo excellent, and complaints during the year have 
been few and trivial. 

Interest is well maintained in the establishment and working of school libraries. There are now 
65 in this district, and the number of volumes in circulation exceeds 4,500. This shows an increase 
of 24 libraries and upwards of 1,000 volumes for the twelve months. 

In conclusion, 101 schools have been in operation during 1897. All were inspected, and 95 per 
eent. were up to or above standard. 

The school buildings are in good repair, and provide ample accommodation for all the pupils in 
attendance. 

The teachers have carried out their duties with zeal and success, and have in the majority of 
instances maintained their former high reputation for capable and conscientious work. 

H. PARKINSON, 
West Maitland, 15th December, 1897. Inspector. 

ANNEX K. 

District Inspector McCre die's Eeport. 

The number of schools and departments in operation in the Bathurst District during the past year was 
258, classified as follows : — 

Public 168 

Provisional 23 

Half-time 59 

House-to-house 6 

Evening Public 2 

At the beginning of the year the schools at Cave Creek and German's Hill, both in the neigh- 
bourhood of Orange, were transferred from the Western to the Central Section of the District, the latter 
retaining its status as a Full-time School and the former being grouped with the Half-time Schools at 
Towac and Brokenshaft Creek as a House-to-house School until June last, when it was permanently 
closed, and the stations at Towac and Brokenshaft Creek reverted to their former rank of Half-time. 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction* 125 

Three new schools in the Central Section were opened during the year. These were the Provi* 
gional Schools at Eldorado Gully and Milker's Flat, and the Evening Public School at Mitchell, Sunny 
Corner. The Evening School started well, but after a few weeks' existence lapsed through want of support. 
The only, other important change in the Central Section was the reduction of Ingleswold Public and 
Flyer's Creek Provisional to Half-time Schools, the diminished attendance at each warranting the change. 

In the whole district 10 new schools were opened and 9 closed, the number in operation on 31st 
December last being 249. 

Additions to the school buildings at Lucknow, under the supervision of the Chief Clerk of 
Works, will shortly be completed, and the enlargement under the same officer of several other 
buildings, where the accommodation is inadequate, has been authorised. When all additions sanctioned 
or now in progress are finished, ample provision will have been made in every school for the comfortable 
seating of the children in regular attendance at each during the last quarter of 1897. 

The works carried out under the supervision of Inspectors comprise the erection of 6 small 
schools, 1 teacher's residence, and 3 weathersheds ; also additions to 4 schools, and repairs to 127 
others, and 20 residences. The whole of these works were effected as economically as possible at a 
total cost of £1,941. 

In all schools there is an aggregate accommodation for 16,898 pupils at 8 square feet of floor 
space to each, and for 16,814 at 100 cubic feet of air space to each. The increase for the year is 95 and 
110 respectively. 

The total enrolment — no pupil who attended more than one school being counted twice — was 
15,523 pupils, and the average attendance was 10,399*9 pupils, or 67 per cent, of the enrolment. The 
enrolment, average attendance, and percent-age in 1896, were 15,321, 9,612 '5, and 63 respectively. 

For school fees the sum of £5,215 10s. was paid — an increase of £10 lis. 6d. upon the receipts 
for the previous year. The existing arrears of fees, £155 17s. 3d., are £15 10s. less than in 1896. 

Of the 258 schools open during the year, only one, West Wyalong Evening Public, established 
late in December quarter, did not receive inspection. Twenty-seven schools were re-inspected, and 
the total number of inspections, regular and ordinary, was 284, being 15 more than in the previous 
year. The percentage of schools that satisfied or exceeded the standard of efficiency was 95, there 
being only a small fractional difference in the percentages for the last three years. 

At the regular inspections there were 10,758 pupils present, the increase upon the number 
examined in 1896 being 369. With a view to obtain exemption certificates, 954 pupils underwent the 
usual examination, and 580, or about 60 per cent, of the candidates, were successful. For the last three 
years the percentage of unsuccessful candidates at these examinations has been about 40, the majority 
of the failures being in Arithmetic or Dictation. 

The results of the regular inspection show an advance in some subjects and a slight retrogression 
in others. 

The percentage of passes in the several subjects of instruction were as under : — 

Percentages of 
Subjects. Passes. 

Needlework 91 

Writing 88 

Reading 87 

Natural Science 84 

Music 83 

Geography, Object Lessons, Drawing, Drill, French 81 

Scripture, Australian History 80 

Dictation 79 

Grammar 75 

Arithmetic, English History 74 

Algebra 70 

Latin 63 

Mensuration 61 

Euclid 51 

In Latin, only 59 pupils were examined ; in Mensuration, 212 ; and in Euclid, 404. 

Branches of the Public School Amateur Athletic Association have been formed at Bathurst and 
Lithgow, and it is to be hoped that both branches will receive the warm support of the teachers 
and general public. At Lithgow a nrst sports meeting has been held, but for several reasons it was 
deemed advisable not to hold a meeting at Bathurst before April next. In December last, at the 
competition in Sydney for the Challenge Shield, the cadets of Bathurst District maintained their 
reputation as good shots, Orange Cadets winning the shield for the eighth year in succession, Bathurst 
being second, Lithgow third, and a combined team from Kelso and Milltown Public Schools a good 
sixth. 

In Bathurst, two courses of instruction in Cookery were given during the year to girls attending 
the High School, and the Public Schools at Bathurst, Milltown, and Kelso. At the end of each term, 
aa examination of the pupils was conducted by excellent committees of ladies, whose reports on each 



126 Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 

occasion were very satisfactory and commendatory. The school was temporarily closed in December, 
and the stove and all apparatus removed to Goulburn, where one or more courses of instruction are to 
be given to the pupils attending the Public Schools in the town. 

There are 336 teachers of all ranks employed in the schools of the district. This numbquncludes 
3 principal and 8 assistant teachers more than in 1896. As a body they all discharged their several 
duties satisfactorily, and gave no cause for serious complaint. 

W. McCREDIE, 

District Inspector. 

ANNEX L. 

Inspector Thomas's Report. 

At the close of 1896 my list of schools numbered 82, but two of them (Gave Creek and German's Hill 
Half-time) were transferred to the Bathurst section of the district, and Warroo Public did not re-open, 
so that I commenced the work of the year with 79 schools in active operation. 

During the year three schools (Double Peak Public, Cugong Provisional, and Gum Springe 
Half-time) were closed, and new schools were opened at Bogan Gate, Pinnacle Reefs, Murrin, Warregal, 
and Nanima, while an Evening Public School nas just been established at Wy along West. The year 
closes with 82 schools in operation, viz. : — 

Public 54 

Provisional 10 

Half-time 14 

House-to-house 3 

Evening Public 1 

The following applications for the establishment of new schools were dealt with during the 
year : — 

Bogan Gate Provisional Granted ; school now in operation. 

Pinnacle Reefs Public do. do. 

Warregal Provisional do. do. 

Nanima House do. do. 

W T yalong West Evening Public ... do. do. 

Yurragong Provisional do. building being erected. 

Gulgo Provisional do. do. 

Elswick Provisional do. do. 

Eurow and Back Yamma . . . Half-time do. do. 

Daring the year 85 schools of all classes were in operation, and all but one received a full 
inspection, the exception being Wyalong West Evening Public, which did not open till late in the year. 
Of the 84 schools inspected, 80 were found to be above standard requirements, 1 was just up to 
standard, and 3 were below. Of the latter, one was a small Provisional School, only a week in opera- 
tion, and another was a Half-time School with no class above 1st. Thus, out of 84 inspected schools, 
81 (or 96 per cent.) satisfied the standard. The corresponding percentage for 1896 was 94. 

In addition to the regular inspections above referred to, 5 ordinary inspections and numerous 
incidental visits were made by myself in connection with repairs, inquiries, &c, and one reinspection 
was made by Mr. District Inspector McCredie. 

The total number of pupils examined at the regular inspections was 3,058, an increase of 146 on 
last year's numbers. The numbers examined in the more important subjects were : — 

Reading 3,058 of whom 2,764 passed or 90 per cent. 

Writing 3,009 

Arithmetic 2,843 

Dictation 2,428 

Grammar , 1,010 

Geography 1,010 

History 1,008 

These results so nearly agree with those for 1896 that a tabulated comparison is unnecessary. 
It will suffice to say that the percentage of passes in 1896 was 88 for reading, 81 for arithmetic, and 75 
for dictation. 

The weak points in the value of the instruction are : — 

1. The small percentage of pupils who pass the examination for exemption certificates. 

2. The neglect, on teachers 1 part, of an intelligent use of mental arithmetic. 

The cause of the former is largely to be found in the latter of these two points, and I look for 
better results during the coming year. 



»l 
II 


2,259 , 


n 


79 


»> 


II 


1,909 


ti 


78 


j» 


»» 


795 


l» 


79 


>i 


II 


780 


ll 


77 


»i 


II 


698 


11 


69 


ii 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 127 

The highest marks for general efficiency, in schools with advanced classes, were gained by Wya- 
long West, Wyalong, and Forbes, in the order named. Amongst smaller Public Schools, the best 
results were obtained at Eugowra, Trelo warren, and Sparling Swamp, whilst Boree Cabonne carried off 
ifce palm in the Provisional School class, and Canangles and Derriwang were to the front among Half- 
time Schools. 

The organisation and discipline of the schools continue to be of a highly satisfactory character. 
Faulty time-tables and programmes, incorrect and slovenly records, and defective classification, are 
blemishes rarely met with, and, where they have been found, were more the result of inexperience than 
of carelessness and neglect. 

The past year has been an exceptionally busy one in connection with improvements, additions, 
and repairs effected to school buildings and residences. 

The schoolrooms at Brolgan, Parkes, Trelo warren, Fifield, South Lead, and Wongojong have 
been enlarged, the first three under the supervision of the Chief Clerk of Works, and the others under 
my own direction. A residence at Wyalong West has been acquired by purchase ; 40 schools have 
been repaired and improved ; 5 residences have been repaired and enlarged ; and 3 weathersheds have 
been erected ; the whole under my supervision, at a total cost of £768 13s. 

Five new school buildings were during the year erected, under my superintendence, at a cost of 
£31$ 6s. Two of them replaced rented buildings, and three were erected in places not previously 
supplied with schools. 

Steps are now being taken to provide increased accommodation at Canowindra, Eugowra, 
Wyalong West, Coffee Hill, and Yalgogrin. The three first mentioned are in the hands of the Chief 
Clerk of Works, who is also under instructions to effect material improvements to the buildings at 
Cudal, Cargo, Canowindra, Manildra, aud Meranbura, and to erect a new schoolroom at Great Central 
and a teacher's residence at South Lead. 

When all the works are in progress, and those authorised to be carried out have been completed, 
the Department's vested premises throughout the district will be in a very satisfactory condition. 

Late in. the year the teacher's residence at Toogong was totally destroyed by fire ; but no blame 
appears to attach to the occupants. It is improbable that it will be rebuilt. 

There are 102 teachers of all ranks employed in the district, of whom 74 are heads of depart- 
ments, 15 are assistants, and 13 are pupil teachers. Twenty- two teachers and assistants are unclassified, 
but 14 of these are ex-pupil teachers, several of whom have obtained certificates, to date from 1st 
January, 1898. The usual examinations of teachers and pupil teachers were held in June and December. 

At the close of 1896 the sitting accommodation provided for 5,261 pupils, on the basis of 8 square 
feet per child, and 5,009 on the basis of 100 cubic feet per child. After making due allowance for gains 
and losses daring the year, I find that the net gain is 68 by the former, and 63 by the latter, basis of 
calculation. The available seats now number 5,329 and 5,072 respectively. 

Summanj. 

Number of schools in operation during 1 897 85 

,, fully inspected 84 

Percentage of schools satisfying standard 96 per cent. 

Number of pupils examined 3,058 

Enrolment, December quarter, 1897 4,282 

Average attendance ,, „ 2922*1 

Accommodation provided 5,329 

No. of teachers and pupil teachers 102 

Total amount of school fees paid £1,489 16s. 3d. 

,, ,, in arrear £67 14s. cd. 

Number of free pupils, December quarter 467 

The usual statistics, upon which my report is based, have already been furnished. 

W. GEO. THOMAS, 
Forbes, 1st January, 1898. Inspector. 



ANNEX M. 
Inspector McKenzie's Report. 

The year 1897 opened with 99 schools on the register for the eastern section of the Bathurst District. 
Five of these have since been closed ; and three others have come into operation. There have, there- 
fore, been 102 schools open in this section for the whole or part of the year 1897, and 97 of these still 
remain in operation. 

Schools were reopened at Garland and Ganbenang, Long Swamp, Diamond Valley, and Box 
*tidge. House-to-house stations were converted into independent schools. Burnt Yards and Hampton 
Half-time Schools became full time ; and Bradshaw's Flat Provisional was made a Public School. 

The schools closed through insufficient attendance were Dargan's Creek, Megalong, and Antonio 
Creek, Public, and Alluvial and Taylor's Pit Half-time. 



128 Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 

New schools have been promised at Gilmandyke, Thompson's Creek, and Felled Timber ; and 
applications from Laura, North Springwood, Linden, and Woodford, Bell and Mount Wilson, Clarence, 
Ford's Springs, and Mount David were declined. 

Under the Inspector's supervision one small school building was erected, and repairs were carried 
out in 53 schools and 13 residences at a cost of £761. Three small school buildings are in course of 
erection, and repairs are being effected in 10 schools and 4 residences at a farther cost of £364. 
Besides this a large amount of work has been carried out under the Chief Clerk of Works. 

Existing schools provide ample accommodation for the pupils in attendance. Places are provided 
for 5,375 pupils, and statute accommodation for 5,169. 

For the year 1896 the enrolment was 5,891, and the average attendance 3,160. 

For 1897 the enrolment was 5,837, and the average 3,459, which gives a decrease of 54 in gross 
enrolment, and an increase of nearly 300 in attendance. 

Also in 1896 the amount of fees collected was £1,570, and the arrears reached £39. 

In 1897 the amount of fees collected was £1,583, and the arrears only reached £25 ; so that fees 
have been paid more regularly than in the preceding year. 

All schools received a regular inspection, and 14 an ordinary inspection. Of 102 schools 
examined 94 were above and 8 below standard, as against 100 up to or above standard and 3 below in 
1896. The results for 1897 are, therefore, somewhat lower than those of the preceding year. 

The total number of pupils examined was 3,580. Of these 246 sat for exemption certificates, and 
134 passed. 

There are savings banks in all the principal schools ; arboriculture receives fair attention, and 
the majority of the schools possess libraries. 

A branch of the Public Schools Athletic Association was established and held its first meeting 
at Lithgow during the year. 

The total number of teachers of all ranks employed in the section at the close of the year was 117. 

There is an abundance of schools in the section ; they are well distributed, and satisfactorily 
meet the requirements of the people. 

The teachers, as a rule, are earnest and industrious in the discharge of their duties, and deservedly 
esteemed in their respective localities. 

A. D. McKENZIE, 
Blackheath, 3rd January, 1898. Inspector. 



ANNEX N. 

District Inspector Johnson's Report. 

There were 261 schools in operation in this District this year, 93 of which are in the Wollongong 
section, 77 in the Crookwell section, and 91 in the Bowral section. 

Five new schools were opened during the year and two schools were transferred to this from 
other districts. Five small schools were closed in the Crookwell section on account of the small 
number of pupils in attendance thereat, and two were transferred to the Sub-Metropolitan District. 
The number of schools in this district, therefore, remains unchanged. 

Six new schoolrooms were erected, and 90 schoolrooms and 24 residences were repaired and 
otherwise improved under the Inspector's supervision. 

Accommodation is provided by the various schoolrooms of the district for 19,937 pupils, which 
is fully up to present requirements. 

Two small schools in the Crookwell section were not inspected this year, but all schools in the 
other sections were fully inspected once. Ten of the 259 schools inspected were below the standard in 
attainments, 16 reached it, and the remaining 233 exceeded it. Of the 10 that failed to reach the 
standard, 7 are small schools in the Crookwell section, and of the 16 that only reached it, 13 are in that 
section also. 

1,033 pupils were examined for exemption certificates, and of these 648 were successful. This 
gives a percentage of 62, a considerable improvement on last year's results. There if no reason why 
still higher results should not be secured in the future. 

The total number of pupils examined in the various subjects of instruction was 11,374, a slight 
increase on that of last year, when the number was 11,019. The percentages of pupils up to or above 
the standard differ but little from those of 1896. In reading, grammar, euclid, and sciences, they are 
similar ; in writing, dictation, geography, history, and music, they are higher ; and in arithmetic, 
object lessons, and algebra, they are slightly under. 

Although the results of the inspections show no advance on last year's work, yet they must be 
regarded as satisfactory on the whole. It is not possible that each year's work should continue to be 
an improvement on that of the preceding year, as, were it to do so, the schools would soon reach 
perfection, which they are not likely to do. 

With few exceptions, the schools of this district are doing good work, and give promise of a 
continuance of such. 

W. H. JOHNSON, 
Bowral, 8th January, 1898. District Inspector. 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 129 

annex o. 

Inspector McLellajtd's Report. 

At the end of last year there were 87 schools in the Wollongong Section. During the presentyear a 
Public School at Far Meadow, a Provisional School at Brandon Hill, and Evening Schools at Helens* 
burgh, Unanderra, and Wollongong were established. Yerriyong Vale Provisional was also reopened. 
The Evening Schools were closed after a few months' existence, but will most probably be reopened 
during the coming winter. There are now, at the end of the year, 90 schools in operation, classified 
thus :— Public, 80 ; Provisional, 8 ; Half-time, 2 ; total, 90. New buildings have been completed at 
Jasper's Brush, Marshall Mount, Miranda, and Far Meadow. Additions have also been made to 
existing premises at Woonona, Gerringong, and YalwaL Other buildings are in progress at Avondale, 
Burraneer Bay, and Bombo. New residences have been provided at Avondale, Far Meadow, and 
Marshall Mount, and another is approaching completion at Meroo. The works under my own super- 
vision are tho3e at Burraneer Bay, Bombo, Far Meadow, and Miranda. Miscellaneous improvements 
to 46 schools and 9 residences have cost £235 4s. 5d. Other improvements on a larger scale have been 
effected at various schools by the Clerk of Works. The schools in existence provide sitting-room for 
9,862, and air-space for 9,552 pupils. Action has been taken where necessary to enlarge buildings that 
hare become too small for the increased attendance. 

Of the 93 schools open during the whole or portion of the year all were fully inspected, and only 
3 fell below standard requirements. This result shows that there are few teachers in the district who 
cannot do at least tolerably effective work. The proportion of those who seem unable to do much more 
is rather large, inasmuch as 25 schools failed to reach " Fair " for general efficiency. Thus, while it is 
satisfactory to find scarcely any schools below the minimum standard, it is hardly satisfactory that 
there should be a considerable number in which the teaching never seems to rise beyond respectable 
mediocrity. A general comparison of the passes for the year and last shows so little difference between. 
the two that there is no need for any special remark regarding increase or decrease in the percentages. 
The teaching generally has been up to the standard of former years, and in some respects may claim to 
have been more thorough. Proof of this lies in the fact that 348 out of 546 pupils examined were 
successful in obtaining exemption certificates — a proportion of 63 per cent., while last year the per* 
centage was only 50. 

For organisation and discipline the great majority of the schools continue to deserve praise. 
Very rarely has any serious fault to be found either with the arrangements for carrying on the school 
work, or with the behaviour of the pupils. 

Of the teachers themselves, lam glad to be able to report that as a body they are diligent and 
conscientious in the discharge of their duties. Some have given cause for complaint, but such cases 
are exceptional. They are, of course, possessed of very different degrees of capacity for the profession 
to which they belong, and where success has not attended their efforts, the cause is to be sought in 
want of ability, rather than lack of industry. 

Before concluding, I may mention that there are now in this district two branches of the Public 
Schools Athletic Association. Under wise guidance the prevalent taste for athletic sports may prove 
of great benefit to the rising generation, and the new movement in this direction adds fresh responsi- 
bilities to the teacher's office. Not least among the advantages to be derived from these associations is 
the facility offered to teachers of entering more fully into personal communication with their pupils, 
not as rulers but as friends and companions, and so exerting an excellent influence upon the tone and 
temper of a large number of children. A strong influence of some sort there Mill always be. It rest* 
with the teachers to use it in the right way. 

H. D. McLELLAND, 
Wollongong, 29th December, 1897. Inspector* 



ANNEX P. 

Inspector Smith's Report. 

At the close of 1896 there were in the Crook well section of the Bowral District 77 schools, comprising 
36 Public, 10 Provisional, 24 Half-time, and 7 House-to-house Schools. 

The following were closed during different quarters of the year for want of sufficient atten- 
dance : — Burra Lake and Narrama Public ; Milbang, Pejar, and Streamville Provisional ; and Wheeo 
House-to-house, Schools. 

The firstnamed, however, of the above will be reopened early in 1898 under another name, and 
worked in conjunction with Yalbraith, and Merry vale Half-time will be joined to Currabungla, and 
Myanga Creek Half-time to Monk's Crossing as House-to-house School. Currabungla and Yalbraith 
are new places where no school existed before. 

One school was transferred from the Yass District, Bevendale Provisional, which had been 
closed for a considerable time. 

There will, therefore, be for certain at the beginning of 1898 in this section 74 schools— 36 
Public, 8 Provisional, 24 Half-time, and 6 House-to-house Schools. Four others may be reopened if 
the population increases, which would make the total 78. 

The means of education provided by the State are well distributed and quite sufficient to meet 
all requirements so far as can be determined at present. 



