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Full text of "Royal purple"

COMPTROLLER'S OFFICE 



FROM; Ralph H. Perry ff 
TO: Mr. Beatty 



(0 



_ Mrs. Jones 

2.-- Mr-r Hoffman V^ c tc£ 

3 M r. Sealer 

7 Return to Perry 



Date May 12, 1976 



^4— ^fe-r— To4iv«r /<*-- 



•j ... Mr ■ Lonfllfey 



^^ 



;s 



MESSAGE: 



See Me 



Dictation 



Information 



Comments 



Per Our Conversation 



The reception room copy of the 1976 Royal Purple is now here. You and your staff are 
welcome to check it out from Mrs. Jones for an evening or weekend. 



RECEIVED KSU ~>S.an.&a.s ^>'ate Un'wordity 

COMPTROLLER CorniA.-ol.--fh Office 

MAY 1 7 1976 Manhattan, Kansas 665Q2 



kansas state university 

manhattan, kansas 

volume 67 

Royal Purple 1976 



editor in chief Hf\d& Teed 
managing editor paula meyerS 

business editor deb vantasell 

sports editor tad tKOflipSOn 



contents 



features 14 

academics 120 

organizations . . 140 

sports 206 

housing 286 



It is easy in the world to live after the world's opinion; it is easy in solitude to live 
after our own; but the great man is he who in the midst of the crowd keeps with per- 
fect sweetness the independence of solitude. 



:e Ralph Waldo Emerson 





6 — introduction 




Self-reliance. Think of if and what comes to 
mind? Paint-thirsty barns that still stand 
despite broken boards, or weather-mangled 
cottonwoods. All seemingly indestructible 
structures — the unshakably sturdy. 

Humanize it and what appears? Old people 
with their lives etched in creased faces and 
callused hands. Or the scarred. Outliving it all, 
overcoming life. 

Self-reliance, or literally relying on the self. 
Can a student know self-reliance while exist- 
ing under the protection of a glass university? 



introduction — 7 



Self-reliance and the student. Relying on 
the self, not looking to others for direction or 
example. Nonconforming. 

Students are familiar with nonconforming. 
They've grown up with the subject — having 
"be your own true person" pounded into their 
minds by the media. 

In university surroundings, a student is ide- 
ally offered all alternatives. Involvement or 
apathy. Socialization or isolation. Piety or 
atheism. Sophistication or crassness. 

But, in seeking what is right for one's self, 
can a student march into the conformity of not 
conforming? 

Did the same media screaming be one's 
own true self also illustrate "the college stu- 
dent"? Have all available categories been pre- 
selected? Collegiate stereotypes do exist. 





introdui I on 9 




10 — introduction 




What about K-State? Cowboys, Jesus 
freaks, farmer jocks, home economics majors 
looking for husbands — are there any bona 
fide originals in existence? 

Undoubtedly, the original free-spirit was 
caught in a deluge of pseudo-grubby types, 
wearing mass-produced army surplus. As 
well, the first sincere devoutee shouted 
praises only to hear a resounding echo from 
the thundering Bible-toters behind. Their u- 
nique invention was copied unmercifully to 
the point of monotony or commonplace. 

But it is important that some people once 
relied on their own resources — not another's 
manufactured identity. 



introduction — 1 1 




12 — introduction 




And what of an identity? Labels are tagged 
to the merchandise at K-State as fast as in any 
media. Everyone from southeast Kansas is a 
hick — something a kid from Kansas City is 
above, or not aware of. Typical? Perhaps only 
to those comfortable with prefabricated 
molds, and those with the need to shape oth- 
ers into such. But if one wants to stray — seek 
another level — then confidence in one's self 
helps. Maybe the new level cannot be justified 
by others, but then they aren't living it. 

Self-reliance. If it's there, then no pre- 
imposed caste can set binding limitations. 
Why shouldn't a Kansas City student find 
cowboy boots and a down-filled vest a good 
fit? 



inli.xlmlion - 



features 





^ 



®%^gi 








Hickory sticks 

thrash results 

of 'new school' 



by Scott Kraft 



I'd trade it all — four years of drinking, dating, party- 
ing, cramming, sleeping, and eating sporadically — for 
one honest-to-goodness classroom. 

A classroom with real tests — essay tests, and a 
classroom with real lectures demanding appropriate 
recitation, are the things I've spent my undergraduate 
thesis looking for. In short, a classroom from the "old 
school" of education. 

Oh, for 50 minutes of Socratic training. Stretching 
the mind, searching for an answer that's there, but not 
obvious. Even though the answers are there — they 
may differ from person to person — there's knowledge 
to be gained from the stretching. 

And that's what we as education consumers need — 
a lot of mind stretching. 

But instead, we are permeated for four years of col- 
lege, and most likely four years of high school, with lis- 
tening labs, "appreciation" courses, superficial current 
events discussions, and pud class projects. 

That's right — the junk food of education. 

The word "pud", as attributed to easy classes, has 
almost grown meaningless with overuse. 

It is now possible, with the help of modern technol- 
ogy and all that, to go through four years of "higher" 
education and emerge unblemished — with not one 
stretch mark on the mind. 

How can one get into this great sport we call college? 
It's not difficult to get in, or to stay in. And with a pleas- 
ing personality and a charismatic aura, you can go far 
in college. 



16 — education 




There is one problem educators can't explain away 
— personality and charisma don't always pay the bills. 
Besides, it's hard to be dignified and have self-respect 
when you're flat on your face after graduation. 

Businesses are yelling, though. They charge col- 
leges and universities with graduating ill-prepared stu- 
dents. 

ACT scores are telling the real story, while rising 
grades are giving the educators fallacious arguments 
for their case. 

Grades are skyrocketing with little or no concurrent 
increase in student ability as gauged by standardized 
tests. Standardized test scores are reaching all-time 
lows around the country. 

The indictment is true of at least a handful of educa- 
tors in virtually every U.S. college. 

Where did the classes go? Relaxed grading policies 
keep students from competing. It works, all right — stu- 
dents couldn't give a damn about schoolwork. 

But students aren't stupid. If the teachers don't give 
them enough to do, they'll find something. 

Usually, that something begins with "Aggie" and 
ends with "bars". More brains are lost in urinals than in 
any other place. 

I used to think the forces for traditional education had 
been pushed all the way back to high school. But the 
seeping "education made fun" syndrome is biting 
heavily there, and casualties are becoming numerous. 

First it was history and English courses in high 
school. Next thing you know, it'll be science. 

"Turn up the beat," an uncomfortable student says. 

"Yes, sir," answers the instructor, whose salary is 



dipped from a federal grant for experimental high 
school" education. "But we really must get to the busi- 
ness of teaching you all how to run a projector — that's 
important in the real world, you know." 

How I long for that junior high school science 
teacher we thought was a sadist. He would open all the 
windows in the classroom for a test. 

As the teen-degree air briskly filled the room he 
would remark, with a smile, "You perform better when 
the room's cooler." 

It was funny, though — it always worked. But you 
didn't waste time on questions you couldn't answer. 

Nevertheless, we learned something from that 
teacher. He expected, and got, attention from his sev- 
enth grade classes. We didn't dare turn away or close 
our eyes for fear a piece of white chalk might come zip- 
ping by our ears. No monkey business in that class. 

But perhaps the great educational joke goes back 
even further than junior high. Grade schools are afraid 
to teach the basics, or rather too timid to make the stu- 
dent learn what he or she must know. 

As more than one high school and college teacher 
has remarked, "These kids can't even read." 

If they can't read, what can they get out of college 
classrooms where a premium is put on communication 
of ideas and thinking? 

Not very much. And that's what has been the catalyst 
of alternative learning and the mindless class. 

A graduate without stretch marks isn't going to be 
questioning much of anything — particularly the "edu- 
cation" that bores him. 

I want to be able to ask those questions. 




18 — k-slale union 



K-State's Union celebrated its twenti- 
eth birthday on March 6 — and it's 
come a long way from the barracks 
which housed a makeshift coffee shop 
of the 40s. 

Students began paying into the 
building fund in 1 941 . Five dollars were 
extracted from their student fees each 
semester — a sum comparable to $22 
each semester according to 1976 val- 
ues. 

World War II and the Korean War 
interrupted the fund raising, however, 
and it was not until 1954 that construc- 



tion began. Two years later K-Staters 
replaced the stand-by coffee shop with 
a building that offered a small recrea- 
tion area, food service operations, an 
activities center, and an information 
desk. 

Two additional periods of construc- 
tion in 1961 and 1968 provided the 
Union with a recreation area that dou- 
bled the size of the original area, 
expanded the activities center, added 
the K, S, and U ballrooms, and made 
the Union the facility it is to K-Staters 
today. 



Union lab draws rush crowd 



by Terri Phillips 



It was 8:45 am. I was late and I knew it. 
So did the rest of my lab table. Nobody 
comes late for Union labs, and now I'd 
have to pay the consequences. 

In three years I had never spent more 
than a few minutes in the Union between 
iclasses. But this semester, I was stuck 
with a half hour here, two hours there, 
and time off on Fridays to show my good 
behavior off elsewhere. But now I was 
late, and facing the group was going to 
be ugly. 

"Maybe they'll be easy on me," I told 
myself as I ran across campus. "First 
loffenders get off easy. 

"Maybe Mr. Monitor won't be there 
today," I tried to convince myself as I 
opened the front door of the Union. But 
all my hopes melted to the floor as I 
walked through the cafeteria doors and 
saw his beady eyes looking just at me 
underneath the bill of a Chester White 
hog hat. I squared my shoulders, swal- 
lowed hard, and began my death march 
to the table. 

"You're late, Phillips!" came the 
booming voice of Mr. Monitor. "Nobody's 
late at this table! Nobody!" he shouted, 
slamming a rolled-up 1974 Collegian on 
the edge of the table. 

I closed my eyes and shuttered inside. 
In the few weeks I had been to Union lab, 
I had learned to hate that Collegian. 



Whenever one of us forgot why or how 
he had become table monitor, he would 
unroll that paper and show the finished 
crossword puzzle "completed in record 
time of 16.5 minutes." 

"What's your excuse?" he yelled, 
slamming the paper down on the table 
top again. 

I knew I had to play it cool so I sat down 
and decided to try my luck. "Sorry," I 
said, rubbing my sweaty palms together. 
"I was signing up for credit-no credit." 

"That ended last week!" he screamed, 
this time drawing noticeable stares from 
the other lab tables. 

"Not for Union labs," I said. My fellow 
lab partners, who had been trying to fin- 
ish today's crossword puzzle within Mr. 
Monitor's 20-minute time limit, stopped 
writing and looked up at me. What a per- 
son wouldn't do for an audience, I 
thought. 

"Please Mr. Monitor, don't kick me out 
of the Union!" I pleaded. "Where will I 
go? What will I do between classes? If you 
throw me out, I'll lose the 10 hours of 
credit I just signed up for my Union labs. 
Please, Mr. Monitor!" I was on my knees 
by now and Mr. Monitor was looking at 
me with a confused stare. I decided to 
push my luck a little further. 

"The ladies at the Office of Continuing 
Education were really nice to me," I said. 
After I found out I met the four-hour-a- 
week minimum requirement for Union lab 
credit, they issued me a discount card for 



food and drinks bought during labs, 
assigned me a tutor for crossword puzzle 
help, and even fixed my transcript." 

Mr. Monitor pushed his Chester White 
hog hat back on his head with the news- 
paper and listened for more. I was ready 
to deliver the final blow. 

"Besides, Mr. Monitor, now I'll be able 
to graduate a semester early. And they're 
even making it retroactive. For every hour 
of Union lab spent since 1974, you get 
one half of a credit. One lady said I 
could've graduated a semester ago if I 
would have come in earlier." 

I'd just begun another sentence when 
the table emptied in seconds and a mad 
dash through the cafeteria doors toward 
the continuing education office was in 
progress. In his haste to collect what was 
rightfully his, Mr. Monitor had left his 
sacred Chester White crown and vintage 
Collegian. I picked up the hat and placed 
it on my head. Slamming the rolled-up 
newspaper on the table, I could feel the 
power. It felt good. I then picked up a cur- 
rent Collegian and spied an unfinished 
crossword puzzle. By the wall clock it 
was 9:05. 

"Leaving lab early, without my permis- 
sion, and not finishing the puzzle," I said 
to myself. "That's inexcusable!" I 
slammed the Collegian down hard on the 
table and smiled. "And they thought they 
had it rough before." 



k stale union 




20 — anderson bell tower 



Attic belfry echoes heritage 



by Rita Shelley 



A student of the early part of the cen- 
tury would surely be lost on today's K- 
State campus. Who would have thought 
cornfields could sprout all those build- 
ings? What possible logic could have 
contributed to converting the Domestic 
Sciences Building into a home for the 
geology and geography departments? 

Many campus buildings house differ- 
ent facilities today than they were origi- 
nally built for. Anderson Hall, formerly the 
"Main College Building", contained a 
chapel back in days gone by. It also had 
the early 1900's answer to today's stu- 
dent union: a canteen. And may the male 
students of those days never forget an 
important concession offered by Ander- 
son — the haircut. 

There is one feature of Anderson Hall 
that still exists in its near-original form — 
the legendary old bell. Pigeon droppings 
notwithstanding, it is now used only to 
announce commencement exercises. 

Any visitor expecting a bell tower "just 
like in the movies" won't be disappointed 
by rickety stairs reaching to eerie heights 
and a view of too much distance between 
"up here" and "down there". Flashes of 
headlines reading, "Student Falls From 
Umpteenth Floor Window — Doesn't Live 
To Tell Story" come to mind. 

Several students of earlier days found 
their ways to the upper reaches of Ander- 
son from time to time. Their business, not 
necessarily official, was probably con- 
ducted at odd hours of the night. One 
prank, attributed to a group of sopho- 
mores, involved stealing the bell clapper. 
Perhaps they were sentenced to herding 
the sheep brought to Anderson lawn to 
control dandelions? 

What has been described as "a chilling 
experience" for the bell happened when 
wintertime pranksters turned the bell 



upside-down and filled it with water dur- 
ing the 1870s. Rumor has it that custodi- 
ans had to light a fire under it to melt the 
ice. 

Another time, the bell failed to ring 
when rags were tied around the clapper, 
producing only silence during the early 
morning hours when it usually sounded. 

Not only a victim of intentional pranks, 
the bell suffered accidental damage in a 
1968 fire attributed to faulty wiring. More 
trauma was experienced by the squirrels, 
though, than the tower itself, Vince Cool, 
of the planning department, said. 

During the late 50s and early 60s, it 
was a custodian's job to ring the bell, sig- 
naling the approach of 8 am and 1 pm 
classes. One such custodian, Mark Riat, 
described this aspect of his job to the 
Collegian several years ago. 

" 'Every morning there are pigeons in 
the tower,' he said. 'They aren't any hap- 
pier about being awakened at 7:45 am 
than a lot of students. They fly out when 
the bell begins clanging, but are always 
back when I go to work again at 12:55 
pm'." 

The bell hasn't always been in Ander- 
son's attic. Donated by eastern philan- 
thropist Joseph Ingalls in 1861, it was 
first housed in the Bluemont Central Col- 
lege building. It was moved in 1875 to 
Farm Machinery Hall, which was located 
near Burt Hall. When the central part of 
Anderson was completed in 1882, the 
bell was installed in the belfry where it 
remains today. 

A K-State historian, Charles M. Correll, 
told the Collegian in 1960 that the bell 
once rang every hour to signal the begin- 
ning and end of classes since "time 
pieces were not common" in those days. 

What had been a tradition at K-State 
became history in 1965 when the old bell 
was replaced by an electronic carillon. 
Presented by Mr. and Mrs. Ralf Hockens 
"in appreciation for Kansas State's serv- 



ice to us, and to the people and the state 
of Kansas," it put Ingalls's gift into retire- 
ment. 

Contrary to popular belief, no hunch- 
backed centenarians are responsible for 
the music coming from the carillon. 
Instead, it consists of an electronic sys- 
tem with 98 bells that are struck by tiny 
hammers to produce sound. Rolls of 
music, similar to those used on a player 
piano, are used. 

"Ken Heywood, director of the Endow- 
ment Association, decides what music to 
play," Marge Van Buren, EA secretary, 
said. He chooses from about 80 selec- 
tions that have been donated by campus 
groups. 

Besides playing every hour and half- 
hour, the carillon has been used for 
longer recitals. John Klein, a world- 
renowned carillonneur, played a dedica- 
tory recital on it in 1966. Occasionally, 
the bells announce a wedding in Dan- 
forth Chapel. 

Time marches on. And changes come 
with its passing. The Avi-Tron pigeon 
controller installed in Anderson has sent 
former feathered inhabitants to new 
roosts. The Anderson barbershop no 
longer exists. Barbers of those days 
would be hard put to fulfill requests for 
"fros" and other styled haircuts of today. 

Telling time has been of paramount 
importance to people since the sundial. 
Perhaps all would be better off not worry- 
ing about "being there before the bell 
rings." 

But time is here to stay. Somewhere 
the green freshie will metamorphosize 
into a seasoned senior. Can't stay in 
school forever, kid. 

Whether appreciated or not, Anderson 
cupola melodies are there as a reminder 
of time's passing. 



,»k1t'iM>n [it'll Knst-'i 




22 — the entertainers 



the entertainers 



MARCEL MARCEAU ■ Besides several 
heralding thumps before the curtains 
opened, the performer remained silent. 

That wasn't unusual — the performer 
was Marcel Marceau, world-renowned 
French pantomimist, who entertained an 
overflow McCain Auditorium audience 
March 19. 

The mime of Marceau described in a 
gesture what volumes of words have 
failed to express. 

Marceau exemplified this when he 
acted out the biblical story of Genesis in 
his moving ballet, "Creation of the 
world". Equally expressive and beautiful 
was his interpretation of the life cycle of 
mankind from birth to death in "Youth, 
Old Age, and Death". 

In a lighter vein, Marceau donned the 
scruffy, flower-trimmed hat and striped 
shirt of Bip, his alter-ego creation to 
whom every kind of misfortune, big and 
small, seemed to happen. Some such 
adventures were a tipsy jaunt at a society 
party, failure to tame a stubborn lion, and 
a shaky experience on the high-wire as a 
trapeze artist with second thoughts. 
There were split-second character 
changes as he played both parts in a re- 
enactment of the biblical story of David 
and Goliath. 

Topping off the evening, Marceau per- 
formed his classic, "The Maskmaker". 
While trying on his collection of masks, 
the maskmaker gets a mask stuck on his 
face — a smiling one. With his face trap- 
ped in an obnoxious grin, he tries desper- 
ately to pull the stubborn mask off his 
face. 

SEALS AND CROFTS ■ A crowd 
waited impatiently April 4 as the last ech- 
oes of the jazz back-up band died in the 
corners of Ahearn Field House. People 
twisted in their seats, straining for the first 
glimpse of the pair which was to perform. 
A few people sitting on the floor stood up 
to stretch their legs after the first 20-min- 
ute set. 

And then they appeared — Jimmy 



Seals and Dash Crofts. "I'll Play For You" 
broke the applause which greeted |hem 
and introduced their 90 minutes of music. 

Approximately 4,000 fans were treated 
to a varied musical format, including jazz, 
pop, and bluegrass. Well-known hits 
such as "Summer Breeze", "Diamond 
Girl", and "We May Never Pass This Way 
Again" mingled throughout the concert. 
A jazz number, "Wisdom", allowed the 
pair to improvise with saxophone and 
drums. 

Hog callin' music in the second half of 
the concert brought the crowd to its feet, 
with enthusiasm staying high until the 
performance's end. 

After the concert, Seals and Crofts 
reappeared on the stage to explain their 
religious faith, Baha'i, a belief that all reli- 
gions come from God and all people are 
of one family. 

JEFFERSON STARSHIP "April 17, 
1975 will never hold a prominent place in 
K-State's history. It was the day of a dou- 
ble-bill concert at Ahearn Field House — 
Jefferson Starship was the main attrac- 
tion, with Commander Cody and His Lost 
Planet Airmen starting the show. 

Only 2,000 people attended, many of 
whom were not K-State students. The 
anxious crowd, sporting long hair and 
beads, smoked pot while they waited to 
be entertained. 

Commander Cody played an hour-long 
set. All were on their feet clapping and 
snapping fingers to "Hot Rod Lincoln", 
"Lost in the Ozone Again", "Riot in Cell 
Block Number 9", and "Down to Seeds 
and Stems Again Blues". Commander 
Cody, with his excellent country-swing 
style on the keyboards, helped the crowd 
along. 

When the spotlights illuminated Grace 
Slick, Paul Kanter, and Papa John 
Creech, spines began to tingle. There 
they were, the veterans. Ten years 
together as a sign of the times: from their 
beginnings in 1965, their music has not 



only expounded upon, but helped shape 
and mold the youth culture during one of 
the most controversial and important 
decades of this century. 

Marti Balin, who had taken a back seat 
to Paul Kantner during the Jefferson Air- 
plane days, has all but stepped into the 
lead male vocal part with Starship. He 
harmonized beautifully with Grace Slick 
on songs like "Caroline" and 
"Dragonfly". "Miracles", a soothing love 
song, was introduced to the crowd by 
Balin's rich tenor voice. 

Septuagenarian Papa John Creech, 
though slow in body, showed just how 
young in spirit he was by rocking with the 
best of them. His unique violin sound 
added depth and perspective to 
Starship's music. 

Times have changed, though, and so 
have the crowds and the music. It was 
only eight years ago that the Airplane 
played to half-a-million people on a farm 
in upstate New York. That was Wood- 
stock. Now only a small percentage of 
that Woodstock crowd remains. 

LILY TOMLIN ■ With superb mimicry 
and daft characterizations, comedienne 
Lily Tomlin entertained two full-capacity 
audiences in her April 31 Forum Hall per- 
formance. 

Tomlin told the audience she had so 
many thoughts running through her mind 
she didn't know what to do with them. As 
a result, one-liners spiced her perform- 
ance. 

Lily brought along her best-known 
characters, such as Susy Sorority and 
the maiden from Ma Bell, Ernestine. And 
Edith Ann, the five-and-a-half-year-old 
pixie, who knows about and comments 
upon everything, was there. 

Lily also portrayed a 77-year-old 
female evangelist who preached "boo- 
geying". The former member of the now 
defunct "Laugh-In" television series ram- 
bled on to satirize funerals, commercials, 
politics, sex, and even "tasteful" people. 



the entertainers — 23 




K-State has never been a trend-setter. And if one 
would care to expound on the subject — K-State 
has never really been a trend-follower. The fact 
that streaking caught on in 1974 brought a 
blush of surprise to everyone's cheeks. But 
the following year's appearance of flying 
pies on campus took the cake. K-State had 
managed to "catch on" two years run 
ning. As for future fool-hardy collegiate, 
fads — well, America, K-State's eyes/' 
are finally open and upon you. / 

/ 

Cream pies soar, 

plastering 'paid for' targets sf£. 



by Doug Fink 



Except for an unusually high attendance, the class 
appeared normal in all respects. The professor 
arranged his notes and the students waited for the lec- 
ture to begin. 

One student rose and approached the professor. 

"Dr. Williams, my name is Jeff Pierce and this is for 
you." 

Moments later Pierce, senior in philosophy, was flee- 
ing as Dudley Williams, regents professor in physics, 
stood blinded — his face plastered with pie. 

Creative Promotions had struck again, in reaction to 
a challenge by Ed Klimek, KMKF-FM coordinator, to 
bring the nationwide pie-throwing fad to K-State. 

"We didn't think it would go at K-State," Pierce said, 
"but it went over real big. The phone rang all hours of 
the night." 

Ironically, the first victim of the enterprise was Kli- 
mek, himself. Upon concluding an interview with Mike 
Rice, co-originator of Creative Promotions, concerning 
the pie-tossing craze, Pierce zapped Klimek. 



The KMKF broadcast of the interview brought many 
phone calls and a variety of requests. 

"One wanted us to get a judge," Rice said. "He said 
the judge had arrested him but he wouldn't give us his 
(own) name." 

Another caller asked them to hit a police officer who 
had arrested the caller. 

"For a while we shied away from grudges," Pierce 
said. "Later we decided to take them, as that was the 
purpose of the fad elsewhere. There was really no 
adverse reaction except for one." 

The adverse reaction was elicited from Michael Hoff- 
man, assistant professor of chemistry. Hoffman retali- 
ated by tossing a cup of coffee on Pierce. 

"Dr. Williams took it real well. He waved to me as I 
ran off and later he was full of compliments about the 
company. 

"We did have to worry about the legal aspects," 
Pierce said. "First there was the pie fad, then there was 
a fad to sue the pie-throwers. ' ' 

Creative Promotions helped avoid animosity by pro- 
viding each victim with a towel and certificate. In addi- 
tion, about 85 per cent of the profits were contributed 



24 — pie throwing 




\ 




1 1 1 »i 



to the Southern Poverty Law Center. 

"The towel and certiticate were partly a good will 
gesture and partly an attempt to distinguish ourselves 
trom competitors. Others were beginning to take up the 
craze and we wanted to be sure we didn't have to take 
responsibility tor their work," Pierce said. 

Creative Promotions collected about $350 as a result 
ot 1 5 to 20 hits. Students requesting hits were charged 
$1 5 while others paid $30 as tees were higher for cer- 
tain victims. 

One such case was the attempt to zap Governor 
Robert Bennett. Bennett was participating as a speaker 
at Spring Fling 75 activities and arrangements were 
made to hit him at the bed races. However, the mission 
was thwarted by two K-State students who knocked the 
pie to the ground. 

Hired hit-man Bruce Moore was lectured by the stu- 
dents on the merits of preserving the image of K-State. 
Pierce said he believed the governor would have 
reacted good-naturedly. 

Sessions of Student Senate were disrupted by 
several pie-wielding incidents. Among those zapped 
were student senators Amy Button, Chris Badger — 



and Pierce. 

"I thought it was funny," Gerald Polich, assistant 
professor of music and another of Pierce's targets, 
said. Polich, who displays his certificate in his office, 
said he grew suspicious when several music students 
crowded around his door as he was about to begin a 
class. He also thought it strange when Pierce 
approached him with one hand behind his back. He 
was able to block Pierce's throw and the pie fell. 

"I hit him with it," Polich said. 

Pierce still managed to get pie on Polich's clothing. 

Making arrangements for zaps sometimes resembled 
contacts between spies. One woman met Pierce 
dressed in sunglasses and trench coat, including the 
turned-up collar. Another thought he was to identify 
himself by removing one shoe. Pierce was unaware of 
this code, however, and the man stood in a public area 
for several minutes with his shoe in hand. 

Creative Promotions had made no hits since the 
1 975 spring semester, but remained open to requests. 

As to future escapades? 

"We're just going to wait until the next fad comes 
along and possibly follow up on it," Pierce said. 



pie throwing - 



Records are made to be broken. And 
there's always someone who is willing 
to take on the challenge. Though not 
quite as bizarre as the older versions of 
goldfish swallowing or flagpole sitting, 
the more modern marathon stunts are 
just as mentally and physically gruel- 
ing. K-Staters were involved in several 
attempts at record-breaking — and will 
probably go on and on. 



Record breakers collapse 
and heroes remain unsung 



by Greg Doyle 



Just a few more hours and it will all be over. Heart — 
how you doing? Beating a little fast, I see. Stomach — 
sure you're hungry, but you've gone without food for a 
lot longer than this. Legs — a little more Ben Gay will 
soothe the ache. Back — don't tense up now. Eyelids 
— don't close yet. Not yet . . . but they're so heavy 
. . . so . . . heavy . . . 

And just before they shut tight and the owner's body 
melts into a Sealy mattress for a day and a half of 
peaceful slumber, the ordeal is completed. Somebody 
switches off the broadcasting console, and the turnta- 
ble stops. The Isley Brothers' "Fight the Power" fades 
off and the exhausted dancers rest their aching mem- 
bers. The last lap is swum, the last card trumped. The 
long haul is over. 

1975 could rightly earn the reputation of being a 
marathon year Guiness Book of World Records got its 
share of business from K-State prestige-seekers who 
tried everything from a 1 00-hour continuous radio 
broadcast to bump-dancing for two and a half days at 
Mother's Worry Tavern in Aggieville. 

As a result, thousands of dollars were raised for 
charity. Long hours were not wasted, despite jeers of 
disbelief from those who cried, "You're crazy!" or 
"You're going to kill yourself!" The finish line was too 
important. Lasting was too vital. 



Steve Physioc, junior in radio and tv, and Gevin Kidd, 
sophomore in radio and television, proved they could 
do the seemingly impossible by staying on the air for 
100 hours on KSDB-FM. 

From 9 am Thursday, April 1 7, to 1 pm Monday, April 
21 , the duo volleyed between the "penthouse" of Far- 
rell Library and the main corridor in -the Union playing 
popular music, joking with listeners, and each other 
over the air, and yawning — a lot. 

During the broadcast, only 60 seconds was lost to 
dead air, when Kidd's eyelids just wouldn't stay up. 
With coffee on hand, and the pair needling each other 
to stay awake, the hundredth hour finally came, and the 
crowd in the Union cheered as the pair pointed to each 
other, proud of the triumph. 

The duo broadcast to raise money for the newly-cre- 
ated James A. McCain Commemorative Scholarship 
Fund. Working in conjunction were Alpha Phi Omega, 
Chimes, and Spurs which took pledges. 

In the back of their minds, though, Physioc and Kidd 
had another purpose for the marathon radio show, and 
that was to break the supposed world record of 99 
hours, 33 minutes. The pair managed to break that 
record, but they missed getting their names in Guiness 
by 63 hours, 45 minutes. The McCain Scholarship 
Fund got off to a good start, but the two disappointed 
K-Staters went down to defeat in their quest for world 
fame. 

Marathons became the craze, though, and through 



26 — marathons 



^feiriy lb@@lf 




out the year other groups began testing their minds and 
bodies to see how long they could last — at just about 
anything. 