030 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



The school buildings, with few exceptions, are in good condition, well furnished, and supplied 
with necessary apparatus and school material, and afford ample accommodation for the number of 
pupils enrolled. A fine large building has just been completed in Crookwell, capable of holding 260 
scholars, at a cost to the Department of £787. Tenders have been invited for the erection of a new 
-schoolroom at Gundaroo and improvements to the teacher's residence, and Run of Water Public is in 
the course of being enlarged. Twelve schools were repaired during the year, including water supply, 
fencing, &c, at a cost of £112 14s. 4d., and a weathersned was built at Turna for £19 7s. 6d. The 
Public School at Fullerton was accidentally burnt down while some repairs were being effected, and 
the schoolroom at Flowerburn, no longer required, was removed And re-erected there at a cost of 
£67 12s. 6d. 

The total sitting accommodation at the end of 1897, allowing 8 square feet for each child, has 
been computed to be 3,860 seats, while the number of scholars does not exceed 2,250. The reason for 
such an apparent difference is the falling off in the attendance at some of the long-established Public 
-Schools. The population is fast spreading out, and small schools are consequently on the increase. 

All the schools in this section received at least one regular inspection, and two stations of a 
House School were both examined. The number of pupils examined in the various subjects and the 
percentage of passes are shown hereunder : — 



Subject 



No of Pupils 

examined. 

1896. 



Papers. 



No. of Pupils 

examined. 

1897. 



Papers. 



Beading ...... ...... 

Writing 

Dictation ~ 

Arithmetic >. 

Grammar... 

Geography 

History 

Scripture .. 

Object-lesson 

Drawing .......... 

Music 

Euclid 

Needlework... > 

Drill 



1,597 

1,597 

1,183 

1,597 

514 

514 

514 

1,387 

1,516 

1,516 

1,333 

16 

525 

1,481 



Percentage, 

87 
91 
72 
70 
39 
78 
68 
89 
82 
63 
59 
100 
71 
79 



1,584 

1,584 

1,160 

1,584 

4S1 

481 

481 

1,329 

1,514 

1,514 

1.310 

14 

488 

1,492 



Percentage. 

86 
91 

71 

82 

43 
85 
79 
96 
87 
70 
67 
100 
41 
73 



The results are rather higher this year than they were last in some of the subjects. One school 

-only, Tallagandra Public, was below standard, i.e., if we xaay exempt the 6 House Schools in which 

only the principal subjects are taught, 13 up to standard, and 55 above the standard of proficiency. 

Total number of schools inspected, 75. Seventy-two candidates presented themselves for examiB&tisii 

.for certificates of being sufficiently educated, and 38 oat of the number passed. 

The discipline of all the schools may again be reported as good, speaking in a general way, with 
one exception, and that is of the Crookwell Public School. The frequent chances of teachers of late 
and the .incommodious buildings brought about a good deal of disorder and confusion, and a state of 
things not quite conducive to steady progress in attainments, but an alteration may reasonably be 
expected when once the children are in possession of the new schoolroom. No improper use of the 
cane has been brought under my notice, and no oharge of any description has been preferred against 
any teacher during the year. The organisation, especially of schools in charge of trained and classified 
teachers, may be pronounced as fair. 

The number and classification of the teachers employed are stated below : — 

Class II A ^ 2 

„ II B 2 

yf XXX .A.. «.. ........t...... ..<••« ..•••.••• ..i ................ ..i ... ... +A 

„ HI B..., 12 

„ III C 3 

43 

Unclassified , , 19 

Employed to teach sewing 1 

Total 63 

JOHN LESLIE SMITH, 
Crookwell, 15th December, 1897. Inspector, 



Report of Hie Minister of Public Instruction. 



131 



ANNEX Q. 

District Inspector Cooper's Report. 

At the end of 1896 there were 382 Bchools on the list of the Goulburn District. One of these was not 
reopened, and, daring 1897, 20 were closed in consequence of diminished attendance, while 10 new 
schools were established. There arc now, therefore, 371 schools in existence, as indicated in the 
following table : — 



Section of District. 


Schools or Departments. 


No. of Places, allowing for 
each Pupil— 


Highest 

Quarterly 

Enrolment. 


1896. 


1897. 


8 square feet. 


100 cubic feet. 


Gonlbnrn 


98 
94 

106 
82 


91 

87 

109 

84 


5,448 
4,562 
5,684 
4,109 


5,188 
3,854 
4,872 
3,635 


4,102 


Braidwood 


3,027 


Bega ._ 

Yass 


4,242 
3,177 


Total* 


382 


371 


19,803 


17,549 


14,548 







It will thus be seen that the aggregate accommodation is ample. It is fonnd, however, that 
while there is an excess of space in some schools, in others the pupils are crowded. Where this defect 
has been noticed, steps have been taken to enlarge the schools concerned. New school buildings have 
been erected under the supervision of the inspectoral staff at 11 places, and additions have been made 
to 3 schools. These works entailed an expenditure of £472, for which sum the prescribed cubic space 
was obtained for 337 pupils. Under the superintendence of the Chief Clerk of Works, an excellent 
Boys' School, to accommodate 395 pupils, has been erected at Goulbnrn, and an addition has been 
made to the Captain's Flat Public School to accommodate 105 pupils. Repairs and improvements to 
97 schools and 21 residences have been carried out under inspectoral supervision, at a cost of £716. 



Attendance ofPupilt and Payment of Fees. 



I 1fiO*7 

Mean quarterly enrolment _».. j ,ggi 

Mean average attendance -[ iqqq 

f 1897 
Mean enrolment of free pupils ~..~~. -j 18 <J> 

F« reeled j }fj£ 



Goulburn. 



Braidwood. 



4,075 
4,160 

2,970 
3,293 

713 
690 

£1,276 
£1,479 



2,936 
3,065 

2,139 
2,138 

462 

429 

£949 
£1,019 



4,181 
4,102 

3,097 
3,004 

580 
521 

£1,452 
£1,469 



Yass. 



3,124 
3,066 

2,230 
2,171 

626 
551 

£992 
£1,055 



Totals. 



14,316 
14,393 

10,436 
10,606 

2,381 
2,191 

£4,669 
£5,022 



The regularity of attendance, as indicated by a comparison of the mean quarterly and mean 
average attendances, appears as follows : — 



1897. 

Goulburn Section 72 per cent. 

Braidwood „ - 72 „ 

Bega „ 74 „ 

Yass ,, * 71 ,, 

Whole District 72 „ 



1896. 

79 per cent. 

69 

73 

70 

73 



>» 



While the regularity of attendance for the whole District is about the same as for last year, 
that for the Goulburn Section shows a marked falling off. In respect to the enrolment of free pupils, 
it is to be noted that 242, or 10 per cent., were State children. In the Goulburn Section alone there 
***© 165 State children. 



132 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



Inspection. 

The schools or departments that were in operation during the whole year of 1897, or a part 
thereof, numbered 395, of which 386 were inspected regularly. Those which were not so inspected 
were closed, through diminished attendance of pupils, before they could be visited. Six of these were 
in the Goulburn, 2 in the Braidwood, and 1 in the Bega section. The inspections held in the several 
sections of the district, and the numbers of pupils examined, are stated in the subjoined table : — 



Section. 



1897. 



Regular. 



Ordinary. 



Tota's. 



Pupils 
examined. 



1896. 



Regular. 



Ordinary. 



Totals. 



Pupils 
examined. 



Goulburn .... 
Braidwood . 

Bega 

Yass 

Totals 



96 


6 


102 


94 


6 


100 


111 


3 


114 


85 




85 


386 


15 


401 



3,100 
2,732 
3,407 
2,338 



11,577 



99 


12 


111 


100 


1 


101 


109 


• • • • • 


109 


83 


3 


86 


391 


16 


407 



3,333 
2,3% 
3,287 
2,416 



11,362 



Mr. Inspector Pitt took charge of the Braidwood section in February last, but subsequently 
became seriously ill. Mr. Inspector G. H. Hunt was accordingly entrusted with the inspection of 30 
schools in that section, and with certain other duties pertaining to the office of inspection, while 
business relating to applications for new schools and repairs to buildings, in the same section, devolved 
upon me. As this work engrossed my attention during a large portion of the latter half of the year, I 
found it necessary to avail myself of the aid of Mr. Hunt in the inspection of four schools in the 
Goulburn section. The Chief Inspector undertook the principal share of the regular inspections of the 
Superior Public Schools at Braidwood and Queanbeyan, and during a short visit to the district, 
inspected, incidently, a considerable number of schools. 



General Efficiency of Schools inspected. 



Section. 



Class of School. 



Above 
Standard. 



Up to 
Standard. 



Below 
Standard. 



Totals. 



Percentage up to 
or above Standard. 



1897. 



1896. 



Goulburn 



Braidwood 



Bega 



Yass 



Public 

Provisional 

Half-time 

Totals 

Public 

Provisional 

Half-time... 

Totals 

Public 

Provisional 

Half-time 

Evening 

Totals 

Public 

Provisional 

Half-time 

Totals 

Grand Totals. 



45 


2 


1 


48 


9 





1 


10 


34 


2 


2 


38 


88 


4 


4 


96 


39 








39 


11 








11 


44 








44 


94 








94 


50 


23 





73 


11 








11 


24 


2 





26 


1 








1 


86 


25 





111 


49 


1 


1 


51 


18 








18 


13 


1 


2 


16 


80 


2 


3 


85 


348 


31 


7 


386 



98 
90 
94 



98 

100 

97 



95 


98 


100 
100 
100 


93 

84 
92 


100 


92 


100 
100 
100 
100 


94 

77 
95 


100 


93 


99 

100 

87 


96 

100 

83 


96 


95 



98 



94 



This table affords evidence of improvement for the year, in respect to organisation, discipline, 
and attainments, but the high percentage of schools meeting the standard requirements must be dis- 
counted somewhat by the fact that the standard mark is only " tolerable," or 50 per cent. When the 



'Report of the Minister of Public Instruction, 



133 



efficiency of a school falls below "tolerable," the teacher must be regarded as incompetent, or negligent, 
but the mere attainment of that mark cannot, in itself, be deemed meritorious. A better criterion is 
the mark obtained by individual teachers as compared with the classifications tbey hold ; and an 
examination of the results for the whole district enables me to report that the schools, as thus tested, 
deserve a high award. 

Proficiency of Pupils examined. 

The results of the examination of the pupils, as disclosed at the Regular Inspections, are as 
given hereunder : — 



Subject. 



Numbers examined in — 



1897. 



1896. 



Percentage of Passes. 



Goulburn. 



Braidwood 



Tass. 



Percentage of Total 



1897. 



1896. 



Reading. 



Writing — 
On slates 
On paper 



Totals 



Dictation 



Totals 



Grammar 

Geography .... 
History — 

English 

Australian.... 

Scripture 

Object Lessons. 

Drawing 

Music 

French 

Euclid 

Algebra 

Mensuration.... 
Latin 

Keedlework .... 
Drill 

Science 



11,577 



4,247 
7,196 



11,443 



Arithmetic — 

Simple Rules , 

Compound Rules 

Higher Rules , 



9,604 



11,362 



4,324 
6,880 



96 



87 



98 
89 



11,204 



9,078 



6,892 
2,897 
1,655 



11,444 



6,603 
2,773 
1,790 



93 



91 
91 



91 



84 



11,166 



4,563 
4,581 

4,576 

770 

11,362 

11,530 

11,373 

10,512 

111 

444 

188 

428 

162 

4,097 

10,747 

231 



4,569 
4,564 



98 
83 
95 



68 



97 



95 
97 



96 



85 



97 



89 
90 



4,583 


76 


782 


80 


11,028 


92 


11,164 


96 


11,062 


92 


10,133 


94 


109 


100 


433 


100 


164 


94 


437 


64 


162 


100 


o, yyo 


99 


11,105 


87 


294 


71 



76 
54 
60 



68 



83 
75 
75 



80 



90 
91 

91 
89 
93 
91 
87 
80 
89 
90 
88 
70 
84 
99 
95 
85 



89 
91 

88 
84 
88 
90 
92 
89 
85 
82 
74 
68 
82 
100 
90 
88 



89 
89 
70 



87 



71 
68 

52 

100 

64 

88 

90 

53 

100 

100 

100 

74 

100 

100 

86 



82 


91 


92 
96 


94 
93 


94 


94 

i 


70 


77 



87 
76 
80 



82 



86 
86 

78 
86 
85 
91 
91 
80 
94 
93 
88 
63 
93 
99 
89 
79 



91 



96 

95 



95 



75 



86 

72 
80 



82 



84 
88 

76 
88 
88 
91 
90 
89 
99 
91 
85 
81 
88 
99 
88 
89 



The general results do not differ, to any great extent, from those reported for 1896. It is 
worthy of note, however, that the two subjects which appear to least advantage are the compound 
rules of arithmetic and mensuration. The low results in the former subject are, I think, attributable 
to a want of skill and painstaking care on the part of many teachers, who seem slow to realise that 
failure in the compound rules, in the ordinary class examinations, and in examinations for exemption 
certificates, are evidences of defective instruction or careless revision. In mensuration, although only 
a small number of children were examined, the results were unsatisfactory, owing chiefly, I believe, 
to a lack of interesting examples of a practical nature calculated to exhibit the usefulness of the work. 
It is to be regretted, perhaps, that instruction in mensuration is not introduced at an earlier period of 
the school course, as the greater portion of the pupils leave school without acquiring any knowledge 
of it. This remark applies also to Australian History, the main facts of which might, with profit to 
our children, be imparted at least as soon as those of English History. 



134 



Report of the Minuter of Public Instruction. 



Exemption Certificates. 
The pupils examined for these certificates numbered 948, as compared with 998 for 1896. 
results are shown below : — 



The 



Section. 


Examined. 


Passed. 


Percentage of Passes. 


1897. 


1886. 




334 
214 
239 
161 


230 

165 
163 

77 


68 

77 
68 

47 


65 




53 




67 


Yass 


47 






Totals 


948 


635 


67 


60 







Improvement to the extent of 3 per cent, is evidenced by this table, but the result cannot be 
considered fully satisfactory. When arithmetic is taught on more rational principles, is made more 
practical, and is more carefully revised, the failures for exemption certificates will be greatly lessened, 
and the pupils will benefit in many ways. 

Superior Public Schools. 

The work done in the Superior Public Schools at Goulburn (Boys' and Girls') South Goulbura 
{Boys' and Girls), North Goulburn (Boys' and Girls'), Bega, Braidwood, and Cooma during the year 
has been very fairly satisfactory. The senior pupils of the four Goulburn schools have, as formerly, 
had the benefit of experimental lectures from Mr. A. G. Sach, F.C.S., at the local Technical College. 
The subject for the year was Chemistry, and, at a written examination held at the end of November, 
the pupils exhibited a degree of proficiency which reflects credit upon the lecturer, and upon the 
regular teachers of the schools, whose skilful and painstaking revising of the substance of the lectures 
successfully impressed on the minds of the youthful students the laws and phenomena which had been 
explained and illustrated in the lecture-room. The Goulburn Superior Boys' School will be conducted 
henceforth in a new and well arranged building, which affords facilities for organising and teaching 
that may be expected to conduce to even better results than those that have hitherto been obtained. 

Kindergarten. 

The infants attending the schools at Goulburn, North Goulburn, South Goulburn, Eastgrove, 
and Queanbeyan have enjoyed the great advantage of instruction in accordance with the Kindergarten 
method, with results that cannot but be regarded as gratifying. On receipt, in August last, of an 
intimation from the Chief Inspector that Kindergarten materials would be supplied to all schools in 
which it would appear they could be profitably utilised, I took action which resulted in the intro- 
duction of this admirable method into the public schools at Bundanoon, Bungendore, Captain's Flat, 
Major's Creek, and Milton ; and arrangements have been made for reviving the use of the materials 
already supplied to the Superior Public Schools at Braidwood and Cooma. Having regard to the fact 
stated in the Chief Inspector's report for 1896, that " all our training school students receive thorough 
training in the theory and practice of Kindergarten work," it is not too much to expect that, in a 
comparatively short time, it will be impossible to find a school the teaching staff of which contains at 
least two members wherein the children shall be without the benefits of the Kindergarten system of 
instruction. 

Public School Manual Training Class. 

This class continues to be very popular with pupils and parents. Fifty-five boys from the four 
Goulburn Schools receive instruction for about two hours weekly, from Mr. Thomas Wilkie, the 
teacher of the class. The course extends over three years, and the practical results have proved 
eminently satisfactory. 

School Libraries. 

In the formation of these excellent aids to the efficient education of the children entrusted to 
their care, an increasing number of the teachers under my personal supervision have shown a commend- 
able interest. Where the matter is taken up with zeal and earnestness, difficulties disappear, and 
success is achieved. In some cases, however, the idea that the mere perfunctory performance of only 
such duties as are specifically enjoined by law or regulation, is all that a teacher need undertake on 
behalf of the youth under their care, serves at once as a hindrance to an undoubtedly good work, and 
as evidence of the inadequate conception, by the teachers concerned, of their responsibilities and 
obligations. 

Athletic Association. 

A Public Schools Athletic Association was established in Goulburn in October last, and its 
inaugural meeting was held on 10th December ultimo, with a result that augurs well for its future 
success. As a means of promoting the physical development and recreation of the children, and of 
forming a pleasant bond of union among the teachers of the whole district, the Association is calculated 
to do much good, and is deserving of support alike from teachers and parents. 



Meport of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



135: 



Teachers. 

There were 392 teachers of all ranks employed in the district at the close of the year, classed as 
follows : — 



Section. 



Teachers. 


3 


Assistants. 


•i 


1 

1 

s 


Pupil Teachers. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 



I 



Goulburn 

Braidwood 

Bega 

Totals 









^ 












48 


19 


8 


4 


12 


74 


17 


6 


13 


50 


20 








7 


48 


22 





5 


79 


14 


1 


1 


5 


85 


15 


3 


7 


48 


28 








6 


52 


90 


3 


5 


225 


81 


9 


5 


30 


259 


84 


12 


30 



110 

82 

110 

90 



392 



As a body, the teachers have shown zeal and ability in the discharge of duty, and have borne 
themselves with a becoming respect for their positions, though, in one or two instances, personal 
misconduct has led to censure and punishment. 

Summary. 

By the buildings now provided, together with those proposed to be erected, the needs of the 
district, in respect to school accommodation, may be said to be fully met ; the educational results of 
the year's work were fairly satisfactory ; and the outlook for 1898 is encouraging. 

Separate reports upon the Braidwood, Bega, and Yass sections are forwarded herewith. 

D. J. COOPER, 
Goulburn, 6th January, 1898. District Inspector* 



ANNEX R. 
Inspector Hunt's Report. 

During the year, or some portion of it, there were 96 schools in operation in this section, viz. : — 

Public 39 

Provisional , 11 

Half-time... 46 

Owing to the unsettled state of the population in many of the rural districts, to the growing up 
of families, and in some instances to the indifference of the parents respecting the education of their 
children, 9 schools were closed, as they failed to maintain the required minimum attendance. The 
schools so closed were : — 

Public 1 

Half-time „. 8 

The school which formerly existed at Eaglehawk was reopened as a Half-time. 
The year closed with 87 schools in operation, viz. : — 

Public 38 

Provisional , 11 

Half-time 38 

These schools provide — 

(a) 4,562 seats at 8 square feet of space per child. 
(&) 3,854 seats at 100 cubic feet of air space per child. 

The enrolment for the quarter ending December, 1897, was : — 

Boys 1,470 

Girls ~ 1,335 

Total 2,805 

And the average attendance for the same period was : — 

Boys 1,0753 

Girls 9696 

Total 2,044-9 



136 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



Under inspectorial supervision, repairs to 27 schools were effected at a total cost of £182 15s, 10d., 
and repairs to 5 others are in progress, the cost of which will total £51 4s. 6d. 

When the works in progress are completed, and certain contemplated improvements are 
effected, the majority of the school premises in this section will be in fair repair. 

Of the 96 schools in operation during the year, 94 received a Regular, and 6 an Ordinary 
Inspection. 

All these schools were up to or above the required standard, and a very fair percentage of those 
scholars who sat for Exemption Certificates were successful. 

The majority of the schools are very fairly equipped, and the Department's property, in most 
instances, is well cared for. 

Whilst arbor-culture, bee-farming, &c., in some instances are carried on with commendable 
success, several teachers have apparently put forth little or no effort to beautify. the school grounds, 
Some of these teachers have promised to give this matter their careful attention in the future. 

The cleanliness of the school-rooms, the neatness of the school records, and the general efficiency 
of most of the schools prove the teachers, both male and female, to be whole-hearted in their very 
responsible work. 

The year just closed has been attended by a goodly measure of success, and the general outlook 
for the year 1898 is hopeful and pleasing. 

GEO. H. HUNT, 
3rd January, 1898. Inspector. 

ANNEX S. 

Inspector Sheehy's Report. 

No change has been made in the boundaries of the Yass Section during the year. 

At the close of 1896 there were 82 schools in operation. One, Broughtonsworth Public, was 
temporarily closed after the Christmas Vacation, but reopened in July as Half-time in conjunction 
with a new school established at Ardnaclach, about 5 miles distant. In January, Half-time Schools 
were opened at Ledgerton and Uriarra, and towards the end of the year Boambolo Provisional was 
discontinued on account of diminished attendance. Brungle, Gunnary, Jenkins, and Yammatree 
Provisional were converted into Public Schools. After these changes the schools under my supervision 
•at the end of the year comprised : — 

Public 51 

Provisional 17 

Half-time 16 

Total 84 

Four applications for the establishment of new schools were received, and dealt with as follows :— 



Locality. 


Kind of School applied (or. 


Result. 


Ardnaclach 


Provisional 


Half-time granted. 
Granted. 


Five-mile Creek, Gundagai 








Declined. 




a 



Inspection. 

There were 85 schools open during the year, or some portion thereof. All received a regular 
inspection, but none an ordinary inspection, as no opportunity in connection with other work occurred. 
The following table shows the number below, up to, and above the standard (50 per cent, of possible 
marks) : — 



Schools. 


Below Standard. 


Up to Standard. 


Above Standard. 


Total 


Public 


1 

2 


1 

1 


49 
18 
13 


51 


Provisional 


18 


Half-time 


16 






Totals 


3 


2 


80 


85 






Totals in 1896 


2 


3 


78 


83 



In 34 schools there is an improvement in the general efficiency, in 34 others a retrogression, and 
no change in the remainder. In many cases the increase or decrease in the efficiency is but slight ; in 
a few it is of a decided character. 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



137 



Organization, 
The school-rooms, as a rule, are in good order, the lesson-guides neatly compiled, and the 
records satisfactorily kept. In one case the organization in these respects was of a discreditable 
character. All schools are well supplied with books and materials, and by most teachers proper care 
is taken of them. 

Discipline. 

In nearly all schools good order is maintained. The government is mild and vigilant. The 
pupils are respectful and obedient, and their behaviour is in general orderly. In the majority of 
schools drill is receiving increased attention. 

Proficiency. 

The subjects of examination, number of pupils examined, and percentage of passes are given in 
the subjoined table : — 



Subjects. 



Number 
Examined. 



Number Passed. 



Percentages. 



1897. 



1896. 



Reading 

Writing 

Dictation 

Arithmetic , 

Grammar , 

Geography 

History — English .., 
,, Australian 

Scripture 

Object Lessons 

Drawing 

Music 

French 

Euclid 

Algebra .. 

Mensuration 

Latin 

Needlework 

Drill 



2,338 

2,212 

1,939 

2,249 

915 

932 

931 

101 

2,338 

2,338 

2,180 

2,338 

5 

55 

30 

35 

35 

902 

2,338 



1,939 

2,098 

1,368 

1,960 

649 

639 

484 

101 

1,496 

2,061 

1,976 

1,260 

5 

55 

30 

26 

35 

902 

2,013 



82 9 

94*8 

705 

87 1 

70-9 

68 5 

519 

100-0 

63*9 

88-1 

90-6 

53 8 

1000 

1000 

1000 

742 

1000 

100 

86 



855 
955 
690 
86 2 
74 5 
78-6 
64-5 
98*4 
67 4 
93 4 
87-7 
57 6 



100 
1000 
100 
100 -0 
1000 
83*4 



Except in English history, music, scripture, and geography, in which the passes are 51*9, 53*8, 
63*9, and 68 5 per cent, respectively, the percentages range from 70 to 100. In several subjects, how- 
ever, they are not so high as those obtained last year. 

One hundred and sixty -one pupils were examined for exemption certificates, and 77 satisfied the 
prescribed test. Of those who had previously obtained certificates, 71 attended school this year, and, 
except a few, were present at inspection. The issue of exemption certificates has in many cases a 
mischievous effect in the withdrawal of children before the usual time from school. This is to be 
regretted, as the examination for them causes teachers to revise their work, and devote special attention 
to the main subject. 

Teachers. 



Teachers in charge 
Assistants 



Totals 



II A. 



0> 



II B. 



*3 



fa 



III A. 



-a 

§ 

fa 



IIIB. 



-a 

S 



IIIC. 



4> 

1 

£ 



Unclassified. 






1 

fa 



Totals. 



o> 



<u 



fa 



Grand 
Total. 



5 







3 





18 


3 


6 


8 


3 


3 


13 


14 


48 


28 







3 








18 


1 





2 

10 



3 



3 





3 




48 


6 
34 


4 


6 


13 


17 



76 
6 



82 



Pupil-teachers. 



Class I. 



6 



"3 

a 

fa 



Class II. 



1 



4 

1 

fa 



Class III. 



•a 



.1 

fa 



Class IV. 



0) 

1 

fa 



Probationers. 



Totals. 



<u 



0) 

•3 

§ 

fa 



Grand 
Total. 











8 



138 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



With a few exceptions the teachers of all ranks are zealous in the discharge of their duties. In 
the matter, however, of famishing returns there are some who are the reverse of careful, and whose 
errors and omissions cause inconvenience, especially at the end of the year. 

Most of the unclassified teachers served as pupil-teachers, and their work is on the whole of a 
satisfactory character. 

Accommodation. 

The total number of seats provided at the end of last year was 3,582. By the closing of one 
school and the giving up of two old school-buildings, 60 seats were lost. There were, however, 113 
new ones provided by the erection of two new buildings, the opening of 3 new schools, and an addition 
to a school-room. Fifty- three new places were thus gained. Hence the sitting accommodation at the 
end of the year consisted of 3,635 places. 

Information respecting the new buildings is given below : — 



School. 



Cost 



Places at 8 Places at. 
square feet 100 cubic 



of floor 
space. 



feet of air 
space. 



Supervised by 



Remarks. 



Gunnery Public ..... 

Wyangle Provisional 
Ledgerton Half-time 

Uriarra Half-time .. 
Ardnaclach 



£ s. d. 

95 

75 


40 

29 
29 

30 
25 


32 

23 
21 

15 
18 









Inspector 



»» 



Residents , 



tt 



Erected to replace old 
building. 

i> » 

Erected where no school 

existed before. 

Room provided by a 
resident. 



Repairs and improvements to 34 schools and 11 teachers' residences, which cost £111 9a. 5«L 
and £152 18s. respectively, were carried out under the supervision of the Inspector. Improvements 
to 11 schools and 3 teachers 7 residences are in progress. The former are to cost £91 5s. 4d., and the 
latter £13 5s. 

Under the supervision of the Chief Clerk of Works the teacher's residence at Coolac la to be 
enlarged, and repairs and improvements are to be effected to the Public Schools at Gundagai, Murrain- 
burrah, and Yass. 

Summary. 

All the schools in operation during the year, or any portion of it, were fully inspected, and 94 
per cent, were above the requirements of the standard. Three new schools have been opened, and two 
new buildings to replace old ones erected. Adequate provision has been made to satisfy the educa- 
tional wants of the section, and the prospects for 1898 are good. 

P. F. SHEEHY, 
Yass, 31st December, 1897. Inspector. 



ANNEX T. 

Inspector Dome's Report; 

During the year 1897 there were 112 schools in operation in Bega section of Goulburn District. Of 
these, three were closed during the year, viz. , the Public school at Toothdale, the Half-time school at 
Moggendoura, and the Evening Public school at Bombala. The schools remaining at the close of the 
year comprise 72 Public, 11 Provisional, and 26 Half-time — a total of 109. 

The gross enrolment of pupils in all schools for the year was 5,157, and the average attendance 
3,129*2. The following table shows the comparative attendance for 1896 and 1897 : — 



Quarter. 


Enrolment. 


Average Attendance. 


Percentage. 


1896. 


1897. 


1896. 


1897. 


1896. 


1897. 


March. 


4,102 
4,148 
4,064 
4,095 


4,171 
4,137 
4,242 
4,175 


2,9751 

2,890*1 
3,089-3 
3,062*8 


3,049 2 
3,073 4 
3,145 9 
3,1210 


72-5 
69-6 
76 

74-7 


731 


June 


74*2 


September 

December 


741 

74-7 







It will be seen that the attendance for 1897 shows a slight improvement on that for 1896. 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



139 



Of the schools in operation during 1897, all, except one, received a regular inspection. This 
school, Deua River Half-time, was only in operation a few days. Three schools received also an 
ordinary inspection. 

The condition of the schools regularly inspected during the year is compared with the schools 
so inspected in 1896 in the following table : — 



Schools. 


Below Standard. 


Up to Standard. 


Above Standard. 


1890. 


1897. 


1896. 


1897. 


1896. 


1897. 


Public 


per cent. 

4 

4 


per cent. 

• •• 

• • • 

• • • 

• • * 


per cent. 

24 

3 

11 

20 


per cent. 
31 

• •• 

7 
22 


per cent. 
72 . 
77 
85 
76 


per cent. 
69 


Provisional Z.^SZZ. 


100 


Half-time 


93 


All , 


4 


78 



The schools have more than upheld their efficiency of 1896 during this year — not one of the 111 
sehools inspected being below standard. At the regular inspections, 239 pupils were examined for 
exemption certificates, and 163 passed — a percentage of 68. The weak subject at these examinations 
is usually arithmetic, and this will continue to be so until teachers give more attention to practical 
questions in this subject. Of the pupils who obtained certificates in former years, 183 were still in 
attendance. 

At the close of 1897 there were 110 teachers employed in the various schools in the District, 
comprising 83 males and 27 females. They are classified as follows : — 

Class 1 B 2 Pupil-teachers — 

6 Class 1 

»» *• - 

53 „ 3 

7 „ 4 

8 






>» 



2 A. 
2B. 

3 A. 
3B 
3C. 



2 

4 
4 



Unclassified 15 



Total 10 



Total 



100 

Grand Total, 110. 



Summary. 

1. There is an improvement both in efficiency and attendance of the schools during 1897. 

2. The schools are well distributed, and are ample for the requirements of the District. 

3. The prospects for the coming year are encouraging. 

P. DURIE, 
Bega, 31st December, 1897. Inspector. 



ANNEX U. 



District Inspector Lobban's Report. 

There were 319 schools in operation in the Grafton District when last year's report was written. 
Two schools in the Grafton section, including the Grafton Evening Public School, 2 in the Lismore 
section, and 4 in the Port Macquarie section, were closed. One new school was established in the 
Grafton section, and 2 others that had been closed for some time were resuscitated — 1 of the latter as 
a House-to-house school, in lieu of 2 Half-time schools ; 1 school was opened in the Lismore section, and 
4 in the Port Macquarie section. In the Grafton section there is an increase of 1 school ; in the 
lismore section a decrease of 1 school ; and the Port Macquarie section contains the same number of 
schools as it did last year. The district lists are therefore unaltered. 

Considerable progress was made in the direction of erecting new school-buildings to replace old 
ones, and in enlarging and improving existing school-rooms and residences. In the Grafton and 
Lismore sections all work of this kind was supervised by the Inspectors ; but in the Port Macquarie 
section a portion of the work was carried out under the direction of the Chief Clerk of Works. The 
total expenditure in the Grafton section was £2,139 3s. Id., and in the Lismore section £1,482 Is. lid. ; 
an appreciable increase in the seating accommodation has thus been secured. 

All the schools in the district, — except one in the Lismore section, which was closed before the 
Inspector could visit it — received a regular inspection ; and five ordinary inspections were also made. 
Messrs. Wright and Board assisted me in the inspection of the Superior Public School at Grafton. 
Mr. Board also assisted at Maclean, and inspected the Provisional School at Camira, in the Grafton 
section. Eight schools on the Manning were inspected by me in the beginning of the year. In the 
Grafton section, 4,054 pupils were examined, 4 f 198 in the Lismore section, and 4,011 in the Port 
Macquarie section. 



n 



140 Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 

Three hundred and twenty-four schools were inspected ; 12 were below standard, and 312 up 
to or above it. In the Grafton section, 3 were below, and 104 above, the standard ; in the Lismore 
section, 4 were below, and 95 up to or above, the standard ; and in the Port Macquarie section 5 were 
below and 113 above the standard. This is our best record. 

All pupils in Fourth Class who had not passed the examination, and those who had been four 
half years in the Third Class, were examined for exemption certificates — 303 were presented in the 
Grafton section, and 218 passed ; 428 were tested in the Lismore section, and 157 passed. Most of the 
failures are in arithmetic ; and in the case of Fourth Class pupils, the cause is almost invariably found 
to be due to the fact that the pupils had been promoted before they had completed the full time in the 
Third Class. 

The attendance throughout the year has, on the whole, been very fairly satisfactory. Improve* 
ment in this direction is still desirable. Small as the legal school-fee is, it has a good deal to do with 
the cases were truancy and irregular attendance are met. As a rule children do not like to be con- 
sidered free ; and some parents who cannot pay fees will not apply for free education for their 
children, even when they know that afterwards they will have to apply for the cancellation of their 
debts. 

The dairying industry, which opens up a wide field for the employment of boys and girls, is 
beginning to touch the schools. The principal part of the work is done early in the morning and late 
in the afternoon. Hence the children are not kept from school ; but several have to come in late and 
leave early. Home lessons in such cases cannot be insisted upon. It is certainly to the advantage of 
boys and girls to be trained to habits of industry, and this work fits them for engaging in profitable 
employment when they leave school. 

The Savings Banks are progressing satisfactorily in most of the schools in which they are estab- 
lished. There are 20 Banks in operation in the Grafton section, with 680 depositors, having 
£181 18s. Id. at their credit ; in the Lismore section there are 15 Banks, with 464 depositors, and 
£194 7s. 5d. at their credit. These figures, however, do not show all the transactions of the Banks. 
Many depositors transfer to the Government Savings Bank, and considerable sums are withdrawn from 
time to time for private use. 

The teaching staff consists of 298 teachers, 4 mistresses, 27 assistants, 71 pupil- teachers, and 
1 work-mistress. Of these the Grafton section has 98 teachers, 2 mistresses, 10 assistants, 29 pupil- 
teachers, and 1 work-mistress ; the Lismore section has 94 teachers, 2 mistresses, 10 assistants, and 
22 pupil-teachers ; and the Port Macquarie section has 106 teachers, 7 assistants, and 20 pupil- 
teachers. The teachers continue to maintain their good reputation as loyal and faithful servants of 
the Department ; and the pupil-teachers have been as zealous and studious as hitherto. 

The results of the year's inspection afford grounds for satisfaction, and there is good reason to 
expect that the work of next year will be equally gratifying. 

A. LOBBAN, 
Grafton, 28th December, 1897. District Inspector. 



ANNEX V. 

Inspectob Weight's Report. 

Of the 115 schools open in this section at the end of 1896 one (1), Warrell Creek Provisional, 
was not reopened this year; so that at the beginning of 1897 there were 114 schools in operation. 
Four (4) new schools were opened, viz. : — 

Macleay Entrance Public. 
Skillion Flat Public. 
Blackbird Flat Half-time. 
Brock's Flat Half-time. 

Three (3) schools have been closed owing to diminished attendance, viz. : — 

The Hatch Provisional 
Moparrabah Half-time. 
Panton Half-time. 

So that there are now 115 schools in operation, viz. : — 

Public 84 

Provisional 13 

Half-time 18 

A new school building has been erected at Mungay Creek, and the school will be opened at the 
beginning of the new year. It is not likely that many new schools will be needed during 1898, and it 
may fairly be said that the means of education in this district, as regards amount and distribution, are 
adequate to the requirements. 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



141 



A ccommodation. 

Accommodation is now provided for 7,031 pupils, allowing 100 cubic feet for each child, or for 
7, 120 pupils, giving to each pupil 8 square feet of floor space, the gain for the year being 120 and 99 
seats respectively. As the highest quarterly enrolment was 4,991, it will be seen that ample provision 
has been made. 

School Buildings. 

During the year the following works have been carried out under my supervision, viz. : — Six 
new school buildings have been erected at a cost of £412 lis. 4d., one has been enlarged for £15, and 
twenty-eight buildings (school-rooms and residences) have been repaired at a cost of £189 17s. 4d. 
Works, to cost £310 13s. 6d., are now in progress, and repairs to several schools have been authorised, 
and will be executed early next year. The buildings generally are in good repair, and in most cases 
both buildings and grounds receive careful attention from the teachers. The teachers at Oxley Island 
Public and Mitchell Island Public deserve special mention for the work done by them in improving 
and beautifying the school grounds. 

Inspection* 

All the schools (118) open during the year were fully inspected, and 113 (95*7 per cent.) were 
found to be above the standard. These results are 2*7 per cent, higher than those obtained last year, 
and show a higher degree of efficiency. Taree Superior Public and Wingham Public were again the 
most successful schools, the former gaining 82 per cent, and the latter 81 '5 per cent, of the possible 
marks. Altogether, 4,011 pupils were examined, as against 3,734 examined last year. 

The organisation ana discipline of the schools are still highly satisfactory, and the results 
generally show that the teachers are a painstaking and capable body. 

Seven pupils passed the University Junior Examination, viz., four from West Kempsey 
Superior Public, two from Taree Superior Public, and one from Wingham Public. 

Attendance. 

The enrolment and average attendance of scholars for the four quarters of the year are given 
below : — 



First quarter 
Second ,, 
Third „ 
Fourth „ 



Enrolment. 



Average Attendance. 



Percentage. 



4,974 
4,959 
4,977 
4,991 



3,715-2 
3,6681 
3,7581 
3,697 9 



746 
73 9 
75 5 

74- 



As compared with last year, the enrolment shows a slight increase, and in regularity of 
attendance there is an improvement of 3*5 per cent. 

Staff. 

At the end of the year there were in all 133 teachers employed, viz., 106 principal teachers, 7 
assistants, and 20 pupil teachers. Eighty-three of the principal teachers hold classifications ranging 
from 1 B to 3 C, and 23 are unclassified. Most of the unclassified teachers are ex-pupil teachers who 
have not yet been allowed to sit for classification. They are doing very satisfactory work in the small 
schools. All the assistants hold third-class certificates. 

Summary. 

Satisfactory work has been done during the year, the schools are in a high state of efficiency, 
and the teachers are earnest and capable. The prospects for the year 1898 are good. 

S. WRIGHT, 
Port Macquarie, 30th December, 1897. Inspector. 



ANNEX W. 

Inspector Board's Report. 

The year 1897 closes with 98 schools in operation in this section, comprising 79 Public, 15 Provisional, 
and 4 Half-time Schools. During the year, the Public School at Runnymede and the Half-time School 
at Blindmouth have been closed, and a new Provisional School has been opened at Keerrong. 

Owing chiefly to the development of the dairying industry in this district, the population has. 
increased at a rapid, rate ; but, as indicated in last years report, the effect of this growth has been to 
render necessary the enlargement of existing school buildings rather than the establishment of new 
schools. The maximum quarterly enrolment has increased from 5,103 to 5,428, and owing to increased 



143 Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 

m 

attendance, 1 Half-time and 8 Provisional Schools have been converted into Public Schools. Accommo- 
dation is provided in existing buildings lor 5,921 pupils. It is probable that during the coming year 
it will be necessary to enlarge several school buildings where the attendances are approaching the 
limit of accommodation provided. There are, however, not more than two or three localities where 
the establishment of new schools is likely to be called for. 

A larger expenditure than usual has been incurred daring the year to meet the growing needs 
of the district, to place the school buildings in good condition, and to make them more comfortable 
and suitable for all requirements. Under the Inspector's supervision, 2 new schools and 1 residence 
have been erected, 4 school buildings enlarged, and 65 schools and 9 residences have been repaired, at 
a total cost of £1,482 Is. lid. Similar works are now in hand at a cost of £528 6s. 4d. In addition 
to these, contracts have been carried out under the Chief Clerk of Works at a cost of £315 Os. 6d. 

All the schools, except one which was closed before an opportunity for visiting it occurred, 
received a regular inspection, and four ordinary inspections were made. Of the 99 schools inspected, 
94 were above standard, 1 up to standard, and 4 below it, a result almost identical with that shown 
last year. The average general efficiency of the schools shows an advance of 1 per cent. The results 
of examination in the various subjects of instruction preserve a general similarity to those of last year. 
Three hundred and thirty-five pupils were examined for exemption certificates, and 157 passed. 
Arithmetic is the subject in which most failures occurred, and in some of the larger schools pupils had 
been prematurely promoted from Third to Fourth Classes, the course of instruction for Third Class not 
having been thoroughly completed before promotion. The correction of this defect is likely to lead to 
much better results in the coming year. 

The number of teachers now employed in this section is 128, comprising 94 principal teachers, 
2 mistresses of departments, 10 assistants, and 22 pupil-teachers. In all, 86 teachers are classified and 
20 unclassified. Of the latter, 14 have been trained as pupil-teachers, and the work done by them in 
small schools is of a very satisfactory character. With very few exceptions, the teachers of this 
section have proved themselves to be faithful and earnest in the discharge of their duties. 

P. BOARD, 
Lismore, 24th December, 1897. Inspector. 

ANNEX X. 
District Inspector T. Dwyer's Report. 

The limits of the Maitland District, and its divisions for the purpose of inspectoral supervision, are the 
same as for last year (1896). The number of schools in operation daring some portion of 1897 was 243, 
comprising : — 

Maitland Newcastle Dungog i*v*t«i 

Section. Section. Section. TocaL 

Public Schools .... —-..-. ~....~.... 71 60 69 200 

Provisional Schools, 6 12 18 

Half-time Schools 4 14 18 

House-to-house Schools 3 3 

Evening Public Schools 12 14 

Total ... 82 62 09 243 

In Maitland section during the year two small schools (Eosemoost and Castle Bock) were closed 
for want of attendance. 

New schoolrooms were erected at Cox's Gap (to replace an old one) and at Bureen, where no 
school previously existed. Action for the erection of new buildings at Baerami and Gungal has been 
taken. Forty-eight schools and 23 residences were improved under my supervision at a cost of £638 
10s. 2d. 

In the whole of the Maitland district, 148 improvements to schools and residences, and the 
erection of two weather-sheds, at a cost of £1,547 5s., were made. In addition to this, 14 schools and 
residences are undergoing repairs for the sum of £225 5s. 3d. 

The number of schools in operation at the close of 1897 was as follows : — 

Maitland Section 82 

Newcastle Section..... 62 

Dungog Section 98 

242 

These schools are favourably situated, and give more than sufficient floor and cubical space for 
-the largest aggregate number of pupils in attendance on any date during the year. For 1896, the floor 
space amounted to 25,579 square feet, and the cubical spaces to 27,202. For 1897, they amounted 
respectively to 25,963 square feet and to 27,570 cubical spaces. 

Except in the case of a few schools, very little attention has been given to gardening and tree- 
planting during the year. 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



143 



The organisation of the great bulk of schools in the whole district continues to be satisfactory 
and to improve. Some teachers still give trouble by their carelessness and negligence in forwarding 
correct returns when such are due. 

The discipline of the inspected schools is very favourable, with few exceptions. Punctuality, 
regularity, attention to cleanliness of dress and person, respectful bearing to their teachers and the 
public generally, being characteristic features of the child's school life in regard to these marks of 
good discipline. No case of undue severity in the infliction of corporal punishment on pupils in the 
schools of this district came officially under our notice during the year. 

The number of schools inspected in Maitland district for the year is shown hereunder : — 



Number of Schools 


Regular 


Ordinary 


Total Number Examined 


in Operation. 