Shortly after 1 975 spring break, Mother's Worry Tav- 
ern stayed open for 60 hours straight. The dance floor 
wasn't crowded, but the few couples dancing were 
tenacious. Six couples began the 60-hour "bump-a- 
thon", but only three couples lasted the duration. 

"We got a 10-minute break every two hours," Greg 
Cline, one of the sturdier participants, said. "I was rub- 
bing Ben Gay into my legs during the breaks." 

On February 19, ten more couples survived the trial 
— this time lasting 62 hours. 

Ironically, both marathon dances were put on to raise 
money for Muscular Distrophy of America. About 
$2,000 was raised in the first effort with $5,000 as the 
second's goal. 

If the dances set a world record, Guiness doesn't list 
the dancers' names in its celebrated pages. Apparently 
the editors have never heard of the "bump", or were 
afraid to ask what it was when they received the record 
entry application from the dancers. 

Such are the trials and tribulations of the marathoner. 

Imagination seems to be the key in the marathon 
business. Card games helped raise money for other 
charities across America. 

The annual "Black and Gold Card-a-thon", in March 
1 975 lasted four days, allowing 65 persons from Acacia 
and Alpha Xi Delta to play cards in shifts. Spades, 



hearts, and bridge kept the participants busy at card 
tables in front of the Union. Nearly $2,000 was raised 
for the K-State Speech and Hearing Center, Pittman 
Hall in New York, and the Capper Foundation for Crip- 
pled Children in Topeka. 

In another charity drive, members of the K-State and 
University of Kansas chapters of Kappa Kappa Gamma 
staged a "run-a-thon" in October to raise money for 
the Burns Center at the University of Kansas Medical 
Center in Kansas City. 

More than 160 women participated, meeting at a 
halfway point between Manhattan and Lawrence. A 
participant from each chapter ran a mile, then was 
picked up in a car, and replaced by another Kappa. 
$2,300 was collected to help buy medical equipment 
for the center. 

A 3,200 lap "swim-a-thon" meant survival for the K- 
State women's swim team, which was in danger of los- 
ing its status as an intercollegiate contender. Last 
October, 16 team members each swam 200 lengths. 
The $2,000 the team raised for the effort gained it 
reinstatement. 

Marathons and more marathons. K-Staters couldn't 
seem to exhaust the marathon possibilities. Although 
no group succeeded in its quest for a world's record, 
charities, teams, and scholarship funds profited by the 
unselfish efforts of those who believe that people are 
capable of much more than they ever thought possible. 



marathons — 27 



/ 




28 — spring bn 




The reincarnation of recess 



Why the pilgrimage? In either direction, the prodding 
begins and ends with "snow". Some can't get too 
deeply buried in the stuff or others too soon rid of it. 
Whichever, in the middle of March, book-badgered col- 
legiates pack it up for a spring break. 

The non-snow faction migrates south, using the sun 
for their guiding star. Sweeping through Dixie, a Kan- 
sas Yankee can pick up mouse ears from Florida, a 
drawl in Texas, or — the quick-steps from Old Mexico. 
Regardless of the souvenir, the aches of winter are 
baked into memories, not to be remembered for at least 
eight months. Alas, if it were only true. As classes 
resume too soon, so does the blizzardous climate of 
Kansas. And the "tanables" must re-enter hibernation 
to await the "second coming" of spring. 

Now for those of opposite opinion, the sun is still 
admired — but only if their feet, ankles, and knees are 
swamped with snow. And under all that, which is so 
often poetically called "a blanket", lurks a pair of skis 
— waxed and waiting for the show to start with a down- 



ward shove. And like their southern cousins, on the trip 
they may also pick up a few remembrances — like bro- 
ken limbs, rearranged faces, or disconnected spines. 
But it's all a part of the package deal and the chance for 
the uneventful run is there. 

At the end of the week, the downhillers are forced to 
make a clean break with the marrow of Colorado and 
strike out across the Kansas plains. If riding on ice all 
the way home, the "snow bunnies" smile at the proba- 
bility of another chilly Easter. When the returning "ski- 
blood" is still too hot, majestic Mt. Bleu of Lawrence 
can bring cooling relief. 

Decisions, decisions. And all because of the snow. 
But returnees can take comfort in the thought that even 
Annette and Frankie were torn between the beaches 
and slopes. 

So when comparing third degree burns or thigh-high 
plaster casts, one conclusion can be drawn. It isn't 
always "just like the movies." 



spring break — 29 



Cash 

by Paula Meyers 



bounces dire needs 



Make checks payable to Kansas State 
University. 

That's the beginning of four more 
years of the same. The pained looks on 
those faces at registration as the checks 
are torn from the checkbooks aren't just 
for show. It hurts. 

The resident student pays a minimum 
of $10,000 ($2,500 a year) to spend four 
years attending K-State. Minimum means 
modest, but adequate — providing for 
the necessities and limiting some of those 
desired things that aren't needed. 

But how is the student to know what is 
really necessary? 

"The first step is to decide on your 
goals. Values come in here," Sandra 
Grey, family economics instructor, said. 
The most basic needs are food, shelter, 
and clothing, but even in these categor- 
ies there is a problem of making deci- 
sions, she said. How much and what kind 
may differ from one person to the next. 

"Spending your money is really a 
series of decisions," Grey said. "As you 
grow older, you don't have to constantly 
be making these same decisions. You'll 
gain expertise — you won't have to go 
back through and re-evaluate each 
time," she said. 

Entrance into college life may very well 
be the first time many students have con- 
trol over their own money, Gerald Ber- 
gen, director of aids and awards, said. 

"Part of education is to learn how to 
manage the funds," he said. "Fees, 
books, supplies, room and board, trans- 
portation, and miscellaneous items are 
considered for all students, and for mar- 
ried students, we consider a 12-month 
instead of a nine-month period, and extra 
books and fees," he said. 

The aids and awards office has deter- 
mined that an allowance of $50 each 
month will probably be spent for personal 
expenses of the student. This includes 
items such as toilet articles, clothing pur- 
chase and maintenance, entertainment, 
and recreation. 

"It isn't as much as a person might 
think until you figure that it includes the 
Cokes at the Union and recreation," Ber- 
gen said. "Then there's lipstick, powder, 



and paint for the girls, and ... I was 
going to say razor blades for the guys 
... but anyway most people can get by 
on it. Some wouldn't spend that in a 
month and others would spend that in 
shoes," he said. 

A tipping of the scales on the entertain- 
ment and recreation side is not difficult to 
achieve. Impulse spending is an espe- 
cially hazardous temptation to the stu- 
dent in a limited situation. 

"Bad habits can be formed that take 
years to unlearn," Grey said. "If you go 
down to a store at the beginning of the 
month and buy a sweater, you're going to 
suffer for it at the end of the month." 

Grey believes that although students 
may occasionally find themselves in eco- 
nomical dilemmas, these small-scale 
crises are, in the long run, helpful as 
learning experiences. These financial 
problems will prepare the person to plan 
future expenditures more wisely. 

"You can grasp control of your budget. 
There isn't really any mythical hand that 
keeps coming down and flicking it away," 
she said. "It isn't something that comes 
naturally. Obtaining it from your own past 
experience plus some kind of formal 
training is ideal." 

Possibly the most unnecessary spend- 
ing by students is tunneled into a posses- 
sion that many would hesitate to consider 
unnecessary — the automobile. 

"They probably buy better cars than 
they need, and could get by on more 
modest transportation," Bergen said. He 
cited upkeep, maintenance, gas, oil, and 
insurance as the areas of accumulated 
expense. However, Bergen does not 
believe that this applies to off-campus 
residents who rely on their cars as the 
only means of transportation. The unnec- 
essary auto expenses are incurred mainly 
by students living on campus, whose 
cars are largely a convenience. 

The over-spending of pocket money is 
also considered as unnecessary by Ber- 
gen. This includes between-class 
refreshments, snacks, cigarettes, and 
other items that don't seem to be costly 
or extravagant at the time of purchase. 
But, Bergen said, if students would keep 
a running account, they would probably 
be astonished at the amount of pocket 
money actually spent. 



Especially for off-campus residents, 
the probable source of most unnecessary 
expenditures ironically falls into the cate- 
gory of a basic need — food. The prob- 
lem comes because of a lack of experi- 
ence on the part of students in purchas- 
ing and preparing the food. Food is sim- 
ply wasted, Bergen said. 

He attributed this to the fact that most 
off-campus residents, perhaps living in 
apartments, houses, or mobile homes, 
are novice shoppers and cooks. Usually, 
they are unfamiliar with the supermarket 
bargain and wise purchases. And when 
they take the food home, they inevitably 
prepare more than they can eat. The net 
result is waste of food and money, in 
addition to the expenditure of time pre- 
paring the meal. 

A popular myth is the idea that a mar- 
ried couple spends less than two single 
people. Wrong. Expenditures of a mar- 
ried couple are exactly double that of a 
single person. Marriage does not save 
money for students, Bergen said. 

He attributed this to factors such as a 
single person being likely to share living 
quarters with one or more other persons 
and dividing the rent among them. Mar- 
rieds can only divide the rent in half. And 
chances are that the couple is purchas- 
ing items such as a television, stereo, and 
furniture, whereas typical roommates do 
not make joint major purchases. 

Loans are available to students who 
wish to borrow. To qualify for the National 
Direct Student Loan, the need for addi- 
tional funds must be clearly shown, Ber- 
gen said. 

Bergen said there is an expectation 
that the student will contribute $400 
from summer employment earnings. After 
the need is defined, undergraduates may 
borrow up to $5,000 on NDSL during the 
college career. 

A guaranteed student loan, the Feder- 
ally Insured Student Loan, is available 
without showing a need for additional 
funds. Up to $2,000 may be borrowed 
until graduation. Both NDSL and FISL 
require the student to begin repayment of 
loans nine months after termination of 
study, with a 10-year span in which to 
complete repayment. 



30 — student spending 




Scholars buy 
tassels, gowns 
. . . and limbo 



The college degree — passport to 
unlimited opportunities? Recent recipi- 
ents of the sheepskin might disagree, 
as attempts at entering the working 
world ended where the unemployment 
line began. What good is a graduation- 
gift pen set if there is no banking 
account to write checks on? 



by Judy Puckett 



There is a certain awe that surrounds a senior — a 
teeling ot reaching a tour-year goal. 

For that last year, he expends his whole energy: 
cramming in everything he may have missed in the firs'- 
three. Then it happens. 

Graduation. Like attaining an enormously gratifying 
climax after four brutal years of being screwed, the 
mind shivers in cold reality that it's all over. 

Traditional America, clinging to its faint traces o 
pomp and circumstances, still silently requests that cer 
emonies remain. For births, funerals, and unless Morr 
and Dad can be talked out of it, graduation. 

Not really sure why, students find themselves seatec 
once again in designated rows, segregated by the hue 
of each one's tassel. The engineer, the farmer, the 
teacher, and the poet — all ready to begin the journey 
But unlike the passengers heading for the famed Atlan 
tis, the opportunities are not there. 

Swamped by letters of regret, growing unpaid bills 
and under societal pressures to succeed, the graduate 
stands, head swimming with "but we will certainly keej 
your resume on file, and notify you if we do have an 
openings." Then someone tells him to sit. 

He lowers his head. He could be sleeping, dreaming 
or thinking. Or he might be bored. Regardless, as th 



32 — graduation 




.eremony continues, the words fly by and he wonders 
| : the orator knows what he's talking about. He wants to 
pelieve, but it seems much too intangible. 
! Traditional America, clinging to its feelings of class 
distinction , admires the attainer, the achiever, and 
urns its nose up at the unemployed, the failure. Moth- 
ers experience it, and so do fathers. But of late, the col- 
lege graduate has created a new sector of the unem- 
ployed, adding an air of sophistication to the social dis- 
order. 

He glances at the young woman next to him. She's 
ambling with her jewelry. He takes a closer look. Her 
;:lass ring. Another $45 she poured toward her educa- 
tion, or at least toward advertising it. Taking it off, she 
patches the prisms in the sun. 

"And as the youth of America, you will be expected 
o shoulder the responsibilities of leadership, and con- 
tinue in the traditions of peace and prosperity," the 
Speaker continues. 

She must not have heard him. The ring is tossed to 
he bottom of her purse. He catches her glance and 
| he shrugs. 

"It seemed important at the time," she whispers to 



He nods, shifting in his seat. He is anxious. There are 
o prospects for her either, he surmises. 
The frustration grows, nurtured by the bureaucrats 



and their messages of what tomorrow will bring; blos- 
soming careers and a chance to exercise the skills of 
education. He knows he has something to give, but no 
one will take it. 

The speaker rambles incessantly. Maybe there will 
be a letter when he returns home. Maybe there will be 
several, and he'll have to make a choice. Which com- 
pany will he choose? He doesn't mean to chuckle out 
loud. But no one quiets him. Instead, there are several 
agreeing nods. Someone even gives him a reassuring 
pat on the back — someone with a different colored 
tassel. 

They know. The feelings are universal among his 
comrades. He remembers sharing feelings with his fel- 
low high school graduates, too. But those were posi- 
tive, and held in store a new life for most of them. Col- 
lege life — the ultimate preparation for the real world. 

The applause brings him back to the present. The 
speaker steps back, and a new voice requests "all 
stand for the National Anthem." Everyone does, for the 
most part, but this time he decides to be still. The 
female next to him looks down. He notices a faint smile. 

"If it's any consolation," she says, "I don't know 
what I'm going to do either." 

She wasn't sure he heard her as he pulled the tassel 
to the other side of his cap and buried his face in his 
hands. 



Oi.uiiMlion !.; 




Summer's dusk casts a Godspell 



by Kathy Kindscher 



of the rock-musi 



)f the 1 975 summer session. 

"Godspell" was originally written to 
evitalize the joy of the Gospel according 
o Saint Matthew. This production did sc 
hrough an unusual set, brightly outra- 
geous costumes, and modern music anc 



from the bleachers. 

The players first appeared in t 
T-shirts and jeans; however, folic 
baptism by a fistful of glittei 



tospel, each with a short cone 
nessage. In one scene the troup< 



changed into brightly-colored clown and the Beatitudes as a kindergarten ci 

motley gypsy costumes. might recite the alphabet, each ac 

"By using colors to remove the stereo- responding with the same sense of w( 

typed apostles' dress, 'Godspell' der a child radiates with learning, 

becomes a penetratina human drama in Magic tricks and vaudeville roi ... 



modern sense," Lvdia Aseneta, cos- were also an nstrumental portion ol 



me designer, said 



I The stage was set on the gray concrete Actors belted the musical's hard ro< 

Dleachers of Memorial Stadium. Rock numbers, which included "Turn Bac 

musicians and some actors were ele- Oh Man", with an earthy bawdines 

i/ated on painters' scaffolds while a mesh Other songs, such as "Day by Day 

fence screened a portion of the stage were presented in a lyrical, devout ma 



gner, said. "Godspell". In "All for the Best", two 

belted the musical's hard rock actors tap danced and crooned for the 

, which included "Turn Back, audience. 

', with an earthy bawdiness. "Godspell" ended with the sill 

igs, such as "Day by Day", Christ reaching out in the dark to the 

;ented in a lyrical, devout man- audience. As the sun set, the play ended. 




36 — theenlerl.-iiner, 





the entertainers 



DIE FLEDERMAUS ■ For James A. 
McCain, the 10-day Festival Arts Cele- 
bration conducted in his honor reached 
its pinnacle at the presidential perform- 
ance of "Die Fledermaus", April 19. 
Between acts of the operetta, Governor 
Robert Bennett officially renamed the 
auditorium McCain Auditorium. 

"President McCain had requested that 
the K-State Players and music depart- 
ment perform 'Die Fledermaus' before he 
retired," John Chalmers, vice president 
of academic affairs, said. 

The production featured ballet seg- 
ments danced by Ronnie Mahler, assist- 
ant professor of dance at K-State and 
Clark Tippet of New York's American Bal- 
let Theater. "Die Fledermaus" was 
directed by Ralph Herbert, director of 
operatic productions at the University of 
Michigan and former Metropolitan Opera 
director. 

HEDDA GABLER ■ An 85-year-old play 
by Henrik Ibsen captured the uncertainty 
of many of today's questions about 
societal roles. The K-State speech 
department's production of the drama 
"Hedda Gabler", directed by Lewis Shel- 
ton, was presented October 16, 17, and 
1 8 at McCain Auditorium. 

The story portrays the protagonist, 
Hedda Gabler, who realizes that she has 
a choice between marital entrapment in a 
domestic life that she finds dull and unin- 
teresting, or using her femininity and 
intelligence to manipulate others. This 
would allow her control of her own life in 
a way contrary to the mores of her soci- 
ety. 

Hedda finally follows the example of a 
former lover who could not survive her 
manipulations and killed himself. With a 
revolver to her head, she snuffs out her 
life. 



Hedda lived in a time of female depen- 
dency. Her tragic death resulted from her 
inability to cope with dissatisfaction with 
herself and her abuse of manipulatory 
power. 

PETER NERO ■ Popular concert pianist 
and composer Peter Nero exhibited the 
keyboard perfection he is renowned for in 
McCain Auditorium, October 24. 

The concert was part of a month-long 
tour that included 21 different cities. 
Although he was accompanied by bass 
guitarist and drummer, the show 
belonged to Nero. His piano mastery 
delighted the audience as he played both 
light and dramatic compositions. 

Contemporary musical arrangements 
provided the bulk of Nero's concert. 
Arrangements of the theme from "Sum- 
mer of '42" and "You Are the Sunshine 
of My Life" demonstrated why Nero has 
earned respect as a musician. But, as in 
many concerts, it was the "golden 
oldies" that received the best response. 

One selection displaying Nero's versa- 
tility over a wide range of rhythms and 
harmonies was a medley of Duke Elling- 
ton numbers. The medley included 
"Don't Get Around Much Anymore", "I 
Got It Bad — And That Ain't Good", and 
"Black Satin Doll". 

By adding conversational humor to 
classical piano, Nero exhibited a good bit 
of showmanship along with his musical 
talent. After his final number, Nero 
returned and said with a smile, "Wel- 
come back to the encore portion of our 
show." 

Nero's concerts have been enjoyed by 
people of all ages around the world. 
Known as a solo performer while still in 
his teens, he has cut nearly 30 albums, 
including his award-winning "Summer of 
'42". 



the entertainer 



Kickin' that Aggieville habit 



by Greg Doyle 



And into the bowels of Babylon go those Epicu- 
rean college-types, to reap the pleasures of wine, 
lovers, and song. Embarking nightly into those dark, 
mysterious taverns and roaming the streets, both on 
foot and in their bellowing chariots, attempting to 
impress the opposite sex, in the haven of hedonism 
known as Aggieville . . . 

Or at least a large proportion of them do. But to 
some students, Aggieville is a carnival where fresh- 
men go out of curiosity and the social set goes to fra- 
ternize. Many who don't belong in either category 
have found alternatives to "Horneyville", because 
somehow, the thrill of Manhattan's town within a 
town is lost. 

A flick at the Union now and then. A mellow eve- 
ning of folk guitar spiced with a bit of refreshing 
country night air at the Flint Hills Theatre. Or it may 
be a romp-stompin' time at Pott County Civic Audito- 
rium, chugalugging Coors to country and western 
licks. Regardless of these and many other options 
extant in the Manhattan area, there are students who 
would rather stomp some other ground on week- 
ends besides the path between bars on Moro Street. 

Film buffs have a reasonable choice in Manhattan 
movies. If they don't have wheels to take in a first- 
run feature at the Westloop Twin, hoofing it over to 
the Union Forum Hall for a look at a last year's Acad- 
emy Award winner seems to satisfy. It's a good way 
to take in all the movies missed last summer because 
the lines were so long that the 1 pm show was sold 
out by 7:30. 

The Union Feature Films series at 75 cents a per- 
son is an empty-pocketed student's dream. Spend- 
ing an evening in the darkness engrossed in the best 
in audio-visual amusement is better than sitting in a 
smoky beer parlor gazing at the scenery anyway 
. . .isn't it? 

Besides the movies, these Flint Hills are a store- 
house of some of the finest folk music in the land. 
Jim Kweskin, Kenton Oliphant, Robert Scott Williams 
— all of whom have on occasion picked and strum- 
med a mellow Martin or Gibson or Guild guitar at the 
Flint Hills Theatre. 

The Theatre's atmosphere is especially conducive 
to listening to those musicians. Sitting on carpeted 
tiers holding a Ball Mason jar of brew, made at the 
foot of the Rocky Mountains, only feet away from a 
live performer is a pleasant change from squeezing 
through the masses and trying to make sense of the 



latest Osmonds' hit you've heard a hundred times on 
the radio. 

Stepping outside the Theatre, the sights and 
sounds of nature blend well with the mellow music 
played inside. The stars are multiplied in the country- 
sky, and the air saturates your lungs with freshness. 
No blasting horns or blinding headlights — only the 
sounds and visions of natural beauty. Like the 
music, it settles the soul. 

But a mellow niche in the country can get old, too. 
Even country-lovin' folks like to raise the roof once in 
a while. So, for those who enjoy the kickin' good 
times of a barn dance, Belvue, KS, is the place to go 
for a drunk and delirious Saturday night. 

"Belvue, Population 350" reads the sign as you 
enter town on Highway 24. And just before the 
speed limit goes back up to 55, there stands a large 
barn-like structure off the highway. The parking lot is 
full. As you near the door, all your fears concerning 
all you've heard about the ruckus that goes on here 
are suddenly confirmed. 

Entering cautiously, you're nearly knocked out the 
door by the vibration from the resounding stomp of 
cowboy boots keeping time to "Panama Red" being 
played at incredible decibels by the Pott County 
Pork and Bean Band. 

So the doorman stamps "BULLSHIT" on your 
hand in red, you grab a beer, find a seat, and start 
slapping your knee. You can't help it, what with 
everybody swingin' their partners, and gals riding 
piggyback on their partners, hootin' and hollerin' 
andclappin'. 

Now you're getting the idea. Another six-pack, 
and you'll be out on the dance floor too. Hootin' and 
hollerin' and slappin' and clappin' just like the 
wasted bunch. Aggieville rocks and rolls at a snail's 
pace compared to this wild crowd. 

All too soon the last song has been played, and 
the last Coors' top has been popped, and it's back to 
the books, because the weekend is suddenly over. 

Aggieville's streets are lined with the empty cans 
of Friday and Saturday nights. In an attic apartment 
in the midst of drink and dance, a desk lamp lights 
the economics book of a student who chose the 
"smartest" option to Aggieville — studying. 

And out of the bowels of Babylon they emerged, 
homeward bound to sleep off the effects of too much 
3.2, not enough love, and too many Top 40 songs. 
And Babylon's streets sleep as well, lurking in dark- 
ness till the next week, when the avenue again will 
clamor with the sights and sounds and suds of those 
who think there's no thrill like Aggieville. 



38 — alternatives 




alternatives — 39 




40 — aggieville 



Play "taps" before day is done 



by Paula Meyers 

"Hey barkeep, we'll take another pitcher and two 
draws. And how about a bag ot pretzels and couldya 
empty these ashtrays? Oh yeah, and bring us a bar rag, 
willya?" 

Alas, the humble servant ot the Aggieville beer- 
drinker moves back into the crowd and is shuffled in 
the general direction of the taps. A co-worker, with 
pitcher held high and change clutched in hand, blazes 
a slow trail through a swaying conglomeration of bod- 
ies that dances in the corner, sits or pushes through 
animated conversations in the middle of the room, and 
leans on elbows and walls around the edges. 

The air is as close as the wrap-around couples mov- 
ing to slow music out on the dance floor. Cigarette 
smoke burns the heavy air and stings eyes that squint 
to choose correct change in the low light. The jeans of 
the humble servant are stiff from careless splashes of 
tottering steins. And there are no words for the 
thoughtful customer who tosses back the dripping bar 
rag. 

11:30 and last call. As the disc jockey leaves his 
booth, not-so-sure-footed couples dance to the juke 
box. 

People begin to abandon booths and tables for the 
fresher air outside. The chugging contest in the corner 
booth comes to a bleary-eyed close as the bloated win- 
ner sinks in his seat. 

At last, all the beer is off the tables and the debris of 
the night's entertainment can be surveyed. The task of 
the humble servant is evident in ashtrays of cigarette 
butts and gum wrappers, empty cups and potato chip 
bags, sticky, ash-dusted tabletops, and crushed pret- 
zels underfoot. 

So why does the Aggieville bartender do it? In the 
face of all these obstacles, what draws a person to the 
job of beer-pourer, money-changer, table-washer, 
crowd-dodger, fight-stopper, and house-cleaner, 
besides occasional plunges into emergency plumbing? 

The average bartender in an Aggieville tavern makes 
no more than student minimum wage. So it's probably 
not entirely for the money. 

"If I wasn't down there working, I'd be down there 
spending money anyway," John Hellman, a Kite's 
employe, said. "The job is definitely easier physically 
than my past work experience, but mentally it's a lot 
tougher. Until you work in a place, you don't realize 
what bartenders go through." 

Generally, money is not the rationale for taking the 
job. Even though there are drawbacks to the work, 
most bartenders enjoy the work and consider it a social 
experience. 



"I couldn't afford to spend money in Aggieville, so I 
started working there. You get paid for being social," 
Mike Hafling, former Mr. K's employe, said. 

Though hectic, and perhaps frustrating at times, bar- 
tenders also consider the job easier than most. 

"I'd rather serve beer than food," Lee Ann Simmons, 
former Dark Horse employe, said. "There's no order- 
ing, and it's less complicated than other jobs." 

Some facets of the work are generally disliked by the 
bartender. Being scheduled to work both nights of the 
weekend is probably the first on the list, with closing- 
time clean-up running a close second. Working the 
door and checking IDs is also considered a bum task. 

"That's one of the worst jobs, because people give 
you a lot of trouble. People get mad when you check 
their IDs," Jim Johndrow, former Mother's Worry 
employe, said. "It's also a hassle to stop fights." 

As student bartenders, employes believe they are 
regarded as equals by customers, the majority of which 
are students themselves. Few Aggieville patrons 
attempt to treat the bartender as subservient, "but 
those few are disappointing," Hellman said. "We're 
human too. We don't like to be treated like that." 

The most appealing aspect of the job is meeting ana 
being with people of the same age group. Perhaps this 
single factor diminishes the low pay and hassles char- 
acteristic of the work. 

"I've had a chance to meet all kinds — to see all 
types of characteristics in people," Hellman said. 

Granted, the brew has been known to lend a more 
friendly than usual atmosphere to an otherwise stilted 
or less than jovial social situation. 

"My favorite part is meeting people, drunk or not. 
Them drunk, not me," Hafling said. 

On the other hand, the overly-friendly customer 
might pose a problem. Simmons cited game days — 
when a rival university visits Aggieville — as particularly 
bad for pinching and other forms of harrassment to 
female bartenders. 

However, those bartenders who turn heads might 
also turn the tables on admirers — to their own advan- 
tage. 

Female bartenders occasionally get tips from cus- 
tomers, Dean Tyler, manager of Brother's, said. He 
believes this "shows favoritism". 

Admiration is not always shown in monetary meas- 
ure. 

"Every bartender that ever worked in Aggieville got 
picked up sometime or another by a girl," Hafling said. 

Ah, the romance of it all. The low lights, dance 
music, the tinkle of glasses, the meeting of eyes across 
a crowded, smoky room. Alas, the humble servant of 
the Aggieville beer-drinker moves back into the crowd 
and is shuffled in the general direction of the taps. 




42 — studying 



Every semester after registration and 
schedule changes, well-meaning stu- 
dents make that dreaded sojourn to the 
bookstore and emerge poorer in pocket 
but richer in potential. The problem 
comes in when it's time to get the mon- 
ey's worth. 



Whet the appetite for brain-feud 



by Paula Meyers 



I squirmed as my "hot liner" squeaked 
across the page. From nearby tables, 
several sets ot glassy eyes rested on me. 
Hmmm. I'd have to be less enthusiastic 
on the next important point I came 
across. As I turned the fuchsia-lined 
page, another ritual ot staring began 
around me. I winced. Farrell's third floor 
reading room was not conducive to 
study. It was too quiet. 

I thought back over the day. With my 
only class of the day cancelled, I had set 
out at mid-morning, ambitious and 
equipped with the necessary books, spi- 
ral notebooks, and an extra pen (to 
counter the inevitable disappearing ink 
trick). An entire day in which to catch up 
on all that reading and finish that paper. 
And maybe tonight ... a little vacation 
from academia, sans guilt complex. 

I had strolled to the Union, glad to 
abandon the usual late-to-class sprint 
across campus. Inside, I found an out-of- 
the-way table and opened a book. Half- 
way through the first column of words 
and the second glazed doughnut, I felt a 
hand on my sleeve. It was George, from 
my cancelled class. 

"G'morning. Isn't it kinda early to start 
studying?" he slurred. 

"Well, I thought I'd get an early start 
since we don't have class today." 

"Oh." George sat down and leaned his 
elbows on my open book. 

"Uh, excuse me . . ."I began. 

"Wait a minute. We don't have class 
today?" he asked, his bloodshot eyes 
widening to reveal a lovely network of red 
on white. 

"No, we don't. Remember? The 



instructor said . . .". 

"Wow, that's great! That means I can 
go back home and sack out," George 
said, as he took a large bite from my 
doughnut. 

"Man, do you know how late I stayed 
up last night?" he asked as small bits of 
moistened doughnut spattered the table. 
"A bunch of my friends and me, we par- 
tied till 3 am and then we went to Vern's 
and . . ." 

I decided to cancel George from my 
schedule. I pulled the book from under 
his elbows and began gathering up my 
things. As I pushed in my chair, he 
rubbed his elbow and stuffed more of the 
pastry somewhere beneath his over- 
grown mustache. 

Outside, I inspected the weather. 
Looked good. The spring sun was warm 
and the sky clear. Definitely a nice day to 
study outside. I found a wide wooden 
bench beneath a tree and settled down to 
outline a chapter or two. 

Occasionally, class bells rang and I 
smirked at my own freedom from classes. 
Fiscal policy and the Federal Reserve 
System was finally becoming clear as I 
flipped page after page. 