Inspections. 


Inspections. 


at Regular Inspections. 


243 


212 


21 


17,679 



All the schools in operation, except one small evening one, had regular inspections. 236, or 
nearly 98 per cent., were up to or above the standard, against 97 per cent, for last year. 

The methods of teaching in use among the teachers of the district are intelligent and effective. 
In a number of cases, third-class teachers have produced better results than those in second-class. 

The proficiency in each subject of instruction, and the percentage of those who satisfied or 
exceeded the standard, are shown in the following table : — 



Subjects. 


Number 
examined. 


Percentage. 


Subjects. 


Number 
Examined. 


Percentage. 


Reading- 
Alphabet 


2,220 
3,280 
6,336 
5,843 


76 
81 
85 
83 


Geography — 
Advanced 


3,302 

3,805 


78 


Monosyllables 


78 


Easv Narrative 


Total 




Ordinary Prose 


7,107 


78 




History — 
English 




Total 


17,679 


83 


7,165 
1,284 

17,069 

17,344 

17,514 

16,900 

210 

942 

233 

390 

234 

6,203 

17,475 

257 






„ 


Writing — 
On Slates 


6,833 
10,846 


83 

82 


62 


,rW*f*lY1EMinA 


72 


Total 


17,679 


82 






SI 


Arithmetic — 
Simple fiules 


11,325 
3,622 
2,690 


80 

82 
74 


Drawing 


80 

81 


Cempoand Rules 


Music 


81 


Higher Rules 


French 


85 




Euclid 


87 


Total 


17,637 


79 


TVf ftTiHiiratjion 


86 
82 


Grammar — 
Elementary 


3,882 

S,49UO 


79 

77 


Needlework 


85 
81 


Advanced a . tiaaiiaiI , JI(ll ,,, 


Drill 


78 




Natural Science . . . . . 


86 


Total 


7,190 


78 



Compared with last year, Geometry is better by 18 per cent. ; Latin and French have advanced 
8 per cent. ; algebra and mensuration, by 6 per cent. ; advanced geography, by 5 per cent. ; simple 
rules, by 4 per cent. ; compound rules are better by 3 per cent. ; advanced grammar and monosyllables 
have improved 2 per cent. ; easy narrative, Scripture, objects, and needlework are better by 1 per 
cent. In the following subjects, the results produced are the same as for last year, viz. : — Ordinary 
?rose (83 per cent. ) ; dictation (8S per cent. ) ; elementary grammar (79 per cent.) ; elementary 
geography (78 per cent. ) ; drawing (81 per cent. ) ; and higher arithmetic (74 per cent. ) ; English history 
has fallen 16 per cent. ; Australian, 4 per cent. ; writing on slates, 3 per cent. ; alphabet and drill ace 
Jiot so good by 2 per cent. ; writing in books, music, and natural science are lower by 1 per cent. 

It appears from the above that tangible progress has been made in 14 subjects. The results in 
6 subjects are the same for both years (1896 and 1897); and that in 8 subjects there has been a 
•slight decline compared with last year. It may be stated that reading, writing, and arithmetic, and 
in fact all subjects, are well taught, and that in schools in which the pupils who write in copy-books are 
*9ade to begin work on the bottom line, the best progress has been made. 

The number of pupils examined for certificates during the year in Maitland section was 763, of 
'whom 612 or 84 per cent, passed. In Newcastle section 767 were examined, and 471 passed, being 61 
per cent, of the number examined. There is no return regarding these examinations from Dungog 



144 



Report of the Minister of Fublic Instruction. 



sectioD. The teachers, assistants, pupil- teachers, and work-mistresses have worked well, and effectively 
during the year. No serious complaint has been officially made against them for the same period. 
Several gained promotion by examination, and under Art. 103 of the Regulations. Their classification 
at the end of 1897 is shown in the following table. 





I A. 


IB. 


HA. 


II B. 


III A. 


IIIB. 


inc. 


Un- 
classified 


Total. 


• 

$ 




• 

© 

"3 

8 


• 

© 

-a 
s 

fa 


• 

.2 

* 


• 

© 


• 

© 
-3 


• 

© 

"3 
© 

fa 


• 


o3 
© 

fa 


• 

© 
*3 
8 


• 

© 

fa 


©' 

1 


• 

© 
"3 

s 


©* 
"3 


* 

© 
*3 

a 
© 

fa 


• 

© 
"3 
3 


© 
"3 

a 
» 

fa 


• 

© 

I-* 

3 


• 

© 
-3 

a 
© 


g 


Principal Teachers 


4 

• • 


• • 

s 

#  


13 

• • 

4 


• * 

6 

• • 


32 

• • 

17 


• • 

23 
18 


17 
6 


• • 

12 


53 
1 


9 
31 


8 

• • 


7 
8 


9 
1 


8 

• • 

8 


18 

1 
19 


16 

20 
36 


154 
30 


40 
32 
89 


194 

32 

119 


Mistresses of Departments . . 






Total 


4 


8 


17 


6 


49 


41 


23 


12 


54 


40 


8 


15 


10 


184 


161 


3*5 






I. 


II. 


III. 


IV. 


Proba- 
tioners. 


- 


60 

• • 


71 
12 






• 

-3 

3 


• 
© 

"3 
S 

© 


• 
© 

"3 


• 

© 

-a 

s 

© 

fa 


• 

© 
•3 


• 

© 
-3 

a 

© 

fa 


© 
"3 

3 


• 

© 

•3 

g 
« 
fa 


• 

© 
-3 
3 


• 

© 

*3 

S 
© 

fa 




Pupil-teachers* 


4 


17 


9 


6 


18 


15 


24 


20 


5 


13 


131 


















12 




robal Tea 


chers of t 














i 


ill ranks 




244 


244 


488 





























Five new schoolrooms were erected during the year by the inspectors at a cost of £205 9s. 6d. 
One hundred and seven schoolrooms, 37 residences were improved at a cost of £1,482 16s., and two new 
weathersheds were built for £64 9s. With the exception of one small Evening Public, every school in 
the district received a regular inspection, and 21 had ordinary inspections. Good work has been done 
throughout the year, and the outlook for 1898 is very favourable. 

T. DWYER, 
East Maitland, 10th January, 1898. District Inspector. 



ANNEX Y. 

Inspector Flashman's Report. 

I have had during the past year 60 departments and 2 evening schools under my supervision. 
The enrolment of pupils has been in excess of that of last year, and was as follows : — 

March quarter 12,812 pupils. 

June quarter.... 12,782 „ 

September quarter 12,810 ,, 

December quarter 12,736 ,, 

The average attendance ranged between 9,700 and 9,800. 

A new school was opened in February last at Argenton. 

The accommodation at the close of the year was for 12,382 pupils. 

Additional seats have been provided at Wallsend Boys' and Lambton Infants'. A new school* 
room has been erected and opened at Cardiff. Extensive repairs and improvements have been made 
at Wallsend Girls', Islington Primary, and Infants' Charlestown, Hamilton, and Minmi. 

Arrangements have been made to erect large Infants' Schools at Newcastle South and Cook's 
Hill, and to enlarge the schools at New Lambton, Minmi, and Hamilton, during the coming year. In 
some parts of the district the population is rapidly increasing, so that several other buildings will have 
to be enlarged in the near future. 

The past year has been one of great activity in the matter of repairing and renovating the 
property of the Department in this district. On the whole, the school property, including teacher' 
residences, may be said to be in a good condition. Speaking generally, the buildings are well looked 
after by the teachers in charge. I have not noticed, excepting in one or two cases, any attempt to 
plant the grounds with trees, or to form gardens. This is much to be regretted. Frequently it ia 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 145 

observed that surrounding private property is covered with masses of foliage, while the school ground 
is the only bare spot. I am certain that, with a little encouragement on the part of the principal 
teachers, this reproach might soon be removed, and oar play-grounds made far more attractive. 

All the schools were regularly inspected once during the year ; numerous incidental visits were 
made as opportunity offered. 

The organization is still satisfactory and is of the same uniform character throughout the 
district. I have seldom noticed any feature distinctive or peculiar, but all the schools strongly show 
that the governing power has been trained and moulded by the same influences. In some respects this 
is an advantage, while there are certain disadvantages connected with it. The teacher who simply 
organises his school after the fashion of some other school, and who rigidly follows out directions 
received while in "training," without showing any elasticity or invention of method, will conduct his 
school as a copyist and not as an intelligent modern teacher. 

The government is generally mild, firm, and sympathetic ; this is particularly the case in the 
infants' department. As a rule the pupils are managed with tact and discretion, and without the 
use of corporal punishment. Very few cases of complaint have come under my notice. This is exceed- 
ingly satisfactory, in view of the fact that there are employed as teachers in this district nearly 
150 young persons, full of life and energy, whose enthusiasm may be expected to sometimes to outrun 
their discretion. Many of these young teachers have, early in their career, learned how to manage 
large classes of lively boys and girls ; their experience has taught them that it is easier and moie 
pleasant to lead than to drive, and, consequently, their chief aim is to be on the best of terms with 
their classes. I am pleased to say many have succeeded admirably, for they are not only respected 
but beloved by their pupils. 

The instruction is generally methodical, careful, and painstaking, and in many cases shows an 
amount of preparation which points to the fact that the teacher does nob perform his duties in a 
perfunctory manner. 

A marked improvement has been noticed in the teaching of arithmetic ; the results obtained, 
have been higher and the work done more thorough. A few yeais ago it was not at all unusual 
for fifth-class pupils to be able to state a rule but to be quite unable to prove the rule or give the 
reason for it. The theory of arithmetic has received much attention during the past two yeais. 

Mental arithmetic is taught with far more intelligence and interest than formerly. 

Grammar is admittedly a difficult and somewhat uninteresting subject. In some respects 
considerable improvement has taken place. Parsing is well done in many schools. The accidents. 
are known, and the rules of Syntax were applied. I am not quite satisfied u ith the results obtained 
under the head " composition." Ordinary letter- writing is fairly well doue, but the range is far too 
narrow, and not sufficient variety is imported into the lessons. 

Scripture history is now being well taught in almost all the schools. The amount of informa- 
tion possessed by the senior pupils in this subject i3 most satisfactory. 

Judging by results, dictation and spelling are well taught. 

On the whole, music is carefully taught, particularly in the infants' departments. This subject 
does not rest upon the same footing as other subjects. The chief object of music in our schools is not 
that of turning out musicians, or even readers of music ; its object is more to provide a pleasure and a 
pastime from study. Physically, singing opens the lungs and helps to circulate the blood ; mentally, 
it makes a momentary forgetfulness of study and complete rest to the mind. The union of will, when  
all in a school unite in singing the words of some beautiful song, has a charming effect upon the mind, 
and assists materially in the discipline of the school. 

Lost year I had to complain of the manner in which geometry was taught and the poor results 
obtained. The teachers responded willingly to my appeal for better work, and I am please* I to report 
that in all the schools where the subject is taught, the results this year have been of a very satisfactory 
character. 

The fourth and fifth class boys at Wallsend showed by the high marks they obtained that their- 
teachers had presented the subject in an intelligent and effective manner to their pupils. 

There were 767 pupils examined for exemption certificates ; 471 obtained them. Some schools, 
obtained certificates for every pupil examined for them, but in other schools all who were examined 
failed. 

Perhaps in no part of school work has there been such marked improvement and development in 
school methods as in the infants' department of this section. We are fortunate in having many of our 
Infants' Schools presided over by ladies who are not only highly educated and experienced, but who 
are in close sympathy with their work, and who are able to readily grasp ideas and to intelligently put 
into force any suggestion that may be made to them for the good of their schools. Although there are 
bo Kindergarten Schools pure ana simple in this District, yet most of the schoo's have appropriated • 
tfcany of the best features of that system. Our Infants' Schools are bright and cheerful places ; they 
are popular with parents and pupils, and are doing much to mould and develop the moral, physical, 
and intellectual characters of the little ones. 

The subjects in which the greatest improvements have been made are slate and mental 
arithmetic, reading, drawing, form, and moral training. The only subject I am not yet quite satisfied 
^"ith is the teaching of colour. It appears to me that we require a complete change of method in 
dealing with this subject. There is too much theory and too little practical instruction. The children 
are exercised considerably about first, second, and third class colours, but the training of the e} e to 
detect these colours is somewhat neglected. 



146 Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 

Captain Mulholland has been employed the whole year in giving instruction in drill. His 
influence for good has been felt in every school in the District. In order to extend the beneficial 
effects of his instruction, I arranged fn June last for him to give special instruction to all the pupil- 
teachers of this section, so that every alternate Saturday he gives instruction to about ninety young 
teachers, who repeat his lessons to their pupils during the following week. This has had the effect of 
much improving the drill and physical exercises of the pupils. 

Under Mr. Jones, eighty lads have received regular instruction in manual training, and Miss 
Wright has given instruction to 120 girls in cookery. 

At the close of the year there were employed in this section 35 principal teachers, 24 mistresses, 
93 assistants, 86 pupil-teachers, 9 work mistresses, 1 drill instructor, 1 teacher of manual training, and 
1 teacher of cookery. As I stated in 1892, with few exceptions the teachers are hardworking, enthu- 
siastic, conscientious workers ; they are inspired with a love for their profession, and are exceedingly 
anxious for their schools to stand well with the general public. They make themselves acquainted with 
the best ideas of the leading educationists of the day, and are even on the alert to learn and appropriate 
what may be of advantage to their schools. To these men's thoughts their professional work is ever 
present; they are always experimenting — frequently succeeding, occasionally failing, yet never becoming 
discouraged. Their methods are sufficiently elastic to accommodate themselves to any suggestion, yet 
they have sufficient acuteness not to allow their zeal for novelties to endanger their prospects of a 
successful school inspection. The pupil-teachers are a highly respectable body of young persons ; in 
every case they have been selected with great care. A very healthy spirit of emulation is noticed 
among this branch of the service, and a strong desire to give satisfaction and to excel in the profession 
of their choice is very manifest. 

The work of the past year has been successful and been performed with spirit and smoothness, 
which reflects great credit upon all concerned. The prospects of 1898 are bright and promising. 

C. 0. FLASHMAN, 
^Newcastle, 30th December, 1897. Inspector. 



ANNEX Z. 
Inspector Kevin's Report. 

At the end of last year I had on my list 98 schools, classified thus : — 

Public 69 

Provisional 12 

Half-time 14 

House-to-house «. 3 

Total 98 

This number was increased by the opening of two Evening Public Schools (Dungog and Broke), 
-and one Half-time School (Gindigah), in conjunction with Clairwood, formerly a small Public School 
The numbers now stand : — 

Public 67 

Provisional 12 

Half-time 16 

House-to-house 2 

Evening Public 1 

Total 98 

The apparent discrepancy in these numbers is explained by the conversion of certain schools 
from one class to another. Some trifling changes took place during the year, but matters stand at 
present on almost the same footing as at the end of last year. It is probable that three small schools 
will be established in the early part of the coming year. 

Every school under my supervision received a regular inspection during the year except Broke 
Evening Public. The attendance had fallen so low that it was closed before I had an opportunity of 
visiting the locality. My experience of these schools is that they are very ephemeral in their existence 
and do little good. Seventeen (17) ordinary inspections were held, and a large number of incidental 
visits paid. All such inspections were made without any previous warning to the teachers concerned, 
yet I am pleased to say that, as a whole, I found matters in a satisfactory state. 

Buildings. 

The school premises of the District are in a satisfactory condition generally, though there are 
still some places that need attention, notwithstanding the liberal expenditure of the last two years. 
The scourge of this part of the country with wooden structures of all kinds is the white ant, which, in 
two or three years, will make a shell of a new building. The Gunnedah pine, if used more extensively} 
might in some degree mitigate the ravages of these pests. 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 147 

The sum of £742 Os. 3d. was expended .during the year on repairs under my own supervision, 
while new buildings were erected at .Sedge field, Redman Vale, and Gindigah ; and weathersheds at 
Dungog and Strathisla, also under my own care. The buildings at Redman Vale and Gindigah, 
however, only received assistance in money from the Department. The water supply became very 
low towards the end of the year owing to the drought, and some schools had an allowance made to 
them by the Department to purchase water. I must say, however, that if more care had been taken 
of the supply no such assistance would have been required. I am convinced from personal observation 
that, at many schools, one-third at least of the water is allowed to run to waste by giving the pupils 
tbe free use of the tap key. Such schools need not look to the Department in future for money where- 
with to purchase water. 

Organisation. 

This is on the whole satisfactory. The schools are suitable, large enough, centrally situated, 
and well lighted as well as suitably ventilated. The supply of working materials is sufficient and of 
fairly good quality. The lesson guides are drawn with skill and care, and the records are generally 
correct and neat. 

Several of the schools can boast of neat rows of ornamental trees and shrubs, as well as of nicely- 
kept flower-beds ; but there are others where the grounds are little better than the near highway. A 
large number of the trees sent from the Sydney nurseries never do any good, being too small and puny, 
ana often perishing altogether before reaching their destination. Except in a few cases, the pupils 
appear to have ceased taking an interest in their trees, flowers, and shrubs. 

I found it advisable during the year to have a number of schools supplied with departmental 
furniture in lien of the primitive and wholly unsuitable articles provided locally when the schools were 
first established. The gains are — more comfort to the children, an improved appearance in the internal 
economy, and greater facilities in the daily work of the scholars. 

Discipline. 

The discipline may be regarded as a very satisfactory feature in the schools under my super- 
vision. It is in the main firm, yet geutle, and without any of the elements of cruelty in it. No case 
of excessive corporal punishment came under my notice during the year. 

Drill has received fair attention, but I do not think the time devoted to it commensurate with 
its importance. No school can be said to be satisfactorily disciplined where drill is not regularly and 
efficiently taught. 

The regularity and punctuality has been satisfactory, due allowance being made for wet weather, 
harvesting, dairying, and sickness. 

Instruction. 

The instruction has been carried on earnestly, faithfully, and on the whole skilfully during the 
year, — though there are, of course, various degrees of skill brought to bear on the work. All, however, 
try to do their best, with the result that the work produced, if not in every case of a very high order 
of merit, is at least honest and piins taking. On these lines then, ninety- two (92) of ninety-eight (98) 
schools inspected were above or up to the Department's standard. The least satisfactory work done 
was in home lessons, but then the pupils have not much time for these after their farm duties have 
been properly fulfilled. Two hundred and twelve (212) were examined for exemption certificates, and 
of this number one hundred and thirty -eight (138) passed — an average of 65 per cent. 

School Libraries. 

These institutions continue to work well as a refining and intellectual agent for good among the 
people, and the interest taken in them by parents, pupils, and teachers grows daily ; the parents and 
senior members of families read the books and talk of them as much as the children attending school 
do. The anniversary of the foundation of each library was celebrated all over the district this year by 
picnic, concert, &c, thus keeping alive the interest taken in them as well as raising more money 
wherewith to buy fresh books. This is to be an annual function in future. 

In conjunction with Arbor Day, opportunity was taken cf the recurrence of that festival in many 
instances to have a special tree planted by one of the senior pupils, and named the "School Library 
Tree." 

Twenty (20) new libraries were opened during the year, thus raising the total to ninety-one (91) 
with an aggregate book collection of over seven thousand (7,000) volumes. The total sum collected in 
aid of the libraries within the last twenty months (the period of their existence here), has been 
£318 10s. 3d. Many books were gifts from friends and sympathisers. Where the schools are small 
and the pupils poor, — or rather their parents —it is a beautiful sight to see the large schools helping 
them by sending them books they have read. 

The annual examination of teachers and pupil-teachers were held at the appointed times, with 
in most cases, satisfactory results to the candidates. 

Tie teaching staff of the district is a most respectable, intelligent, and well-conducted body of 
public servants, and they dignify their positions as behoves persons holding and guarding the grave 
responsibilities of educating the rising generation. I note with regret one matter among them, how- 
ever, as a body, —that there is not, so far as I can -see, the same enthusiasm in study and self -improve- 
ment that I think existed a few years ago ; why, I am not prepared to say. The pupil-teachers have 
been well-conducted, and attentive to their duties. 



148 Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 

Summary. 
To sum up briefly, — 

(1.) The means of education are ample and well distributed. 

(2.) The organization and discipline are satisfactory generally ; and 

(3.) The instruction is complete and well regulated, and imparted earnestly and on skilful lines. 

Judging matters as a whole, therefore, I consider that a good year's work has been done, and I 
look forward hopefully to the future. 

JOHN KEVIN, 
Dungog, 24th December, 1897. Inspector, 



ANNEX Z 1. 

District Inspector Lawfobd's Report. 

There have been no changes in the boundaries of the district during the past year, and the different 
sections remain in charge of the same officers, excepting that Mr. Nolan replaces Mr. McKenzie as 
Inspector-in-charge of the Hay section. 

There is an increase of 4 schools in the total number ; 335 schools having been open during 
some part of the year, as against 331 last year. 

These are classified as follows : — 

Public 244 

Provisional 41 

Half-time 43 

House-to-house G 

Evening 1 

Twelve are new schools. 

They were all fully inspected, excepting 6 small schools ; 3 in the Young section, 2 in the Hay, 
and 1 in the Albury, which are accounted for by the officers in charge of those sections. 
The schools are distributed as follows : — 

Wagga section 78 

Albury „ 95 

Hay , 70 

Young „ i,2 

In point of efficiency there is a slight gain, 93 per cent, of the schools examined being up to or 
above the standard, as against 92 in the previous year. 

A good deal of building has been none, and there is a net increase of 890 places during the year, 
besides work in progress that will give about 100 more. 

In the Wagga section the following work has been done under my own supervision : — 

£ s. d. 

Building 12 new schoolrooms 1,402 9 4 

,, 2 new residences 957 16 

Enlarging 2 schoolrooms 168 7 6 

Repairing 42 „ 499 13 5 

„ 7residences 283 12 1 

Total 3,311 18 4 

The following new schools opened during the year : — 

Bectric, Derrain, Elliott, 

Brushwood, Lockhart, Gobbagaula. 

A new school has just been completed at the Wagga Experiment Farm, which will open on 17th 
inst., and other new schools will open during the year at Mair Jimmy and South Collengullie. 

Five new buildings were completed at Jerilderie, under the Chief Clerk of Works, giving 
accommodation for 239 children. 

The schools at Notherwono and Upper Yanko, which were closed in 1896, were reopene.1. 

Only one school, Cuddell, has been closed, and it is likely that it will reopen in a few months 
when the place increases. 

On the whole, the year's work has been quite up to the average, and the teachers, as a body, 
maintain the high character gained in previous years. 

L. E. LAWFORD, 
Wagga Wagga, 1st January, 1898. District Inspector. 



Repwl of tlie Minister of Public Instruction. 149 

annex z 2. 

Inspector Friend's Report. 

The schools or departments in my inspectorate during the year 1897 numbered 68 Public, 1 1 Provisional, 
12 Half-time, and 1 House-to-house, total 92. Five of these lapsed for want of sufficient attendance of 
pupils. As two new schools (and probably a third) will open early in 1898, there will be about 90 
schools on my list for next March quarter. 

During the current year, schools came into operation at Kings vale, Lintondale, and Morrison's 
Hill ; to meet these cases, buildings were removed from localities which could no longer support a 
school. Under my supervision also, 34 school buildings and 6 teachers' residences were improved or 
repaired, one schoolroom was enlarged, and the old structure at VVattamadara was abandoned in favour 
of a more suitable one, removed from Warraneong. Improvements of a more or less important nature 
at Cullinga, Cowra, Demondrille, Temora, and Young were placed in the hands of the Chief Clerk? of 
Works. 

Allowing 8 square feet per child, there are seats for 5, S29 pupils. As the higest quarterly enrol- 
ment was 4,151, the buildings provide liberal accommodation. There is no instance of over-crowding. 
They are sufficiently numerous for present requirements, well distributed, and generally speaking in 
good repair. 

Of the 92 schools in operation at any time during the year, 89 were tested by regular inspection ; 
the unexpected closing of the remaining 3 will account for their non-examination. Four schools recei ved 
an ordinary inspection. 

Viewed broadly, the instructional results are somewhat better than they were last year, though 
the advance is not so marked as that of 1896 over 1895. I attribute this in a measure to the fact that, 
in consequence of the recent severe and lengthy drought, the punctuality and in some instances the 
regularity of children attending the outlying schools have been disturbed by their having to cut scrub 
for the stock, and drive them long distances to water. Eighty-four (84) of the schools which under- 
went a regular iuspection were found above standard, and the remaining 5 bslow it. The following 
schools were represented in the University Junior Examination : — Cowra 2 passes, Dudauman 1, Gren- 
fell 2, Temora 1, Young 5. 

The teaching staff under my supervision comprises : — 

Class I B 4 

II A 11 

II B 6 

III A 38 

„ IIIB 10 

„ III C 4 

Unclassified (the majority of these served as Pupil- teachers) ... 21 
Pupil-teachers 14 

Total 103 

The organisation of the schools is, in the main, well regulated, and the discipline a praise- 
worthy feature. The teachers, with few exceptions, are capable and dutiful, and are doing vigorous 
and profitable work. 

CHAS. J. W. FRIEND, 
Young, 25th December, 1897. Inspector. 

ANNEX Z 3. 

Inspector Pearson's Report. 

The year commenced with 93 schools classified as Public, 56 ; Provisional, 17 ; Half- time, 18 ; 
House-to-house, 2. During the year Talmalino Public and Handley Half-time were closed, Burrum- 
buttock North and Little Billabong Provisionals were established. Ournie Provisional was raised to 
Public, and Ulandra Half-time changed to Provisional. The year closed, therefore, with 93 schools. 

Ample provision is made for the educational wants of the District. 

The total number of schools and departments open during 1897* or any portion thereof, was 
95. With one exception, all were regularly inspected, the exception being a small school of 9 children, 
which was closed during first quarter before it could be visited. 

Seventy-nine schools or 84 per cent, exceeded standard limits, 4 were below, and 11 just reached 
it. This percentage (84) corresponds exactly with that of last year ; the number below standard last 
year was 12. 

The following subjects show an advance : — Reading, writing, dictation, arithmetic, grammar, 
English history, Australian history, scripture, object lesson, drawing, music, euclid, algebra, men- 
suration, needlework, drill, and natural science, whereas only three subjects, geography, Latin, and 
French, show retrogression. The important subjects show the moat marked improvement. 

The teachers generally have given careful attention to organisation and discipline, and a very 
satisfactory improvement is the result. 

Some teachers are very inaccurate and unpunctual in connection with their returns, and much 
inconvenience and serious delay are occasioned. 






150 



Mepwt of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



The school Banks do not appear to be popular, and the majority are languishing notwithstanding 
the efforts of teachers to popularise them. 

The results of the examination for exemption certificates were again unsatisfactory, only 40 per 
cent, passing the prescribed test. 

On the whole, the schoolrooms and premises present a well-ordered appearance, and the teachers 
generally take an interest in the preservation and appearance of the Department's property. 

The schools of highest efficiency are, in order of merit — Albury Boys, Albury Girls, Albury 
Infants, Corowa, German ton, Major's Plains, Mulwala, Shepardstown, Urana, Wagra, and Wandalga. 

The teaching staff at the end of the year consisted of : — Principal teachers, 81 ; mistresses, 2 ; 
assistants, 7 ; pupil-teachers, 13. The teachers generally are industrious and zealous, and esteemed in 
their respective towns. 

School accommodation, allowing 8 square feet per child : — 

Accommodation existing at commencement of 1897 5,697 

Additional provided 567 

Accommodation lo3t by closing, &c 214 

„ existing at end of 1897 6,050 

This accommodation far exceeds requirements. 

New buildings erected by Inspector or supplied by residents during the year. 



Burrumbuttock North 

Coreen 

Dightan 

FeltonWood 

Little Billabong . .'. 



x If new. 



Seats. 



Ooet. 



New , 

Replace old .... 

New , 

Replace old ~ , 
New , 



Total 



30 
31 
33 
33 
64 



191 



£ s. d. 
67 10 
98 10 
63 10 
85 
Residents. 



304 10 



The sum of £330 19s. 6d. has been expended in repairing 44 schools, and £149 9s. 6d. in renovating 
5 residences. 

Summary, 
The general efficiency of the schools has been maintained, the means of education are sufficient 
and well distributed, and the prospects for the coming year are good. 

T. PEARSON, 
Albury, 23rd December, 1897. Inspector. 



ANNEX Z 4. 

Inspector Nolan's Report. 

Of the 71 schools on the Hay list at the date of the last annual report two (2) were not reopened, and 
one (1) was permanently closed during the current year. A new school, Bunganbil Public, was 
established early in the year ; Nunnagoy t House-to-House school has been temporarily closed since last 
March, but it will resume operations early next year. At present there are under my supervision 69 
schools, three of which are likely to collapse on account of insufficient attendance ; on the other hand 
steps are being taken to establish new schools to meet the extension of settlement. The existing 
schools are well distributed, and they reasonably meet the present requirements of the district. 
In several instances, however, the buildings are of a makeshift character, and they are unequal 
to the climatic conditions ; such is more especially the case in remote localities where the sparse 
and unsettled population renders inadvisable the provision of more costly buildings. Active 
steps are being taken, where the circumstances warrant such a course, to replace unsuitable buildings 
with others more consonant to the surroundings. In a few schools the accommodation is insufficient, 
but, speaking generally, the room provided is more than ample for the enrolment ; arrangements are 
being made to provide increased accommodation where required. 

Under inspectorial supervision two (2) small buildings were erected at a total cost of £92 10s., 
thirty-one (31) buildings were improved at a cost of £150 12s. 5d.; and the works now in progress will 
amount to £129 10s. Substantial works costing £3,175 17s. were carried out during the year under 
the direction of the Chief Clerk of Works. 

Two schools, Warangesda Evening Public and Nunnagoyt House-to-house School, having been 
closed before my visit to their respective localities, were not inspected. 4,418 pupils underwent the 
examination prescribed by the standards of proficiency. Of the 68 schools regularly inspected, 5 were 
below, 4 up to, and 59 above standard requirements. The corresponding numbers for 1896 were (of 
71 schools inspected by my predecessor) 6 below and 65 above standard. A comparison discloses 
almost stationary results. In forming an estimate of the results obtained in this district, considerable 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 161 

allowance must be made for the many advene circumstances which militate against more successful 
teaching. Owing to the intense heat the work of instruction is carried on daring the summer months 
under most trying and unfavourable conditions. All things considered, the teachers, with few 
exceptions, are zealous in the discharge of their important duties,* and the results of their labours may 
be regarded as reasonably satisfactory. The pupil-teachers continue to give satisfaction to all concerned 
in their training. The following schools are worthy of special mention for their commendable general 
condition : — Alma Primary, Broken Hill North Superior, and Deniliquin Public Schools. The schools 
for aboriginal children at Cummeragunja and Warangesda are very well conducted, and the results 
obtained thereat are far in advance of those achieved in several of the ordinary Public Schools. The 
exceedingly well kept flower garden at Hay Superior Public School is an ornament to the city. Active 
steps are being taken to provide suitable shade trees in all the enclosed play-grounds. School Banks, 
found in all the larger schools, are in a fairly flourishing condition. Increased interest is manifested 
in the formation of school libraries. 

In some of the smaller schools the furniture is of a makeshift character ; but the majority of 
the schools are well equipped, and their general organisation is satisfactory. The disciplinary condition 
is of a high class, and the prevailing moral tone is very pleasing. 

W. NOLAN, 
29th December, 1897. Inspector. 

ANNEX Z 5. 

District Inspector Long's Report. 

The divisions of the District have remained unchanged, and consist of the Mudgee section, under Mr. 
Inspector J. P. Rooney ; the Dubbo section, under Mr. Inspector J. W. £. Baillie ; and the Wellington ^ 
section, under my immediate supervision. 

At the end of the former year there were 240 schools in the District. Of these 9 have been 
closed for insufficient attendance, and 10 new schools have been opened. The whole number of schools 
in operation during the whole or some part of the year 1897 was 250, of which the number remaining : 
in existence at the end of the year is 241. 

The buildings in which these schools are conducted suffice for 14,996 pupils, at the regulation 
allowance of space, being an increase of 523 places for the year. The number of pupils enrolled for 
the year was 14,435, of whom 1,676 are returned as enrolled at more than one school. The average 
daily attendance was 8,270*8. The accommodation provided by the buildings is therefore ample. 
Excepting, perhaps, one or two of the smaller wooden buildings, they are in good condition, and well 
supplied with all requisite appliances. Where repairs or improvements are desirable, the action for 
effecting them has already been taken. 

Under Inspectors' supervision 7 small school buildings have been erected, 2 schools enlarged, 
and 9 residences, and 67 schools repaired and improved, at a total cost of £1,404 lis. Id. Works of a 
more extensive nature have been effected under the Chief Clerk of Works. 

Each of the 250 schools in operation during the year received a regular inspection, excepting l r . 
which was closed before it coula be visited. Ordinary and incidental inspections were made a» 
opportunity occurred. Of the 249 regular inspections, 86 were by Mr. Inspector Rooney, 73 by Mr. 
Inspector Baillie, 85 by myself, and 5 by Mr. Inspector Parkinson, who rendered temporary assistance 
during Mr. Inspector Kooney's serious illness. For the same reason three of the inspections by Mr. 
Inspector Baillie were in the Mudgee section. Mr. Rooney and Mr. Baillie each inspected one school 
in the Wellington section. 

Two hundred and forty-one schools— that is, 96*8 per cent, of the whole number, exclusive of the 
1 school not inspected — either reached or exceeded standard in regard to general efficiency, including 
the several details under organisation, discipline, and instruction, oeing an advance on the satisfactory 
result of 95*5 per cent, for last year. Only 8 schools were returned as below standard, as against 11 
last year, and, in the case of most of these, the unsatisfactory result was due to causes beyond the 
teacher's control. 

The number of pupils examined at the inspections of the year was 9,027. The percentages of 
passes in the several subjects of instruction, as shown in the tabulated statement furnished, do not 
differ materially from those of the preceding year, and indicate that the teaching generally is intelligent, 
diligent, and efficient. 

During the year 680 pupils were examined for exemption certificates under section 35 of the 
Act, and of these 487, or 71*6 per cent, passed, being an improvement of nearly 5 per cent, on the 
result of these examinations for last year. 

The organisation almost invariably shows proper knowledge of the prescribed system, careful 
effort to carry it into effect, and due appreciation of the beneficial influence of pleasing and well-ordered 
surroundings. The attention bestowed in so many instances on tree-planting and flower-culture in the 
school grounds is deserving of commendable notice. As a rule, the lesson guides are appropriately 
designed, and the records well kept. Errors in the latter, excepting, perhaps, the lesson register, are 
Tery rare. 

The discipline and the order and other details connected with it, continue to be pleasing features, 
while the methods of government are, as a rule, judicious and effective. It continues to be matter for 
regret that the effect of the school training in this direction is not more apparent in the general deport- 
ment of the youth of the community. 



152 Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 

The total number of teachers employed in the district is 291, including 57 who are unclassified, 
35 pupil-teachers, and 2 work-mistresses. Their classifications, ranging from 1 A to 3 C, and their 
positions in the service are given in the tabulated statement attached. With few exceptions they are 
zealous and successful in the performance of the duties of their honorable and responsible positions, 
and are respected by those amidst whom they reside. In some cases there is observed a certain 
carelessness in details of deportment, suggestive of a tendency to succumb to the deteriorating influences 
so often prevalent in the more remote localities, but these, it is satisfactory to be able to state, are few. 
The advice and warning given in some such cases which have come under my own observation have 
been received in a proper spirit, and been productive of the desired effect. The schools of the district, 
with those whose establishment is in contemplation, suffice for its present requirements. The material 
condition of the existing schools and their efficiency are satisfactory. The year's work in this district 
has been attended with success in regard to the objects for \\ hich the Department exists, and affords 
reason for anticipating equally satisfactory progress in the future. 

The reports of the officers associated with me in the charge of this District are forwarded with 
this. 

GEORGE E. LONG, 
11th January, 1898. District Inspector. 

ANNEX Z 6. 
Inspector Rooney's Report. 

At the close of the year 1895 there were 89 schools in this section of the Wellington District. 

During the year the Half-time Schools at Gulgoura, Havilah, and Hammond, and the Provisional 
Schools at Bocoble and Upper Meroo were closed owing to insufficient attendance. The question of 
reopening the two latter schools is now under consideration. 

The question of working the two schools— Bocoble and Upper Meroo — as Half-time is under 
-consideration. The Pinnacle Swamp Provisional School was converted into a Public School, and the 
Half-time at Sally's Flat into a Provisional. Provisional Schools were established at Bargong and 
Uarbry. 

The Provisional School at Dexter Springs is now worked with the new school at Moolarban as 
"Half- time. 

At the end of 1897 there were in operation in this section of the Wellington District 56 Public 
> Schools, 9 Provisional, 20 Half-time, and 2 House-to-house. In all, there were 89 schools. 

A residence was erected at Burrundulla. 

Additional accommodation for upwards of 70 pupils is approaching completion in connection 
with the Mudgee Boys' School. In all, school accommodation is provided for 3,899 pupils ; that is, 
for 260 pupils more than the greatest quarterly enrolment for the year. The material accommodation 
of the Public Schools is good, but 3 Provisional and 5 Half-time Schools are conducted in very inferior 
buildings (non-vested). 

The planting of trees and the cultivation of plants in the playgrounds have diminished owing to 
the drought that prevailed during the greater part of the year. 

The total enrolment for the year was 4,387 ; of this number, 455 were returned as pupils of more 
than one school. The average daily attendance was 2,668*7, being an increase of 94*4 on that for 1896. 

The amount of school fees received for the year was £1,257 5s. 9d., being a decrease of £70 8s. 6d. 
The fees in arrear at the end of the year amounted to £41 3s. 9d. 

The year closed with 448 free pupils on the rolls, an increase of 71 on the previous year. 

Inspection. 

All schools in this section received regular inspection, and 1, Hill End, ordinary inspection. 

Owing to my serious illness in November and December, I was unable to inspect 8 schools, but 
5 of these were examined by Mr. Inspector Parkinson, and 3 by Mr. Inspector Baillie. In all, 2,884 
pupils were examined. Of 182 pupils examined for exemption certificates, 153 passed the required test. 

As a result of the examinations, 73 schools are classed above the standard, 14 equal it, and 6 
are below it. Generally speaking, the results in the various subjects are on the same level as last year. 
Music is still badly taught in the majority of schools. 

Teachers. 

Under my supervision there were 83 teachers and 11 pupil -teachers. Two teachers are in 
Class I, 13 in Class II, 59 in Class III, and 9 are unclassified, but of these 5 have previously served as 
pupil- teachers. 

Only one complaint — and that a trivial one — was made against a teacher during the year. 

As a rule, the teachers are industrious and of good repute— the great majority being much 
esteemed by the people among whom they labour. 

In conclusion, it may be stated the present requirements of this portion of the district are 
amply met by the existing schools, that the organisation and discipline of the schools are very satis- 
factory, and that a successful year's work has been accomplished. 

JOHN P. ROONEY, 
Mudgee, 8th January, 1898. Inspector. 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 153 

ANNEX Z 7. 

Inspector Baillie's Report. 

In the Dubbo section of the Wellington District the year 1897 closed with 69 schools in operation. Of 
these, 49 were Public, 14 Provisional, 2 Half-time, and 4 House-to-house Schools. 

Bulbodney Provisional was not re-opened at the beginning of the year, owing to insufficient 
attendance, and for the same reason Ironbarks Provisional was closed early in April. New schools 
have been established at Girilambone, Dulla Dulla, and Yantabulla, the first as a Public, and the latter 
two as Provisional. Girilambone School was temporarily opened in the Mechanics' Institute, but new 
and commodious buildings are in course of erection on the land dedicated for school purposes, which is 
considered one of the best and most healthy positions in the town. Under the supervision of the 
Clerk of Works two new school buildings, viz., Sandy Creek, near Dubbo, and McPhail, near 
Tomingley, have been erected, and will be opened at the beginning of the year; the Infant School and 
the Girls' School were enlarged, and considerable improvement made to the Boys' School, at Dubbo, at 
an outlay of £536 ; Narromine had substantial additions, costing £235 16s. 6d. ; a new residence was 
erected at Gulargambone at a cost of £309 10s., and additions and repairs to school are in progress at 
a cost of £140. 

Under the Inspector's supervision 2 small schools, viz., Dulla Dulla and Yantabulla, were 
erected at a cost of £119 17s. 9d., 1 enlarged at a cost of £73 15s., 25 repaired, painted, &c, at an 
outlay of £298 5?. 7d., and 7 teachers' residences repaired and painted, at a cost of £230 3s. 9d. A 
new Provisional School is in course of erection at Quambone, which should be completed early in the 
year. Repairs are being effected at Warren School during the vacation, at a cost of £24. 

The accommodation at the end of 1896 provided floor-space for 5,804 pupils ; at the end of 1897 
there was accommodation for 6,089 pupils, being an increase on the former year of 285 seats. The 
material condition of the schools in this section of the District has been greatly improved during the 
past year by the additions of new verandahs, painting, repairs, &c. The accommodation is ample, the 
schools are well distributed, and in no place where the minimum average could be maintained have the 
claims of the residents been overlooked. 

Enrolment and Average Attendance. 

The enrolment and average attendance for the quarters ending March, June, September, and 
December, were : — 

Enrolment. Average Attendance. 

March quarter 3,955 2,7706 

June quarter 4,013 2,8471 

September quarter 4,214 3,085*0 

December quarter 4,175 2,830*3 

Both the enrolment and average attendance have increased during the year 1897. The whole 
number of pupils enrolled was 5,269 ; of these, 564 attended more than one school. The school fees 
received for the year amounted to £1,551 12s. ll^d. ; and the school fees in arrear to £52 12s. 9d. 

Other than State children, 155 pupils had free education for the whole year, 26 for nine months, 
91 for six months, and 47 for three months ; total, 319 pupils, or an average of 232 pupils for the 
whole year. 

Inspection, Instruction, and Discipline. 

All the schools in operation, with the exception of Ironbarks Provisional, which was closed 
early in the year through small attendance, received a regular inspection, and several incidental 
inspections were made as opportunities offered. 

Of the 69 schools inspected, 64 were above standard, 4 up to, and 1 below. Nine schools either 
reached or exceeded 75 per cent., and of these Dubbo (Boys'), Warren, and By rock rank first, second, 
and third respectively. 

Of the 3,149 pupils examined, 327 were examined for exemption certificates, of whom 200 were 
successful. The average percentage of passes was 61 as against 52 last year. Arithmetic is still the 
weak subject in these examinations. 

The order, discipline, and management of the schools have been well maintained, and the 
demeanour and general behaviour of the pupils becoming, gratifying, and creditable. 

Teaching Staff. 

The teachers, assistants, and pupil-teachers, taken as a body, are earnest, zealous, and assiduous 
in the performance of their duties, and are highly respected by both parents and pupils. The schools 
are neat and tidy, the records well kept, and lesson guides carefully drawn up and duly suspended on 
the walls of the schoolroom. Libraries have been formed at several of the more important schools. 



154 Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 

Classification of Teaching Staff, 
Teachers — 

Class I B... „ 2 

„ II A 15 

„ II B 6 

„ III A 21 

„ IIIB 8 

„ IIIC 5 

Unclassified 29 

Total 86 

Thirteen of the unclassified teachers are ex-pupil teach srs who have either been appointed as 

assistants or placed in charge of small schools, and who will present themselves for examination when 
permitted to do so in accordance with the regulations. 

Pupil-teachers — 

Class 1 2 

„ 2 1 

,» 3 2 

„ 4 5 

Probationer 1 

Total 11 

Work-mistress 1 

Total of all grades 98 

Very satisfactory work has been done daring the year. 
The outlook for 1898 is healthy. 