Then, the inevitable happened. My pen 
began to skip. I pressed it against the 
paper more vigorously. No luck. It was 
"drysville" again. 

As I rummaged through my purse for 
the spare, my spiral notebook fell onto 
the ground. I scooted across the bench 
to recover it. Instant, splintering pain. My 
desire for open-air study came to an 
uncomfortable end as I hobbled toward 
the library. 

My stomach growled that it was past 
lunchtime. With a bag of chips and a cup 



of carbonated empty calories, I slid (care- 
fully) into a booth in the library basement. 
Crunching and sipping, I made it through 
Act I, Scene V of "Hamlet." 

Gradually, I became aware of a sort of 
suspense in the air. I listened. Next to me, 
a college-type had snoozed off. A raspy 
snore, louder than the previous series, 
escaped from the next booth. I could 
ignore it. Back to Shakespeare. 

Ouch! A kick in the shin. I glanced 
down and spied the culprit's earthshoes. 
Another kick. It seems I had been taken 
for a chair rung. I recrossed my legs, to 
move out of the path of attack. The feet 
changed their course. There was no 
escape. 

Behind me, a couple of humorous 
types exchanged the latest versions of 
dead baby jokes. Their outbursts of wild 
laughter grew more frequent. I glanced 
around. One of them looked and 
sounded a lot like Woody Woodpecker. 
The other wiped his tear-filled eyes and 
went into another spasm of giggles. 

Shakespeare and I bade farewell to 
Sleeping Beauty, Golden Toe, and 
Woody and headed for the elevator and 
the silence of the third floor reading 
room. 

Overwhelming silence, that is. Here I 
was, trying to breathe quietly. Campus 
had to be the least favorable place to 
study. 

I revolted. I capped my hot liner with a 
click and began to noisily tear pages from 
my spiral. As I crumpled them and threw 
the wads about the room, several people 
began to leave with armloads of books. I 
continued until the last wide-eyed scholar 
had scampered from the room. 

Back to Hamlet and Ophelia. 



the events 



HOUSING SHORTAGE ■ Home sweet 
home was non-existent for about 1 ,500 
students who came to K-State this year 
with no place to live. 

"There is no housing shortage," 
Thomas Frith, director of housing, 
explained. "At the first of the year people 
need a few weeks to find where they want 
to live." 

Most students had help finding tempo- 
rary housing from the Temporary Hous- 
ing Committee. Formed in the light of the 
sudden crisis, the committee helped stu- 
dents find immediate living places with 
faith that permanent housing could be 
found later. 

Chaired by Margaret Nordin, associate 
director of the Center for Student Devel- 
opment, the committee first contacted 
faculty members who might have room 
for one or more students. The Chamber 
of Commerce, Alumni Association, and 
various churches were asked the same 
question. The committee did most of its 
work during the week of registration, 
August 18 through 22. 

The average stay in temporary housing 
was four days, and the longest about 
three-and-one-half weeks before perma- 
nent housing was found. According to 
Joe Cousins, director of off-campus 
housing, many people moved into resi- 
dence halls after additional space turned 
up. Some students found friends or rela- 
tives to live with while others made their 
temporary housing permanent. 

K-STATE — KU CANOE RACE ■ 
Packed into vans, station wagons, and 
jeeps, 300 K-State and University of Kan- 
sas students arrived at the bank of the 
Kansas River to begin the seventh annual 
canoe race from Manhattan to Lawrence 
— a distance of 1 03 miles. 

The annual event, sponsored by K- 



State and KU's associations of residence 
halls, began at 9 am September 6 when 
35 canoes were launched at once. The 
decision by the judges to start the canoes 
in one heat resulted in a bottleneck in 
which a few canoes were tipped and oth- 
ers started in the wrong direction. How- 
ever, in five minutes the canoes were all 
headed in the right direction and disap- 
pearing around the bend. 

Once the canoes were launched the 
rest of the teams piled back into cars and 
headed for the first checkpoint. The race 
was run much like a relay, with predeter- 
mined spots for changing teams. 

When non-paddling team members 
arrived at checkpoints it was time to 
check maps, chatter on citizen-band 
radios, and squint anxiously down the 
river. As the canoes came into sight, 
fresh teams ran out into the river yelling 
encouragement and instructions to their 
tired teammates. A quick switch and the 
canoes were off down the river again. 

Dinner time found tired, aching, and 
sunburned canoeists stopping for the 
night at the sandbar near St. Marys. After 
dragging the canoes onto the sand, it 
was time to set up tents and start fires to 
dry out wet clothes, tennis shoes, and 
hair. The rest of the night was spent par- 
tying, making friends, or even sleeping. 

In the morning, judges sent the canoes 
off in the same order that they had come 
in the night before. Brunch was served 
outside of Topeka. From there it was non- 
stop to Lawrence. 

After about 17 hours of canoeing, the 
winning Haymaker 3 team paddled into 
Lawrence. 

Though the race was open to resi- 
dence hall and independent teams, only 
residence hall teams were counted in the 
official race results. 




activities carnival 




m 




housing shortage 




ACTIVITIES CARNIVAL ■ K-Staters, 
laughter, exhibits, and tables of organiza- 
tional literature filled the Union on a 
steamy Sunday evening. Once again, the 
Activities Carnival displayed for students 
the organizations the campus offers. 

An estimated 6,000 students browsed 
among the 1 97 organizations' booths 
and displays on September 7. 

Steve Hermes, assistant director for 
programs at the Union, said most attend- 
ing the carnival were freshmen or first- 
year students. For the clubs represented, 
approximately 10 per cent of all new 
members were recruited then. 

One significant feature of this year's 
carnival was the presence of the new K- 
State president, Duane Acker. President 
Acker stopped by each booth to talk with 
organization representatives, ask ques- 
tions, and shake hands. 

PARENTS' DAY ■ Mom and Dad were 
welcomed to K-State with a beautiful day 
that could be really appreciated. Septem- 



ber 20 marked Parents' Day for 1975, 
and along with the first home football 
game, many activities were contrived by 
students and faculty members to greet 
the folks. 

Following the game with Wichita State 
University, visitors were invited to tour the 
campus, getting a taste of college. All 
parents were recognized at the game, as 
members of Chimes presented a wood 
carving called "Vision" during halftime. 
The carving was created by Chester 
Peters, vice president for student affairs, 
and donated to K-State especially for 
Parents' Day. 

Parents were shown their college kids' 
talent, as they were entertained with skits 
and refreshments by those living in resi- 
dence halls and greek houses. 

The Union planned a special buffet din- 
ner following the game. That evening the 
Pointer Sisters presented a concert at 
McCain Auditorium with John Biggs as 
the opening act. 



theevents — 45 



Mystery frames campus art 



by Rusty Harris 

Wind blowing through the trees. Squirrels romping 
across the grass. Feet shuffling in the fallen leaves. 
Then it happens. 

"My God, what is that thing?" 

"Gee, I don't know. Kinda looks like a smashed 
cockroach to me." 

K-State students "discover" art on campus. 

Yes, Willie. Art. 

For in spite of poor art facilities and almost entirely 
due to a private grant, art in many forms, shapes, and 
colors dot the K-State landscape. 

"Most of the more visible things are from the Art in 
Situation workshops," John Vogt, associate professor 
of art, said. 

The workshops were funded by a special grant sup- 
plied by the Ford Foundation and covered three sum- 
mers. Vogt and Alden Krider, professor of pre-design 
professions, were in charge of the workshops, the last 
taking place in 1973. 

Pieces of sculpture and other works, designed and 
executed in the workshops by students from across the 
nation, have since taken their places as part of the K- 
State environment. 

"Art needs to get out on the campus where people 
can bump up against it," Vogt said. 

And over the years, students have bumped up 
against, stared at, or just plain ignored the artwork on 
campus. Other students, attempting to discover for 
themselves the true meaning of the artwork, have 
labeled the displays — including "Denison Iceberg", 
the Willard Hall "Dead Fly" or "Smashed Cockroach", 
the Seaton "Thing", and the King Hall "Fork". 

Most of the art from the workshops is still standing. 
However, some pieces have not remained, nor were 
they intended to. 

One used to occupy the concrete slab between Ked- 
zie and Anderson Halls. Consisting of large, colorful 
geometric forms and constructed of plywood, it didn't 
stand the test of time. 

"That was one of the projects that was rather tempo- 
rary in form. It wasn't meant to be permanent," Vogt 
said. "It was getting scratched up and had taken a 
beating." 

Therefore it was removed, leaving only the concrete 
slab. 

Other works caused controversy while under con- 
struction — like the mural on the north side of East 
Waters Hall. 

Designed by Charles Theis, a professor from St. 
Louis, the mural consists of bright colors in abstract 
form. But some students, notably students of the Col- 
lege of Agriculture, believed at the time that a land- 



scape would have been more appropriate. In spite of 
their protests, the work remained, with little said about it 
now. 

Not all the art on campus is a result of the Art in Situ- 
ation workshops, Vogt said. 

Other works, including the mural on the north end of 
Seaton Hall, the painting of the physical plant boiler, 
and the metal sculptures next to West Stadium, were 
projects of various classes and individuals in the Col- 
lege of Architecture and the department of art. 

Yet the art on campus isn't just plopped down any 
place. 

For if something on a monumental scale is available 
for placement on campus, the matter is taken before 
the University's Long-Range Planning Committee, 
Oscar Larmer, professor of art, said. But one area on 
campus, the site next to West Stadium, has been 
assigned to the art department for its use. 

"From time to time, student sculpture is displayed 
there. And we don't have to go through any planning 
board to change it either," Larmer said. 

At times, more than just the Long-Range Planning 
Committee's "okay" is involved. 

"When you talk about putting sculpture in public 
places, the quality and durability must be taken into 
account," Vogt said. 

Students continue to debate the quality and merits of 
campus art. And the question of whether or not the 
campus needs more is also one of continual discus- 
sion. 

"We don't want to saturate the environment with art- 
work," Vogt said. Yet, both Vogt and Larmer agree that 
there is still room for more. 

"Around the new auditorium should be some good- 
sized pieces of art. There are a lot of good places on 
campus for it, ' ' Larmer said. 

And Vogt believes that the now vacant slab between 
Kedzie and Anderson Halls is "an ideal place for 
another sculpture." 

In spite of room for more art, there are currently no 
plans underway for another Art in Situation-type pro- 
gram, Vogt said. 

"It was kind of a one-shot deal. It wasn't intended at 
the time to be a continuing thing," he said. "However, I 
think the program overall was a success." 

Vogt also believes that there are risks involved in 
placing art on campus, risks that are worth taking. 

"We need to take more risks," he said, "because 
you can always take something down!" 

Meanwhile, students can expect to continue their lei- 
surely afternoon strolls across campus, discovering 
things they've never seen before as they stumble 
across yet another work of art and ask themselves: 
"Just what is that thing?" 




campus art — 47 



the catskeller 



The Catskeller. By day — a study 
haven, with soft music and carpeted tran- 
quility. By night — an entertainer's night 
club, with applauding audiences under 
low lights. The performers are as versatile 
and varied as the Catskeller itself, rang- 
ing from bluegrass to classical guitar to 
pantomime. 

Among the weekend entertainment 
offered there was the local country rock 
of Pott County Pork and Bean Band, the 
bluegrass sounds of Grand River Town- 
ship and New Grass Revival, the mime of 
Michael Hennessy, and the Nashville- 
influenced, progressive country of South 
of the Tracks. Classical guitarist Michael 
Johnson, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band member 
John McEuen, and composer-guitarist 
Peter Lang also shared their talents with 
Catskeller crowds. 

MICHAEL HENNESSY ■ Michael Hen- 
nessy's mime and Blegen and Sayer's 
music combined to form Michael Hen- 
nessy's Mime and Musical Theater, 
which put the icing on K-State's first din- 
ner theatre, November 1 4 and 1 5. 

Presented by the Union Programming 
Council, the dinners were served in the 
Catskeller. Hennessy, dressed in the tra- 
ditional mime garb of white face, black 
beret, and black and white harlequin's 
suit, chose a wide range of acts. "The 
Surgeon", "The Kite", and "The Trained 
Flea Act" were traditional acts, while oth- 
ers, such as "College Registration", were 
designed for the college audience. 

Hennessy's performance was sup- 
ported by the music of Dan Blegen and 
Eric Sayer, who played a wide range of 
musical instruments and styles. Their 
back-up served as a highlighter for Hen- 
nessy, amplifying the meaning of his act. 
The group also provided segue music 
between acts. 

Intermission proved to be different than 
most, with Blegen and Sayer presenting 
their own musical show. They sang 



several self-written songs, one being 
"Marvin Marc and His Two Wheeled Tri- 
cycle". 

Hennessy returned after the intermis- 
sion for more pantomime, including an 
improvisation session in which he mim- 
icked a waterbed and a snowflake. 

The performance was a combination of 
Hennessy's charm and Blegen and Say- 
er's musical talent. Both interludes of 
music alone and mime alone presented a 
refreshing view of the two arts. 

JOHN MCEUEN ■ Fantasy became 
fact December 12 and 13, when John 
McEuen, master of banjo and fiddle from 
the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band meticulously 
strummed and picked his way through 
four solo performances. Switching con- 
tinually from banjo to guitar to mandolin 
and back to banjo again, McEuen played 
and joked until the audience applauded 
for more — which he gladly gave them. 

McEuen's performance was largely 
classical banjo and classical guitar, with 
brief interruptions of bluegrass banjo and 
frequent monologues of Nitty Gritty-type 
humor. The Dirt Band is notorious for 
their jovial criticism of other performers, 
and McEuen's concert was no exception. 

"Did you all see the 'John Denver 
Average' on television the other night?" 
he asked, at one point. "John Denver 
thought it was special, but I thought it 
was just average." 

Although McEuen is not renowned as a 
vocalist, probably the biggest number of 
his performance was "The Mountain 
Whippoorwill". Through the song, 
McEuen sang the story of how a young 
hillbilly travels to the county fair in hopes 
of winning the Georgia Fiddler's Show, 
and how he, in the end, out-fiddles the 
finest fiddlers there. 

McEuen was no stranger to K-State, for 
with the Dirt Band, he has repeatedly 
played concerts here in the past few 
years. Although he usually appears on 



stage with the other members of the 
band, McEuen enjoys these solo shots 
because they give him a chance to be a 
perfectionist. 

"I like to play by myself because it's 
harder. When you're with the band, you 
can hide behind the others," he said. 

MICHAEL JOHNSON ■ Though classi- 
cal guitarists have never gone over big at 
K-State, Michael Johnson seemed to be 
the rule's exception. Greeted by only mild 
rounds of opening applause in the Cat- 
skeller, February 7 and 8, Johnson 
appeared to have won audience approval 
by the close of his shows. 

Johnson, a folksinger who has already 
cut two albums, is a self-taught musician 
who claims to play a lot in the key of D. 
This may be true, but it was unapparent 
as his fingers moved across the guitar 
with the dexterity and skill essential to 
being a classical guitarist. 

What made Johnson more successful 
than many classical cohorts was that his 
performance was not strictly instrumen- 
tal. He proved himself easily capable of 
carrying a. tune. His main preference is 
folk, and his soft, easy-going voice works 
well for this type of vocal. 

Besides music, Johnson also poured 
out a good deal of humor during his per- 
formances. 

"Welcome to the second spasm," 
Johnson said, as he began the second 
half of his first show. 

Although the shows were composed 
largely of classical guitar, it was 
Johnson's humorous songs that were the 
crowd pleasers. "You're Concave and 
I'm Convex, Sure Is a Wonderful World of 
Sex", received the most obvious 
approval by the audience, along with a 
more mellow ballad, "Love Will Get You 
Through Times of No Sex Better Than 
Sex Will Get You Through Times of No 
Love". 




thecatskeller — 49 




Greeks pull 



gZZZ 2. -^ilzjl:^ 




by Pam Page 



Throughout the year, K-State greeks sponsor various 
activities to promote unity or to raise money for any 
number of causes. 

Greek Week, March 2 through 8, gave greeks a 
chance to unwind and have fun getting acquainted. 
Activities included exchange dinners, a houseparents' 
tea, and a leadership banquet. Free movies in the 
Union and Greek Week buttons, good for Aggieville 
specials donated by Aggieville merchants, contributed 
to the week's success. 

Greek Follies, March 3 through 6, highlighted the 
week when onlookers filled the bottom tier of the audi- 
torium for over two hours of entertainment. 



"Six groups, with five to six houses per group, com- 
posed the acts. Numbers ranged from plays and skit 
combinations to dance musicals. Many hours of work, 
rehearsal, and above all increased cooperation, cre- 
ated friendship among the houses," Keith Pike, Greek 
Week co-chairman, said. 

A cable-thon, March 3 through 6, sponsored by 
Alpha Tau Omega fraternity, donated $17,000 toward 
the March of Dimes. Local talent contributed and radio 
and tv class members helped set the program that aired 
over channel 2 on cable tv. 

Acacia fraternity sponsored their third annual card-a- 
thon with Alpha Xi Delta sorority. Cards were shuffled 
and dealt under a tent outside the Union for 1 50 hours. 
The $1 ,800 earned was later donated to three philan- 



SO qn i ■ ■ :• : ■■ : ' . 




hropies. 

"The motto of our fraternity is human service and this 
s the most efficient way to contribute. In the three 
/ears we've participated, $6,500 to $7,000 has been 
9arned and we have had fun getting to know other 
nouses," Dan Stables, Acacia coordinator, said. 

Two sororities and four fraternities teamed up to 
'dance for those who can't" at the Muscular Dystro- 
phy Bump-a-thon. The management of Mother's Worry 
(donated the building while 60 continuous hours of 
I dancing produced about $2,000 for the cause. 

"It was a good way of having a public relations pro- 
|ect that everyone could have a good time at," Scott 
Stuckey, Sigma Chi representative, said. 

The twelfth annual Derby Day, sponsored by Sigma 



Chi, earned $806.75 toward their national philan- 
thropy, the Wallace Village for Children, a center for 
children with minimal brain damage. Sorority women 
competed in numerous fund-raising projects, such as a 
T-shirt sale, aluminum can collection, and a Mother's 
Worry function. 

"Each year we try to re-evaluate the various compe- 
titions and get rid of those that have lost their purpose 
while replacing them with new ones. The women are 
asked for feedback before and after Derby Day so that 
we may make the changes that they desire," Kile Morri- 
son, Sigma Chi coordinator of Derby Day, said. 

So no matter what the cause or reason, greeks man- 
age to create original vehicles of fun to support their 
drives. 



gieek week and lollies — 51 



Donates race motors 



mnji 










by Cheryl Charles 



Spring Fling is that time of year when for one week, 
students participate in fun and games — and go just a 
little crazy. Sponsored by KSUARH, Spring Fling cov- 
ered everything from a seesaw marathon to bed races. 

Spring Fling 1975 kicked off Sunday, April 13, with a 
seesaw marathon to raise money for the McCain Schol- 
arship Fund. Starting at 4 pm, the seesaw bobbed 
steadily in front of the Union until Friday. Sunday also 
brought a scavenger hunt and then a dance at Kramer 
Food Center featuring K-State's "Bobbie Gem and the 
Blue Diamonds". 

On the second day, a scholarship banquet was 
served at Kramer, as well as movies on Goodnow Hall's 
front lawn. 

A Sweet Sassafras ice cream social and table games 
played in and out of Derby Food Center on Tuesday. 

Wednesday was dedicated to former President 
James A. McCain, as a McCain display was shown in 
the Union. McCain dined in Derby's Gold Room and 
spoke at the leadership banquet in Putnam Hall. "The 
Chase" and "The Pink Panther" were the movies fea- 
tured on Goodnow's front lawn that night. 



Thursday night brought rock and opera music and 
cheap beer. The group "Jefferson Starship" played to 
a crowd in Ahearn Field House; Johann Strauss' opera, 
"Die Fledermaus" was presented in the newly-chris- 
tened McCain Auditorium; and it was discount night in 
Aggieville. 

The seesaw marathon ended Friday and Saturday 
closed off Spring Fling with events scheduled all day. A 
parade through Aggieville led to the bed races outside 
Ahearn with Governor Robert Bennett as the official 
starter. Participants pushed the beds, some rode; and 
water balloons hailed both winners and losers at the 
finish line. All were rewarded by a picnic lunch outside 
Danforth Chapel. 

Dancing to "Hot Foot" on Derby basketball courts 
ended Spring Fling — the week that students of the 
residence halls went a little wacky. 

Similar to Spring Fling was the first weekend in Octo- 
ber, when residence hall co-eds got a chance to 
"Escape From It Hall" with 1 975 Fall Follies. 

Friday, October 3, marked the beginning of Fall Fol- 
lies with "TGIFing" at Mother's Worry. Also featured 
were a talent contest in the Catskeller and another 
Sweet Sassafras in Derby Food Center. A Weber Arena 
dance brought Fall Follies to a close Saturday night. 



spring huh: and I ill tollies — 53 








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54 — houseparenls 



All-purpose guides answer calling 

by Doug. Fink 



"We are younger than some think we 
are," Mary Belle Chappell, houseparent 
tor Delta Tau Delta fraternity, exclaimed. 
"I always try to be happy and look on 
the bright side." 

Such a youthful spirit is a useful pre- 
requisite in fulfilling the duties of a 
houseparent, now officially called resi- 
dent advisers. Resident advisers need to 
be skilled in many ways, from the man- 
agement of the food budget and menus 
to thoughtful listening to individual 
problems. 

Veda Johnson, resident adviser for 
Delta Zeta sorority, makes out all the 
menus, buys all the food, hires house- 
boys, and aids in hiring the cook. A resi- 
dent adviser for both fraternities and 
sororities for 14 years, she is well-pre- 
pared for the rigors of the job. 

"I know I can take the pressure," 
Johnson said. "I've learned to keep my 
temper." 

In addition to managing the kitchen, 
"you're the hostess of the house," 
Chappell said. The houseparent's func- 
tion is to "uplift the fraternity and add 
grace." 

Resident advisers represent their 
chapters at special events and dinners. 
At Delta Tau Delta, Chappell even 
instructs pledges in etiquette. 

Helping in the rushing of prospective 
members is another activity of the resi- 
dent adviser. Once a prospect is 
pledged they take the initiative of offi- 
cially welcoming the newcomers, Cindy 
Biehl, Beta Sigma Psi fraternity adviser, 
said. Biehl teams with her husband 
Dave, a veterinary medicine student, 
though she shoulders most of the 
responsibility. 

Chappell endeared herself to the 
rushees so well that they were calling 
her "Mom" like the rest of her "boys", 
she said. 



Resident advisers sometimes serve as 
friends in hearing out the problems of 
greeks, both on management and per- 
sonal levels. 

"A lot of times they come for my opin- 
ion," Biehl said. "Usually they need 
help in such areas as planning 
dinners." 

Occasionally men go to Biehl to talk 
out problems concerning girls or rela- 
tionships with other men in the house. 

"I'm a good sounding board," Chap- 
pell said, "but the boys also help each 
other out a lot. There's always an 
upperclassman to help, especially with 
schoolwork." 

The resident adviser also helps in little 
ways, such as sewing on buttons and 
mending clothes. Chappell, with previ- 
ous experience in tailoring, will even 
shorten or lengthen pant legs. 

The greeks reciprocate these ser- 
vices in many ways. Johnson noted that 
her girls will escort her to church or any 
other event she wishes to attend. 

"I go to everything they have," Biehl 
said, "any function or formal. I help to 
organize these events." 

The men also ask her to attend, along 
with their dates, such activities as mov- 
ies or theatre productions when her 
husband is unable to accompany her. 

Chappell especially enjoys going to 
varsity and intramural athletics with the 
fraternity members. She enjoys the 
experience of sharing in the varied 
interests of the members. 

The problem of noisiness or rowdi- 
ness were deemed no problem at all by 
the resident advisers. None expressed 
any need to discipline members, except 
perhaps in an indirect manner. 

"You have to go the long way 
around," Johnson said. "You have to 
work behind the scenes. You can't say 
'don't do this'." 

No good house would give, or need 
to give the resident adviser, real discipli- 
nary authority, Biehl said. 



"They have ways of taking care of it 
themselves," Chappel said. "I love the 
hubbub, it doesn't bother me one bit." 

"I've always felt if a person couldn't 
adjust to group living they should 
leave," Johnson said. 

Solomon Tafesse, former resident 
adviser and member of Kappa Alpha 
Psi, played a less defined but equally 
vital role in the fraternity. 

Tafesse, who is from Ethiopia, 
assumed duties of house manager and 
also assumed a leadership role when he 
became houseparent. 

Like Johnson, Tafesse said he does 
not command people to "do this or 
don't do that." Instead he attempted to 
help individuals become aware of their 
mutual responsibilities. 

"You make a person aware that he's 
away from home and living with 14 
other people," Tafesse said. "There is a 
good relationship with the brothers." 

Tafesse stressed that the members 
take on the responsibility of upkeep and 
cleaning on their own initiative a great 
part of the time. His job became subse- 
quently a matter of reminding others of 
things which needed to be done. 

"Any time a conflict arises I help as a 
mediator," Tafesse said. "You become 
the center of attention as far as making 
decisions. You have to play a role and 
practice what you preach." 

Tafesse played a role in helping with 
individual problems, but no more a pro- 
nounced role than any other member. 
The fraternity provides a feeling of home 
and helps raise the feeling of black con- 
sciousness, he said. 

"Over there we just live like one fam- 
ily," Tafesse said. "To me it's a matter 
of being part of what I am." 

For all the resident advisers their 
responsibilities require a strong commit- 
ment in time and personal energy. 

"This is a full time job, don't let any- 
body say any different," Chappell said. 
"You've got to give your all." 



housopatenls — 55 




M It,.' , ' ,[„ ITI-, 





the concerts 



POINTER SISTERS ■ Parents' Day 
1975 brought four sisters trom Oakland 
by the name of Pointer. Sponsored by 
UPC, Anita, Bonnie, Ruth, and June 
danced, strutted, stepped, and sang in 
McCain Auditorium, September 20. 

Besides performing their own popular 
songs such as "Fairytale", "Yes We Can 
Can", and "How Long (Betcha Got a 
Chicken the Side)", they harmonized to 
songs from artists Dizzy Gillespie and 
Duke Ellington. 

After opening the show with Gillespie's 
"Salt Peanuts", they combined four 
songs in a tribute to Ellington — "I Ain't 
Got Nothing But The Blues", "I've Got 
Rocks In My Bed", "Black Satin Doll", 
and "Indigo Blues". Backed by two gui- 
tarists, a drummer, and a pianist, the sis- 
ters didn't forget to let them shine also in 
solo performances. 

Singer John Biggs, a native of Manhat- 
tan and K-State graduate, was first on the 
bill at the concert. Recently recording his 
first album, Biggs has toured with groups 
such as Ike and Tina Turner, Nitty Gritty 
Dirt Band, Rare Earth, and Dionne War- 
wick. 

JETHRO TULL ■ The massive string of 
people that crept forward, pressing 
through the single set of doors, was even 
longer than the line eighteen days earlier 
that formed for those first precious tick- 
ets. It was October 18, homecoming 
night, and everyone outside Ahearn Field 
House was waiting for the same thing — 
a seat which would give them a ride into 
the world of Jethro Tull. 

And what a ride! After a late start, a 
less than excellent performance by back- 
up band U.F.O., and a frisbee-filled inter- 
mission, Jethro Tull lost no time in captur- 



ing the audience. 

From the concert's first number to the 
encore's last farewell, it was evident that 
Britain's rock superstar, Ian Anderson, 
was in complete control; he radiated the 
fieldhouse with his energy. His solo per- 
formance on the guitar, flute, and saxo- 
phone, along with his near acrobatic per- 
formance on stage kept the audience 
straining in their chairs. 

Although Tull's blend of mellow and 
hard rock was excellently received by the 
audience, the band's showmanship far 
out-distanced their musical presentation. 
At one point in the show, two band mem- 
bers garbed in a zebra costume 
appeared on stage and excreted striped 
rubber balls, which were in turn juggled 
by guitarist Jeffery Hammond-Hammond. 
Ian Anderson's analogy of this scene was 
that while Elton John had his funny 
glasses, Mic Jagger had funny lips, and 
David Bowie didn't know which way to 
go, Tull had their shit together. 

Other stage effects employed by Tull 
added to the concert. During "Warchild", 
Anderson was bombarded by several 
near-miss explosions, with a final burst of 
smoke obliterating him at the song's end. 
Fiery explosions during a drum solo by 
Barrimore Barlow slowly engulfed the 
stage in smoke, filling the fieldhouse with 
a blue-gray haze. 

Tull treated the audience to a longer- 
than-average encore. At the concert's 
close, a few people left, but the majority 
remained in hopes of bringing back the 
band. 

After a few minutes of upheld matches 
and lighters, Tull returned for a full 30- 
minute encore. 



the concerts — 57 



Full-time-and-a-half job bogs book 



by Rita Shelley 



Many are the laments of the working 
student. No time to play — or to study tor 
those so inclined. 

Compared to the tate of an imprisoned 
bridge builder in Outer Siberia, it's not a 
bad life. Boredom certainly isn't a prob- 
lem. Who can be bored leading a double 
life? And the folks surely can't complain 
about the money spent if it's not coming 
out of their pockets. 

Students find jobs for one of two rea- 
sons. A need to fill up some spare time. 
Or parents can't afford (or are suddenly 
unwilling to pay for) the beer and pizza 
. . . and tuition . . . and books . 

The lifestyle of working students is not 
much like that of their non-working 
counterparts. While their friends are con- 
suming Aggieville pizzas, they stand 
behind the counter taking orders and 
watching the crowd go by. By the time 
they finally get free time, they're too tired 
to spend it. For the person trying to cram 
36 hours into a 24-hour day, sleep is a 
precious commodity. 

For Dan Bolton, professional fireman 
and junior in journalism and mass com- 
munications, this tends to be a hectic life. 

"There have been times when I've 
fought a fire until 7:30 am, slept for half 
an hour, and had an 8:30 test," Bolton 
said. "I'm not much good on days like 
that." 