J. W. BAILLIE, 
Dubbo, 31st December, 1897. Inspector. 



ANNEX Z 8. 
Report of the Principal ov the Training School, Fort-street. 

The enrolment of students in the 1897 session was 25, classified as below : — 

15 full scholarships. 
10 half scholarships. 

Course of Study. 

Latin. — Livy, Book II ; Bradley's Arnold ; Dr. Smith's Smaller Latin Grammar. 

French. — First and Second French Course ; First French Reader (Macmillan) ; Lea Plaideurs. 

English. — Longer English Poems (Hales) ; Meiklejohn's Book of English ; Shakespeare's Comedies 

and Romances. 
English History.— From 1685 to 1760. 

Mathematics. — The work prescribed for honour papers, matriculation examination. 
School Management. —Practical School Management ; Theory and History of Education ; Public 

Instruction Act and Regulations ; the Kindergarten Principle. 
Natural Science. — Anatomy, Physiology, School Hygiene. 

Music. — Sutton's Theory of Music ; Part Songs ; Stainer's Harmony ; Voice Training. 
Drawing. — Practical, Plane, and Solid Geometry ; Perspective. 
Manual Training. — Application of Geometry to Mechanical Drawing ; Colonial Timbers; Exercises 

in the use of common hand-tools for working in wood. 
Drill. — Squad, company, and battalion drill; manual and firing exercise ; physical drill, with and 

without rifle. 

Practical Training. 

Each student was regularly employed in the practical work of class-teaching for about a week 
every quarter. Specimen lessons were given frequently, and test and criticism lessons twice every 
week. 

Staff, 

The staff for 1897 consisted of the Principal ; J. D. St. Clair Maclardy, M.A., Lecturer in 
Languages and Mathematics ; J. Finney, B.A., Lecturer in English and English History ; Dr. Roth, 
Lecturer in Physiology ; Hugo Alpen, Lecturer in Music ; F. W. Woodhouse, Drawing Master ; 
W. Powrie, Teasher of Manual Training; Q.M.-S. Smith, Teacher of Drill. 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction, 



155 



Examinations. 

The Chief Inspector visited the Trainirfg School at the end of each quarter and conducted written 
and viva voce examinations. The examination to test the students' practical skill was held in the 
third week of December. The final examination for certificates commenced 13th December. The 
results are given below : — 



II A with Honours. 


HA. 


II B. 


HI A. 


TotaL 


1 


4 


13 


4 


22 



Two students were prevented from taking part in the final examination owing to illness near the 
end of the year, and a third student suffered so severely from an attack of rheumatic fever that he 
had to give up when he was about half-way through the examination. 

Results of examination in Manual Training, held 10th December : — 



Honours. 


First Grade. 


Second Grade. 


Total. 


3 


11 

1 Practical (only). 


9 

1 Practical (only). 


25 



Results of examination in Ambulance work. — This examination was conducted by the St. John's 
Ambulance Association. The members of the 1897 session showed great proficiency in this work and 
were highly complimented by the examiner. Every student gained the " First Aid certificate. 

Results of examinations in Drill. — In drill a good standard was maintained throughout the year.. 
Target practice was carried on at the Randwick rifle range for one afternoon each quarter. 

Health and Conduct. 

The health of the students was good with the exception of three who were ill towards the close 
of the year, and their conduct without exception was very satisfactory. 

J. W. TURNER. 
Training College, Fort-street, 25th January, 1898. 



ANNEX Z9. 
Report of the Principal op Hurlstone Training College. 

The number of students enrolled during 1S97 was 25, namely : — 

15 scholarships. 
10 half scholarships. 

Of these, 24 attended the final examination. One student died during the first term. 

Course of Study. 

Latin.— Bradley's " Arnold's Composition " ; Livy, Book IT ; Latin Grammar. 

French. — Racine's " Les Plaideurs " ; Macmillan's Third Year. 

English. — Meiklejohn's Book of English Composition; Essay Writing; Hales' Longer English 

Poems. 
History. — Ransome's English History, from William III to George II. 
Algebra. — Smith's Smaller Algebra. 
Geometry. — Mackay's Euclid, Book I ; Euclid's Elements. 
Arithmetic. — Theory and Practice ; Lock's Arithmetic. 
School Management. — Gladman's School Method ; Criticism Lessons and Practical Training ; the 

Regulations ; the School Records. 
Music. —Sutton's Theory of Music ; Stainer's Harmony ; Part Songs. 
Drawing. — Plane and Solid Geometry ; Model Drawing ; Perspective Drawing. 
Needlework. — Cutting out and Setting work. 

Reading. — Macaulay's Essays ; Shakespeare's Julius Cesar ; Hales' English Poems. 
Physiology. — St. John's Ambulance Course ; First Aid to the Injured. 
Drill. — Calisthenics ; Free Exercises. 



156 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



Examinations. 

An examination in needlework was held after the first half-year by Mrs. Dadley. Dr. Vandeleur 
Kelly conducted an examination in the St. John's Ambulance Course. All the students passed, and 
received certificates. 

During the year the Chief Inspector held periodical examinations. The results of the final 
examination are given below : — 



II A. 


2B. 


III A. 


Total 


6 


15 


3 


24 



Practical Training. 

Each student has had four weeks' actual teaching and practical training in the Practising School, 
under the direction of the mistress. In addition to this, each student has given criticism lessons, and 
has conducted drill and music lessons, under the guidance of the respective instructors. A course of 
practical cookery has also been given. 

The Teaching Staff. 

The teaching staff is the same as last year, with two exceptions : — 

1 . The Lecturer in Chemistry has resigned. 

2. The Teacher of Cookery has resigned, and Miss Sarah Gelding has been appointed in her 

place. 

General Remarks. 

The interior of the building is in very good condition, but the outside needs painting. The 
grounds are in fairly good order, but they cannot be kept in a satisfactory manner until a permanent 
gardener is appointed. 

The health of the students has been remarkably good throughout the year, with two exceptions, 
and their conduct has been highly satisfactory. 

J. A. NICOLL, 

Principal. 



APPENDIX XIII. 

REPORT ON DRAWING. 

Results of School Inspections. 

This: results of my inspections of 91 schools and 203 departments (of which 7 schools and 12 depart- 
ments are not in the Metropolitan District) are as follows : — 





Above 
standard. 


Below 
standard. 


Total. 


Passes in 
1697. 


Passes in 

1896. 


Average 
class-mark. 


Roys 


11,687 
10,335 
14,793 


2,992 
3,031 
2,908 


14,679 
13,366 
17,701 


79 6 
77 3 
835 


74 8 

75 
82 9 


7*3 


Girls 


71 




7-7 


Totals 


36,815 


8,931 


45,746 


80 4 


76 6 


7 3 



These figures show some slight general rise, but though the standard demanded has risen 
considerably above what it was a few years ago, it is still far below what is desirable, if the skill 
obtained is to be of much practical use, and is to form a good foundation for the work of techn ical 
classes and other secondary instruction. More frequent inspection and assistance in teaching on the 
lines of the system carried oat in Birmingham (where every school is visited twice a month) form the 
be3t means of improvement. Last year I was able to pay incidental visits to only 32 departments out 
of 203. An authoritative graduated syllabus and a minimum time-allowance fixed by the Department 
would do much to improve the present state of things. 

That the minimum in such matters is not always regarded as a maximum, may be proved by 
the example of the Boird Schools in England, where the minimum (1£ hour) is, on the average, 
exceeded by more than half-an-hour per week. 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



157 



Examinations. 

In jfche following table are given the results of the examination of 161 teachers, 522 pupil- 

~ i, and 995 applicant pupil-teachers' papers — 1,757 in all : — 



teachers, 79 training students, 



A. P. Tin. 

P. Trs 

Trg. Sts... 
Trs. 



Blackboard. 



No. 
exd. 



Pass. 



Freehand. | 



Model 
Drawing'. 



No. 
exd. 



Fass. 



No. 
exd. 



Pass. 



Geometry- 



No. 
exd. 



Pass. 



Perspective. 



No. 
exd. 



Pass. 



Totals. 



94 

• • • 

19 



• • • 


995 


59*6 


745 


203 


50*0 


• • • 


2 


• • • 


84*4 


46 


37*0 



225 387 

6 170 

25 40*0 



69 
56 



51*0 
321 



2 
15 



50-0 



995 

522 

79 



53*3 161 



The work of the A. P. teachers shows clearly the want of methodical teaching and great want 
of observation ; while model drawing generally shows little real study and a tendency to rely on 
chance. A large proportion of the candidates pass on a minimum number of marks, both in this and 
freehand, and few show by their own method that they have any proper knowledge of how to teach. 

Training Schools, 

The work of the training students baa been arranged, to a large extent, in accordance with the 
suggestions in my last report. More lessons were given in method, and in the latter part of the year 
every student gave a test lesson in my presence. These showed, as a rule, the usual tendency to give 
instruction without making the pupils observe and think for themselves, while in very few instances 
was any attempt made to interest them in their work. 

The same lack of interest pervades the teaching of the subject in the schools, especially that 
given by the pupil-teachers, whose Knowledge of the subject is not thorough enough to enable them to 
give a collective lesson to a class with confidence. Individual instruction alone is quite inadequate, 
except where the number taught is very small. 

It is a pity that so few young teachers avail themselves of the technical classes. The drawing 
lesson is rarely, as it might be, made the vehicle for observation of common things outside the school, 
or for promoting taste and judgment by consideration of the meaning and reason of the shape and 
decoration of such things, or of the ornamentation of houses and public buildings. 

Summary, 

The fact that the number of children examined has risen more than 36 per cent, in about four 
years, shows that the work is growing beyond the power of a single individual to cope with, or at least 
to do justice to. Every school should, I think, receive not less than two visits a year. The 
hindrances to greater success lie in the need of special instruction for young teachers, the want of 
sufficient time to meet the requirements of a syllabus devised for very different conditions, the ueed 
of an authorised detailed syllabus, and for more frequent visits from specialists. 

F. W. WOODHOUSE, 
14th January, 1898. Superintendent of Drawing. 



APPENDIX XIV. 

REPORT ON SINGING. 

I have visited and examined all schools within the Metropolitan District, in the theory of music and 
singing. I have also paid, when time permitted, teaching visits to such schools that seemed to require 
my assistance. 

There can be no doubt that our schools are steadily progressing ; the improvement in " singing at 
Bight" being most marked. I can safely vouch for this fact, as in each succeeding year, I have made 
greater demand on the various classes. It may not be out of place to refer to the Jubilee Celebration, 
when a chorus of over 5,000 children sung a number of songs, which were in most cases strange or new 
to them, and as very little time was available for practice, it shows the improvement in " singing at 
sight" that has taken place in our schools. 

I would also like to refer to the visit of Charles Vincent, Mus. Dr., perhaps the highest educa- 
tional authority in musical matters that has visited this country. He, after an exhaustive examination, 
Winning with some of the lower classes and ending with the 5th (Fort-street Model School), gave 
as his opinion that we were certainly doing what they were but trying to achieve in England. 



15S Report of tlie Minister of Public Instruction. 

In the actual singing schools differ very much ; whilst there are certain schools (both large and 
small) in which the singing is really admirable, there are others in which much is left to be desired. 
The principal faults noticeable are : indifferent production of voice, loud and often coarse singing, and 
bad pronounciation of vowels. For the latter, the teachers themselves are chiefly responsible, and 1 
have not failed to draw their special attention to the faults mentioned. Last year I drew attention to 
want of precision in keeping time and observing rests. This has been much improved. 

In the teaching of theory, the average mark is very fair (a higher mark than last year) ; in 
singing it ranges from fair to very fair, although there are a very fair number of schools where a higher 
mark is given. 

The best classes examined this year I found in Fort-street Boys' Department (Class 3a) taught 
by Mr. A. Massey, and a similar class in Cleveland-street Boys' Department, taught by Mr. Arnold ; 
these two classes obtained the highest marks given by me both in theory and singing. 

There can be no doubt that our teachers are doing good work, and I think that more interest is 
shown, both by teachers and pupils. In some of the larger schools I noticed a healthy spirit of rivalry 
existing, in \thich pupils as well as teachers share. Such a spirit can only be productive of good work. 

HUGO ALPEtf, 

Supt. of Music. 



APPENDIX XV. 
REPORT ON NEEDLE- WORK. 



During the past year I have examined and reported upon 90 (ninety) schools in and about the 
Metropolitan District. In all, 14,539 (fourteen thousand five hundred and thirty -nine) pupils were 
present at examination. 

The work actually accomplished in this large and important branch of the department continues 
to make good and rapid progress. In upper classes especially the results have been most satisfactory, 
the marks gained after close and searching tests ranging from very fair to excellent. This conclusively 
proves that the instruction imparted by work-mistresses is sound and efficient. 

Mixed Schools, 

Mistresses, teachers' wives, infant school-mistresses, and assistants in charge of needle-work in 
mixed schools have obtained, with few exceptions, the same good results as formerly, many schools, on 
examination, ranking higher than the required standard. 

The encouragement and recognition extended by the ladies of the Local Board in many suburbs 
to the pupils for proficiency in needle-work is much to be valued, it having the much-to-be-desired 
•effect of stimulating industry and inciting emulation among the young workers. 

The dressmaking lessons given in these mixed schools are highly appreciated by parents, 
•especially in suburban schools. 

The small specimen squares worked with coloured cotton in lower classes prove an attractive, 
prominent, and fundamental feature of instruction among young children. It is pleasing to notice the 
anxiety and ambition of these small pupils as they proceed, also the painstaking manner with which 
they endeavour to embellish their work with various fancy stitches. 

Here I wish to draw attention to the pressing necessity for some provision being made by the 
•department for the material for this special feature of elementary training. 

Uniformity and precisiou in the size, colour, and texture of these specimen squares are 
•absolutely essential to the proper carrying out of this foundation of the great system of needle-work, 
and many teachers of needle-work, with their hearts in their work, rather than allow their pupils to 
use the dirty incongruous materials sent in by many of the parents, themselves make fitting provision 
from their own limited means. 

Pupil-teachers. 

In my incidental visits to schools I find that the pupil-teachers are attentive to the instruction 
of work-mistresses, anxious to excel, and evince the same proficiency in the art of needle-work and 
•design as formerly. 

In many schools pupil-teachers receive their needle-work lesson from the work-mistress at the 
visual sewing lesson. This is an undoubted advantage, as it affords much varied and useful experience 
in cutting and setting, also in the management and control of sewing-classes. This experience proves 
of good service at the close of their apprenticeship as pupil-teachers. 

Dressmaking. 

Dressmaking in all schools I have visited and examined is still a special subject with work- 
mistresses, and is carried out and made general in all metropolitan schools, work-mistresses having 
acquired the practical knowledge necessary to impart this instruction. 

In many large schools where no special workrooms are provided it is almost impracticable to 
give this lesson, as the fitting-on attracts attention, and disturbs the quiet and order of the other 
classes. - 



Report of the Minister of JPtiblic Instruction. 



159 



Method and Dhci/Jine. 

Method and discipline in sewing-classes continue to be well maintained, and time economised in 
giving out and receiving needle-work. Work-aprons and needle-books, self-made and well furnished, 
are provided by the girls fpr sewing-lessons, many most artistic devices showing culture, skill, and 
self-reliance. Head mistresses take interest and pleasure in the work of sewing- classes, and this acts 
as a powerful stimulus to the efforts of the pupils. 

Throughout the schools I have visited and examined I am able to testify to the unremitting 
care and attention given to needle-work instruction during the past year, also to the support ana 
interest bestowed on this subject by head mistresses, teachers in charge of schools, and others. 

ANNIE DADLEY, 

Directress of Needle-work. 



APPENDIX XVI. 

CHIEF CLERK OF WORKS' REPORT. 
During the year the following works have been carried out by this branch of the department, viz. :- 



No. 



Description of work. 



Accommodation. 


Cost. 


3,500 


£ s. d. 

14,747 10 11 

4,355 11 4 




269 8 6 


1,369 


5,792 15 9 
1,881 12 6 




16,559 4 







20 
12 
5 
22 
10 
300 



Public school buildings* 

Teachers' residences 

Weather-sheds 

Additions to schools 

Additions to residences 
Sundry works 



* In one case weather-sheds are included, forming basement of building, viz., Crown-street. 

The increased accommodation for the year amounts to 4,869, over double that of the previous 
year, and costing £20,540 6s. 8d., or at the rate of £4 4s. 4Jd. per head, which compares very favour- 
ably with "the cost of similar buildings in other parts of the world. 

Thes number of works, in addition to the above, for which contracts have been entered into and 
are still in progress are as follows : — 



No. 



Description of work. 



Accommodation. 



Cost 



12 
6 
3 
17 
15 
73 



Public school buildings 
Teachers' residences .... 

Weather-sheds 

Additions to schools .... 
Additions to residences 
Sundry works 




£ s. d. 

15,670 1 3 

2,743 12 6 

291 19 5 

7,065 8 2 

2,963 15 8 

4,140 17 9 



Further increased accommodation will thus be provided for early in the year to the extent of 
3,552 pupils. 

In the preparation of the plans for new school buildings special attention has been given to 
improvements in the lighting and ventilation with marked success, and in many cases, especially in 
buildings required for the hot parts of the Colony, both floor and air space have been considerably 
increased above that usually allowed. 

In addition to the school work, a class-room for assaying, fitted with all necessary furnaces and 
appliances for the study of minerals, is in course of erection at Broken Hill, forming another branch of 
the Technical College. 

No report has yet been received as regards the Bathurst Technical College. I believe it is 
approaching completion, and probably will be ready in time for the commencement of the new term. 

The staff has been slightly increased by the appointment of a temporary draftsman and a 
temporary clerk of works. A change was also made on account of the retirement of one of the 
clerks of works through ill-health, necessitating the transfer of a gentleman from the Works Depart- 
ment to fill the position. In all other respects the staff has been the same as reported last year. The 
amount of work performed is shown by the foregoing figures, from which it will be seen that only 
through supreme efforts on the part of all employed iu this branch the task has been accomplished. 



16th March, 1898. 



J. S. WIORAM, 

Chief Clerk of Works. 



160 Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



APPENDIX XVII. 

BOARD OF EXAMINERS' REPORT. ' 

The total number of examinations daring the year 1897 was 3,085, as against 2,444 for the year 1S96. 
They were made up in the following manner : — 

1. Applicant pupil-teachers 1,281 

2. Pupil-teachers 608 

3. Training students 68 

4. Teachers 539 

5. High-school candidates : . ... 589 

Applicant pupil-teachers — 

Eligible for employment 275 

Ineligible 900 

Examined in music or drawing 10 

Pupil-teachers — 

Promoted from Class IV to III 209 

„ „ IlltoJI 180 

II to I 47 

Passed final examination 6*2 

Failed to obtain promotion 108 

Retired from examination 2 

Examined in drawing only 11 

Candidates for training — 

Males — 

Passed x 19 

Failed 

Females — 

Passed 43 

Failed 2 

Students in training — 

Males — 

Recommended for classification of II A, with Honors 1 

II A 4 

II B 13 

III A 4 

Females — 

Recommended for classification of II A 6 

II B 15 

HI A 3 

One male student retired from examination before its completion. 

Twenty-one students were examined in June in drawing only. Of these 10 passed, and 11 
failed to reach standard requirements. 

Teachers — 

Teachers were examined and classified as under — 

Promoted to Class I 17 

II A 7 

II B 36 

„ HI A 122 

„ III B 38 

IIIC 14 

Examined in drawing or music, and passed 72 

„ ,, failed 44 

Retired from examination 7 

Examination cancelled 1 

Failed to secure promotion or classification 181 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 161 

High School Examinations. 

The total number of candidates examined in the months of June and December were 590 ; 570 
of these were recommended as having qualified for admission as pupils of the Public High Schools, 
while 20 failed to reach standard requirements. Scholarships and bursaries were recommended for 
award, as under — 

Boys — 

Sydney 15 

Maitland 10 

Girls- 
Sydney ,.... „■ 15 

Maitland 10 

Bathurst 6 

The following bursaries were given :— 

Boys — 

Maitland <.. 10 

Sydney 10 

Girls- 

Maitland 5 

Bathursc 1 

Sydney 4 

Half bursaries in Sydney — 

Boys 10 

Girls 6 

There is a large increase in the number of applicants for the office of pupil-teacher as compared 
with previous years. This increase arises from the fact that, when examinations are held at various 
centres, only such eligible candidates who can be provided with employment at once are regarded as 
having passed. In other words, each local examination is a competitive one, and the necessity for 
holding such competitions arises more frequently than hitherto. 

The number of pupil- teachers examined for promotion is slightly smaller than that for last year. 
This may be accounted for by the fact that the numbers of pupil-teachers in classes II and I were 
fewer than in the other classes, due no doubt to the policy of the department in filling the vacancies 
occurring several years ago for the services of pupil-teachers, by the appointment of those who had 
already completed their pupil-teacher course, but for whom no openings as small school-teachers were 
readily available. At the time of writing, only pupil- teachers of the 1st and 2nd classes have been 
reported upon. Those of 4th and 3rd classes are still outstanding. The number of passes as compared 
with the failures of those results already dealt with is above the average. 

Fewer teachers sought promotion or classification by examination during the past year than in 
the previous year. A very large majority of the ex-pupil-teachers of more than 2J years' standing as 
such has now been classified, while teachers generally are in the main qualified for the positions they 
at present hold. 

In the case of the examinations of candidates for admission as pupils of the High Schools, the 
results indicate a satisfactory percentage of passes. 

Having regard to the examination results as a whole, it may fairly be asserted that the general 
proficiency of the examinees is up to the average standard of previous years. 

In closing this report, I feel compelled to draw the attention of teachers and pupil-teachers to 
the fact that many neglect to properly study the prescribed text-books. Unless the proper amount of 
preliminary study be indulged in, there can be little hope or prospect of ultimate success at examination. 