In order to get the most mileage out of 
the time they do have, working students 
have special considerations. Planning is 
the key word. 

Bolton works in 24-hour shifts three 
times a week. He meets with his profes- 
sors at the beginning of each semester to 
iron out time conflicts between when he 
must work and when tests are scheduled. 



"Most teachers have been very coop- 
erative," Bolton said. "One professor 
gave me a test at the station — he 
wanted to see the fire trucks anyway. " 

"I have to plan a whole day's schedule 
at a time," Keith Tucker, an engineering 
student and houseboy for Gamma Phi 
Beta sorority, said. "What I put in my 
backpack in the morning has to be every- 
thing I need until 9pm that night." 

A job can have disastrous effects on 
grades — depending on how the student 
does or does not organize time. 

"I've had 3.6 and 3.7 semesters as well 
as 1 .9 semesters while working," Bolton 
said. He restricts himself to nine or 1 1 
hours a semester. 

"When I have to use my free time for 
working, there's less time for studying," 
Larry Reed, senior in landscape architec- 
ture, said. Reed works at the engineering 
copy center. 

Because free time is at a premium, it's 
hard not to steal from study time for 
"times to remember". And it never gets 
easier to spend a spring afternoon in the 
library. 

A working student may not finish col- 
lege in four years. Though there are alter- 
natives to working while in school, these 
aren't always feasible. For instance, engi- 
neering courses are designed to be taken 
consecutively. A student in that field 
would risk forgetting a lot of necessary 
information if he or she took a semester 
off to earn money. 

Another alternative is to borrow money 
to finance one's education, but for stu- 
dents who dislike being in debt, this isn't 
the answer. 

"In my field I might be faced with a few 
years in a low-paying job. A $5,000 debt 
could be disastrous," Bolton said. Being 
married, he believes he has a responsibil- 
ity to maintain a financially sound budget. 



Even though working students often 
miss a lot of good times with friends and 
have worries they wouldn't otherwise 
have, they do find occasional advantages 
to their lifestyles. 

"The quality of your free time improves 
because you find yourself being more: 
creative with the time you do have, 
Reed said. "I find myself meeting more 
people. It forces you to think of things to 
talk about besides your major." 

Another advantage is the added edu- 
cation of the real-life situations the stu- 
dent doesn't experience in the class- 
room. 

"I feel like sometimes this education 
interferes with the real life education, 
Bolton said. 

When money spent is gained by one's 
own blood, sweat, and tears, it is likely to 
be appreciated more. 

"I appreciate my education a great 
deal more for having sweated it out," Bol- 
ton said. 

"I feel more responsible toward the 
money I spend when it's my own,"! 
Tucker said. 

These students are probably more) 
conscientious about attending classes; 
and getting the most out of the gamei 
called higher education. 

"If I'm spending $2,000 to $2,500 a 
year, I want to say I get something for it," 
Tucker said. 

As working students say "au revoir" to] 
another potentially great weekend to | 
spend it pushing pizzas, a serving cart, or! 
themselves off of Bluemont Hill, they canj 
keep one happy thought in mind. In these; 
days of unemployment, at least they have; 
a job. And it is good training for what: 
they'll be doing after graduation — push- 
ing pizzas, serving carts, or themselves 
off of Bluemont Hill. 



58 — working students 




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working sludents — 59 





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60 — k-stale alums 



Genuine loyalty burns 
with a purple passion 



by Greg Doyle 



Long before I was indoctrinated to hav- 
ing purple pride, I heard what a great 
place K-State was. Not from present stu- 
dents (I didn't know any then), but from 
alumni. They kept saying I couldn't go 
wrong at K-State because their parents 
had gone here, and their parents' parents 
had gone here, and therefore, it must be 
about the best university in the world, or 
at least in the United States. 

I hope that says something about loy- 
alty. Loyal is the only word that depicts a 
K-State alumnus properly. Everyone, 
from county extension agents to house- 
wives to wheat farmers to lawyers, con- 
fesses allegiance to their purple and 
white alma mater. 

That allegiance isn't just nominal, 
either. That allegiance includes support- 
ing K-State athletic events, academic 
concerns, and financial obligations. 

Take a relatively distant, sparsely-pop- 
ulated region of the state like Norton 
County and you'll find generations of K- 
Staters and more generations to come. 
K-State is as much a part of these people 
as is the soil upon which they grow their 
life-sustaining wheat. Purple blood runs 
thick in the veins of people living in areas 
like this. 

Thick enough, in fact, that great 
groups of alumni travel to football games 
whenever the team plays in Manhattan. 
Thick enough to upset them when they 
can't get basketball tickets to home 



games. 

They even have a 1960 Cadillac 
hearse they call the "Community Good 
Will Car" painted purple with purple seats 
and white carpeting that they drive in 
parades like the Miss Frontier Pageant, 
held in Pratt every year. 

And when they get together on occa- 
sion with University of Kansas alumni 
(what few there are), the K-State alumni 
show the Jayhawkers around in the 
hearse. 

Although there is no formal organiza- 
tion of K-Staters in Norton County, the 
alumni seem to have purple pride 
ingrained in their characters. 

"We should have won that game," one 
alumnus said about a recent basketball 
defeat. "Our team was just fooling 
around too much." 

That particular alumnus has a right to 
speak of K-State as his. Boyd Hall was 
named after his grandmother, Mamie, 
who, until she passed away in 1 972 at the 
age of 96, had her own special seat at the 
stadium and fieldhouse and never missed 
a home football or basketball game. 

Purple pride became a hereditary trait 
in the Boyd family — Mamie's sons all 
went to K-State, and her sons' sons spent 
their college days here too. It's as if they 
didn't know any other university existed. 

Soon all of us will be alumni in one 
sense or another. When you leave your 
last class for the last time, remember the 
heritage of K-State: Willie Wildcat dies 
hard. 



-slate alums — 61 



Two steps ahead, one back 
put 'person' in right place 



by Linda Reed 



No score and four years ago. 
That's not an unpatriotic printed 
mix-up. It's the way the situation 
added up before college — and 
Gloria Steinem — greeted me. 
Those were the days prior to the 
match up between the male pop- 
ulation and me. No trumpets had 
been sounded, nor battlefields 
bloodied. 

Now, with a B.S. degree in one 
hand and no ring on the left, it's 
time to regroup and survey the 
casuality list. Which were my vic- 
tories and which my defeats? Or, 
in short, what have I "ms.'d" out 
on? 

1 . On the question of bras, 
whether or not to wear one. Now, 

for me there was never anything to decide. Personally, 
it was either wear one or be prepared for a slap on the 
back and, "Hi, there fella. Funny lookin' T-shirt you're 
wearing!" To put it another way, by age 1 6, it was obvi- 
ous I could never sue a bra for non-support. Two years 
older and thrilled to have actually outgrown a few of the 
darned contraptions, I had a barricade thrown at me by 
"the libbers". 

"Burn that bra and show the world what you've got 
to offer!" they shouted, or something to that effect. 
Back then, my sheltered brain couldn't quite compre- 
hend what or to whom I should be shouting "unfair". 
But there's one thing I certainly was not ready to get off 
my chest. And that was my bra! 

A month or so into college life and some of the "terri- 
ble injustice" began to bear its real misguided, peach- 
fuzz face to me. 

2. On the question of home ec, whether or not to 
major in it. My initiation into libber basic training came 
unexpectantly. In fact, the setting was more conducive 
to the breeding of unliberation. It happened — ta da! 




— at a dorm function for fresh- 
men. Not unlike eighth grade 
dances, sweaty palms, perspira- 
tion, and dry lips were of real 
concern there. Everyone was 
uneasy, trying not to do what 
freshmen do, trying to be 
worldly. 

My number happened to come 
up and I was asked to dance by a 
fellow rookie of the college social 
game. We threaded our way 
through the fidgety crowd toward 
the impromptu bandstand. The 
drummer was getting off on his 
solo — the fifth one that night — 
which left us nothing to do but 
talk. So then came the "big 
three" — what's your name, 
where you from, what's your 
major? Right away, I knew this 
kid was the original wit! Anyway, 
to pick it up in the third round 

"What's your major?" 
"Home economics and journ 



"Home ec? Home ec! Are you planning to get mar- 
ried?" he shrieked. 

"Well, no . . . but really, don't you think it would be 
better if we went out a few . . ." 

"Then what good will a degree in home ec do you if 
you don't get married?" 

I was hoping for an instant replay of the last few min- 
utes of my life so as to correct my offending answer or 
whatever had set this kid off. But just then, the entire 
teachings of liberation came together for me. And hav- 
ing "the word" handed down to me, I theorized, "Who 
needs this jerk?!" With visions of Gloria's commanding, 
streaked mane waving in the wind, I confronted the 
enemy and blurted: 

"I don't have to take this crap. Which, by the way, is 
what you are full of!" 

Ah, how sweet the smell of singed peach fuzz! 



It was crude, but cute and to the point. Luckily, I later 
increased my vocabulary and was able to express 
myself less inhibitedly. You know, let my gut feelings 
shine through. 

From that exhilaratingly liberating moment on, I 
announced my home ec and journalism major without 
hesitation and openly glared anyone to defy me. 

It was the same patented, perfected glare that carried 
me through my next mission. 

3. On the question of male-opened doors, whether or 
not to walk through one. Being a person of small frame, 
all those heavy, tightly encased doors can be a pain. 
So, in the beginning, I sought relief of my burden 
through the chivalry of males. To spur them into action, 
I entailed special tactics — a look of total helplessness 
with an almost-ready-to-drop book or two teetering in 
my weak, puny arms. Successful campaigns were pol- 
ished off with a smile and soft "thank you". 

Then came the period of possession. Visions blotted 
my sleep at night. Gloria kept leaping at me, spitting 
phrases like "double standards" and "the weaker 
sex"! So with bags under my eyes, I vowed to make 
good the commitment to my sisters. No more taking the 
easy way out. It was either develop a good set of 
biceps or succumb to the male faction. 

Wrestling with wind-whipped, two-ton doors didn't 
turn me into Charles Atlas, but it did drive the demon 
Scarlett O'Hara out of me. Once exorcised, I began my 
retaliation. Whenever a door magically sprang open for 
me, I would move on to an alternate route, sometimes 
circling a building two times before gaining entrance. 
But I did it my way! 

Soon the tardiness to classes caused by this ritual 
began to play havoc on my GPA. So I resorted to 
i merely glaring all amateur doormen into submission 
and a subsequent slamming of the door in my face. A 
Teal triumph for my liberation! 

But it was time to move on up the hierarchy of libber- 
ness. 

4. On the question of freebies, whether or not to 
drink them. My memory fresh with warnings of "no boy 
gives you something for nothing without expecting 
; something in return" — whatever that means — I 
spent my first two years of college life warily sizing up 



every offer of free beer. Aha! Just a beer and it's over 
between us? Fat chance! But since the "us" usually 
consisted of seven girls total, the risk wasn't too great 
and I drank up. 

As the semesters drew on, I noticed in my female 
friends a new interest in men — namely their billfolds. 
The biggest contributors were rated and cataloged, 
and a watchful eye searched for the more select items 
on every night out. 

One especially obliging male practically declared 
bankruptcy each time he sat in our booth. Such a price 
to pay for the company of this bevy of beauties! I soon 
lost my taste for the "prostituted" drink and made alter- 
nate plans for future weekends. 

Tripping into the golden semesters of my college 
career, I stumbled over a startling phenomenon. While 
out with three friends for the evening, I ordered a 
pitcher of beer, cringing in apprehension of the inevita- 
ble scene to follow. Sure enough, the male next to me 
reached for his money. Suffering from battle fatigue, I 
routinely muttered that I really wanted to pay for it. And 
eureka! It happened! The bills were slipped back into 
his pocket, no fuss or reassurances necessary! 

Here, sitting on my right, was my first truly liberated 
male! Now the next step popped into my head. How 
could I ever afford to "keep" a liberated man? 

That brings me back to the degree. There it is. My 
"purple heart" for surviving four years of sorting out 
and saving, trying to gain some ground. So where do I 
stand? 

Alice Cooper still laments that only women bleed. 
Guess more blood will spill in the battle for human 
rights. But the injuries are seldom fatal in this fight. 
Most of the ammunition used is meant to "shake up" 
the inflicted. 

Now for the self-evaluation. Occasionally, I get 
pinched by my bra, hear a snide remark about home ec 
majors, or walk through a male-opened door. And as 
for the naked left hand, it doesn't bother me much. 
Anyway, who can afford a husband and kids with 
prices the way they are on the meager salary of a 
woman? 




veterinary medicine open house 



64 the e tents 




the events 



VETERINARY MEDICINE OPEN 
HOUSE ■ "Veterinary Medicine and All 
Creatures Great and Small" set the 
theme of the nineteenth annual Veteri- 
nary Medicine Open House, Saturday, 
October 1 8. 

Besides veterinary medicine displays 
on small animals, food animals, and 
equine, there were special displays by 
the Riley County Kennel Club, pre-veteri- 
nary medicine students, and the Manhat- 
tan Humane Society. 

The open house committee worked to 
present a wide range of exhibits and 
events. 

"In the past, exhibits were usually con- 
cerned with the major divisions of animal 
groups. This year we tried to be more 
diversified, including more exotic animal 
classes," Sue Sawyer said. She, with 
another senior in veterinary medicine, 
Kathy Potter, conducted the event. 

"This was entirely a student-con- 
ducted open house. All displays and pro- 
jects were the brain-childs of veterinary 
medicine students," D. W. Upson, pro- 
fessor of physiology, said of the event 
I that involved 400 students. 



ACKER'S INAUGURATION ■ Pomp, 
ceremony, a dignified procession of stu- 
dents and faculty donning academic 
attire, and formal speeches. All the trap- 
pings of academia were present for 
Duane Acker's installation as K-State's 
eleventh president, September 26. 

Also present was a sense of substance 
and optimism. 

"You have asked me to lead this Uni- 
versity and I accept your eagerness," 
Acker said. "But leadership is shared by 
many, especially in a university." 

Student body president Bernard Frank- 
lin expressed the students' expectations 
of an active voice in campus affairs. 

"Not only do we urge your support for 
a faculty salary increase, we feel as stu- 
dents that we should have a constructive 
voice in the reappointment and tenure of 
our faculty," Franklin said. 

"We are not interested in running the 
University, only in the opportunity to 
voice and be heard on our concerns on 
major issues, such as Nichols Gym," he 
continued. 

In response, Acker said he expected 
students to "mature, by experiencing, 
encountering, interacting by voicing on 
University issues, but to mature in the 
cadence of time, not by rushing or grasp- 
ing." 

Acker charged the faculty to develop a 
knowledge as to the place of their disci- 
plines in both the academic community 
and society as a whole, and "to harness 
basic research, wherever done, in 
applied research for Kansans." 

In his summary remarks, Acker said 
"the vineyard now assigned me is K- 
State, extending to al! corners of Kansas. 
I will work using all the talents given me, 
and with your help." 

Franklin perhaps summarized the feel- 
ings of alumni, faculty, and students alike 
by assuring President Acker that our 
"eyes are upon you." 

HOMECOMING ■ Once again, adrena- 
lin is pumped into the veins of an ancient 
custom. After respiration begins, this 
revived entity is carefully dusted off, 
given a new suit of activities, and set 



loose to terrorize the villagers for a few 
days before cardiac boredom sets in and 
the sleepy homecoming monster retreats 
for still another year. 

The traditional mystique surrounding 
homecoming is as strong as ever. The 
custom appears to be immortal — silver 
bullets only bounce off its thick hide. 
Backstabbers only dull their knives on it. 

In all fairness to Blue Key, Mortar 
Board, the alumni, and everyone else 
concerned, Homecoming 1975, while not 
universally appreciated or supported, still 
provided meaningful enjoyment for 
many. 

The first official homecoming activity 
was the revival of a long-forgotten K- 
State tradition: the horsetank dunking of 
"favorite" campus figures in the Union 
courtyard the Wednesday before home- 
coming. 

For Thursday night, KSUARH, Interfra- 
ternity Council, Panhellenic Council, and 
the Student Governing Association spon- 
sored a free street dance in Aggieville 
which featured The Exceptions. A recep- 
tion and banquet for alumni and the stu- 
dent body took place Friday night in the 
Union. Homecoming decorations and 
displays created by residence halls, 
sororities, and fraternities were also 
judged that night. All through the week, 
these living groups spent time and money 
constructing wood and paper to depict 
good ol' Willie Wildcat and his friends 
picking on poor Sooner characters. 

On October 18, Homecoming Day, 
President and Shirley Acker were hon- 
ored in the pre-game activities before the 
Wildcat-Sooner battle, as Ms. Acker was 
crowned homecoming queen. 

The alumni band marched out on the 
field playing "Wildcat Victory," and com- 
bined with the KSU marching band to 
perform "76 Trombones" during the half- 
time show. The Pridettes also held a half- 
time reunion with former drill-team per- 
sonnel to celebrate their fifth anniversary. 

Homecoming came to an end Saturday 
night as 7,200 fans packed Ahearn Field 
House for the Jethro Tull concert. 




Hey, lady— you're a pint low 



by Sara Severance 



Medical authorities try to claim that there are several 
types of blood, ranging from "A negative" to "O posi- 
tive". They say that determining a person's blood type 
is a complicated matter, requiring elaborate equipment 
and technical expertise. 

Balderdash! 



There are exactly two types of blood: the type run- 
ning through the veins of a blood donor, and the type 
running through the veins of a non-donor. Determining 
which type a person belongs to is a simple matter. Jusl 
mention the word "bloodmobile" and the person will 
volunteer his type. 

Type D (donors) swagger about their type. "Yup, I've 
given blood 12 times now — had to wait in line four 
times last year," they say, with an unconscious flexing 






66 — giving blood 



of the arm muscles. "I never miss — figure it's my patri- 
otic duty." 

The non-donor (ND) types, on the other hand, have a 
sheepish air. They tend to shudder a lot and change 
the subject when blood giving comes up in conversa- 
tion. "Who, me?" they ask, if pinned down. They then 
go on to tell about how they know a person who was 
perfectly healthy until he gave blood. Then he fainted, 
and got hepatitis from a dirty needle, and had to quit 
school, and so on and so forth. 

I've always been a type D, with all the blatant charac- 
teristics of the breed. I carried around the little pink 
bloodmobile appointment card conspicuously, bragged 
about waiting in line through two classes to give blood, 
and casually mentioned in conversation that in another 
eight years I'd be eligible for the Golden Drop award. 

In fact, there was nothing I was prouder of than my 
generous Red Cross habits. 

Well, as any faithful follower of K-State football 
knows, pride goeth before a fall. The last time the 
bloodmobile was in town, I almost decided to change 
blood types. 

Early stages of the process went well. With a previ- 
ous appointment, I only had to stand in line for a few 
minutes to snag one of the chairs in the queue leading 
to the pulse-temperature lady. After that came the 
blood pressure lady, then the 20-questions lady. 

As a seasoned veteran, I was usually ahead in this 
question-and-answer session. Malaria? No. Teeth 
extracted? No. Ears pierced in the last few months? No. 

Ever rejected to give blood? Had an abortion or been 
pregnant in the last six months? Are you on any type of 
medication, including aspirin? Has the doctor ever told 
you that you have too much blood? (I presume in this 
case they would extract two pints instead of one.) 

I survived the questioning and moved on to the ear- 
sticking phase, the test to separate the merely curious 
from the truly dedicated. Anyone not truly dedicated 
could not endure the jab in the earlobe by what 
appears to be a rusty paper clip, with the volunteer 
squeezing and pulling until a drop of blood appears. 

The nurse's aide noticed my yelp, but wasn't notice- 
ably sympathetic. "This isn't as bad as getting a sample 
; taken from your finger," she said. It's not as bad as 
: being run through by a bayonet either — so what! 

Then, after a glass of lukewarm orange juice and 
llanother wait, D-hour had arrived. Up onto a table 
where the bloodmobile nurse efficiently connected vein 
t ; and plastic bag. 

ii Invariably I'm steered to the table facing the door, 
ci where only the immediate world can see me. It's diffi- 



cult enough to concentrate on squeezing the sponge 
for five counts and releasing for three without trying to 
satisfy an audience. 

"Hey — how're you doing?" a friend might ask, from 
a cozy vantage point immediately outside the donating 
area. 

"One-two-three-fine-one-two-three-four-five-and 
you?-one-two-three . . ." 

"Oh, not bad. How're your classes going?" 

"... four-five-okay-one-two-three-and yours?-one- 
two . . ." 

"Not bad. I've got this one professor — do you know 
anything about physics?" 

By the time the conversation has deteriorated into 
oblivion, the other person has usually decided I've 
regressed to kindergarten stage. 

After the blood had been transferred from vein to 
plastic bag and a Band-aid slapped on the puncture 
mark, it was happy hour. Time to visit the canteen. 

The canteen is a good place to visit your friends and 
neighbors and enjoy a glass of water. If you don't have 
any friends or neighbors present and have finished the 
glass of water before the 20-minute rest period is 
over, then it's best to read the literature the Red Cross 
provides to while away the hours. 

I chose "Facts and Figures About Blood Donation". 
Hmm, I'm A-negative, that means I'm one of only six in 
1 00 donors. Far out. What's this? A section labeled "So 
You've Just Given Blood . . ." 

"Drink plenty of fluids in the next few days, and avoid 
lifting heavy objects with the arm used to give blood." 
All the talk about blood was beginning to make the ther- 
apeutic doughnut sit a bit heavy in my stomach. 

"Some bleeding is normal. However, if you should 
see blood start to seep from beneath the bandage 
. . ."I got no further. 

The Red Cross volunteer had seen enough lily livers 
and shrinking hearts to recognize my greenish com- 
plexion and wild-eyed expression. 

She quietly hustled me off to a cot where I could col- 
lapse in peace and relative privacy. 

An hour later I was on my way, slightly shaky, but 
with my "Be nice to me — I gave blood today" sticker 
firmly tacked to my lapel. 

Giving blood probably wouldn't rank in anyone's list 
of top 10 experiences, but next time the bloodmobile is 
in town, all the type D donors will be there. 

After all, it's our patriotic duty. And in another eight 
years we'll all qualify for Golden Drop awards. What 
more could you ask for? 



giving blood — 67 




68 — soap operas 



by Greg Doyle 



Many a housewife has scorched her 
husband's shirt as she suddenly discov- 
ers that John is living with Joan unbe- 
knownst to John's wife Sally, while Sally 
thinks John is really seeing Mary on his 
lunch breaks. 

The smell of burning fabric reaches the 
housewife's nose, and she realizes that 
what's on the tube couldn't be that 
important. At least not any more impor- 
tant than what will happen between Bill 
and Diane on the next program. 

And as if college weren't complicated 
enough, hundreds of attentive viewers 
flock to public televisions all over campus 
to watch the complicated lives of their 
favorite stars unfold. Television melo- 
drama, otherwise known as soap operas, 



because her party crystal has water 
spots. 

The audience, however, is chattering 
away, apparently unconcerned about 
dishwashing troubles, wagering on what 
earth-shaking event will take place as the 
plot unravels on the next program. 

And that's the way it goes from day to 
day. For a few hours at midday, soap 
opera addicts step out of the doldrums of 
school and secretarial work, involving 
themselves in complex webs of love, 
death, infidelity, pain, and on rare occa- 
sions happiness and humor of daytime 
television. 

And being the curious sort, I asked two 
young ladies why. Why is this time in 
front of the tube so important? Why does 
"The Young and the Restless" bore me 
to tears, while they seem to be engrossed 
in it? 



like. It's always the ones you like the most 
— the cutest guy, the ones that are hap- 
pily married." 

So day after day the viewers return with 
anxious anticipation to follow the trials 
and tribulations of these characters of 
that never-never land of daytime tv. 

The regulars consist of about 95 per 
cent females, and about five per cent 
males. Among that male population is 
one about whom there is no mistaking his 
masculinity — namely, Carl Pennington, 
defensive linebacker for the Wildcat foot- 
ball squad. 

"He's not shy at all," one girl said, 
about Pennington's precise arrivals at 1 1 
am for "The Young and the Restless." 

"He marches right up and sits 'on the 
front row, and is as attentive as the girls. ' ' 

The girls believe that guys watch the 
soap operas usually to see the good- 



Spending the days of our lives 
in search for another world 



attracts people from every walk of life, 
and yes, one sex is as attentive as the 
other. 

Coeds of every description crowd the 
Union tv room every day around noon, 
equipped with pop and a cottage cheese 
salad, to catch up on the latest gossip 
from both sides of the tv screen . . . 

"Oh Jack, it was like I was born to love 
you," a swooning female on "Ryan's 
Hope" explains. 

"What are your parents going to say 
when you tell them?" asks her lover. 

"If they see how happy I am, and how 
sure I am, they'll accept it," she replies. 

The scene changes, and the girl tells 
her parents of the affair she's been hav- 
ing with this married man. 

"I don't want you spending any more 
time with that scoundrel," snaps her 
father. 

"Dad, I've made the decision. You 
can't make me feel guilty," comes the 
daughter's defense. 

A couple of foreboding organ chords, 
and the scene changes to a busy kitchen 
where a distraught newlywed bemoans 
the fact that she's losing all her friends 



"There's nothing else to do," one coed 
replied. Hmm, I could think of a lot of 
things, but I kept quiet. 

"We mostly laugh at the acting," the 
other answered. "There's just nothing 
else on tv." 

At first they weren't too open about the 
subject. Gaining their confidence, how- 
ever, I discovered the real reasons why 
soap operas are so popular. 

"When you get sick and tired of 
school, you can identify with someone 
else's life, and get out of your own," one 
girl said. "When they get angry, you get 
angry." 

"Okay, that sounds reasonable. At 
least there seems to be some substantial 
reason for wasting . . .I mean spending 
your time here. But all the programs 
seem the same," I said. 

"They're just about life," one girl rep- 
lied. "Somebody's got to fall in love, get 
hurt, die. That's why the shows seem all 
alike." 

"The most fun thing about watching 
them is guessing what's going to happen 
next," one girl said. "I'm always wrong. 

"They never kill off the ones you don't 



looking girls, which, I must admit, seems 
as good a reason as any. Because, 
regardless of their acting skills, most of 
the characters could be models. 

For whatever reason people watch, 
though, there are those who are hope- 
lessly addicted to the pastime. Asked 
how often she watches, one girl replied: 
"Every day. I can't miss. I've even skip- 
ped classes. Last semester this long 
event was occurring over a two-month 
period. I had to see the show. 

"I was taking economics credit-no 
credit, and I ended up with no credit," 
she said. "Last summer I had a friend 
who tape recorded all the shows so I 
could listen to them when I got home 
from work." 

She admitted she'd hardly missed a 
show in a year and a half. But her room- 
mate was beyond hope. 

"She can't sleep at night worrying 
about what is going to happen next," the 
girl said. 

So when school gets you down, go 
watch a soap opera. It may be the worst 
thing that's happened to you all day. 



soap operas — 69 




I II I I. II III 




Study soars to telescopic heights 



by Terri Phillips 



Sitting underneath that plain white 
dome, you wonder just what could possi- 
bly happen. Then you notice the lights 
are gradually dimming, and off in the 
background, faint music starts to 
increase in intensity. You look up above 
and in a matter of seconds, that plain 
white dome has become a dark sky full of 
stars. 

For the next 20 minutes, you can see 
any portion of the sky at any time of any 

:year — without having to leave Room 
407 in Cardwell Hall. 

"Our only limitation is our 
imagination," John Evans, associate pro- 
fessor of physics and director of the K- 

< State Planetarium, said. "The mechanical 
devices in the room are equipped to pro- 
duce a simulated sky — a sky that you 

lean see with the naked eye. And it's rea- 
sonably accurate." 

"Reasonably accurate", however, may 
not be the phrase that comes to mind as 



you sit through one of the 12 shows 
offered in the planetarium. Through the 
use of projectors and the new sound sys- 
tem, realistic constellations, comets, and 
exploding stars appear on the overhead 
dome. 

"We are not limited by subjects for 
presentations as long as they are astro- 
nomically-oriented," Evans, who special- 
izes in astronomy, said. Shown on the 
tours offered by the physics department, 
some of the shows deal with UFOs, the 
evolution of stars, galaxies and the uni- 
verse, and Indian legends of the sky. 

These presentations are prepared and 
given by K-State students, Evans 
explained. By the time they have devel- 
oped the script, planned and coordinated 
the visual effects, and blended in a suit- 
able musical score, the students have 
spent about 60 hours. The presentations 
average about 20 minutes in length, he 
added. 

"We have no staff as such that keeps 
the planetarium in working order," Evans 
said, "and the planetarium is open just 



for the tours. We have about 2,000 to 
3,000 people from outside the University 
visit the planetarium a year." 

Built when Cardwell Hall was con- 
structed in 1963, the planetarium was at 
first poorly equipped and offered a limited 
selection of shows. In the last five years, 
however, several major improvements 
have been made, including the installa- 
tion of the sound show and taped presen- 
tations. 

"It's small, but we keep it up to date," 
Evans said. "It's one of the oldest plane- 
tariums in the state in educational institu- 
tions. But we think it is as scientifically 
accurate as the professional ones." 

He proved just that as he pushed a but- 
ton and produced a sunrise as real as the 
actual one earlier that morning. The 
orange ball finished its ascent on the 
eastern side of the dome. 

"Excuse me while I reset the sun," 
Evans said. "Everything goes in cycles 
around here, just like it does up there," 
he added, pointing toward the sky. 




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the speakers 




JAMES A. McCAIN ■ With words of 
praise, retiring president James A. 
McCain held his first and last all-Univer- 
sity convocation, April 29. The small 
crowd in McCain Auditorium heard 
McCain review his 25 years as president 
of K-State. 

McCain lauded land-grant universities' 
pasts as well as their prospective futures. 

"It is eternally to the credit of these 
institutions that they have remained faith- 
ful to their original principles. Their aca- 
demic programs have been continuously 
adapted to altering conditions of society 
as witness the pioneering developments 
in nuclear engineering and the agribusi- 
nesses here at K-State," McCain said. 