R. N. MORRIS, 

Examiner 



*- 



APPENDIX XVIII. 

REPORT ON PUBLIC SCHOOLS' CADET FORCE. 

1. At the end of 1897 the Cadet Force had an enrolment of 3,294, being an increase of 130 on 1896. 
A number of city and country corps were resuscitated, and several new corps were authorised, and so 
great was the expansion in this direction that the enrolment had to be limited in some corps. Teachers 
continue to evince much interest in this important work. 

2. I inspected the whole of the Metropolitan Cadet Corps, and noted a great improvement in 
their dress and general bearing on previous years. The Country Corps, however, were not inspected. 

The monthly half-day parades, and the quarterly whole-day parades, were held regularly, to 
attend which many officers provided themselves with uniforms, and acquainted themselves with the 
drill programmes of the day, so as to take an intelligent part in the parades. During the summer 
months I conducted the parades at waterside grounds, to give the lads an opportunity for swimming 
exercise after the day's work. 



162 Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 

Target practice, in the form of team-shooting, and general practice, was carried on throughout 
the year. Tbis important part of cadet work is interfered with by the limited number of rifles suitable 
for ball cartridge, but I am making efforts to obtain patterns of a more suitable weapon. The thanks 
of the cadets are due to the Public Schools Athletic Association for the handsome donation from the 
Jubilee Fund of £15 to provide prizes at these practices. 

3. Two battalions of cadets took part in the Jubilee Demonstration, and were reviewed by His 
Excellency the Governor, Lord Hampden, and Major-General French. The former, in bis speech, 
congratulated the lads, and said, " I should also like to compliment the Cadet Corps upon the efficient 
manner in which all. their movements were carried out, and the smart way in which they marched 
past." 

The following day the cadets attended the Military Beview held in the Centennial Park, lining 
each side of the saluting base, when Major-General French took the opportunity of expressing to me 
his high appreciation of the appearance and movements of the lads the day previous on the Sydney 
Cricket Ground, and remarked that these cadets were the soldiers of the future. 

At the Annual Sports of the Public Schools Athletic Association, the cadets were again in 
evidence, when they were reviewed by His Excellency Admiral Bridge, who addressed the officers and 
cadets present in the' following laudatory terms : — " He said he had that afternoon seen various physical 
displays which, though he was pleased with them, he did not profess to criticise ; but on military 
matters he claimed to be able to speak with a certain amount of authority. He wished, therefore, to 
express his gratification at the high state of efficiency of the Public School Cadets. Being about to 
re-visit the old country after three years* residence in Australia, he felt it his duty, before leaving, to 
bear testimony to the excellence of the cadet system in this Colony, proof of which had just been given. 
He would point out that this military training in the schools was beneficial not only from a physical 
standpoint, but also towards the production of future, soldiers, and its value could not be over-estimated. 
As the preliminary drilling of the lads was undertaken by the school-teachers, who were also the 
officers at parades, he felt sure considerable enthusiasm must prevail and great pains be taken to ensure 
such excellent results. To Lieut. -Colonel Paul and the other officers present he tendered his hearty 
congratulations on the success achieved, and he also wished the Cadet Force increased support and 
prosperity in the future. " 

4. The Annual Bifle Meeting of the Cadet Force was held on the Randwick Range on the 18th, 
20th, and 21st December, when 630 lads, representing 42 corps, competed. The meeting was the 
largest and most successful ever held in connection with the Cadet Force. This fact was owing to the 
increased vote for the purpose, which allowed a greater number of matches, and provided, each day, 
lunch to every boy present. The Challenge Shield again went to Orange — which team has won it 
yearly since 1889 — Bathurst securing a good second place, Lithgow and Braidwood earning next in order. 

The Gold Medal and Trophy for the Championship in individual shooting was won by Cadet 
Leo Price, of Penrith. 

In addition to the Challenge Shield, about £60 in money, medals, and trophies, presented by the- 
Department and Sydney citizens, were competed for. Favourable comment was made at the interesf 
the Minister, Chief Inspector, and Deputy Chief Inspector took in the meeting and their presence 
thereat, and regret expressed that our Under Secretary was unable to be present through illness. As 
in previous years, country cadets not staying with relations or friends during the meeting were 
accommodated at the Agricultural Ground, kindly placed at their disposal by the Boyal Agricultural 
Society. Arrangements were made for the oversight of the lads, whose conduct throughout was good. 
The great success of the meeting fully justifies the Minister in placing an increased amount on the-' 
estimates for this necessary work, and leads me to hope for a further increase next year, bo that a 
greater number of lads may take part. 

The Minister, in presenting the prizes at the Girls' High School on Wednesday, 22nd December, 
congratulated the officers on the success of the meeting, and in a few well-chosen words praised the 
Winners and encouraged the losers to try again. He also gave the lads some good advice as to their 
conduct as citizens, and the necessity for them, when in uniform, deporting themselves as soldiers. 

Through Mr. Garrard's kindness, the Government steamer " Dawn " was placed at my disposal 
to take the country cadets on a harbour trip, and visit the training ship "Sobraon." The discipline 
and drill on board delighted and astonished the teachers and lads. 

Drill Inspection. 

5. I inspected the whole of the Metropolitan, and many of the larger Sub-Metropolitan Schools, 
and the inspections show that the new standard works out with the most gratifying results, fully 
providing for the setting up of the pupils and the exercise of every muscle of the body ; but a need is' 
felt for a further supply of dumb-bells and wands for the girls, and dumb-bells and drill-rifles for the 
boys. 

6. The Sydney High Schools were instructed weekly by a member of the staff— the boys uv 
company drill and physical drill, and the girls in a complete course of calisthenics. 

Fort-street and Hurlstone Colleges. 

7. The students of these institutions were thoroughly posted in standard requirements, and 
opportunities afforded them of being tested periodically in the Practising Schools. They were subjected 
to a theoretical and practical examination at the end of the year, and the results were most satisfactory. 



"Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 



163 



8. The cadet staff, in addition to cadet work, visit the schools for instructional purpose, in 
accordance with a quarterly programme ; but, owing to the limited staff, this cannot be done as 
frequently as desirable. 

9. Classes for calisthenics and standard drill were held in the Girls' High School every Friday 
evening, but I regret to say that a larger number of pupil-teachers do not avail themselves of the 
excellent opportunities thus afforded them of becoming proficient in this most necessary part of their 
school duties. This work could be attended with greater advantage to teachers if the ground adjacent 
to the High School were let, so as to allow of more extended work being done in the shape of squad 
and company drill. 

10. In conclusion, I feel convinced that drill and physical education are now being more system- 
atically and efficiently attended to than has been the case hitherto, and I hope in my next report to 
record a still more satisfactory improvement. 

A- PAUL, 
Lieut. -Colonel, Chief Staff Officer, and Superintendent of DrilL 



ANNEX A. 

Cadet Corps Branch — Department of Public Instruction. 

Receipts and Disbursements for the Year 1897. 



Receipts. 


| Disbursements. 


To Balance on account of 180C ? 


£ 8. d. 
106 17 7 

1,650 

2,100 


By Salaries 


£ s. d. 

1,117 6 8 

278 12 6 

384 15 

853 15 4 

124 8 10 
198 
429 5 7 

834 

67 6 

5 


£ 8. d 


Amount received from the Treasury on 
account of 1896-7 account 


Purchase of arms 




Travelling expenses, carriage of 
Grant account of annual prize 




Amount received from Treasury on account 
of 1807-8 account 


• 








Military instructors 


' 




Equipment of cadets 






Allowances as per Regulations 
35 and 66 


- 




Rifle practice, &c 






School drum and fife bands .... 
Unexpended balance 


3,782 8 IT 
74 8 '8 








. 






£3,856 17 7 




£8,866 7 7 



E. & O. £. 

Account Branch, Department of Public Instruction, 
Sydney, 17 March, 1898. 



A. E. BASSAN, 

Accountant. 



APPENDIX XIX. 



REPORT ON TECHNICAL EDUCATION WITH ANNEXES. 

The work of the Technical Education Branch has advanced during the year, as will be seen by 
the following comparative statement of enrolments : — 

1896. 1897. 

Sydney Technical College 3,302 3,678 

Suburban classes 578 726 

Country classes 2,285 2,342 

Classes connected with Public Schools 954 912 

7,119 7,658 

The number of individuals attending the colleges and branch schools was 5,848, as against 5,396 
for last year, being an increase of 452. The average weekly attendance throughout the year was 
3,983. There were 2,702 examined, of which 1,923 passed. Ths improvement in the percentage wae 
maintained this year. 



164 Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 

Teaching Staff. 

The teaching staff consists of 85 persons, distributed as follows : — 

13 Lecturers in charge of Departments. 
5 Resident Masters in charge of branch colleges or schools. 
36 Teachers. 
12 Assistant Teachers. 
19 teachers in charge of classes, and remunerated by the fees of pupils only. 

Several changes in the staff occurred during the year. Mr. Angus Mackay was succeeded by 
Mr. Henry Lord, and Mr. B. Dunstan, Teacher of Geology, accepted the position of Assistant Govern- 
ment Geologist, Queensland. The Rev. J. M. Curran was transferred from Travelling Lecturer to 
take the oversight of the Classes in Geology, Mineralogy, and Mining. Mr. J. Pentecost, Resident 
Science Master, Newcastle, died after a short illness, and Mr. John Mitchell was appointed his suc- 
cessor. Applications for day instruction in the Fitting and Turning became so numerous that it was 
decided to add to the teaching staff. Mr. Hanley, who held the position of assistant to the night 
classes, was fully engaged, and Mr. Malcolm Green, formerly connected with the engineering shops, 
was appointed assistant for three evenings each week. The classes are now carried on daily as well as 
every evening. It was also necessary to increase the class nights in Mechanical Drawing, and to 
appoint Mr. Benjamin Rourke assistant. A class in Quantity Surveying was established on fees only, 
Mr. Knevitt being appointed teacher, which position he resigned at the end of the first term. Mr. 
O. Jackson succeeded Mr. Knevitt, but only remained in charge of the class for the two following 
terms. Mr. Stockwell was appointed Assistant Teacher of Mechanical Drawing at Granville Tech- 
nical School. A branch school has been reopened at Broken HilL A building has been erected for 
teaching subjects allied to Chemistry, under the charge of Mr. A. Rutter, F.C.S., &c, Resident 
Science Master. Applications are constantly received for the establishment of classes in suburban and 
country districts. When possible the lecturers have visited country districts and delivered lectures, 
but as so much time is taken up with class work, only a few centres can be visited, and these when 
train and boat serve, so as to allow no break in their class work. The lecturer in Sanitation visited 
Newcastle and Maitland, and delivered a special course of lectures at these centres. Examinations 
for master plumbers' and drainers 1 licenses have been conducted at the Sydney Technical College, and 
local examinations have also been arranged to avoid the necessity of bringing condidates to Sydney. 
Permits were granted to water-fitters to lay on water, after undergoing the usual tests. The gold 
medals awarded annually by the Water and Sewerage Board have caused a spirited competition among 
the Plumbing and Sanitary Engineering students. In the plumbing class the work has reached a very 
high standard, and this is influencing the trade to a marked degreee. Several valuable prizes 
were given during the year by private citizens for competition amongst the trade classes. 

The Technical College building at Bathurst is still in the hands of the builders. 

In speaking of the work of the Metropolitan College, mention should be made of the necessity 
for increased accommodation. Many of the rooms have become tco small on account of the large 
enrolments. Some of the trades classes require extensions to their workshops, particularly the Plumb- 
ing and Pattern-making. The Electrical Engineering will also need additions, both to the premises 
and appliances, if this department is to keep pace with the developments of the science, and the 
demands of the students. Many trades are still unrepresented in the College course. 

The day students attending the College are in need of a suitable space for recreation. In the 
luncheon time there is neither a common room nor place for them to partake of their meals. During 
the hot months and the wintry weather they are placed at a great disadvantage. 

Agriculture. 

The classes under this Department have been well attended -throughout the year. The same 
course of instruction was carried out at the centres (Sydney, Granville, and Hunter s Hill) ; and the 
Suburban Classes united with the Sydney Classes in the out-door excursions, and visits to farms for 
practical work. As far as possible the requests for the services of the Lecturer in Agriculture were 
granted, and lectures were delivered at Cecil Park, and Toongabbie, with an average attendance 
of forty. 

Veterinary Science and Farriery. 

Compared with last year there has been an increase in the number of enrolments. The course 
of instruction was somewhat modified, and greater attention paid to the inspection of meat, and 
to the hygiene of dairies, in order that students could qualify for such positions as Inspector of Stock, 
Meat, or Dairies. The practical demonstrations at the Zoological Gardens were well attended. In 
the Farriery class a thorough course of theoretical instruction was given, and during the last term 
practical work was done. The average attendance was good, and encouraging progress shown. 

Botany. 

During the latter part of the year the Botany class was reopened with a fair number on the rolL 
The attendance was satisfactory, and good work was done, all the students passing the examination. 
The class promises to be a large one next year. 



JReport of the Minister of Public Instruction. 165 

[Sheep and Wool Department. 

Seventy-three students attended the day classes in this Department. Several applicants were 
refused admission owing to the want of accommodation. The sheep and wool sales were attended by 
the students. Squatters sent many applications for classers and table hands ; and it was not possible 
to meet the demand. The average attendance at the night classes was good all through the year, and 
sound work was done. 

Chemistry. 

The great increase in the number of pupils attending the chemistry classes in 1696 was exceeded 
during the year 1897. The Saturday morning class improved, ten pupils being enrolled. A more 
intelligent interest was taken by the students in practical chemistry, and in all matters relating to 
manufactures. 

Pharmacy. 

The attendance at the classes is slightly less than that of the previous year, but the total number 
of students enrolled shows an increase. The fact that many of the students are not employed during 
the week in any calling, which enable them to turn to practical account the instruction received, is a. 
disadvantage which has in many instances been removed. Several lads who had been at school when, 
they first joined these classes are now employed by chemists or manufacturers where their knowledge 
has been the means of their obtaining employment. 

Geology, Mineralogy, and Mining, 

Geology. — There were thirty-four students in attendance through the year, and on the whole* 
the work done was satisfactory. The system of handing to each student a synopsis of each night's 
lecture, before the lecture began, was introduced. This enabled the students to follow the lectures 
with more system in their studies, besides providing a basis for further study. The use of note-books, 
was encouraged, and all such books handed in by the students were examined from week to week. 

Mineralogy. — Thirty -four students attended the classes in mineralogy, and an amount of good 
work was done during the year. Here even more than in Geology a practical turn was given to every- 
thing.* Many of the students prepared note-books so methodically and neatly, that they will prove of 
service professionally in years to come. 

Metalliferous Mining. — There is reason to be satisfied with the progress made in this class. 
Twenty students attended the lectures, but only a few presented themselves for examination. One' 
lecture each week is not sufficient to cover the present syllabus. 

Applied Mechanics. 

The numbers in this class have kept up to the average of the previous year ; the students being 
fairly intelligent. Those who attended the Elementary Mechanics, under the Lecturer in Physics*, 
were able to cover much more ground than those who did not, as they had been grounded in the law*, 
underlying the subject of Applied Mechanics. The attendance was satisfactory, and good work wab- 
done throughout the year. 

Mechanical Drawing. 

So many pupils entered that it was necessary to appoint an extra teacher, and to increase the- 
classes from three to five each week. The passes at the last examination exceeded those of previous 
years. The drawings of some of the students were excellent. 

Fitting and Turning. 

This class still retains its popularity, very large numbers are enrolled, and, although the days- 
and hours for teaching were increased, many intending students could not be received. The instructions 
is thorough and suited to the requirements of the trade ; and a large percentage of the students consists- 
of apprentices, improvers, and journeymen. Although the machinery is in good order and up to date, 
still additional vyces and lathes are needed to keep pace with the increasing numbers. The first working 
model was completed by the students, and was on view during the Annual Exhibition. 

Iron-founding. 

There was a marked improvement in the attendance in this class during the year, the average 
enrolment was higher, and the students attended more regularly. The roll contained the names of 
many journeymen and apprentices approaching the end of their time, so that the lessons comprised 
some more advanced work. Additional patterns are necessary, otherwise the class is well supplied 
with appliances. 

Pattern-making. 

The improvement shown during the last portion of 1896 has continued throughout the past year 
The workshop has been rearranged, and the work laid down in the syllabus has been adhered to 
Excellent models were made by the students, resulting in a creditable display of work done. 



166 Report of the Minister of Public Imtmckvon,^ 

Blacksmithing. 

The enrolment for this class has been the largest since its establishment. Strikers from several 
of the Blacksmiths' shops have joined to qualify as journeymen. Tradesmen are also realizing that the 
course of instruction given is beneficial, and are influencing the younger men to attend the class. 

Boiler-making, 

A large number still attends this class. It is well known that few boilermakers are well up to 
the mark in the theoretical portion of their trade, and every inducement is offered to remedy this 
defect. Special attention is paid to theory and template-making, but students prefer the practical 
rather than the theoretical, consequently the lectures are not so well attended as could be desired. 
However, the work is encouraging, and the recent examinations were satisfactory. 

Slide Rule. 

Good work was done by the students of this class, and the benefits resulting from the knowledge 
of the slide rule are becoming more widely known and recognised by those who need rapid methods of 
calculating. 

Electrical Engineering. 

The elementary class lectures were attended by over 40 students throughout the three terms. 
Most of them are employed as fitters, draughtsmen, electricians, telegraph, and telephone operators, 
and engineers' apprentices. Some are working for the different electrical firms, whilst others are 
following the courses for the full certificate in electrical engineering. In the advanced class, the 
attendance was not so large. In the lectures the most recent developments in electrical engineering 
were kept in view. Lessons in methods of insulating joints in cables and wires were added to the 
instruction in jointing. The roll was more than full for the practical classes, and owing to the limited 
space many applicants could not be admitted. 

Applied Physics. 

The number attending these classes has largely increased, and 180 were enrolled during 1897, 

being an increase of 41 on the previous year. The practical class was full for all three terms, and, 

- notwithstanding the additional assistance granted, it was not possible to admit all who wished to join. 

The work of the year was very satisfactory, and all those who presented themselves for the yearly 

examination passed creditably. 

Mathematics. 

The total enrolment, 109, shows a slight decrease on last year, but remains the same as the two 
preceding years. Many of the students have such an elementary knowledge of mathematics to begin 
with, that rapid progress is almost impossible. Additional class time is needed to overcome the 
difficulty. 

Practical Sanitation. 

The Sanitary Engineering classes were well attended, a satisfactory feature being the many 
students joining, who hare previously passed through the Plumbing classes, to carry on their work in 
the more advanced work of the Sanitary Engineering course. Several students also availed themselves 
of the laboratory course. One hundred and twenty-five were enrolled during the year for Practical 
Plumbing, which is the highest number since the class was started. Every night the workshop was 
full, and more attended than could be conveniently accommodated. Many of the senior students 
rendered commendable assistance, by taking some of the juniors, so that the teachers were able to 
devote more time to those who required the advanced instruction. Excellent work was done all 
through the year, and its appreciation by the trade is shown in this that many journeymen plumbers 
axe found among the students. 

Architecture Department. 

The individual enrolment for the classes was 225, as against 187 in the previous year. The 
lectures in historical architecture have been well attended, and the average daily attendance has 
exceeded that of the past few years. In the drawing section, several students have displayed marked 
ability, and were successful in winning competitions for original designs. The quantity surveying 
class was not so well supported as was expected, the change of teachers affecting the numbers on the 
Toll. Masonry and bricklaying are still unrepresented in this department. 

The carpentry and joinery classes were well attended, as also the day-classes for manual training. 

The number presenting themselves for examination was very small compared with the enrolment. 
Several students passed creditably. 

Art Department. 

The classes are progressing, and are in a healthy condition ; all the divisions have larger enrol- 
ments than in previous years. Freehand and model drawing are as popular as ever, and students 
value the instruction in these subjects on account of their usefulness both for trade and art purposes* 



Jleport of the Minister of Public Inst motion 167 

The attendance for geometrical drawing improved, whilst that for perspective somewhat fell off. The 
plant drawing class is growing, as the instruction is very helpful to botanists, designers, aud decorators. 
The china painting class is making headway ; no less than 29 were enrolled. The general standard of 
work done was higher than last year. Out-door sketching from nature was introduced during the 
year. The life classes have been well supported, and much good work has been done. Many of the 
advanced students have regularly visited the National Art Gallery, for instruction in advanced work* 
The improvement in the work, as well as in the variety of subjects attempted, was apparent at the 
recent annual exhibition of students' works. Several students give good promise as modellers, and 
their original designs are worthy of mention. A new class was formed early in the year for casting in 
plaster, with successful results. The students of this class cast the greater portion of the work executed 
in the modelling class. 

Industrial Art. 

The numbers attending the classes in house-painting, graining and marbling, continue to increase, 
«nd some difficulty is experienced in accommodating so many students. Three-fourths of the pupils 
are engaged during the day in the trades in which they desire instruction at night. The decoration 
classes are also well attended, and among those seeking instruction are many journeymen painters. 
The instruction is thorough and systematic, and, if properly followed, cannot but produce excellent 
workmen. The design class has a very important place in the college curriculum, for it is a necessary 
adjunct, both to general as well as decorative art. Excellent designs were produced by the pupils 
during the year, but extra lessons are essential to make the course a satisfactory one for the students ; 
at present too much ground has to be covered in the short time given to so wide a subject. 

. Cookery. 

The numbers gradually increased during the year, the weekly average being 63. The practice 
classes were always full, and the demonstrations, plain and high class, were well attended. The 
ironing class became so large that two lessons had to De given each week, instead of one, as previously 
arranged. 

Dress-cutting and Millinery. 

The enrolment exceeded that of last year, and the attendance was good throughout. The pupils 
made good progress, and the year's work made a creditable display. The millinery class was started 
with 9 on the roll ; next year the attendance will be larger. Good results were obtained at the recent 
examinations. 