"In my opinion, no legislature in the 
history of our state has been more 
responsive than the 1975 session," 
McCain said, praising the legislators for 
their support of K-State. Among the 
appropriations noted by McCain were 
$2.7 million to raise faculty salaries by 10 
per cent, a $168,775 increase in the stu- 
dent payroll, and a $30,000 increase in 
funds to support women's intercollegiate 
athletics. 

ESTELLE R. RAMEY ■ Sex and society 
was the topic of the first all-University 
convocation of the 1975 fall semester. 
Estelle R. Ramey, professor of physiology 
and biophysics, addressed a crowd of 
about 500 persons in McCain Auditorium 
September 9, on the current social 
changes stemming from an increase in 
the educational level of women. 

"If women had been used in solving 
societal and scientific problems, this 
would be a different and better society," 
Ramey said. "Not because women are 
better than men, but because they per- 
ceive the world differently. ' ' 

According to Ramey, American women 
are the "best fed and watered, best 
dressed, best sheltered, and best edu- 
cated women the world has ever seen." 
But more and more women are asking 
"why educate me, and then discard me 
as an intellectual entity?" 



"It costs $25 billion a year to keep 
women in college, and no one has the 
faintest idea why we are doing it," Ramey 
said. 

JULIAN BOND ■ Julian Bond, the out- 
spoken state senator from Georgia, gave 
a striking oration on poverty, the adminis- 
tration, and the 1 976 presidential election 
to a crowd of over 1 ,000 in McCain Audi- 
torium during an all-University Convoca- 
tion on November 20, 1975. An informal 
discussion in the Union Big-8 Room fol- 
lowed the program. 

Bond believes that the civil rights gains 
of the 60s are slipping away in the 70s 
due to the state of the economy, apa- 
thetic administration, and public igno- 
rance. The Nixon-Ford administration 
was criticized by Bond as one that 
showed "arrogant contempt for the peo- 
ple and their problems." 

Bond's powerful sarcasm cut into Con- 
gress, which he cited for lacking "testicu- 
lar fortitude" for being unable "to offer 
any alternative to the President's pro- 
gram of promoting austerity by making 
the poor pay more for food stamps and 
gas and by refusing a decent raise in 
Social Security." 

Bond illuminated several blights on 
America's image. 

"The black infant mortality rate is twice 
as high as whites. The black American 
male can expect to die seven years ear- 
lier than a white male," Bond said. 
"Blacks are the last hired and the first 
fired." 

On the upcoming election Bond said 
he is not running for the presidency 
because of a lack of money. The Georgia 
legislator was cast into the world spotlight 
during the 1968 Democratic convention 
in Chicago when he was nominated for 
vice-president on the Democratic ticket, 
only to withdraw his own name. When 
asked if he would consider accepting the 
same nomination in 1976 with an appro- 
priate presidential running mate, Julian 
Bond simply said, "Yes." 



Ilv speakers — "5 




76 — man bcothen. 



"I shot an elephant in my pajamas this 
morning. How he got there I'll never 
know!" The cigar, bushy eyebrows, 
and atrocious posture symbolize only 
one man — Groucho Marx. Mix him 
with an Italian and a mute, and out will 
come a comedy gourmet's delight. 
Then sit back and savor it. Or as Grou- 
cho would say, "Don't fight it. It's big- 
ger than both of us. In fact, you're big- 
ger than the both of us!" 



Brothers retain comedy domain 



by Paul Rhodes 



"Turn up the sound!" someone near 
the front of the theatre yelled, as the 
speakers blared out at full volume. As the 
laughter and volume both died down, 
avid comedy fans — who nearly filled 
Union Forum Hall — settled into their 
seats and applauded furiously because 
the Marx Brothers were about to "Go 
West". 

Yes, the Union Programming Council 
out-did itself by delighting Marx Brothers 
fans with not one, but rather the entire 
cinematic works of the zaniest brothers in 
film history. Beginning September 1 1 with 
"The Cocoanuts", "Marxists" laughed, 
yelled, and applauded through all 13 of 
the brothers' film productions. 

As though offering the series was not 
enough, UPC made it almost impossible 
not to attend one of the films. With each 
film being shown three times the day it 
was presented, students had 39 chances 
to catch the brothers in action. And, at 75 
cents, the "brothers-four" were the 
cheapest entertainment in town. 

It was evident by the number of season 
tickets sold and the large crowds attend- 
ing the films, that the Marx Brothers were 
just as — or probably more — popular 
than ever. Harpo, Chico, Zeppo, and 
Groucho breezed through their antics on 
screen with such ease, that they 
appeared as if acting quite naturally. This 
was understandable, because off stage, 
they were even crazier than when acting. 

Once, after becoming annoyed from 
sitting nearly a half hour in a producer's 
waiting room, the Marx Brothers pro- 
ceeded to build a fire in the fireplace. 
When the smoke was thick enough, they 
stripped naked and burst into the produc- 



er's office screaming, "Fire, fire!" The 
producer was never known to keep them 
waiting again. 

Although it is true that W. C. Fields re- 
fused to follow the Marx Brothers on 
stage, Groucho, Harpo, Chico, and 
Zeppo were not born into success. When 
they first entered vaudeville with their real 
names of Julius, Adolph, Leonard, and 
Milton, they were barely able to get a 
laugh. 

It was only after Harpo began to panto- 
mime, that the other brothers developed 
the individual styles that led to their suc- 
cess. Chico, who had often used an Ital- 
ian accent, adopted it for the stage. 
Groucho, on the other hand, was a suc- 
cess just being himself. Unfortunately, 
Zeppo, whose humor was nearly identi- 
cal to Groucho's, was destined to "die in 
show business" as a straight-man. 
. K-Staters were not only entertained by 
the humor of the Marx Brothers, they 
were also spellbound by the musical tal- 
ents of Harpo and Chico. When Harpo 
strummed his harp and Chico fingered 
his piano, there were very few who could 
not recognize their musical genius. But 
the sharp notes of Groucho's wit always 
out-distanced piano and harp. 

"Eh, my shrinking violet?" Groucho 
asked Madame, in "Monkey Business". 
"Say, it wouldn't hurt you to shrink thirty 
or forty pounds." 

The Marx Brothers series was high- 
lighted by two major events. The first was 
the Marx Brothers dress-up on the day of 
"Duck Soup". Though those who garbed 
themselves as one of the brothers were 
allowed to enter for two bits, the turnout 
of appropriately dressed persons was 
small. 

Although the dress-up did not pan out, 
"Duck Soup" proved to be one of the 



funnier movies of the series. If one scene 
from all the Marx Brothers' films was to 
be singled out as the best, it would quite 
possibly be the mirror scene from this 
film. In it, the brothers put on a "mirror- 
image" pantomime, showing themselves 
capable of perfection. 

The other highlight of the series came 
February 12, when Maxine Marx, daugh- 
ter of Chico, presented two lectures in 
Forum Hall. Bearing subtle characteris- 
tics of her father and uncles, Marx deliv- 
ered an interesting and humorous 
address and revealed a number of 
unknown facts about the brothers. 

"The brothers voted on everything. But 
Harpo always voted with Chico, so what 
Chico wanted to do — they did. " Maxine 
also told of her own feelings about her 
father and how he appeared to her. 

"He was a father like a will-o'-the-wisp. 
He was always entrancing." Marx 
shocked the audience at one point by 
bringing out a quite different side in the 
personality of her Uncle Groucho. It 
seems his nickname fit his personality to 
a"t". 

"He was a cold, bitter man. When I was 
a kid, he used to pick on me." But she 
told the audience that at times Groucho 
was also capable of "extreme love and 
generosity." 

Although April 22 ended the Marx 
Brothers' stay at K-State, the influence of 
their wit and humor remained behind. 
Jeffery Haag, an avid Marx Brothers fan, 
had a final comment about his comedian 
heroes: 

"I owe a lot to the Marx Brothers. See- 
ing those four treat everything that hap- 
pened to them so lightly has helped me to 
look at life in a much more positive man- 
ner than I thought possible." 



marx brothers — 77 



Cold Reality 




Existing within the confines of a college 
campus can instill confidence. Living 
among peers, ideals and viewpoints are 
shared at near-equal age levels. But 
then there is the occasional and rude 
brushing with the real world. The bub- 
ble bursts against its sharp cruelty, 
leaving only fragments to piece 
toaether. 



As bedfellows of higher education's fri- 
volity, the outs of suicide, discourage- 
ment of employment-seeking, the 
entanglement of unplanned pregnancy, 
and disgust at sexual assault must be 
contended with. Making light of crises 
may be the remedy for onlookers while 
personal counseling supports victims. 



No matter what cure is taken, the mere 
cold reality of the real world's existence 
chills the University's spine. 



Cold Reality 



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Shadows assault imaginations 



by Judy Puckett 



The sky was clear, but dark. The moonlight was 
vague. I thought to myself, the only thing missing was 
the whispering wind. Just then the leaves rustled. 

My composure remained intact, though, and I contin- 
ued through the small-scale forest just south of Justin 
Hall. It would be silly, I decided, to get worked up over a 
few noisy leaves. But it was inevitable. My attempt at 
keeping a clear mind was thwarted by darting thoughts 
of recent reports of females being attacked on campus. 

As I reached in my pocket, the cold steel generated a 
warm feeling in my hand. I hadn't wanted to go this far, 
but it seemed the only thing to do. If I were to be threat- 
ened by physical danger, I would need a weapon of 
some sort. It had been a last resort. 

Nearing the rose garden, I thought I heard the famil- 
iar rhythm of hard-soled shoes caressing concrete. 
Momentarily, I hesitated. Should I glance over my 
shoulder? What if no one was there? I turned my head, 
just a little, when — whoosh — a red Corvette sped by 
me. 

My pace lost its sense of urgency as I concluded the 
Corvette had been a taxi for the feet that had trailed me. 

Nearing Anderson's front lawn, I became aware of a 
sense of pressure within myself. Of course. I released 
the tight grip on the hunk of steel in my coat pocket. All 
would be okay, I was sure. A few more minutes and I 
would be at work, safe within the newsroom and near 
my friends. 

The wind whipped around and I pulled my jacket 
closer to my neck. The odor of the pine trees filled my 
lungs. I breathed deeply, and stared at the tops of the 
reaching trees. That was a mistake. The heel of my 
shoe caught in the hardened remains of a once-muddy 
crevice. Sitting clumsily on the ground, I likened a mis- 
placed picnicker. My ankle was throbbing. 

Grabbing a nearby limb, I tried to pull myself to a 



standing position. No such luck. I couldn't put any 
weight on my right foot. Then I heard the noise again. 

My first thoughts were of relief. Someone was here 
who could help me. As the sounds of the steps grew 
more intense, my thoughts changed. There was, of 
course, another possibility to consider. 

Overwhelmed by eerie ideas of danger, I crawled 
closer to the pines, pulling myself into seclusion. Then I 
waited. 

My heart thumped with the methodical movements of 
the mysterious steps. Then something happened. 
Something that jarred the regularity of the cadence. He 
must have seen me. 

I crouched lower, thinking what a good idea it had 
been to wear jeans. The denim faded into the darkness. 
Maybe he would pass on by. 

Long ago my hand had found its way to my pocket, 
and I had a strong hold on my only element of protec- 
tion. I slowly, quietly withdrew my hand. With it came 
the carefully manufactured instrument. 

Then the shadow moved. Slowly, with calculated 
thought. Crouching. Lower, lower, back underthe 
pines. 

My eyes were wide. She too was clasping steel. 

Before the laughter came, I felt my grasp loosen on 
the cold metal of my whistle. 

"I thought — " was all the further I got. 

She nodded her head. 

"I know. I saw you hiding by the bush and thought 
you were going to attack me." 

We laughed. First for relief, then about the situation. 
"We must make quite a pair," she remarked. I admitted 
we probably looked cute, posed beneath the pines. 

"I suppose we should celebrate," she said, with a 
gleam in her eye. 

Simultaneously, we reached for our whistles. The 
shrillness broke the dark silence. 

We were safe. 



Cold Reality 




Counsel services ease stress 



by Paul Rhodes 



"Hello, this is The Fone. Can I help you?" 

"Hello," comes the hesitant reply at the other end of 
the line. "I don't really know why I called. I ... I guess 
I'm just bummed out on school. I was wondering if I 
could talk to someone for a while . . ." 

A second phone rings, the young man at the receiver 
answers, then waits for a reply. A long pause follows. 
His voice shaking badly, the caller begins. 

"My buddy took some pills about an hour ago. I don't 
know what they were, but he's really strung out. I need 
some help." 

Mike Caldwell, director of The Fone, strains on the 
edge of his chair, quickly scribbling down the address. 
Explaining to the others there what has happened, 
Caldwell grabs his coat and runs for the door. Some- 
one else takes his chair. The phone rings again. 

This is The Fone — K-State's call-in/walk-in crisis 
center. Started in 1969 by the Laramie House, The 
Fone is designed to assist people with problems rang- 
ing anywhere from depression to unwanted pregnan- 
cies. The service grew so rapidly, that in 1970 it 
became funded by the Student Governing Association. 

Most of The Fone's calls deal with depression. 

"About 35 per cent of our calls fall into the category 
of loneliness or depression," Caldwell said. "About 15 
per cent are drug-related calls, another 10 to 15 per 
cent deal with sexuality, and about five per cent of the 
calls deal with pregnancy." 

The Fone received 1 ,254 calls during the fall semes- 
ter. Of these, about 60 per cent were referred to other 
sources. 

"There are a lot of calls we can't handle ourselves. If 
the problem is alcoholism, for example, we refer the 
person on to the Drug Education Center," Caldwell 
said. 

Along with The Fone, SGA funds two specialized cri- 
sis centers — The Drug Education Center and the 
Pregnancy Counseling Center. 

The Drug Education Center began services in 1971 . 
Under the direction of John Leslie, the center provides 
counseling for problem drug users and has initiated a 
wide range of programs. 

"We're really in a growing stage right now," Jeff 
Morris, assistant director, said. "We've established a 
number of programs, and we seem to be gaining 
ground through them." 

Besides serving as a walk-in drug counseling service 
and giving presentations to campus groups, the center 
also airs a television show on Manhattan's cable net- 
work. "Focus on Drug Use and Abuse" provides the 



community and campus with weekly updates of infor- 
mation. The center also offers two classes through Uni- 
versity For Man. One is designed for parents of high 
school students, while the other is specifically for drug 
users. 

"The class is designed to teach drug users how to 
use drugs properly," Morris said. "If a person is going 
to use drugs, he should know which drugs are the least 
harmful. This way, we hope to reduce the number of 
overdoses." 

Leslie and Morris also teach two University- 
accredited courses, Speed I and Speed II. 

The second specialized crisis service funded by SGA 
is the Pregnancy Counseling Center. Located in Holtz 
Hall, the center is directed by Karen Barquest, graduate 
student in counseling. 

"Basically, my office is a resource center for people 
who want to know about birth control, venereal dis- 
ease, pregnancy alternatives, and abortion," Barquest 
said. 

Probably the biggest advancement of this service 
has been in the Peer Sex Education Program. Last 
year, over 4,000 persons took advantage of it. 

"The upward trend in counseling this year has been 
tremendous," Barquest said. "Personal counseling 
during the fall semester increased 1 27 per cent and the 
number of telephone contacts tripled." 

Many times, problems faced by students seem to 
have no solution. Because of this, some turn to suicide. 
But, because of the efforts of Robert Sinnett and other 
staff members of Lafene Student Health Center's men- 
tal ward, many persons are finding such a drastic 
measure is unnecessary. 

Sinnett, a clinical psychologist, said the mental 
ward's staff treats over 400 patients a year. 

"Most of the individuals I see are self-referred. Nearly 
95 per cent of the patients we see come in without re- 
ferral," Sinnett said. "The road to us is wide open. 
We're open 24 hours a day here, and if we're needed 
for anything, the nurses will call us any time day or 
night." 

Although many persons consider suicide at one time 
or another, few ever follow the act to completion. 

"Suicide forms somewhat of a pyramid," Sinnett 
said. "There are a few individuals at the top who do 
commit suicide. Below them is a larger number who 
attempt suicide and fail. At the bottom is the largest 
number, those who at one time or another contemplate 
suicide." 

Through the efforts of The Fone, the Drug Education 
Center, and the Pregnancy Counseling Center, many 
are finding life's cold slap in the face a little less chilling. 



counseling services — 83 



Cold Reality 




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Job search is steady work 



by Doug Fink 



The process of job hunting can be traumatic, easy, 
or of no concern at all, depending on the inclination of 
the job hunter. 

Curriculum plays a major role in the availability of 
jobs. Specialized skills are currently the best guarantee 
of finding employment. Engineers, in general, have 
greater opportunities, Bruce Laughlin, director of the 
Career Planning and Placement Center, said. 

Specialization doesn't always assure abundant 
opportunity, though. Craig Meyer, graduating senior, 
notes a tight job market in his field of agricultural mech- 
anization. 

"There aren't enough companies coming to campus 
in my area," Meyer said. "I've had to start writing let- 
ters to companies on my own." 

Meyer was given one definite rejection, which he 
described as "discouraging", but still has at least one 
prospective job. He laments, nevertheless, that big 
companies that hire from his curriculum are laying peo- 
ple off. 

A liberal arts degree presents even more difficulty, 
but is not hopeless. 

"We don't regard a liberal arts curriculum as a bad 
curriculum in any sense. It doesn't in and of itself defeat 
them," Laughlin said. "If the person is capable, with 
strong personal qualities, he or she will likely succeed 
anywhere." 

While employers find greater difficulty in applying 
broadly-based training, there are opportunities in such 
fields as sales and public relations, Laughlin said. 

Possibly even more discouraging to many students 
than the shortage of jobs is the prospect of the job 
hunting process itself. 

Knowing what an interviewer expects, and what to 
expect from him is one aid in helping the applicant. 

"The worst thing a student can do is to be fright- 
ened," Dick Humes, Westinghouse representative, 
said. "We want you to be very much at ease. Tell us 
how you perceive yourself." 

Casey Smith, graduating senior in marketing, 
reflected Humes' advice from his experience. 

"Make sure you know who you are and what you 
want. You should have a confident attitude," Smith 
said. "The reason they come is to get an idea of who 
you are." 

Interviewers assess candidates in terms of curricu- 
lum, academic records, outside activities, honors, geo- 
graphic preferences, and travel attitudes, Humes said. 

"The GPA is important. We look at the transcript and 
apply it to communications skills. We try to ascertain 
self-sufficiency and look for strong points," Humes 
continued. 

Humes emphasized that he looked for positive quali- 



ties in people and did not try to discern specific weak- 
nesses, except where such matters as health were con- 
cerned. 

"Everyone has a self which is a 'product' they are 
trying to sell, such as personality, mannerism, and the 
educated self," Laughlin said. "Everyone can have a 
strategy in marketing themselves, though we do not 
ourselves plan the strategy. It must be the individual's 
project." 

Laughlin noted that students are often overly con- 
cerned with being interviewed as to their competence. 
Employers rely on the GPA and transcript for this 
information. 

Resumes are important also in job hunting because 
they are what employers use as an initial screen of 
applicants, Laughlin said. 

Beginning the job hunt early is a valuable but much 
neglected aid. Both Meyer and Humes agreed that 
interviews should begin as much as a year before grad- 
uation. 

"My personal view is that students should start talk- 
ing to employers at the sophomore level and should 
look for summer employment for experience," Humes 
said. 

"The last semester of the junior year is a good time to 
start looking and taking advantage of services like the 
placement center," Meyer said. 

Written recommendations may be overrated by 
some. 

"Frankly I think recommendations are of limited 
importance outside the teaching profession," Laughlin 
said. 

"They are not a real important input to us," Humes 
said. "Our own input is much more important." 

Then, after all the effort, comes the rejection. How 
should and how do students handle it? 

Meyer simply wrote more resumes and made more 
intense efforts to contact companies on his own, the 
response suggested by Laughlin and Humes. 

"It's not human to be happy to be turned down, but 
the only way to succeed is to not get discouraged. Fail- 
ures should be treated as signposts or guideposts. 
They should channel students to where they can be 
accepted," Laughlin said. "It's a matter of working 
harder and longer." 

"A rejection doesn't mean you're not valuable, it 
means there wasn't a match between needs and capa- 
bilities," Humes said. "It's probably not a setback but 
another experience. ' ' 

Many students still have alternatives in case they 
cannot find work, and some place their alternatives 
before work. Some regard graduate school as some- 
thing to fall back on, while others look forward to travel- 
ing or simply spending a few months at odd jobs or 
idling — waiting for a job. 



landon lecturers 



WILLIAM SIMON ■ A full McCain Audi- 
torium, television cameras, and scores of 
reporters awaited to hear Treasury Sec- 
retary William Simon deliver his Landon 
Lecture. But Simon's plane was "fogged- 
down" by unappreciative weather at 
Manhattan airport. His Washington jet 
was forced to land at Salina where he 
was taken by helicopter to Manhattan. By 
the time he arrived, the March 18 lecture 
had been cancelled. 

Simon did, however, deliver his pre- 
pared speech to a sprinkling of students 
and Landon Lecture patrons at a Union 
Ballroom luncheon. 

"We cannot long survive as a world 
leader if we continue to trade our free- 
doms to the government in exchange for 
false promises for a better future," Simon 
warned. 

To recover from the recession, Simon 
insisted, American government must 
restore greater discipline to its financial 
affairs, control overzealous government 
regulations, make policies that encour- 
age savings and investment, and make 
Americans aware of the threat of bigger 
government. 

DANIEL MOYNIHAN ■ "Several years 
in South Asia have convinced me that a 
rhetorical dynamic has taken hold in the 
new nations." 

This comment, reflecting the fear of 
growing anti-Americanism across the 
world, was made during the May 6 
speech and thirty-first Landon Lecture by 
Daniel Moynihan, former ambassador to 
the U.N. and India. 

Moynihan, then in line to become the 
next United States ambassador to the 
United Nations, said new nations are 
acquiring a different view of the United 
States. He believes growing anti-Ameri- 
canism is placing responsibility on the 
United States not only for American mis- 
deeds, but the misdeeds of all world pow- 
ers. The danger occurs when these 
charges are believed or accepted. Moyni- 



landon lecturers 



han is convinced many of this country's 
educated young people believe this rhet- 
oric, and that withdrawing from the other 
nations will cause them to become 
dependent on totalitarian regimes. 

He cautioned that dependence of other 
countries on totalitarian regimes could 
affect the United States. 

"Even a country as big, independent, 
and self-sufficient as ours needs a kind 
word somewhere and, increasingly, we 
find that it is in our relations with totalitar- 
ian nations that we can obtain some 
approval of what we do and some legiti- 
mation of what we are." 

HENRY JACKSON ■ Under the ever- 
alert eyes of secret service men and 
other security agents, Senator Henry 
"Scoop" Jackson delivered the thirty- 
second Landon Lecture in a nearly full 
McCain Auditorium on January 21 . 

"I will not settle for a 'lesser America'," 
Jackson retorted, to the "prophets of 
doom" who warn that America cannot 
continue unrestrained economic growth. 

Jackson, one of the many democrats 
vying for the 1976 presidential nomina- 
tion, also attacked current American for- 
eign policy that prompts the Soviet Union 
to "become more powerful, more adven- 
turous, and more threatening to Ameri- 
can interests and international order than 
at any time since the Stalin era." 

Jackson blamed detente, "a body with- 
out a soul — a policy indifferent to 
human rights," for promoting "expan- 
sionist Soviet policy." 

"The restoration of real economic 
growth" was Jackson's answer to the 
problems of poverty, education, health 
care, adequate housing, and full employ- 
ment. The Senator decried those who 
warn that "the age of plenty is over." 

Jackson lauded Kansas as an agricul- 
tural example of America's richness and 
productivity, built up by "our free market 
system, and the free people who make it 
work." 




henry jackson, duane acker 





daniel moynihan 




landon lecturers - 



- holidays and home 




Home rules respect 



by Judy Puckett 



As students, most ot us find a sense of 
security in being collectively surrounded 
by the limestone walls of our environment 
where: 

— ending a Friday night in a state of 
Aggieville-bred drunkenness is the rule 
and not the exception. 

— shouting a four-letter word just to 
make yourself feel better is not offensive. 

— coming in the front door at 8 am 
after a hazy all-nighter with a member of 
the opposite sex is not immoral. 

College life breeds an openness 
among students allowing traditionally 
unaccepted actions or roles to become 
acceptable. And, for the time we are in 
school, that is good. But several times 
each year, college plays the devil's advo- 
cate by forcing us outside of those oh-so- 
comforting walls and into the confines of 
Mom, Dad, and the old home town. 

Alas, students facing the well-earned 
breaks and vacations from campus life 
find themselves shoved into a mild state 
of schizophrenia. 

People are complex creatures. We col- 
lect, over the years, bits of tradition and 
hints of rebellion and uniquely intertwine 
the two, each creating our own separate 
characters. 

But we quickly learn that certain 
aspects of that character are offensive to 
some. That is, what your roommate may 
approve of could give Mom a heart 
attack. 

So it is in going home we find ourselves 
changing. Curbing the cussing, denying 
the drink — ultimately altering our living 
habits so as not to disrupt the norm. 

Often in this situation, we find our- 
selves struggling with notions of hypoc- 
risy and guilt. If we honestly feel the 
things we do at school are not wrong, 



how can pattern changes be justified? 

Through respect maybe. While we are 
within their home, we act according to 
our parents' rules and regulations, pri- 
marily placing their feelings ahead of 
ours. 

From the time we are children, respect 
for others is greatly impressed upon us. 

We don't throw mashed potatoes at the 
woman seated next to us in a public res- 
taurant. We don't burp during church 
services. We don't walk down Main Street 
in the nude. 

Why? Essentially, out of respect for 
others. 

This reasoning creates a new struggle. 
When a sense of respect for others 
begins to encroach on our honesty with 
ourselves, which do we choose to favor? 

Consider the time element. 

Is the time we spend at home great 
enough to justify the hassles we will prob- 
ably incur by riding against the tides of 
pre-set norms? 

How much longer will Mom and Dad be 
around? Is it worth it to invoke upon them 
the worry they'll harbor when we return 
to school? 

Because Mom and Dad have had more 
time to experience life, is it possible they 
will understand our non-traditional 
actions? Remember, they haven't always 
been in an authoritative role. It's possible, 
highly probable, they have been involved 
in unconventional actions, too. 

The dilemma is constant — the deci- 
sion, ever-changing, as we are. It may 
have started with college life, but it isn't 
going to stop there. 

We are constantly under demand by 
society to re-evaluate, re-work ourselves 
as we fit into the masses. But we can only 
do so successfully if we keep foremost in 
our minds that individuality, our unique- 
ness, is the mainstay of change. 





90 — the events 





the events 



GREAT PUMPKIN CONTEST ■ Jack- 
o'-lanterns are priceless. Unless they 
were entered in the Horticulture Club's 
annual Great Pumpkin Decorating Con- 
test — then they might be worth $5. 

Five K-State faculty members acted as 
the panel of judges, and with all the 
expertise of pumpkin connoisseurs, 
selected the lucky pumpkin from each 
category — most ugly, most beautiful, 
most original, and best characterization. 

But decisions were not long debated, 
because there were only four entries. The 
$5 prizes went to Cinde Doby, Susan 
Bell, Cindy Helferstay, and Janene Lewis, 
for their mastery of the seasonal art of 
pumpkin decorating. 

UNIVERSITY SING ■ K-State's Univer- 
sity Sing proved that not only little kids 
care about Hurst Major's Children's Zoo, 
but big kids do too. 

Sponsored by the Interfraternity Coun- 
cil, 15 performing groups from greek 
houses, dormitories, and scholarship 
houses formed in the spring of 1 975. 

Practice sessions began soon after 
everyone returned from summer vaca- 
tion. Groups competed not only in sing- 
ing, but also in selling tickets for the final 
night of competition. 

After endless hours of practice, partici- 
pants competed in the semi-finals. Eight 
groups were then chosen to continue in 
the November 1 6 finals. The singers were 
judged on the basis of a number of fac- 
tors, from song selection to stage appear- 
ance. 

The judges announced their decisions. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon and Gamma Phi 
Beta took third place and Delta Delta 
Delta and Delta Upsilon came in second. 
Farmhouse and Chi Omega, who sang 
"Matchmaker" and "Days of Wine and 
Roses" were declared first place winners. 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon led in the ticket 



sales by bringing in $800. Delta Delta 
Delta came in right behind, with Gamma 
Phi Beta placing third. 

Proceeds from the ticket sales were 
used for the zoo's benefit. 

A CHRISTMAS CAROL ■ Christmas 
cheer won out in K-State's musical ver- 
sion of Charles Dickens' "A Christmas 
Carol". The play was presented Decem- 
ber 5 and 6 in McCain Auditorium by the 
speech and music departments. 

The traditional forces of good and evil 
were pitted against each other in this pro- 
duction. Scrooge, played by Matt Smith, 
graduate student in speech, was a mean, 
grasping miser who repeatedly grumbled 
"Christmas — bah, humbug!" 

His meetings with three spirits of 
Christmas provided the drama of the 
play. The Ghost of Christmas Past led 
Scrooge through his unhappy childhood, 
the Ghost of Christmas Present showed 
the Christmas festivities that Scrooge 
despised and refused to participate in, 
and the Ghost of Christmas Future pre- 
dicted a bleak future for the miser and the 
death of Tiny Tim, the crippled son of his 
clerk. 

The play was a joint effort of the Uni- 
versity and Manhattan residents. Dressed 
in scarves and mittens, local children car- 
oled with K-State students who wore 
bonnets and top hats. 

Special effects were an instrumental 
portion of the production. Snow fell as a 
woman sold balloons in the street. The 
ghostly image of Joseph Marley, 
Scrooge's deceased business partner, 
flashed on a door knocker and then dis- 
appeared. 

The staging of "A Christmas Carol" 
was intricate. Store fronts on a street 
scene opened to reveal Scrooge's bed- 
room, a drawing room, and even a rag- 
picker's storehouse. 