Manual Training. 

This branch is becoming more popular every year. Its usefulness and its educational value are 
being more understood. Fort-street students in training have gone through the course prescribed for 
them with good results ; many attended classes voluntarily after ordinary class hours. In the boys 
classes the enrolment has not been so good, neither has the attendance been quite satisfactory. Those 
who have attended regularly made good progress. In addition to ordinary class work, models have 
been made for some of the object lessons. At Crown-street, Blackfriars, and Sussex-street, the usual 
classes have been held, and the same lines followed. At all the centres the work is progressing 
favourably. The total number attending the classes was 634, of which 415 were examined, and 375 
passed. 

Lithography. 

Thirty-eight students were enrolled, and their attendance was most regular. In addition to the 
ordinary course, printing from zinc was introduced, with good results. All known processes in photo- 
lithography were gone through, and the work was exhibited at the annual exhibition. Several photo- 
graphic journals made special mention of the class, and the useful work it was doing. 

Book-keeping. 

Favourable progress has been made in the classes. Thirty-seven enrolled at the College, whilst 
twenty joined the Crown-street class. The number of passes at the last examination was larger that 
in any previous year. An additional class night is needed. 

Physiology. 

This class was re-opened in the end of the second term with thirteen entries, the majority of 
the students being teachers. Extra hours were devoted to teaching to make up for lost time, so that 
the syllabus could be covered, and the pupils prepared for examination. 



Ashfield. 

The number enrolled in the art class was not so high as was expected at the beginning of the year. 
Good elementary work was done, and several of the students passed well at the December examinations. 
The enrolment for the penmanship, book-keeping, and shorthand classes continued up to former years. 
The speed section, both of the penmanship and shorthand classes, proves popular. 



168 Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 

Newtown. 

The art classes are in a healthy condition, and show an increase in the number of students over 
last year. Model, freehand, geometrical, perspective, mechanical, and architectural drawing are still 
successfully taught. An exhibition of the work of students held in the local Town Hall was well 
attended, and the drawings of all sections were of greater merit than those of former years. Shorthand 
classes are also held, and the attendance has been good. 

North Sydney. 

In addition to freehand and model drawing, the students enrolled for geometrical and perspective, 
but the ordinary school desks are not suitable for the latter subjects, so that some difficulty is 
experienced. Good progress was made during the year. 

Petersham. 

The individual students exceed those of last year by sixteen. The art classes were instructed 
on the lines laid down in the calendar, and did good work. Book-keeping and mathematical classes were 
reopened during the pear. The apparatus and appliances are in good order, but additional models for 
mechanical drawing are needed. The annual meeting and exhibition of students' work were a success. 
A large number of the local residents attended. The prospects for the coming year are good. 

Armidale. 

A great improvement took place in the classes at this centre, and the institution of day classes 
proved a success. The enrolment was considerably increased and the work done was of a higher order. 
Unfortunately some of the senior pupils left the district just before the examination, so that fewer 
presented themselves than were expected. The medal for drawing at the University Junior Examina- 
tion was awarded to one of the students attending these classes. 

Newcastle. 

The teaching embraces eighteen subjects, with a staff of thirteen teachers. The science classes 
were not so well attended, which is easily explained by the illness and death of the late resident 
Science Master, Mr. J. Pentecost. The coal-mining classes still maintain a large enrolment. Extra 
classes for Mine Surveying are demanded, and it is expected that during the coming year these will be 
formed. The establishment of the Metallurgical Works at Cockle Creek, will, no doubt, lead to the 
extension of the science classes. The exhibition of paintings from the National Art Gallery has been 
very much appreciated by the people of this and surrounding districts. Technical Education promises 
well in Newcastle. 

West Maitland and District. 

The individual enrolment throughout the district was 519, which shows a decrease of 71 on those 
of last year. The accommodation for the trade classes is suitable, but the rooms on the upper floor are 
not so convenient, the low ceiling and faulty ventilation cause excessive heat during the first and last 
terms of the year, which seems to be the cause of the falling off referred to. A new building is badly 
needed. Sixteen subjects are taught, and the teaching staff comprise eight teachers. The district is 
a very extensive one ; the regularity of attendance is evidence that the students are earnest in their 
studies. Many of the residents who were opposed to Technical Education now take an interest in the 
College, and are assisting it in any way they can. With the turning prosperity of the district the 
classes are expected to increase. The work for the past year was satisfactory in every way. 

Singleton. 

The art classes were very successful this year, and the students above the average. The 
attendance was excellent, and the total number of individuals on the roll was fifty. 

Seaham, Clarencetown, Morpeth, and Hinton. 

The attendance at these centres is very encouraging and good work was done. Some of the 
students travel many miles to these classes. The progress has been fairly good, and many of the 
students obtained satisfactory passes at the last examination. 

Goulburn. 

Five hundred and fifty-nine enrolments were recorded for the year, representing (exclusive of 
Public School pupils) 196 individuals. The work done in the science classes has been thoroughly prac- 
tical, and in theoretical chemistry the experiments were performed by the students themselves. The 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction. 169 

■woodworking classes are always full, and owing to the very limited accommodation, many divisions 
have to be made, this makes it necessary to devote a large amount of time to the teaching of the sub- 
ject. Considerable interest is taken in magnetism and electricity, and the special lectures on " local 
geology " attracted good attendances. Satisfactory work was done in all classes during the year, and 
the prospects of the college are good. 

Lithgow. 

Shorthand classes are flourishing, the average enrolment for each term was 52. The pupils made 
good headway and attended regularly. There is an increasing demand for instruction in this subject, 

Bathurst. 

The year which has just closed has been one of steady work on the lines of previous years and 
Las not been marked by any special features. Some 227 individual students joined the classes, but the 
number is slightly less than that of the preceding year. Fewer pupils from the Public Schools attended ; 
there were 175 last year, as against 130 this year. On the other hand there has been greater regu- 
larity in the attendance of the students generally, and more adults have been enrolled. The numbers 
keep up in the art and commercial classes, but the science section is not so well attended. Several art 
students have gained prizes at local exhibitions. The work has been encouraging all through the year, 
and when the new building is occupied, and more suitable apparatus is available, no doubt the science 
classes, as well as others, will have a larger enrolment. 

Granville. 

The improvement in the attendance was marked all through the year. The enrolment in the 
Mechanical Drawing Class increased beyond anticipations, necessitating the appointment of an addi- 
tional teacher. The classes in Applied Mechanics, Mathematics, Model Drawing and Agriculture were 
especially well attended. The Annual Industrial Exhibition was held by the School of Arts Com- 
mittee, and special prominence was given to the work of the students. During the year incandescent 
lights were substituted in the School of Arte for the ordinary gas burners, and an improved light, 
which was badly needed, resulted. The prospect for the work of the coming year is encouraging. 



TECHNOLOGICAL MUSEUMS. 

Perhaps at no period of the Museum's history has so much original and important economic work 
been done as during the past twelve months. The result of the year's labour of the Scientific Staff 
will, no doubt, lead to the opening up of new commercial avenues by the utilisation of our indigenous 
vegetable products. 

The discoveries have been referred to by English, foreign, and colonial Scientific and Technical 
journals, and our success has, no doubt, been due, in a very large measure, to the fact that the 
Museum, so to speak, is self-contained in the matter of botanical determination and chemical research. 

The discovery of the occurrence of Cinnamomum trees in New South Wales redounded to the 
credit of the Department, as the trees are well dispersed throughout the northern coastal areas, and 
yet have escaped! the notice of all previous botanists. 

The importance of the find is that : — 

(a) The bark contains a valuable oil which we have named "Oliverian oil." It can be used for 
perfumes, confectionery, medicines, scented soaps, &c. Inquiries for this oil have already 
reached us from Victoria. 

(&) The leaves were found to contain a camphor similar to the camphor of commerce, so that by 
the judicious cultivation New South Wales could produce sufficient camphor for its own use, 
and from an indigenous tree. 
A new soluable (and, therefore, marketable) gum was found to occur in a new species of Acacia. 

An important paper was read before the Australian Association for the Advancement of Science 
by Mr. R. T. Baker on our indigenous pines. The primary object of this paper was to obtain a 
botanical survey of the Colony of our economic coniferous trees, and thus collect information concerning 
the distribution of each species, and more particularly in regard to the "Cypress pines," Callitris 
Robusta, R.Br., and C. Calcarata, R.Br., so that merchants and others interested in the Sandarach 
trade could ascertain through us the likely localities to obtain supplies. 

I must here acknowledge my indebtedness to our teachers for the ready and willing assistance 
in forwarding to us from all parts of the Colony specimens and also much valuable data. Through 
their co-operation the Museum now possesses a collection of pine resins (Sandarachs) and botanical 
samples which is, probably, unequalled in any part of the world, and which I hope to see displayed at 
the Paris International Exhibition of 1900. 



170 Heport of the Minister of Public Instruction* 

"Logs, cut to show the French, German, and American systems of collecting pine resins, have 
been placed in juxtaposition, so that the whole forms a very instructive and valuable additions to our 
exhibits. 

Some handsome models of Australian plants hare been executed by some of the members of the 
College staff. They form an attractive exhibit in our Botany Court, ' and are much appreciated by the 
teacher and students of the College Botany Class, which is now held twice a week in the Museum, and 
thus the two courts of botanical exhibits, as well as the herbarium, are at the disposal of the teacher — 
a privilege only obtainable in such an institution as this. 

A large number of essential oils have been distilled from the leaves of indigenous trees, and 
other material. Many of the products are at present under investigation, and the results will be 
published as completed. It is expected that great economic results will be obtained from these 
investigations. During the year an eucalyptus oil equal in quality to that of the renowned eucalyptus 
globulus was found to exist in the Sydney. " Grey gum," E. Punctata, and it is hoped that the 
discovery will prove of great importance to the colony. 

In some of the eucalyptus oils we discovered a new solid camphor, which we have named 
" Eudesmol." This camphor may be of considerable value, as most of the camphors are of economic 
importance. 

The odoriferous principle of " Huon Pine " has also been isolated, and proves to be a good 
essential oil. 

The mineralogical work has been satisfactorily carried out by Mr. Smith, who has acted in the 
double capacity of organic and inorganic chemist. His organic work speaks for itself under the botany 
division of this report. 

List of Original Work for the year 1897. 

By R. T. Baker, Y.L.S. 

1. On two new species of acacia from New South Wales. Proc. Linn. Soc. N.S.W., VoL X, 2nd 
series. May, 1807. 

2. Contributions to a knowledge of the Australian flora, Part I. Proc. Linn. Soc. N.S.W., Vol. 
XI, 2nd Series ; June, 1897. Many economic notes are here recorded for the first 

* time for Australia. 

3. On the Cinnamomums of New South Wales, with a chemical research on Oliverian oil. Proc. 
Linn. Soc. N.S.W., Vol. XI, 2nd Series; July, 1897. Apart from the botanical discovery, 
it is shown that in the bark alone there is a valuable oil to be obtained, and in good quantity. 

4. Descriptions of two new Pultenaeas. Proc. Linn. Soc. N.S. W., Vol. XI, 2nd Series ; August, 
1897. 

5. Plants of New South Wales (illustrated) ; No. IX. Acacia gladiiformis, A. Cunn. ; acacia 
rubida, A. Cunn. ; acacia obtusata, Sieb. ; acacia triptera, Benth. ; var. Lyndoni ; var. nov. 
Proc. Linn. Soc. N.S.W., VoL X, 2nd Series ; November, 1897. 

6. Note on the occurrence of a Solid Camphor in the leaves of Cinnamomum Oliveri. Proc Linn. 
Soc. N.S.W. November, 1897. 

7. The Indigenous Pines of New South Wales. — Bead before the Australasian Association for the 
Advancement of Science, January, 1898. 

By H. G. Smith, P.C.S. 

8. On the saccharine and astringent exudations of the Grey Gum, (Eucalyptus punctata) and a 
product allied to " Aromadendrin." Proc. Roy. Soc. of New South Wales j August, 1897. 
This announces the new dye material of eucalyptus leaves, " Myrticolorin," and completes 
the investigation of the exudations of this tree. 

9. Notes on Myrticolorin. Proc. Roy. Soc. of New South Wales. December, 1897. 

Joint Papers by R. T. Baker and H. G. Smith. 

10. On the essential oil of Eucalyptus piperita, Sm., and the occurrence therein of a solid camphor 
or stearoptene. Proc. Roy. Soc. of New South Wales ; July, 1897. In the finding of this 
new camphor we add another product for the consideration of the commercial world. 

11. On Eucalyptus punctata, D.C., especially in regard to its essential oil. Pro. Roy. Soc. of New 
South Wales ; August, 1897. The economic side of this species is very fully treated, and its 
oil is shown to be superior in quality, and equal in quantity, to that of eucalyptus globulus. 

The Zoological side- of the Museum is now in charge of Mr. Finckh, who succeeds Mr. W. W. 
Froggatt. 

In order to make economic zoology a more prominent feature in the Museum, the whole of the 
specimens on the floor allotted to animal products have been re-arranged. A scheme, having for its 
basis the scientific classification of the animal kingdom, has been devised, and in accordance with it 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction* 171 

every exhibit of a zoological nature is placed. It has been found that by adapting such a scheme a 
much better oversight of the whole subject is offered ; it also considerably facilitates the placing of 
any exhibits which from time to time are being added to the collections, and lastly, it clearly shows to 
the officer in charge such gaps which, in order to make the collection as complete as possible, are to be 
filled. 

During the year the foundation has been laid of a collection of marketable fishes of New South. 
Wales, the modelling and colouring both being executed at the College. By this means representatives 
of our fishes are obtained which are more life-like than spirit specimens. 

Two circulars have been sent out during the year in connection with investigations which art* 
being conducted ; —one is in reference to insect pests in timber, and another in regard to the supposed 
occurrence in New South Wales of a venomous lizard. These- investigations are at present not 
completed. 

A report on the weevil pest in granaries has been made, and will be shortly published. 

Several important collections were received during the year, in exchange for specimens sent 
from this Museum. 

The correspondence, both inward and outward, exceeds that of any previous year by at least 
25 per cent. 

The wool section has made steady progress during the year, although the season was very bad 
for wool-growing ; there were 480 fleeces and samples of wool received and added to the collection. 
These specimens were off some of the most aristocratic and well-bred rams and ewes bred in the present 
day. Also, it is encouraging to note that a good many wool-growers hitherto entirely unknown to this 
Department have sent specimens of their production for report, and as presents to the wool collection. 
All wools are reported upon. The Murrumbidgee Pastoral and Agricultural Society placed their 
seventh scouring test in the hands of this branch to sort, scour, and report. This is regarded as a high 
honour, and the work and report were favourably received. Collections of wool and tallow have been 
sent away to different countries. 

The Country Museums have done good work during the year, and the specimens received locally 
show that great interest is taken in these branch establishments. 

The Trustees of the Sydney Art Gallery have exchanged art collections with the Newcastle, 
Ooulburn, and Bathurst Museums. 

The Albury Museum was formally opened by the Minister in May. 

Attendance of visitors at the Mueums for 1897 were : — 

Sydney 100,680 

Newcastle 49,068 

Ooulburn 24,586 

West Maitland 24,054 

Bathurst 22,278 

Albury (for 8 months) 4,318 

The following are appended : — 

Annex A — Summary of Statistics. 
Annex B. — Financial Statement. 

R. N. MORRIS, 

Superintendent. 



ANNEX A. 
Enrolment or Students. 

1896. 1897. 

Sydney Technical College— Technical Classes 3,176 3,462 

„ ,, Classes on Fees only 126 216 

,, ,, Classes sanctioned temporarily 



• a • 



3,302 3,678 

Suburban Technical Classes 245 280 

„ „ on Fees only 333 446 

Country Technical Classes 2,052 2,027 

„ ,, on Fees only 233 315 

Classes connected with Public Schools 954 912 



7,119 7,658 



172 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction, 



ANNEX B. 

Technical Education Branch, 

Receipts and Disbursements for the year 1897. 



RlCBTTB. 



DlSBUBSBMENTS. 



To Balance on account of 1800 

Amount received from Treasury, on 

account of Vote for 1896-7 

Amount received from Treasury, 
account of Vote for 1897-8 



on 



£ 8. d. 

14 7 1 

10,574 17 1 

10,500 



£21,089 4 2 






*» 



Sydney Technical College and 
Branches, 

By Salaries— Administrative. . 
Mechanical Staff 
Lecturers and 

Teachers 

Caretakers and 
Gleaners 

Apparatus and Fittings , 

Materials 

Cleaning Branch Schools. 

Examination Fees 

Prizes 

Freight, Cartage, Ac. . . . 

Library 

Lighting 

Bent 

Repairs, Ac 

Travelling Expenses 



Technological Museum*. 
By Salaries and Contingencies 



Refund to Treasury, 30th 
June, 1897, of 1896-7 
account 



Unexpended Balance, 1897 



£ s. d. 

1,358 4 
1,306 15 5 

8,923 8 2 

719 5 6 
345 3 5 
919 12 9 
112 15 4 
343 4 

59 17 11 
258 9 10 
143 7 11 
794 8 
296 

21 13 4 
151 6 10 



£ 8. d. 



15,753 5 1 



3,998 19 10 



19,752 4 11 



901 19 4 



20,654 4 3 
434 19 11 



£21,089 4 2 



Note.— In Addition to the above, the following payments were made by the Treasury during the year 1897 : — 

£ 8. d. 

London payments 105 5 7 

From Loan Vote of 1890, £20,000. Erection of Technical Colleges and 

Museums at Bathurst, Broken Hill, West Maitland, and Newcastle 5,357 8 



Technical Education.— Fees Account. 



£5,462 6 3 



To Balance on account of 1896 

Fees received from Students, Sydney 

Technical College 

Fees received from Students, Branch 

Technical Schools 

Fees received from Branch Cookery 
Schools 



£ s. d. 

561 15 2 

3,230 17 6 

1,388 2 

24 6 5 



£5,204 19 3 



By Fees paid to Teachers, 

Sydney Technical College 

Fees retained by Teachers, 

Sydney Technical College 

and Branch Colleges . . , 

Transfers to Revenue 
Account, Treasury . . . 

Balance to credit of the 
Technical Education Fees 
Trust Account at Treas 
ury,1897 



£ s. d. 
1,779 15 6 

1,336 11 10 



1,333 9 9 



750 2 2 



E. & O. E. 

Account Branch, Department of Public Instruction, 
Sydney, 21st March, 1898. 



£ 8. d. 



3,116- 7 * 



2,088 11 11 



£5,204 19 3 



A. E. BASSAN, 

Accountant. 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction* 



173 



APPENDIX XX. 

Public School Sites obtained in 1897. 

Number of sites granted by the Government 64 

„ resumed under Act 51 Vic. No. 37 16 

,, purchased 4 



99 



Total number of sites secured during the year, as per following lists ... 84 



1897. — School Sites granted by the Government. 



Argent's Hill (reserva- 
tion) 
Ancowrie 
Ardnaclach 
Ashby 

Arakoon (additional) 
Armidale ,, 
Barrieton 
Billabong Creek 
Bingara, Upper 
Boney's Rocks 
Bolah Gap 
Bridgewater 
Brocklesby 
Bunganbil 
Bukkulla 
Burrumbuttock 



Burnt Yards 
Byron Bay 
Cainbill Creek 
Carwell 
CofFs Harbour 
Coreen 

Corowa, South 
Cowandooey 
Crawford River 
Cucumgillica 
Currabungla 
Currency Creek 
Deniliquin, North 
Derriwang 
Dilga 

Darlington Point 
Eldorado 



Gilgunnia 

Gobbagaula 

Girilambone 

Hernani 

Keerrong 

Ledgerton 

Manilla 

Macleay Entrance 

Martinsville 

Macleay Heads 

McPhail 

Medgun (reservation) 

Moofarban 

Mosquito Bay 

Mungay 

Numbugga 

Pinnacle Reefs 



Peak, The 

Ponto 

Sandy Creek 

Strawberry Creek 

Teven 

Three Brothers 

Tootal 

Towamba, Lower 

Tumorrama 

Wattamadara 

Warregal 

Wagga Experimental 

Farm 
Wyalong West 

(reservation) 
Yarrow 



1897.— School Sites resumed under the " Public Works Act of 1888" (51 Vic. No. 37). 



Place. 


Amount already paid. 


Estimated amoumt 
still due. 




£ s. d. 
5 2 9 

•NiL 

70 5 10 

16 2 6 
643 1 3 

tNiL 
t Nil. 
No claim made. 

No claim made. 

§Nil. 

8 5 6 


£ 8. 


d. 








5 7 


6 






Coramba 


40 13 


9 


Cranbury 




Darling Road (additional) 




Elliott 




Fox Hill 










5 3 


5 






LiOck wood 


4 4 


9 








14 5 


4 












742 17 8 

* 


69 14 


9 



* A gift from Mr. W. Dawson. t A gift from Mr. T. Mooney. I A gift from Mr. John Whiffen. § A gift from 

Mr. G. Gehrig. 



1897. — School Sites purchased. 

Place. Amount paid. 

£ s. d. 

Cabramatta 10 

Moss Vale 200 

Pyrmont 75 

Rose Valley 10 

Total , £295 



171 



Report of the Minister of Ptthlic Instruction. 



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176 



Report of the Minister of Public Instruction, 



APPENDIX XXII. 

Statement showing the Payments made by the Treasury on Account of Services 
rendered to the Department of Public Instruction, from 1st January to 31st 
December, 1897. 



To Amount from Vote of £666,446, 
Item No. 316, of Appropriation 
Act of 1896-7 

To Amount from Vote of £630,282, 
Item No. 243, of Appropriation 
Act of 1897-8 , 



£ 


8. 


d. 


685 








685 








£1,370 










£ s. d. 
1,370 



£1,370 



Account Branch, Department of Public Instruction, 
Sydney, 15th March, 1898. 



A. E. BASSAN, 

Accountant. 



Sydney : William Applegate Gullick, Government Printer.— 1898. 



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