Conspiracy: 

super sleuths stray 
figment department 



by Jerri Phillips 



A Massachusetts Assassination Bureau came to the 
K-State campus — with information instead ot threats. 

"Politics of Conspiracy", a lecture series sponsored 
by the Union Program Council, enlightened students 
and faculty with lectures and seminars about political 
assassinations, the presence of secret dealings within 
the government, and other clandestine operations. 

Bob Katz, co-founder of the Massachusetts-based 
Assassination Information Bureau, began the week- 
long program Monday, November 1 0, with two evening 
presentations entitled "Who Killed JFK?" 

Through the use of slides, including a bootleg copy 
of the famous Zapruder home movie, Katz retraced the 
events and evidence in the Kennedy assassination for 
the near-capacity crowds in Union Forum Hall. Though 
at times rather sarcastic, Katz pointed out obvious 
weaknesses of the controversial Warren Report. 
Throughout his presentations, Katz urged public sup- 
port to reopen the investigation, which after more than 
1 years, still has no conclusive answers. 

"We need a strong organization of networks of local 
groups interested in getting a Congressional investiga- 
tion going," he said. 

Katz followed his night lecture with a seminar in the 
Union Big 8 Room Tuesday. Speaking again on the 
Kennedy assassination, he noted a recent Gallup poll 
showed that only 10 per cent of the American public 
still believes the Warren Report findings. 

Katz also touched on the Martin Luther King and 
-Robert Kennedy assassinations in his hour-long semi- 
nar. He presented evidence to his audience that King's 
assassin — not necessarily Earl Ray — did not fire the 
fatal shots from the rooming house. He also mentioned 
that the FBI is more strongly involved in the King case 
than generally thought. 

"People should understand that if we don't know 
who assassinated President Kennedy, we also don't 



92 — conspiracy 



know who is running our country," he said. "We can't 
rely on Congress to reopen investigations into the 
assassinations. I'm convinced of the need for a political 
effort involving petitions, demonstrations, and media 
saturation if we are ever to have a full and open investi- 
gation." 

"The CIA and You", the second lecture of the series, 
was presented Tuesday in Union Forum Hall. Those on 
hand listened to a sometimes light treatment of the 
Central Intelligence Agency by Doug Porter, consultant 
to the House Select Commission on Intelligence opera- 
tions. 

Sprinkling humor throughout his presentation, Porter 
drew laughter recounting CIA operations against 
national leaders. 

Intelligence operations are carried out in 64 govern- 
ment agencies, Porter said. And the CIA is one of the 
smaller ones. That doesn't limit the agency or its activi- 
ties, he said, as they are diversified. Only a small part of 
agency operations involve intelligence gathering, the 
original task. Most CIA operations involve clandestine 
work in other countries. 

Porter also called for public support in CIA investiga- 
tions saying that one of the main problems America has 
to deal with in trying to control the CIA is that the public 
doesn't seem to care. 

At his Wednesday afternoon seminar, Porter echoed 
his main lecture points and delved deeper into some of 
the illegal action taken by the CIA. 

"The CIA is fat and self-serving," Porter said. "They 
should be taken out of the meddling business and put 
back into coordinating." One of the agency's main 
faults is not coordinating information picked up from 
different areas of government, which Porter believes is 
the real purpose of the CIA. 

Speaking about the FBI, Porter briefly mentioned its 
role in Martin Luther King's assassination and said the 
'investigation bureau and the IRS have taken the cue' 
from the CIA in clandestine operations of their own. 

Explaining what he labeled "a mosaic of earlier con- 



cepts," Carl Oglesby reviewed his theory of political 
control in the final evening program of the "Conspir- 
acy" lecture series. 

Speaking before a small but interested group in 
Forum Hall, Oglesby related what he terms the "Cow- 
boy-Yankee theory of political elites contending for 
control of national political policy-making." 

"The power pyramid of this country is not uniform," 
the one-time president of the Students for a Democratic 
Society said. "We have a divided group of competing 
elites based on independent economic factors." 

Oglesby explained the history of his theory, which 
although never stated as such by anyone else, was 
active throughout American history — beginning with 
the struggle for national independence all the way 
through to recent political assassinations and clandes- 
tine operations. 

Oglesby believed the JFK assassination was a strug- 
gle between the Cowboy faction — those with modern 
interests tied in oil, land, and industry — to overthrow a 
Yankee president — eastern factions of old banking 
institutions and wealthy family backgrounds. 

Oglesby said he offers the theory as a way for people 
to see through the inner mechanisms of governmental 
conflicts, without confusing them. At a Thursday after- 
noon seminar in the Union, Oglesby gave a more 
detailed explanation of the way his theory worked. 
Throughout his hour-long discussion session, he 
traced incriminating links among the Rockefellers, 
Howard Hughes, Richard Nixon, and the syndicate, 
involving a power struggle to run the country. 

Oglesby said that the Rockefellers were at the top of 
the Yankee faction — the top banking magnates. 
Hughes, on the other hand, headed the Cowboy group 
of agri-businessmen and independent oil tycoons. He 
explained specific details of how the two groups were' 
continually locked in a power struggle and how it even- 
tually involved ex-President Nixon through illegal cam- 
paign contributions. 




conspiracy — 93 



the bicentennial 




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1* + ++ + + ** + + + + ******** fjMMt 




********* ********* * *****J 



96 — bicentennial 



****************•¥•**¥** -¥■** 



Some revolutionary ideas 



Botched party calls for amends 



by Scott Kraft 

We did it all wrong. 

It's probably not the first time we've 
bungled the job, botched the project, or 
just plain fumbled the ball. 

But just imagine the grandiose plans, 
the stacks of $1 ,000 bills, and the used 
elbow grease we, the United States, will 
have after the Bicentennial celebration 
falls to its knees. 

It'll be taller than a master's thesis on 
the national debt or George Washing- 
ton's immortal cherry tree (we really 
always doubted that bit of historical trivia 
anyway). 

And for what? 

A colossal flop, no doubt. A few 
streamers, but no heart-warmers. A can- 
non on a hill, but no defense and no 
peace. 

We'll feel a bit like the irreverent kid 
who — gorged on popcorn, soda pop, 
and Butterfingers — still can't get the 
sticky feeling of cotton candy off his face. 

But this sort of stuff never sticks to your 
ribs, only your face. 

That's the kind of empty feeling we're 
liable to have following Bicentennial 76, 
U.S. of A. 

But, like most other things, the after- 
effects of the unevent can be avoided. 
Not this year, but the next time we decide 
to throw that colossal super-party. 

And, as the greenskeeper for the 
Augusta National or the official head of 
the Rose Bowl parade will tell you, the 
preparation for next year begins "now". 

Mark these words: the next time a cen- 
tennial celebration graces our country, 
chances are we still won't have true 
objectives in mind, priorities straight, or 
wise money in hand. 

So, as an aid to those budding Tricen- 
tennial planners who will soon be pound- 
ing away (not as in fingers to typewriters, 
rather as in heads to walls), we offer sug- 
gestions for an efficient celebration. 

"This year is when the planners should 



begin thinking about 2076. Start saturat- 
ing the people with news of the 
pseudo-event. Urge corporations and 
nonprofit organizations alike to declare a 
Tricentennial Week. 

Maybe the Department of Health, Edu- 
cation and Welfare, in conjunction with 
the city of Boston can construct a papier- 
mache statue — tomb of the unknown 
student in a school bus — at a cost of 
less than $15 trillion. 

Other cities and government agencies 
can construct similar disposable master- 
pieces depicting similar great social 
events. 

The Tricentennial will mark an ideal sit- 
uation for an opportunistic president 
(name one that wasn't). The President 
will have a chance to place people from 
groups other than the majority race, reli- 
gion, or sex in full-time jobs with big titles 
— and bigger salaries. 

Some radical leftist and extremist right 
groups will surely be supporting their 
favorite candidates for Tricentennial 
Director of Community Action. It'll be an 
uncertain proposition — purring liberal 
programs or crass anarchist ones. 

That'll be a high price to pay for token- 
ism. But by Tricentennial time, the white 
male will probably be as abused as any- 
one. 

Presidential appointments can also 
provide good hideouts for aging politi- 
cians. "Let them plan a Tricentennial cel- 
ebration," the President will say. 

Taxpayers will pay for the construction 
of plastic men in buccaneer outfits, at the 
whims of these senile presidential 
appointees. 

And television, if there is such an ani- 
mal in 2076, should have "Tricentennial 
Seconds" in which a sponsor pays $30 
million for 59 seconds of advertising to 
support one second of programming. 
Thousands of aging history books will 
feel the brunt of dog-ears and coffee 
stains as tv programmers rack brains and 
funds for tidbits of history worthy of one 
second of airtime. 



Chances are, they'll find something. 

And while the Fed continues its god- 
like stranglehold on the money supply, 
government will continue to print that 
small percentage of money supply — 
known as currency. 

Government engravers can have a 
heyday with the currency. A red, white, 
and blue dollar bill heads the list of inno- 
vations with Patty Hearst, national hero 
(anybody that can dodge the FBI that 
long ought to have her track shoes 
bronzed) and on the back of that same 
dollar bill a flattering picture of Spiro 
Agnew, with dollar signs for eyes. 

Silver coins should be by then of 
recyclable plastic. For the Tricentennial, 
the government can sell advertising on 
each coin, with an inverse relationship 
between advertising cost and worth of 
the coin. 

Cigarettes should not be allowed to 
shine from U.S. coins however — the 
government must not be bastardized. 

And when the party's all over, future 
planners, make sure to lock the gates. 

Citizens will be applying wildly for 
passports to get into those countries less 
fortunate than ours — anything to get 
away from cleaning up the aftermath. 

But catch them — they can't get away 
without doing their "fair share" to clean 
up the mess. 

In line with its policy of noninterfer- 
ence, the government should not hinder 
free enterprise from cleaning up the gov- 
ernment's mess. Just to be safe, when 
you approach the businesspersons ask- 
ing them to "sweep up" . . . and you tell 
them the government threw the party 
. . . bring a bedpan. 

And don't forget to send suggestions 
to the Quadcentennial planners with a 
personal note attached, written in blood: 



WiT P» }TJ 




bicentennial — 97 



Buffs graze 'grass roots' history 



by Rusty Harris 



Kansas? 

Kansas and the Bicentennial? Now 
come on, I've heard of odd combinations 
in my day, but really, what the heck does 
Kansas have to do with the Bicentennial? 

Well, in some ways, very little. But in 
others, I can only say, yes, Kansans do 
have something to celebrate in this, the 
year ot the "buy-centennial". 

While most people may believe — 
somewhat accurately — that 200 years 
ago, Kansas was nothing more than the 
Great Buffalo Dumping Ground Out 
West, a lot more can be said about Kan- 
sas history. 

For, if nothing else, Kansas is unique in 
that the greater part of its history has 
been nothing more than a place for peo- 
ple to pass through — thank God. 

The first record of a European coming 
out Kansas-way was in the 1500s. It was 
a very modest affair, nothing more than 
some people — some in chains — out 
looking things over for the Spanish crown 
under the command of Coronado. Lucky 
for us, the dear boy only got as far as 
central Kansas. If he had seen the Flint 
Hills, he might have wanted to stay. And I 
have enough trouble trying to get "hello" 
to come out right, much less "buenos 
dias". 

After the Big C, little was heard or seen 
of Kansas by the Europeans for about 
300 years. 

Then a few short years after the Ameri- 
can revolt, Lewis and Clark came whip- 
ping through — or around — in their 
hurry to find a short-cut to the California 
beaches. And they weren't the last ones 
to try that trick. 

Oh yeah, even the Indians didn't last 
that long. 

Shortly after L & C came to find L.A., 
various tribes signed treaties with the 
good ole U.S. of A., selling their lands 
east of the Mighty Miss in exchange for 
lands in Kansas. 

That lasted for a few decades, and then 
most of the Indians moved on. Come to 
think of it, "shoved out" would be a bet- 
ter term. 

Those Indians unlucky enough to stick 
around found themselves in the midst of 
a legal dispute when the upstart Kansas 
legislature tried to tax Indian lands and 
property in the 1860s, in violation of ear- 
lier treaties. They should have remem- 

98 — bicentennial 



bered a lesson their Eastern counterparts 
had learned — that the only good white 
man was a dead one. 

But wait a minute, I'm getting ahead of 
myself. 

On the track once again, one can find 
that Kansas didn't make "news" too 
often in the first hundred years of the 
nation's existence. 

The first biggie, if you can term it that, 
involved name-calling. Well, more specifi- 
cally, it was the controversy over the cor- 
rect spelling of Kansas. 

It seems everyone and the dearly 
departed mapmakers had a different 
interpretation of the name of the Indian 
tribe that predominated this neck of the 
plains. 

Some said "Cansa", others claimed 
"Canza", still others "Kanza". All in all, 
there were about 50 different spellings 
given to that poor tribe. The dispute 
wasn't really settled until the Territory of 
Kansas (that's right folks, two of the "s", 
one "k", and no "c") was established in 
1854. 

Between that time and the earlier trav- 
els of Lewis and Clark, hundreds of set- 
tlers trekked across the hills and plains of 
Kansas. All of them, in the tradition estab- 
lished by the non-dynamic duo, headed 
for the west coast. 

In fact, no one really decided to drop in 
and stay in mass (other than the buffalo 
chips), until it came time for admitting 
Kansas into the Union. And then the word 
was out — it would be up to the inhabi- 
tants (as long as they were white males), 
to decide if the soon-to-be state would be 
free or slave. 

Perhaps the world has never witnessed 
such a monumental effort at ballot-stuff- 
ing. Thousands headed this way — to 
stay, believe it or not — to attempt to 
swing Kansas and the nation their way. 

New communities sprang up every- 
where, including at the base of Bluemont 
Hill. Thanks to the efforts of a group of 
determined Massachusetts Methodists 
who were bound and determined to see 
Kansas a free state, Manhattan was born 
after a few name changes (one of them 
including New Boston). 

Both sides, free and slave, entered the 
area with battle gear in place. And when 
the two factions met, sparks flew. The 
brouhaha got so bad at times that some 
of the eastern newspapers promptly 
dubbed the territory "Bloody Kansas". 
The Kansas Chamber of Commerce must 



have loved it. 

Well, anyway, when the dust settled, 
and the votes were in, Kansas entered 
the not-so-united Union on January 29, 
1861 as a free state. And within 90 days, 
the Civil War had broken out — some 
birthday party. 

And since then, things have been fairly 
much downhill. 

Yeah, we can't forget other big events 
in Kansas history since then — the first 
land-grant college (rah, rah!), Alf Landon, 
Carrie Nation, Amelia Earhart, being the 
breadbasket of the nation, the Soviet! 
Union, et. al. 

But time and time again, Kansas has 
been maligned, mostly due to our good 
friends in Hollywood. Did you know that! 
most easterners still believe there are 
Cowboys and Indians running loose out 
here shooting at one another? 

And in spite of our clean air, scenic vis- J, 
tas, and a long list of famous Americans! 
(you know — Matt, Kitty, Doc, and Fes-ji 
tus), the rest of the nation still treats us as j, 
if God created Kansas to receive the]* 
enema for the rest of the country. Need i 
we forget where the government wanted! I 
to dump all those nasty nuclear wastes ajf 
few years back? 

But the heck with the rest of the nation I 
anyway. Let them all run out and buyji 
their way into the country's next one hun-1 
dred years. Kansas is about the only | 
place that hasn't jumped onto the red , | .. 
white, and blue bandwagon. I mean, after*! 
all, if we had we would have red, white, ;| 
and blue hybrid wheat growing all over)'! 
the place, right? 

But maybe we ought to jump on thatJjj 
bandwagon, just a little bit. Just to get . 
even. 

You see, I've got this great idea to get I 
back at our sophisticated Yankee cous- 
ins. 

All we have to do is take some of those 
things lying around in the pastures — <<lj 
you know, those round things the Universal 
sity For Man staff taught us to throw j 
through hula-hoops. 

Anyway, all we have to do is paint the I 
things red, white, and blue and write all 
manual on how to care for them. 

Then we could sell them to New York- 
ers as genuine, 200-year-old, pet Buffalo i 
Chips — I hear they'll buy anything, even" 
a birthday. 













bicentennial — 99 







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bicentennial — 101 



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the concerts 



the flying burrito brothers 




HARRY CHAPIN ■ Popular singer Harry 
Chapin charmed a K-State audience Feb- 
ruary 2 in McCain Auditorium. The audi- 
ence laughed, sang, and demanded two 
encores before they allowed him to leave. 

Although Chapin started the concert 
alone, he was later joined by John Wal- 
lace on the bass guitar and Howie Fields 
on lead guitar. The trio sang and poked 
fun at each other throughout their joint 
performance. 

Audience participation was a key por- 
tion of the concert. It began when Chapin 
asked their help on the country and west- 
ern song, "Bananas", a comedy about a 
truck driver who lost his load of 30,000 
pounds of bananas. 

Other songs were more serious. In 
one, "Bummer", he sang of the troubles 
of a black Vietnam war hero. 

Following a 1 5-minute intermission, 
Chapin returned onstage with several 
sheets of crumpled paper, which con- 
tained the lyrics of two songs he had writ- 
ten recently. He sang while reading the 
lyrics from the papers. 

"I wrote 'Kansas City Airport Blues' 
while waiting in the airport terminal on the 
way over here today," he said. "The 
longer I waited, the filthier the verses 
got." 

Throughout the concert Chapin ridi- 
culed several well-known personalities 
and issues. His final comment on one of 
these issues, women's liberation, was, 
"Thank God, you women are taking over 
the world." 

PURE PRAIRIE LEAGUE ■ Boots, belts, 
and cowboy hats are in vogue at K-State, 
but February 1 3 was the cowboy's hey- 
day. Pure Prairie League and The Flying 
Burrito Brothers appeared in concert at 
Weber Arena. 

The concert opened with The Flying 
Burrito Brothers, a country-rock band on 
their first wide-spread tour since their 
recent reunion. The band, who broke up 
over three years ago, came on strong for 



the K-State audience. Although The Fly- 
ing Burrito Brothers played numbers 
mainly from their new album, "Flying 
Again", their best response came when 
they dug into the past for traditional 
country numbers. 

After the introduction of Country Fid- 
dler Floyd Gilbeau, the audience went 
wild as the band broke into "Diggy Liggy 
Lo". During the encore, Gilbeau again 
showed his fiddle expertise with another 
old-time song, "Orange Blossom Spe- 
cial". Gilbeau proved to the audience he 
was one of the best. The audience 
acknowledged the fact with a thunderous 
round of applause as Gilbeau and the 
band left the stage. 

After a long wait between changes, the 
lights dimmed and Pure Prairie League 
began their portion of the show. Although 
The Flying Burrito Brothers were tough to 
follow, Pure Prairie League soon picked 
up the pace and had the audience clap- 
pin' 'n hollerin' to the music. 

Featuring lead guitarist Larry Gros- 
horn, Pure Prairie League opened with 
several mellower country numbers, with 
"Amy" coming early in the concert. The 
audience became restless during this lull 
of mellower numbers, but Pure Prairie 
later got them on their feet and picked up 
the pace, playing the fast-moving country 
songs that many had come to hear. 

"Pickin' to Beat the Devil", a fast- 
action country song featuring guitar and 
banjo, got the audience back into the 
same mood that the Burrito Brothers had 
left them with. "I'll Change Your Flat Tire, 
Merle" turned out to be another crowd 
pleaser. Near the end of the concert, the 
band again gave the audience what they 
wanted with their second big hit, "Two 
Lane Highway". 

Pure Prairie League did not go over as 
well as expected, and a number of listen- 
ers left before the concert was over. 
Many believed the group was slow-mov- 
ing and did not play up to par. 



i 1 '.' . i ini ens 



01' Bossie is 

moo-ving on 

to better barns 




by Linda Reed 

They're moving the herd up north. Yep, 
Silo Tech may soon lose one of its infa- 
mous landmarks — the dairy barn. But, 
contrary to popular myth, odor isn't a 
main motive in the move from Manhattan 
city limits. Obsolescence has spurred the 
search for greener pastures. 

But until there's a new barn raising, the 
aging limestone continues its productive 
existence. Yes, productive. 

Besides irking neighborhood residents 
and providing hayshed seclusion for 
minors craving a few smokes, the dairy 
turns out one-and-a-half million pounds 
of Grade A milk each year — enough to 
supply K-State dormies with milk and 
soft-serve ice cream. Call Hall's process- 
ing center handles the total- bulk and also 
houses a dairy bar where more "campus- 
made" ice cream is sold. All money made 
is recycled into the dairy and poultry 
departments, bracing major financial 
support for research. 

Providing a herd for teaching and 



research — in areas of nutrition, physiol- 
ogy, and management — is the dairy 
barn's initial objective. The 300 head of 
cattle housed there fully meet the nutri- 
tional and physiological needs but the 
management side is lacking. Though 
constantly remodeled throughout its 43 
years, the barn has reached its final 
roundup and must be put out to pasture 
permanently. 

"It's been do or die here," George 
Ward, dairy and poultry science profes- 
sor, said, as he patted the limestone. 
"There is just so much you can do to 
remodel a barn with strong stone walls 
like this." 

In his 20 years at K-State Ward has wit- 
nessed or initiated quite a few of these 
changes. He can remember when Elaine 
and Todd Road didn't exist. No, those 
long-ago campus planners didn't pick an 
urban lot for the original site! Rather, a 
flourishing Manhattan has engulfed the 
barn. 

Virtually no corner of the dairy plant 
has escaped change. Two wooden barns 



moved onto the present site in 1933 as 
temporary structures to house bulls now 
shelter calves. The original 70-stall milk- 
ing parlor was reduced to 35 and then 
cut to eight stalls, making room for indi- 
vidualized feeding bunks. Pipelines were 
added to the parlor as a bit of moderniza- 
tion. Still the best possible use of labor 
was not feasible under such deteriorating 
conditions. 

Not all appendages of the barn havei 
been salvaged. Age has punctured the 
silos to the point of no repair. The only 
feed stored in them now is an occasional 
mouse-dinner for industrious resident 
cats. 

Beings living in the barn, other than the 
feline and bovine type, are two students. 
Bunking in second-floor rooms, their 
chores consist of riding night watch on 
the herd. A full-time herdsman and 
several civil-service persons carry out 
daytime duties. 

So . . . plans were drafted for a new 
dairy plant to fit between the swine and 
poultry locations north of campus. 




Expected facilities will undoubtedly allow 
improved nutritional and physiological 
research and also boost management 
back to an acceptable level. 

But what of the remains? Quite possi- 
bly, the "stink" raised over the barn's 
future might have equalled any smells 
generated in the past. The vacated struc- 
ture had all the possibilities of a pigeon 
paradise — Nichols Gym II. The cost to 
tear it down today would equal its original 
construction cost of $45,000, Ward spec- 
ulated. 

However, university planners stam- 
peded through with the decision to turn 
the structure over to plant science. So the 
dairy's packing chores began. 

The move may clear the air for a while, 
but there will still be a profound need to 
watch where one steps. Sooner or later 
courting co-eds are sure to hear a 
mournful moo bellowed by some home- 
sick beast grazing in the Top of the World 
pasture. 




Never can say goodby . . . cow pies. 



dairy barn — 105 




I0< 1> /(.'Ml- 



the events 



UNION BEER ISSUE ■ Students 
responded to the Union Governing 
Board's decision to not sell or serve beer 
in the Union with a scream of apathetic 
silence. This was, however, the same 
response that was shown throughout the 
battle for the repeal of campus prohi- 
bition. 

In October 1975, when the Kansas 
Board of Regents amended its policy to 
allow 3.2 beer to be sold in campus 
unions, many students felt that the issue 
was open and shut. Beer would be sold. 

But this was not so. UGB refused to 
allow malt beverages sold before the 
issue was decided upon. 

The dry factors on campus began 
showing their discontent and outrage 
against the potential contamination of K- 
Straight. But students in support of beer 
on campus were uniformly silent. 

UGB conducted two different surveys 
to better ascertain student opinion. One 
survey composed of seven questions was 
printed in the Collegian and relied upon 
student initiative to take fifteen seconds 
to fill out and turn in — only 215 both- 
ered. Of these few students, those 
against the brew were in an unquestiona- 
ble majority. It seemed some people did 
not want beer more than others wanted it. 

A more representative random sam- 
pling of opinion was achieved through a 
telephone survey. It found the campus 
fairly split on the same seven questions 
posed by the Collegian survey. 

On catering beer for banquets in the 
Union, 45.7 per cent approved while only 
21 .3 per cent were against it. The ques- 
tion of selling beer in the Union brought 
32.9 per cent approving and 32 per cent 
registering a negative opinion. 

A clear majority of 41 per cent said 
they would not "personally buy beer in 
the K-State Union" while only 26.1 per 
cent said they would. 

This final question was one of the key 
ones leading to the UGB decision, Walter 
Smith, Union director, said. 

"The only way the Union could make 
money or simply break even would be 
! through volume sales on an Aggieville- 
Itype scale," Smith said. "We have a u- 
j nique situation. With Aggieville as close 



as it is, we don't need beer in the Union." 

"Three hundred irate letters opposing 
the sale of beer on campus were sent to 
the UGB before the final decision was 
reached," Smith said. After the decision, 
a few letters praising the UGB's action 
were received. There were no letters con- 
demning the vote. 

When the UGB vote finally came on 
January 20, six members on the board 
voted against the Union handling of beer, 
while two voted for it. 

The people who made the decision 
were, in reality, the students. Many voted 
with their unconcern. 

ID VALIDATION ■ Hurriedly, I double- 
checked all my pen marks: name, 
amount, address, and date — March 5, 
1976. Everything was in order. I was 
about to get my badly-needed weekend 
allowance. I marched up to the Union 
check cashing window, smiled, and 
handed the cashier my check and ID 
card. But before there was chance for a 
transaction, both check and ID were back 
in my hand. 

"I'm sorry sir, you'll have to have your 
ID validated before I can accept it." I 
wasn't sure what she had said, so I just 
stood there. I still wanted my money. She 
repeated herself. This time it sunk in. 

"What do you mean I'll have to get it 
validated?" was my first ignorant, but 
obvious question. 

"It's after the first of March. You'll have 
to go to Farrell Library to get your ID vali- 
dated. You know, with one of those little 
green stickers." 

I wanted to tell her where she could 
stick her little green stickers, but instead, 
I slid my worthless check and ID back 
into my empty wallet. 

As I stormed off around the corner, a 
bright green poster that I hadn't noticed 
before caught my eye. "Sorry we 
goofed," it said, "but you'll have to get 
your ID validated." The sign was right, 
but I had goofed, too. 

Made effective by the Student Govern- 
ing Association, the idea of validating IDs 
was conceived to prevent the misuse of 
student identification cards. Various cam- 
pus facilities reported that students who 
had graduated or were no longer attend- 



ing the University were using their old ID 
cards to check out books from the library, 
for services from Lafene Health Center, 
and to check out recreational equipment. 

Steve Phillips, head of the committee 
that proposed and designed the idea of 
validation, said the misuse of IDs was 
brought to attention mainly by the over- 
crowding of campus facilities. Phillips' 
committee originated the idea of the 
small, gum-backed paper tags to be at- 
tached to the ID cards. But Phillips 
acknowledged that the tags are not fool- 
proof. 

"We're aware that the present system 
needs improvement. We're looking for a 
new system that will be more effective in 
the future." 

Hassle or no hassle, ID validation is 
going to be a biannual event for K-Sta- 
ters. 

THE MIKADO ■ Sleet and cold winds 
forced the cancellation of the scheduled 
March 4 performance, but the cast and 
crew of "The Mikado" proved that the 
show must go on when they performed 
Gilbert and Sullivan's operetta the follow- 
ing two nights. 

Presented by the speech and music 
departments, the story, written in 1885, is 
set in a Japanese village called Titipu. 
The plot evolves around a proclamation 
by the Emperor of Japan, Mikado, that 
flirting shall be deemed a crime punisha- 
ble by beheading the offender. 

The story thickens as Mikado's son, 
Nanki Poo, who is traveling under the 
guise of a minstrel, attempts to win the 
hand of the beautiful lady Yum Yum. 
However, she is betrothed to Koko, the 
Lord High Executioner who would rather 
not carry out his official duty in this case 
— because he is guilty of the flirtation 
crime himself. 

This theatric triangle is strongly supple- 
mented by the antics of the other colorful 
characters. Under the direction of Lewis 
Shelton, assistant speech professor, the 
play was sprinkled throughout with songs 
by the cast members, coached by Jerry 
Langekamp, associate professor of 
music. Choreographer was Lynn Shel- 
ton, assistant professor of speech. 






Purple Masque 




" 05 — purple rn3squf; 



by Terri Phillips 



Thirteen years ago if you had ventured through the 
northern doors ot the East Stadium and followed your 
curiosity down a lengthy corridor, you'd probably have 
been trampled by K-State athletes on their way to the 
cafeteria. 

If you retraced that same path today, however, you'd 
find yourself walking down a brightly decorated hallway 
that leads to K-State's own experimental theatre, the 
Purple Masque. 

Room 107 was redecorated from training tables and 
food service lines to a three-quarter round stage and 
seating for 1 1 in 1 963 after the athletic dorm moved to 
a new location. Under the guidance of Jack Rast, pro- 
fessor of speech, the theatre was ready for a July 
showing of "A Majority of One". The Purple Masque 
has since provided settings for more than 1 01 plays. 

"The Masque is primarily committed to the training of 
students in theatre and to show them how it can work," 
Norma Bunton, professor of speech, said. Some direc- 
ting classes conduct direction of scenes in the theatre 
and make-up classes also use the facilities. 

Most productions shown in the Masque are directed 
by students under faculty supervision. Several thesis 
projects have been staged in the theatre, Bunton said, 
adding that at least six of the present speech faculty 
members have taken a turn at directing a show. 

While many of the productions in the Masque are 
original one act and full length plays written by K-State 
students, some of the more standard plays are also pre- 
sented. And this is where most of the experimentation 



takes place. 

"By experimental theatre, I don't mean just present- 
ing student-written plays," Bunton said. "We take the 
more standard plays, written by established play- 
wrights, and present them in different ways. The 
Masque lends itself to certain kinds of plays better than 
most theatres do. We can abandon the usual settings 
and try different types of scenery." 

The theatre is a three-quartered stage, with seating 
around all three sides. Depending on the configuration 
of the stage, which can be changed dimensionally, var- 
ious types and styles of scenery and settings can be 
arranged. 

The Masque housed a full schedule of productions 
this year. "Beanstalk Country", "Carry", and several 
one acts were among the shows staged. 

Because of its accessibility in the East Stadium, the 
theatre has been vandalized frequently, Bunton said. 
One student has been hired to keep the place in order, 
but there are some things he just can't do to keep 
rehearsals going on schedule. 

Last year a female cat crawled into the theatre to 
have her kittens, Bunton explained. The cast of the pro- 
duction at that time brought food for the animals every 
day which slowed things down a little. But this year, a 
more threatening menace for rehearsals and produc- 
tion has appeared. A skunk was recently reported to 
have taken up residence nearby and sometimes makes 
rather untimely appearances. 

"The Masque can best be described as a dark 
cavern," Bunton said. "And there are a lot of short- 
comings with cramped quarters. But it's a chance for 
students to try and see the theatre in a different light." 





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the construction 



DURLAND HALL ■ For 40 years, K- 
State's chemical and industrial engineers 
have been making do with a 72-year-old 
building designed to serve as a creamery. 

But after June 1 976, it will no longer be 
necessary to "make do". These two 
departments will be housed in some of 
the finest facilities in the country. Durland 
Hall, located across the street and north 
of Ahearn Field House, will be a reality. 

The new building will house class- 
rooms, laboratories, and offices for 
chemical and industrial engineering stu- 
dents and faculty. 

One lab, for human factors engineer- 
ing, offers facilities for research of human 
performance under various environmen- 
tal conditions. The effects of factors, 
such as lighting, interior design, and work 
methods can be studied. 

Durland Hall is unique at K-State for its 
glass facing instead of the usual lime- 
stone. Its modular design is meant to fa- 
cilitate "adding on" in the future. 

Extreme inflation of building costs 
posed several problems in financing the 
new building. When bids for the project 
were higher than the legislature's $2.7 
million allocation for construction, adjust- 
ments had to be made. 

Following an appeal to the Kansas leg- 
islature, K-State was authorized to spend 
up to $1 50,000 from sponsored research 
overhead funds and to accept monetary 
gifts in any amount to help meet costs. 
The state architect was authorized to 
negotiate directly with the lowest bidder. 

In these negotiations, it was agreed to 
eliminate some equipment, exterior 
steps, change from copper to aluminum 
wiring, and transfer the sewer extension 



to another contract. These brought the 
estimated cost from $3.1 million to $2.85 
million. 

The building's namesake, M. A. Dur- 
land, is a K-State graduate and Manhat- 
tan resident. He served as dean of the 
College of Engineering from 1949 until 
1 961 . During this time he was also direc- 
tor of the Engineering Experiment Sta- 
tion. He taught at K-State from 1 91 9 until 
1967. 

As dean, Durland established a KSU 
College of Engineering Advisory Council 
— a group of Midwestern leaders in engi- 
neering, education, and industry who 
provide input toward instruction and 
research in the college. 

The building was dedicated on April 9. 

VETERINARY MEDICINE ADDITION ■ 
Ranking as the second most expensive 
building in the history of Kansas, the new 
$17 million veterinary medicine addition 
is scheduled for completion in two years. 

Two concerns accompany the clinical 
science and pathology building. Will it, 
unlike the original buildings in the com- 
plex, be air conditioned from the begin- 
ning? And will the University power plant 
have the capacity to provide power for it? 

The answer to the first question is a 
definite "yes", Vince Cool, assistant to 
the vice-president for University develop- 
ment, said. Due to insufficient funds, orig- 
inally there were not enough cooling tow- 
ers to operate the air conditioning. This 
time there will be. 

As to the power plant's capacity to 
serve the building's needs, the answer is 
a qualified "yes". In order to accommo- 
date the additional 268,000 square feet 
of floor space, the present plant facilities 



must be bolstered, Cool said. 

"Within two years, we hope to receive 
a report on the power plant study and 
arrive at a solution to the rising needs," 
he said. 

Possibilities range from renovating and 
adding on to the present plant to building 
an entirely new plant. Aiding in the solu- 
tion of energy problems is the fact that 
the new clinical sciences building is 
designed for maximum conservation of 
energy. 

"It will have up to five inches of high- 
grade insulation and will utilize heat 
recovery systems which can recover 70 
to 72 per cent of the heat loss," Cool 
said. 

The heat recovery systems are an 
asset in compensating for the heat loss 
incurred by the constant flow of fresh air 
needed in buildings which house ani- 
mals. 

"The main problem is with extreme i 
temperatures outside. When classes are 
in session people are constantly going in 
and out," Cool said. "There may be times 
when we can't heat or cool to a comforta- 
ble point, but campus buildings will l 
always be heated and cooled." 

Only the foundation and supporting 
columns are intact. The building will be 
similar in appearance to the others on the 
site. Although only two stories high, it will 
have about twice the floor space as any 
of the others. 

The facade will be of the familiar lime- 
stone. 

"The limestone won't actually hold the 
building up, like it does in Waters Hall. 
But it will be a long-wearing, durable sur- 
face," Frame said. 



112 — the construction 



• 




tho construction — I K! 





This is the first, last, and possibly 
never-should-have-been issue of K- 
State's Gallegian. Its columns have 
been crammed full of timeless news. 
The monumental and non-monumental 
decisions, the newsmakers or newsfak- 
ers, the uncovered scandals and those 
affairs that no one cares to see — all 
contained in the one-time press run. 

So, for future reference when the tots 
inquire as to what K-State was like in 
"the old days", just whip out this heir- 
loom to back up the "wild stories" . . . 
or tell them the way it really was. 



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Students 
in public 



found hustling 
dance halls 




All together now. 

Up and back four times. Then the 
steps. Two to the front, two to the back, 
repeat once, inside, outside, kick, and 
turn. That was the bus stop. Or was it the 
Latin hustle? Or the Chicago, Dallas, or 
New Yorker? 

Whatever the name, hustlers stepped 
and strutted en masse in musical motion 
to the predetermined steps of the hustle 
and other unreasonable facsimiles 
thereof. And nobody was really sure what 
they were doing — but it looked good. 

On illuminated, sole-tromped dance 
floors, a new cult had been born. The off- 
spring of synchronization and sound was 
not coddled, however. It was distorted 
and contorted to fit the moods, tunes, 
personalities, and quirks. 

College types embraced the fad and 
stomped it out in sine. Poor spasticated 
beginners, not sure of which foot went 
where when, even got trampled in the 
high beat of enthusiasm. Everyone had 
their own versions. Back home, parents 
heard something about it and wondered 
about all the hustling going on in the 
schools. 

Hustling just ain't what it used to be, 
folks. But then, neither is dancing. 



No accident report 

A K-State student suffered a brain con- 
cussion and dislocated shoulder blade 
when he unwittingly fell head first into a 
freshly dug pit. 

Cal Q. Lashan, graduate student in 
computer science, was reported to have 
been studying a printout when he made 
the slip. 

Campus police reported that Lashan 's 
fall was broken by a physical plant 
employe who was lunching at the bottom 
of the pit. 



future retereii! e 



r'bu I If ace 

Bee gets the nod, 
sunflower the shaft 



Kansas legislators matched strides 
with societal advancement by supporting 
legislation to make the honey bee the 
state's ofticial insect. It was later reported 
that buftaloes all over the state were 
stunned by the move. 

Humming right in tune were Iowa's 
lawmakers. There, it was officially 
decided that the wild sunflower was a 
noxious weed. As corny as the passed 
proposal was, Kansas showed great 
restraint and maturity in their reaction. No 
move was made to declare Iowa's 
beloved goldfinch a public nuisance as in 
years past. 



'Key' locks door, 
women admit men 

In compliance to Title IX, K-State's 
Mortar Board announced among its 26 
selections for 1976-77, three males. 
However, Blue Key, possibly fearing 
impotency, remained of a masculine 
nature. This nonadvancement was made 
in lieu of the organization's national deci- 
sion to go coed. 

Once again, some Kansans preferred 
to sit back and not make any hasty deci- 
sions. Who knows, Title IX could be just 
another passing idiocy — like the auto- 
mobile, color tv, Frank Sinatra . . . 



Go east, NCAA! 

So, they promised the Cats a berth if 
Utah lost? The "if" happened but the invi- 
tation didn't. And the K-State basketball 
squad bid the NCAA tourney farewell. 

With the scream of "foul" still echoing, 
the Cats packed their 20-7 season record 
and caught a plane to the NIT. 



Spurred on 




The shortcomings of Title IX 



transitions 



FADE OUT: Ernie Barrett, 46, left two 
positions at K-State in as many weeks. 
His service as athletic director terminated 
on December 16, Barrett accepted the 
post of assistant to the president for spe- 
cial projects. But being an APSP wasn't 
much fun anymore so he quit. Rumors 
had Barrett spotted at Wildcat basketball 
games carrying two-gallon buckets of 
paint and trying to cover up debts . . . er, 
dirt on Ahearn walls. Or something like 
that. 

LOST OUT: Vince Gibson, 44, resigned 
from the Big 8 and winged his way to the 
more secure surrounding of independ- 



ence — Louisville to be specific. In his 
first season stripped of purple pride, Gib- 
son guided his new following through a 
turf-ripping season of 1-10. If that isn't a 
kick in the old end zone! Better luck come 
next scheduling time. 

PULLED OUT: Pop tops, ??, disappeared 
from aluminum beer cans, making them 
completely recyclable. Replacing the 
rings are two indented perforated discs. 
Outcomes of the new system are: (1) the 
cut in time spent for fingernail upkeep (as 
no one has any now), and (2) an upswing 
in crime due to obliterated fingerprints 
(caused by massive scar tissue build-up). 



1 16 — luture reference 



Cancer creators lurk! 



Technology makes for neurotic paran- 
oia. Yes, day after day, the 6 o'clock 
news and the evening paper barrage us 
with the latest scientific discoveries. And 
we don't always want to know. Maybe we 
are perfectly content to be unaware of 
rodent hairs, mercury, salmonella, mag- 
gots, and other mouth-watering additives 
in our food — unless that food happens 
to be on our tables or in our mouths at 
the time of the breakthrough. Then, there 
is much upheaval. There also follows 
strick abstinence from nutrition for long 
spans of time. 

Less disgusting, and more frightening, 



are the oft-heard reports concerning can- 
cer-causing forces. 

Carcinogens haunt us throughout our 
daily activities. How can we even be sure 
that sleeping between sheets isn't carci- 
nogenic? Cigarettes, or "cancer sticks", 
are probably the most talked-out item in 
this category. And if the Surgeon General 
deterred some of us from the habit, he 
didn't always succeed with the person 
sitting in the adjacent study booth. 

Then there are the food additives that 
sneak into the diets of even the most cau- 
tious consumers. And of course, the little 
pills labeled with the days of the week 



Mercy cries unheard 



Aspirin bottles equipped with child- 
proof caps protect minors from acciden- 
tal overdoses. But this medical technol- 
ogy advancement failed to ease the suf- 
fering of inflicted collegiates. 

Numerous cases of student deaths rel- 
ated to underdoses of aspirin were 
reported following final weeks and major 
Wildcat victories. The biggest killer was 
terminal migraine, with eyestrain compli- 
cations. Advance hangover followed as 
an uncontested second. 

Loss of blood from perforated finger- 
tips threatened the health of untold oth- 



ers who sought relief by the buffers. 

Efforts to develop specially designed 
acetylsalicylic acid containers for the 
higher educated expired, as officials 
found the students' unique perplexity 
bayerly plausible. 

Representative X. Cederin ignored the 
fact that seven out of every 1 students 
supported the evidence against the 
safety caps. He retorted that the facts 
were "hard to swallow, leaving a bad 
taste in his mouth." 

One rejected supporter suggested he 
try eating soda crackers. 



Old receding hairline is back! 



Although there was a time when 
strangers were welcomed here, familiar 
faces from the past still are. Neil Sedaka, 
that middle-aged musical wonder, 
crawled back into the Top 40 and Casey 
Kasem's countdown. 

Riding in on the high tide of his choir- 
boy pipes, the ex-has been flooded the 
charts by laughing in the rain, claiming 
that's where the music took him? Elton 



John stepped aboard the return voyage 
to stardom and helped propel Sedaka to 
a grand slam. 

Though he'd slowed down a bit, 
Sedaka still wailed that breaking up is 
hard to do. Maybe he'll stick around 
longer this time, as any bad blood exist- 
ing between the artist and audience 
appears to have dried up. 



may do away with some immediate prob- 
lems, but may be contributing to detri- 
mental, long-range effects. 

Sunbathers and sunlamp cheaters sim- 
ply have to assess their priorities. After 
all, what's more attractive — bronze- 
beautiful body now or wrinkles and skin 
cancer later? 

But these things are superficial, insig- 
nificant trivia in the face of the most shat- 
tering recent development. The appear- 
ance of the latest carcinogen — Red Dye 
#2. This is where we must draw the line, 
and put a stop to the technological 
advances that are ruining our lives. They 
can take away our cigarettes and birth 
control pills and sunlamps and cycla- 
mates but we must not tolerate the con- 
fiscation of the red maraschino cherries 
in our vodka collins! 



Tepid drink draws 
gurgles of surprise 

Having strayed from the rest of his 
tribe, the nomad finds himself baking 
under the merciless sun, parched and 
dreaming of nothing but a long, cool 
drink of water. 

Baked out of his mind, he is tortured by 
mirages, one after another, taunting him 
until he finally collapses. 

But this time it's no mirage. There it 
flows — the only oasis for hundreds of 
miles. He staggers closer. He throws him- 
self down, submerges his face and gulps 
the drink he's been dying for. 

AAARGH! 

The sheik has been at it again. 

Never in this desert dweller's wildest 
dreams did he suspect the energy short- 
age to reach him, too. Leaving no cor- 
ners uncut, he must make do with luke- 
warm water. 

This time the plug has been pulled on 
the drinking fountains' cooling system. 



tuture reference — 1 17 



Adopt crush on rocks 



To think it took so long to catch on. For 
millions ot years, humans have been 
ignoring them, throwing them around, 
and just plain walking all over them. But 
1976 was a milestone year, the time ot 
the greatest discovery since back in the 
Stone Age — when cavepeople were 
"oohing and aahing" over the wheel 
while they should have been digging on 
their geologic counterparts — pet rocks. 
(You know — rocking and rolling.) 

And we have been just as ignorant, just 
as stonyhearted about the whole aftair as 
were the Neanderthals. While we and our 
recent ancestors have pampered and 



indulged Fido, Thomasina, and Tweety 
Pie, the gems waited patiently in drive- 
ways and quarries, to be unearthed, to be 
swept off their formations. All they got 
was kicked in the fossils or completely 
skipped over. 

But metamorphosis has rocked the 
country, and we have left no stone 
unturned in our quest for more of the 
earthy little products of sentiment and 
sediment. No longer must we settle for 
the shedding, chirping, and littering of 
what we once knew as our pets. 

To think it took so long to get down to 
basics. 



Printout too revealing, 
this does not compute 



A group of students huddled near the 
bulletin board where the test results 
were to be posted. At first, they quietly 
scanned the computer printout sheets, 
searching in vain for their respective ID 
numbers and the matching grades. A few 
began to perspire and nibble at their fin- 
gernails. Others squinted their eyes and 
stoically persisted in the digital dilemma. 
The scene grew tense, strained. 

"Not again!" one screamed. 

"Why me? Why always me?" another 
asked, his voice cracking. 

Across campus, in the data processing 
center, a computer giggled a calculated 
giggle. It had done it again. It knew it had 
all those human students out there 
wrapped around its little activator switch. 

There was a formula to the whole thing. 
One little erasure was all it took. And no 
matter how well the campus creatures 
had followed directions, no matter how 



evenly and neatly they had darkened in 
the blanks — in fact, no matter how 
sharp their minds or pencil leads had 
been before the test, it could always 
detect a bit of No. 2 lead pencil outside 
the bubble area on the IBM card. 

But compie's favorite strategem was 
the "optional" section of the card. Here 
were unlimited chances to spindle and 
mutilate test results. Especially if the stu- 
dent had designated here that the grade 
could be posted. 

Then, in automated ecstasy, compie 
would spit out all of the cards into a neat 
little erroneous pile and nearly lose its 
control panel out of sheer delight at the 
stacks of blunderous printout sheets that 
would soon adorn campus bulletin 
boards and make students very nervous. 

For as all good computers are pro- 
grammed to know, "To forgive is human 
and to err, devised." 




That's a no-no! 

Choke smokers 

Mrs. O'Leary's cow has always been 
blamed for the Chicago fire. But no one 
really knows for sure if this was the case 
or it was really old lady O'Leary sneaking 
asmoke in the barn. 

University officials have taken the les- 
son to heart and decided that where 
there's smoke there's fire. 

Thus, a no smoking policy. Theoreti- 
cally, students may only light up in desig- 
nated areas. 

Unfortunately, Mrs. O'Leary wasn't the 
only one with a nicotine habit. Ashtrays 
and hallways are still recipients of smol- 
dering visitors. And plenty of note-takers 
still puff their way through class lectures 
— and dirty looks from neighboring 
scholars. No doubt the cigarette industry 
is doing as well as ever. 



■ future reference 



Fashion scoffs misfit 



The courtroom inhabitants rise. The 
judge enters. The case? 

Glamorous magazine vs. Georgina 
Slopperina on two counts ot poor taste 
— wearing hiking boots with her new 
midi-length skirt and refusal to discard a 
tube of pink lipstick. 

The sentence? 

Two years at a well-known Midwestern 
charm school, Patricia Paintface's 
School of Fine Taste, and 20 hours in a 
library reading fashion magazines for 
insured rehabilitation. 

Along with many other concerns facing 
twentieth centurians is the runaway crime 
found in cities and rural areas alike. Many 
a study has been done on this phenome- 
non — its possible causes and cures, but 
no real answers have been found. 

Georgia's case is used here because it 
happens to be representative of the many 
others causing a tremendous backlog in 
courthouses. 

When the young lady talks about her 
childhood she remembers daily temper 
tantrums when she wasn't allowed to 
wear a flower-decked Easter bonnet to 
the sand pile. 

"Such things aren't accepted, dear," 
her mother would say. 

But even this early training was to no 
avail. After serving time for a minor 
offense, wearing sweat pants to a dress 
ball, her family and friends hoped her 
troubles would be over. 

But she continues to have relapses. 
She is luckier than some in that many 



rise and fallings 

University professors have been 
instructed to strengthen their class 
requirements and raise grading scales. 

GPAs are too good and no longer 
reflect high enough standards within the 
University, officials said. 

Aggieville merchants have been 
encouraged to lower beer prices in order 
to attract more customers. 



people are concerned about her welfare. 
But she can't really be helped until she is 
ready to help herself. 

According to a survey by 'Preen maga- 
zine, occurrences of hiking boots worn 
with dresses are on the rise. Three out of 
1 people questioned admitted to this 
offense. One coed offered her story. 

"Who can afford two pairs of shoes in 
this day and age?" she asked. "When my 
jeans were dirty I had no choice but to 
wear a dress. I would have worn my ten- 
nis shoes but they disintegrated last 
year." 

Another finding of the survey was that 
the floods of the 50s had put an over- 
whelming fear of high water into the 
minds of many college men. Some of 
them are still too petrified to wear their 



jeans more than half way down their 
calves. 

Because of the affluent society in 
which this generation grew up, they are 
often guilty of certain excesses. One of 
these, the silk scarf syndrome, is charac- 
terized by draping scarves in hundreds of 
different ways — around the neck or 
shoulders, tied about the head to hide 
greasy hair, and a few isolated cases of 
wearing the pointed end forward to hide 
blemishes. 

Who knows what this misguided gener- 
ation will come up with next? As in Slop- 
perina's case, neither gentle reminders 
nor harsh sentences have any effect. 
This potential plague faced by society 
must somehow be nipped in the bud if it 
is to be controlled at all. 




Metric System 

Nowadays, 1 5-cent candy bars are so 
commonplace that hardly anyone 
remembers paying a nickel for them. 
When you think about it, who really 
remembers paying a nickel for anything? 

As of April, the dollar bill also went the 
way of small change. Due to the ineffi- 
ciency of using a bill that was only worth 
a shadow of what it used to be, the num- 
ber on it was doubled. 

Dogs' hind legs will always be crooked, 
but the two-dollar bill is no longer odd. 

Two-Dollar Bill 

"Do your own thing" — an expression 



coined by Thoreau and brought back to 
life during the 60s. 

But things don't always work that way. 
By 1 980, Americans will be forced to 
adapt to the metric system in order to 
stay in tune with the rest of the world. 

Many complications could result from 
this conversion. Customer requests for a 
yard, gallon, or pound of merchandise 
will be met by blank stares from rattled 
salespersons. 

Adjustments of more than just stand- 
ard measures will have to be made. So as 
we inch (oops) toward 1980, Americans 
will have to measure up to the transition 
or be caught with their yards down. 



tuture reference- 



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academics 




Open communication remains 
though leadership changes 



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by Rita Shelley 

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payrolls for the University. When h 
came to K-State, Beatty conv< 
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eased complications caused b\ 
increased enrollment. 



environment. There may be a phy. Besii 
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u i itiiuunai-it aspect Of Carnuus i liumu 



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lining the 
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Though relatively nc 
dean, Hoeflin served as associate de 
for 15 years. Because : 
closely with the former < 
Doretta Hoffman, she doesn't i 
make many major changes. 

Another of Hoeflin's concerns is the 



sophisticated te< 

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securing ot national accre< 

American Home Economics Association. 

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Vows join with books 



by Debbie Olmstead 



Time and money, two commodities stu- 
dents never have enough ot, are even 
more difficult to manage when students 
have responsibilities not only to them- 
selves but to another person — a 
spouse. 

"Finding time for myself is hard," Mari- 
lyn Bader, a married student who lives in 
Jardine Terrace, said. Both she and her 
husband, Terry, attend K-State. Though 
Marilyn is a part-time student, she works 
full time. 

Connie and Steve McFarland, married 
students living in Jardine, believe that 
time isn't a problem once the couple gets 
organized. 

"Once you adjust to the time demands 
of the other person, there's no problem," 
Steve said. 

When free time is available the couples 
like to spend it together. "We play tennis 
at the rec complex together or we go 
bowling together at the Union," Steve 
said. The couples like what the University 
has to offer in the line of recreation and 
services for married couples such as 
counseling and insurance. 

Marilyn finds that, in general, being a 



married student isn't that much of a prob- 
lem. In fact, she thinks it has more advan- 
tages than being a single student. "When 
you're upset about something that hap- 
pens you can go home and there will be 
someone who cares to listen to your 
problem," she said. 

Both Marilyn and Steve commented 
about the difference between the per- 
sonal development of a single student 
and that of a married student. 

"You grow with the other person," 
Steve said. Marilyn believed, however, 
that the growth could be classified as 
"coping skills" — learning to handle new 
experiences and new situations. 

Their outings are usually inexpensive. 
Entertainment might be movies at the 
Union or tennis games on the University's 
courts. The McFarlands enjoy football 
games in the fall and thought the price 
was reasonable. The Baders expressed 
the desire to go to the basketball games 
but wished the University could offer 
reduced ticket prices to married couples. 

These married students believe they 
are anything but "left out" of university 
activities and that K-State has done ever- 
ything possible for married students. 

"We just want to be treated like stu- 
dents," Marilyn summed up. 




1 32 — married students 




married students — 1 33 




1 34 — professional blocks 



It's a stiff dose of 'the real thing' 



by Pam Page 

Students anxious to go into the work- 
ing world find experiences await them in 
blocks and internships away from K- 
State. Being thrust into the world can be 
frightening, as a taste of civilization can 
hold its own problems. 

For the elementary education under- 
graduate, there are teaching blocks in 
Topeka and Kansas City under the Multi 
Institutional Teacher Education Centers 
(MITEC) program. Unlike the regular 
eight-week student-teaching program, 
MITEC is a full semester. The additional 
time allows the student to attend semi- 
nars and learn about various modes of 
education outside the classroom. 

To the student teacher, this experience 
means moving away from most connec- 
tions with K-State. Full tuition is required, 
although no time is spent on campus. 
Finding an apartment and setting up 
housekeeping is an adjustment in itself. 

"I felt lonely at first because I was used 
to living with lots of people and all of a 
sudden I was alone," Bill Powell, a senior 
in elementary education, said. 

"As far as a changed schedule, I have 
no choice — it's 8:30 am to 3:30 pm and 
I'm expected to be there," Powell said. 

The official classroom teacher super- 
vises and there's also a supervisor from 
K-State who visits periodically to keep 
tabs on progress. 

"We come out of the program more 
prepared because we know how every- 
thing runs. Instead of just learning 
through books and lectures, we see and 
experience teaching as a whole," Powell 
said. 



New scenery also awaits the student 
who commutes to Topeka for pre-school 
student teaching. In the College of Home 
Economics, family and child development 
is a four-day program. The fifth day is 
spent at K-State in the classroom. 
Approximately forty dollars a month is 
spent on gas in addition to the full tuition 
paid to K-State. Aside from programs in 
Topeka and Kansas City, weekly class- 
room participation is still required. 

"It's nice coming back on Mondays 
and becoming a student again," Trish 
Kerr, senior in family and child develop- 
ment, said. The weekly curriculum 
includes working with children and 
attending staff and teachers' meetings. 

"It's a nice change after three years of 
classes. I'm finally practicing what I've 
been reading about all these years. Inter- 
acting with the children is the fun part," 
Kerr said. 

The College of Home Economics holds 
various outlets for internships — such as 
clothing and textiles. Participating stu- 
dents are paid by the rate of the individual 
store and work full-time in either Kansas 
City, Topeka, Wichita, or Manhattan. 

"This type of internship gives a three- 
way benefit — the stores, the University, 
and the student. It also provides the stu- 
dents with a chance to put to use all they 
have learned," Miriam Cross, instructor 
in clothing and textiles, said. 

Students involved know the store and 
even the department in which they will be 
placed a month in advance so they can 
make necessary living preparations. 

"The internship provides both the stu- 
dent and the store with a chance to eval- 
uate one another for possible future 



employment. Each store usually has at 
least one student working there perma- 
nently," Cross said. "The stores' involve- 
ment helps public relations for them and 
gives them the opportunity to send feed- 
back on our system. This helps us 
improve our program on the whole." 

Horticulture therapy, an extension of 
horticulture and forestry, has a six-month 
field study available to students twice a 
year. 

Students inthiscurriculumearn 15 
credit hours without pay. Working in the 
adult-hospital section with the activities 
therapy area of the hospital is the crux of 
their duties. 

Activities include creative crafts, art 
therapy, and ceramics, in addition to hor- 
ticulture-related activities. 

Other recent experimental internship 
programs are the Veterans Administra- 
tion Hospital in Alabama where interns 
work with rehabilitation, as well as psy- 
chiatric patients, and the John Knox 
Retirement Village in Lee's Summit, MO, 
where elderly are primarily cared for. 

"Some students are hired after intern- 
ships. We have three students currently 
at Menninger's Clinic in Topeka," Rich- 
ard Mattson, assistant professor of horti- 
culture and forestry, said. 

"I think the transition is important in 
adjusting from college to the real life. Stu- 
dents leave with ideas, and finding out 
what it's really like out there helps," Matt- 
son said. 

Although venturing alone into the 
working world is a big adjustment, stu- 
dents make it by accepting the responsi- 
bility and hard work with ambition. 



professional blocks - 



Knead bread for a hungry world 



by Mary Jane Smith 

K-State claims the title ot the only uni- 
versity in the world ottering bachelor's 
degrees in bakery science and manage- 
ment and milling science and manage- 
ment. Master's and doctorate degrees in 
grain science are also ottered. 

One-hundred torty-five undergradu- 
ates and about 75 graduate students are 
enrolled in bakery, teed, and milling cur- 
riculums. Options in these curriculums 
are administration, chemistry, and opera- 
tions. 

Because K-State's grain science and 
industry program is the only one in exist- 
ence, 60 per cent ot its students are from 
foreign countries. They represent 15 dif- 
ferent countries throughout the world. 

Foreign students come to K-State to 
gain knowledge for use when they return 
to their own countries to work in process- 
ing, research, or milling. Because cereal 
products constitute most of the food 
intake in overseas countries, the govern- 
ments of these countries believe their stu- 
dents should be well-educated in the 
grain science fields. 

One class in the milling science and 
management department makes flour for 
use by K-State resident housing. Classes 
in the feed science department process 
feed for University-owned animals. The 
bakery department offers courses which 



teach the process of bread baking in the 
all-day labs, Baking I and II. 

Students enjoy the courses because 
they gain practical experience while they 
are preparing for jobs. 

"What I like most about the grain sci- 
ence and industry department is the will- 
ingness of the professors to help the stu- 
dents," Eileen Havel, junior in bakery sci- 
ence and management, said. 

"It's just so personalized — it seems 
we know our teachers like our parents. 
It's a close relationship," Mary Soltis, 
sophomore in milling science and man- 
agement, said. 

K-State administrators realized the 
need for exploring the field due to the 
lack of milling knowledge about Kansas' 
prosperous wheat industry. Experimenta- 
tion led to the organization of the depart- 
ment of milling industry in 1910. Since, it 
has grown rapidly, and generous dona- 
tions have made possible construction of 
new buildings with modern equipment. 

With the emphasis today on world food 
problems, the grain science and industry 
department is helping to meet the 
demands for the increase of protein-rich 
foods. There are more available job posi- 
tions than students to fill them. Students 
are also able to get summer jobs with 
companies, helping them further their 
careers. 




1 36 — bakery and milling sciences 




(\iker\ .iiKi milling sciences — 137 



to it with glue 'n gumption 



by Doug Fink 

The lights burn long in Seaton Hall. 
Every night. 

Combined with the extended hours is 
the panoply of talents of architecture stu- 
dents, many whom spend an entire 
semester on a single project. 

Their work requires both tedious exact- 
ness and creative imagination. The result 
is a professional product, be it the com- 
prehensive plans for a park development 
or a piece of custom-made furniture. 

A chair seems a simple thing — 'until 
you design and build one. The planning 
alone takes four to five weeks, Randy 
Hoffman, senior in interior architecture, 
said. Hoffman, who has built a synthes- 
izer as well as a chair, undertook consid- 
erable research before beginning to 
design his chair. 

The designers must first study anthro- 
pometrics, the study of the dimensions of 
the human body. Using these principles, 
they adapt the chair's features to the 
contours of their own bodies. The chair 
structure must conform to their shoulder 
widths, the length of their arms and legs, 
and a host of other considerations. 

These measurements must then be 
incorporated with the aesthetic principles 
of design, Hoffman said. Such factors 
include form, materials, and coloring. At 
this point, working drawings of the chair 
are made "showing every screw and 
every dowel." 

The students then submit their plans 
for criticism by professors and fellow stu- 
dents. The criticism, Hoffman said, can 



be quite intense, and heated debates 
may ensue. The rest of the semester is 
spent building the chair in the interior 
architecture workshop. 

Although the methods are sometimes 
crude by commercial standards, the stu- 
dent is responsible for each step in the 
process. Hoffman, whose chair was fiber- 
glass, built the mold of chicken wire and 
plaster of Paris himself. He also hand-laid 
the fiberglass. 

Once the furniture piece is completed, 
the student must have a presentation 
board which is, in essence, a sales pitch 
"which goes into graphic design," Hoff- 
man said. 

The students do not limit themselves to 
chairs, Dave Meyer, senior in interior 
architecture, said. Among the other pro- 
jects are tables, beds, and even a grand- 
father clock. 

"I don't think people know the things 
which go into these projects," Meyer 
said. "We design it; we don't copy the 
plans." 

Past projects made at K-State have 
attained high honors in national competi- 
tion sponsored by the International 
Woodworking Machinery and Furniture 
Supply, Steve Murphy, workshop instruc- 
tor, said. 

Team work is essential in some of the 
Seaton Hall projects. Four landscape 
architecture students joined forces to 
construct a promotional display for fire- 
arms. 

The most visible product of their efforts 
are two scale models of a shooting range 
to be located in a park. Both are topo- 



graphical reliefs, requiring careful meas- 
urement to assure proper proportion. 

"The big model shows the activity in 
relation to other park activities," Dave 
Wagner, senior in landscape architec- 
ture, said. "We made it to show that it can 
be compatible with other park activities." 

The smaller model shows the shooting 
range in greater detail. 

Four weeks were taken to prepare 
drawings and gather information before 
the actual models were made. Two or 
three weeks were spent learning about 
shooting and rifle ranges, then more time 
was spent making site and slope ana- 
lyses, studying weather conditions, and 
determining safety factors. Soil, vegeta- 
tion, and drainage had to be evaluated. 

"We spend four nights a week and five 
afternoons a week working on this," 
Roger Schenewerk, senior in landscape 
architecture, said. "We even have to 
build the shipping crates." 

Mike Hauck and Mike Snyder, seniors 
in landscape architecture, concentrated 
on the drawings, specifications, and cost 
estimations. 

"They show the various techniques for 
sidewalks, roads, and other things," 
Schenewerk said. "This provides the 
client with alternatives for different meth- 
ods, materials, and expenses that can be 
used." 

"The project will be shown to park 
departments and placed in booths at 
sports and home shows," Wagner said. 
"It will possibly be shown at the National 
Recreation Commission Conference." 



organizations 






\ 



U\V»r tit 

k WW- 



SHMV 




Students can find means of involvement by gaining 
admittance, through scholastic achievement, to honor- 
ary organizations. Groups such as Blue Key and Mortar 
Board usher at Landon Lectures and sponsor home- 
coming activities. Though some honoraries encompass 
little more than membership dues, others aid in promot- 
ing knowledge and fellowship within their colleges and 
professions. 




1 42 — honorary groups 



alpha epsilon rho 






alpha kappa psi 








M □ 1 


~b rf^i fci. j wi 



alpha lambda delta 




TOP ROW; Timothy L. McDiffett, Gordon V. Hibbard, 
Eric P. Deffenbaugh, Cynthia L. Railsback, Philip P. 
Omenski, Connie J. Doebele, John C. Feldmann, Mar- 
lene K. Henderson. SECOND ROW: Jerry D Schnacke, 
Marlene S. Adkison, Susan L. Griffith, Suzanne C. 
Shaw. BOTTOM ROW: Emme Smith, Kathryn A. Bailey, 
Marcia G. McGraw. 



TOP ROW David W. Perky, Robert W. Parker, Steven J. 
Hoffman, Donald R. Johnson. SECOND ROW: Royce 
C. Janssen, Larry D. Fox, Donald J Voth, Ralph E Lag- 
ergren, Dell J. Klema. BOTTOM ROW: Rod L. Jones, 
Bruce A. Mullen, Mark S Lee, Larry L. Sears, Verlyn D. 
Richards 



TOP ROW: Jana B Blythe, Linda E. North, Roxanna M 
Fundis, Connie J. Olson, Angela C. Rexwinkle, Kathryn 
L. Hullman, Glenda R. Keil, Debra S. Higgs. SECOND 
ROW: Teresa K. Klaumann, Angela M. Callahan, Julie 
L. Hampl, Elaine C. Hefty, Rosann G. Garrett, Laurie A. 
Norman, Merilu James. THIRD ROW: Michele R War- 
mund, Sheryl A. Ingram, Phyllis A. Murphy, Venita J. 
Brokesh, Marsha A. Hagenmaier, JoLee Wingerson, 
Cynthia L. Fry, Julie Albright. BOTTOM ROW: Carol E. 
Oukrop, Connie D. Nutter, Carolyn M. Beaudet, Ann E 
George, Sue J Gibbs, Julie A. Bieberly, Joyce A. 
Hyson, PamS. Grout. 



honorary groups — 1 43 



TOP ROW: Sudhakar R. Paidy, Anil Mital, Girish D. 
Desai, Bruce L. Fredrick, Krishen K. Sud, Pramil 
Kumar, Subramaniam Knshnan. SECOND ROW: Yosef 
S. Sherif, Daniel E. Deter, Anand Chitlangia, Robert A 
Becker, Leslie E. Trainor, Roderick C. Briggs, THIRD 
ROW: Bob D Squires, Jon P. Jantz, Lynn E. Bussey, 
James H. Bachman, Marc A. Campbell, Karl L. Town- 
send. BOTTOM ROW: Robert A Moore, Leroy W Paul, 
David G Bell, Michael D Chatham, Alan J Siemer, 
Rick R. Weir. 



alpha pi mu 




alpha tau alpha 



TOP ROW: James J Albracht, Kenneth Eugene Rob 
son, Abdu D. Tofa, Ralph W. Unger, Steve J. Albracht 
SECOND ROW: Randall L. Warner, Leroy W Russell 
Maurice A. Catlin, Adam A. Warra, Robert D. Lauber 
Ralph J. Cassibba. BOTTOM ROW: Michael W Catlin 
Ray G. Flickner, Ronald J Wilson, Dale D. Hostinsky 
Harry L. Field, Jim M. Maguin. 




blue key 



TOP ROW: Mark A. Furney, William F Small, Allen L. 
Hurley, Robert A. Smith, David J. Mugler, James P. 
Weyer, Thomas S. Strickler, J Gregory Kite. BOTTOM 
ROW: Edward H. Perry, Merlin B. Chestnut, Keith A. 
Wright, Don A. Folkerts, Keith D Tucker, Steven W. 
Rankin, Gary A McNaughton, Andrew L. Oswald, Sam- 
uel E. Mathis. 




TOTOu? 




1 44 — honorary groups 



chi epsilon 




TOP ROW: Nancy J. Johnson, Allen L Sneath, Sidney 
A. Thompson, David M. Janssen, Eldon F. Mockry, 
Jerry Zovne, Mark G. Snyder, Cynthia K. Sanders. 
SECOND ROW: Steven C. Dollmann, Kim A. Tanner, 
John T. Barrett, Richard L. Kussman, James B. Henley, 
Rick F. Biery, Peter H. Best. BOTTOM ROW: John H. 
Ahern, Steve Anderson, W. Clay Adams, Gordon A. 
Brest, Darrell R. Riekenberg, Richard W Saunders. 



chimes 




TOP ROW: Debra K. McCandless, Amy D Bachman, 
Christy S. Shrum, Linda D. McCune, Patty E. Compton, 
Deborah D. Ward. SECOND ROW: Elaine Geist, Paula 
Marten, Deborah F. Hobble, Ann C. Tolletson, Nancy L. 
Musick THIRD ROW: Marie L. Wisegarver, Deana C, 
Paulsen, Becky L Durst, Deborah J Stadel, Nancy V. 
Benignus, Barbara I. Roe. BOTTOM ROW: Lesley K 
Whitehead, Kay D. Patrick, Deb Haifleigh, Janet K. 
Anderson, Debra J. Romberger 



delta psi kappa 




TOP ROW: Ginger K. Thull, Janet K. Reusser, Ten L. 
Anderson, Judy M. Biegler, Shann A. Shalala, Kimberle 
J. Rule, Kristin A. Stockstill. SECOND ROW: Mary E. 
Palmateer, Cynthia A. Corbin, Deborah A. Andrew, 
Elaine L. Webster, Kathie J. Orme, Donna G Perry, 
Cheryl J. Hill. BOTTOM ROW: Miriam P Poole, Joann 
M. Dobbie, Margie L. Wilke, Joyce R. Urish, Katheryn 
A. McKinney. 



honorjr*, gfoups 



eta kappa nu 



TOP ROW: Debra K. Miller, Michael L. UN, Kala J. Mar- 
ietta, John H. Yoakum, Donald D. Firestone, Gary A. 
McNaughton, Sharon A. Feightner, William A. Bucher. 
SECOND ROW: John K. Waterman, Robert J. Fogler, 
Glenn E. Funk, Ronald G. Rogers, Steven E. Shute, 
Thomas A. Beery, Philip N. King. THIRD ROW: Janusz 
Pawlus, Robert G. Montgomery, Richard M. Kelsey, 
Edward H. Perry, Jeff S. Barth, David E. Kimble, James 
P. Moore. BOTTOM ROW: Joe E. Ward, Thomas L. 
Hopkins, Robert W. Owens, Scott A. Boster, Greg Degi, 
Douglas D. Fowler, Randy Rhodes. 




gamma theta upsilon 



TOP ROW: Sy Seyler, Patricia Lambert, M. Candace 
Bogart, Robin Blackman, Martha A. McCoy. SECOND 
ROW: Brian C. Logan, David L. Wall, Barbara B. Eakin, 
Doug R. McAdams, David A. Rhoads, Rick lllgner. 
THIRD ROW: Steven E. Chellgren, John R. Horton, 
Randy A. McKinley, Theodore H. Grossardt, Chuck 
Bussing. BOTTOM ROW: Michael G. Sooy, Gail A. Lei- 
thauser, Laura J. Ahlstrom, Emelise Stutzman, Michael 
F. Ortmann. 




kappa delta pi 



TOP ROW: Carole Sharp, Teresa A. Oesterreich, Joyce 
K. Speer, Susan K. Pharr, Lynne E Bessier. SECOND 
ROW: Beverly E. Holman, Linda L. Holeman, Pauline M. 
Wold-Echert, Carol E. Holmes. BOTTOM ROW: Sharon 
D. Johnson, Connie J. Poland, Cindy M. Macy, Debo- 
rah L. Tripp, JoeH. Loeb. 





1 46 — honorary groups 





mortar board 




f^w 


■as 






^r < 






" Pi P 

' 1 



TOP ROW: Nancy D. Womack, Heather K. Johnson, 
Cindy M. Macy, Sara J. Severance, Carol J. Campbell, 
Sharon L. Kroupa, Sallie K. Davis, Mary A. Robben, 
Patricia A. McEwen. SECOND ROW: LouAnn Bruey, 
Meg McGranaghan, MaryAnn E. Channel, Evelyn S. 
Bergkamp, Pam S. Gudikunst, Suzanne Bruce, Julie A. 
Gamba, Cathie Silva, Leslie A. Koepke. BOTTOM ROW: 
Luci L. Ronning, Karen S. Ukena, Barbara J. Doebele, 
Shann A. Shalala, Deborah E. Clark, Carol A. Hille- 
brandt, Jane A. Fore. 



phi epsilon kappa 




TOP ROW: Ralph P. Ziegler, Ronald G. Dreher, Tom A. 
Fenton, Rex A. Chnstner, Paul V. Klipowicz, Randy E. 
Merritt. SECOND ROW: Greg B. Miller, Gene W. War- 
ren, Vernon J. Henricks, Randall K. Dirks, Randy L. 
Condie, Alan D. Newkirk, Larry Noble. BOTTOM ROW: 
Tim A. Strathman, Roger N. Stucky, Dick J. Smith, Wil- 
liam R. Kehneier, Stephen E. Long, Brad W. Friesen. 



phi eta sigma 




TOP ROW: Duane A. Dale, Ronald A. Kite, Steve M. 
Clark, Donald T. Dinges, Thomas L. Bell, Steve A. Liebl, 
Loren D. Bareiss, Randy D. Groves, Kent C. Kelly, Wil- 
liam J. Sidebottom. SECOND ROW: Terry C. Matlack, 
Jack R. Weaver, Rex M. Joyce, Kent A. Martens, John 
M. Cooper, Gordon W. Thayer, Douglas J. Little, David 
G. Deters, David M. Ylander, Donald W. Hanna. THIRD 
ROW: James E. Cole, Larry D. Vavroch, Jeft A. Snyder, 
Reginald A. VanPelt, Douglas A. Hall, Greg A. Tucker, 
Sam D. Brownback, Casey D. Garten, Dale P. Denning, 
William A. Bunch. BOTTOM ROW: Philip F. Palma, Dar- 
rel E. Krause, Dan L, Delimont, Richard H Brensing, 
Ronnie L. Sims, Karl F. Fabrizius, Donald E Atwill, 
Michael L. Gonzalez, Gregory L. Stock, James L. 
Cooper. 



honor.ir\ groups 



phi upsilon omicron 



TOP ROW: Debra K. McCandless, Colleen G. Feese, 
Karen S. Matson, Lois J. Hagen, Vickie A. Doud, Denise 
L. Glick, Mary C. Sharp, Charlotte A. Ediger, Beverly E. 
Holman, Barbara A. Rust, Dee A. Lewis. SECOND 
ROW: Brenda J. Lala, Heddy E. Kroeger, Cynthia D. 
Roney, Judy A. McKee, Janet L. Twaddell, Christina L. 
Blackaby, Vickie L. James, Brenda S. Hunt, Cheryl J. 
Keller, Karla J. Carney. THIRD ROW: Janice L. Ewing, 
Carol A. Whitney, Barbara J. Kelly, Rebecca J. Smith, 
Stacey J. Miller, Marlene S. Stum, Laura S. Carnes, 
Lana J. Woolery, Cindy M. Macy, Susan E. Bowe. BOT- 
TOM ROW: MaryAnn E. Channel, Bonnie R. Funk, Mar- 
ilyn A. King, Barbara I. Roe, Donna R. Meyer, Aline G. 
Nelson, Carol J. Barnett, Sandra J. Ward, Nancy S. 
Carnahan. 



TOP ROW: Deaun K. Trayer, Joe A. Ragole, Stan L. 
Williams, Terrill J. Munkres, Luci L. Ronning. SECOND 
ROW: Steven D. Johnson, Richard A. Sachse, Kervin J. 
Brungardt, Lawrence R. Redd. BOTTOM ROW: Rod H. 
Cool, Jim R. Banks, John W. Hein, Paul L. Miller. 




pi tau sigma 




spurs 



TOP ROW: Sharon S. Kelly, Karen S. Dammann, Vero- 
nica S. Kasten, Angela C. Rexwinkle, Debbie L. 
Rhoades, Joleen D. Moden, Glenda R. Keil, Elaine L. 
Case, Jo A. Schrock, Joni C. Kroupa, Laurie A. Nor- 
man. SECOND ROW: Lisa I. Isch, Elaine C. Hefty, 
Teresa R. Basom, Melanie A. Landrith, Janet M. Stofter, 
Merilu James, Sidney R. Reynolds, Amy S. Cooley, Nei- 
sha L. Bennett, Julie L. Hampl. THIRD ROW: Jean C. 
Sharp, Deborah S. Stover, Marsha A. Hagenmaier, Car- 
olyn Hoener, Patty J. Bruey, Sheryl A. Ingram, Sylvia J. 
Dumler, Elaine C. Naegele, Charlotte A. McKee. BOT- 
TOM ROW: LuAnn Holmes, Sue A. Stettenhagen, 
Diane M. Robson, Mary E. Soltis, Sue J. Gibbs, Ann E. 
George, Jodi R. Knocke, Donna R. Meyer, Terry L. 
I i'1'lkimjj 



I Hit If T| Jfl! J,, 



TOKKoff 




1 48 — honorary groups 



■&— JM By 








steel ring 


M l :f ? 


Jeff /jf'f?- 






CkIpM^ 


•k^^^Tr* *" )>^^^^^ 


EgOE 


E 


L^^nl 


Hi jKl- iJBiH 


^^fc^^T 




1 i 


• ■ •'< ' ■ ' ■ ! 



TOP ROW: Gregory B. Fyfe, Jeffrey D. Bone, William G. 
Houf, Keith D. Tucker, Eldon F. Mockry, Ronald L. 
Brown, Jonathan P. Jantz, Steven L. Phillips. BOTTOM 
ROW: Gary A. McNaughton, Peggy A. Gilliam, Luci L. 
Ronning, Steve T. Brumbaugh, Stephen L. Lewallen, 
Sharon A. Feightner, Edward H. Perry. 







tau beta pi 






■ ■■■ Irw* 




mUTWM 


A IB 




H I ■■ . fl i* i 


llllia 



TOP ROW: Luci L. Ronning, Debra K. Miller, Robert W. 
Schmidt, John H. Yoakum, Dody L. Demuth, Marilyn A. 
Bailey, Eldon F. Mockry, Steven T. Brumbaugh. SEC- 
OND ROW John T. Barrett, Steven E. Shute, Jonathan 
P. Jantz, Ronald L. Brown, Dennis C. Wegener, Robert 
W. McGnff, Richard A. Kinder, Kim A. Tanner, Joe A. 
Ragole THIRD ROW: Edward H. Perry, Thomas L. 
Hopkins, Robert G. Montgomery, William G. Houf, 
Douglas D. Fowler, Rocke C. Verser, Richard M. Kel- 
sey, Michael D. Chatham. BOTTOM ROW: Tracy E. 
Weaver, Jeffrey D. Bone, Keith D. Tucker, Greg A. 
Degi, Roger W. Toebben, William M. Upton, John B. 
Garner, Kenneth B. Gooden, Theodore F. Wiesner. 




TOP ROW: Cynthia K. Sanders, Michael L. Uhl, Kala J. 
Marietta, Gary A. McNaughton, Sharon A. Feightner, 
Jonathan W. Bredow, William A. Bucher, John K. 
Waterman, Robert J. Fogler. SECOND ROW: Tim L. 
Heiman, Lowell R. Mitchell, Thomas A. Beery, Philip N. 
King, James B. Glaze, Ronald G. Rogers, Steven C. 
Dollmann, Keith G Peetz. THIRD ROW: Wayne A. 
Harms, Randy A. Rhodes, Robert W. Owens, Scott N. 
Kalivoda, Kervin J. Brungardt, Wayne L. Edward?, 
Gregory J. Wurtz. BOTTOM ROW: Rick F. Biery, Chris- 
topher A. Gner, Jerald A. Howell, Roger C. Gorman, 
David M. Dechant, Frank A. Tillman, Lawrence R. 
Redd. 



tau sigma delta 




TOP ROW: Douglas W. Frednkson, John W. Irwin, 
Richard K. Tilghman, Cynthia J. Browne. Somjetana 
Bua-Aim, Kendall J. Helmer, Douglas P. Wikoff. SEC- 
OND ROW: Greg D. Shanklin, Michael W. Milburn. 
Merle F. Jantz, Randall G. Allen, Victor J. Vouga, 
George M. Holton. THIRD ROW: Steve J. Hageman, 
Mark D. McCluggage, Kim A. Williams, Jim C. Fisher. 
Ronald L. Brown, Terry F. Bader, Gary A. Busse. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Ben J. Tensing, James R. Vollintine, Bob L. 
Fingland, Dennis A. Haugh, Neil E. Murphy, Steve L. 
Weidner. 



honorary groups - 




Fraternities are assisted in chapter projects of chari- 
table, public relations, and social nature by the little sis- 
ters women's auxiliary organizations. Selected by fra- 
ternity members, little sisters are viewed as representa- 
tives of their respective fraternities. 



'cacia girls 



TOP ROW. Glenda R. Keil, Gina L. Sanders, Elizabeth 
L Rhodes, Kay R. Yarnell, Kristie A. Painter, Julie L. 
Hampl. SECOND ROW: Janet L Myers, Stephannie A. 
Hunsley, Connie A. Hatfener, Debbie L. Meyer, Dee A. 
McMurray, Julie A. Dill. BOTTOM ROW: Jeanette F. 
Gaylord, Sherry M. Nave, Natalie K. Green, Anna J. 
Roberts, Marsha L. Trueblood, Teresa A. Collier. 




chi delphia 



TOP ROW: Debbie Rudd, Sheree Lowe, Theresa M. 
Kiernan, Barb Weisser, Lynn M. Duncan, Cathy Allen. 
SECOND ROW: Suzanne K. Moore, Monica R. Sainich, 
Debi L. Bishop, Debi R. Swenson, Debbie L Fisher, 
Kathy Flynn, Stephanie Smith. BOTTOM ROW: Candi J. 
Caplinger, Susan B. Henderson, Mary F. Kappelmann, 
Jane L. Cramer, Mary K. Zawatzki, Becky J. Eyman. 




crescents 




TOP ROW: Tamara R. Lowry, Leslie A. Brown, Kathy E. 
Gray, Francie B. Vining, Cindy K. Logan, Karen Letour- 
neau, Shera V. Carpenter, Jeanne A. Holborn. SEC- 
OND ROW: Mary J. Nesbit, Pamela J. Noller, Martha L. 
Baker, Cheryl L. Collins, Gwen Davies, Debbie A. 
Albers, Marsha R. Isaacson. THIRD ROW: Sherri D. 
Voss, Carole A. Immenschuh, Claudia A. Roberts, 
Linda Larsen, Debbie K. Williams, Karen S. Ukena, Car- 
olyn C. Feeney, Cynthia C. Craig. BOTTOM ROW: Les- 
lie D. Johnson, Andrea L. Barlow, Jo L. Ehrlich, Lisa C. 
Montgomery, Gerri A. Laue, Kim L. Auer, Carol A. Carr, 
Joyce L. Morgan. 



daughters of diana 




TOP ROW: Susie J. Brooks, Donna L. Snyder, Brenda 
G. Baker. SECOND ROW: Annette M. Schafer, Barbara 
K. Book, Jackie R. Beatson, Pam R. Johnson. THIRD 
ROW: Kate McNeive, Lisa K. Robinson, Ann C. Tollef- 
son. BOTTOM ROW: Linda J. Spicer, Doreen K. Frantz, 
Shelley A. McBee, Kathy P. Miller. 



delta darlings 




TOP ROW: M. Beth Ellis, Ann L. Spence, Renee I. Sher- 
man, Mary D. Stockton, Becky C. Gardner, Kathy A. 
Hogerty, Del G. Hoge. SECOND ROW: Linda K. 
Knecht, Sandy S. Thies, Johnnie M. Summerlin, Nanci 
K. Jones, Nan C. Goin. THIRD ROW: Karen A. Dunne, 
Denise I. Blomquist, Debora J. Braun, Carla A. Berger, 
Jan A. Saunders. BOTTOM ROW: Kay D. Patrick, Jac- 
que E. Knox, Brenda K. Zwick, Marilyn K. Crouch, Billie 
M. Aaron. 



little sisters — 151 



golden hearts 



TOP ROW: Pamela J. Brown, Elaine L. Graff, Deb A. 
Rumble, Deb J. Barnes, Carol G. Crews, Jennifer L. 
Main. SECOND ROW: Cindy S. Converse, Tana S. Lee, 
Cindy K. Dipman, Nancy G. Woods, Susie J. Sageser, 
Terne L. Lafferty. BOTTOM ROW: Paula J. Neugenf, Su 
M. Townsend, Brenda C. Connor, Nancy J, Wood- 
worth, Cinda A. Hatcher, Jean V. Tideman. 




TOP ROW: Tonya M. Smith, Wilene A. Jones, Karen L. 
Woods, Tami E. Farr, Patricia Stephenson, Lorraine E. 
Breckenndge, Cheryl L. McAfee. SECOND ROW: Terri 
L. Terrell, Tressia A. Brown, Deborah A. Fletcher, 
Diane C. Rogan, Patricia A. Slater, Dore D. Woodson, 
Shern A. Carter, BOTTOM ROW: Valerie A. Pope, Che- 
ryl A. Hill, Sandra K. McGee, Rhonda D. Rush, Mon- 
trula Johnson, Winnona D. Dancy, Cheryl A. Petty. 



kappa kittens 



TOP ROW: Marilyn J. Nielsen, Paula L. Gatzoulis, Janet 
S. Atchity, Marjone Barber, Jan P. Armstrong, Connie 
A. Kennedy, Pam S. Gudikunst, Nancy C. Roach. SEC- 
OND ROW. Debbie A. Winsky, C. Leigh Peters, Sally C 
Reed, Gail A. Cardinal, Barbara L. Campbell, Paula M. 
Ranallo, Linda D. McCune. THIRD ROW: Kimberly A. 
Maupin, Jeanine V. Besch, Teresa J. Case, Barbara A. 
Stanton, Susan J. Denzel, Cindy A. Schmidt, Susan J. 
McClure, Suzan L. Hoffman BOTTOM ROW: Belinda 
G. Dizmang, Teresa A. Bartoszek, Suzanne H. Aal- 
bregtse, Beth A. Zahner, Michelle E. Renz, Barbara I. 
Roe, Marilyn K. Broadie. 




Mm 



little sisters of athena 




TOP ROW: Leigh Ann Kenagy, Pam Y. Green, Nancy 
Johnson, Bekki A. Dunn. SECOND ROW: Susan M. 
Weiss, Debra A. Zimmerman, Connie C. Oppitz, Eliza- 
beth A. Mount, Janet L. Burgdorter. BOTTOM ROW 
Bettie A. Venneman, Janet A. Mahoney, Margaret M. 
Hein, Jackie E. Durant. 



little sisters of minerva 




TOP ROW: Rhonda L. Medill, Terri S. Benedict, Barbara 
A. Kocour, Bobbie L. Bessette, Mary J. Smith, Sandy S. 
Cornelius, Maria J. Zarda, Diana J. Shaw, Nancy A. 
Moddrell, Lynn McCallister, Sally A. Sageser. SECOND 
ROW: Mary A. Bornheimer, Linda S. Hicks, Mikelyn A. 
Sims, Marilyn A. Schreuder, Nancy L. Anderson, Susan 
M. Lacy, Paula P. Knetter, Lisa M. Flynn, Sara J. Clark, 
Sheryl A. Trump. THIRD ROW: Mary J. Johnson, Cindy 
L. Asbury, Mary E. Arnoldi, Mary E. Glidden, Shana K. 
Winston, Linda J. Love, Maureen P. O'Rourke, Renea 
C. Dorsey, Susan R. Schrock. BOTTOM ROW: Donita 
L. Whitney, Julie K. Tucker, Cheri S. Spener, Sharyl A. 
Strack, Karen L. Roughton, Julie C. Albright, Sally A. 
Haertling, Barb J. Lambie, Kathy A. Etzel, Terry Kunz. 



little sisters of the golden rose 




TOP ROW: Susan K. Ringler, Janice M. Fabrizius, 
Dianne L. Murphy, Rebecca J. Bales, Teresa C. Hol- 
thus, Stefni L. Weeks, Sandy S. Blackwood. SECOND 
ROW: Mary G. Hornung, Mary A. Lindstrom, Janiece A. 
DuPree, Susan M. Eisiminger, Debbie L. Staples, 
Nancy S. McDaniel. THIRD ROW: Sheila A. North. 
Deborah Lynn Peters, Kathy K. Lindholm, Sheri L. Bar- 
eiss, Susan M. Peil, Kaye L. Klema. BOTTOM ROW: 
Shirley E. Maskus, Eileen E. Grossardt, Susie A.Chaput, 
Joan D. Vogts, Janet L. Klema, Wilma L. Masters. 



little sisters of the pearls and rubies 



TOP ROW: Janet M. Houk, Jennifer K. Edwards, 
Brenda J. Brinkman, Ronda J. Wilson, Susan J. Dennis, 
Rebecca J. Tanner, Dianna L. Walker. SECOND ROW: 
Nancy S. Carnahan, Margo A. Reiman, Rita A. Oltjen, 
Pennie E. Parcel, Mary T. Suellentrop, Barb K. Blick. 
BOTTOM ROW: JoAnn J. Roth, LuAnne Faubion, Shari 
A. Hildebrand, Susan K. Gartrell, Faire French. 




little sisters of the shield and diamond 



TOP ROW: Nancy J. Murphy, Renee M. McMahon, Col- 
leen P. Kill, Heather M. Warren, Debbie R. Knienm. 
SECOND ROW: Susan L. Specht, Victoria A. Seitz, 
Rhonda G. Young, LuAnne E. Maloney, Jean A. Boyd. 
BOTTOM ROW: Michelle L. Bowman, Audrey L. Rein, 
Debbie S. McLeod. 







little sisters of the white rose 



TOP ROW: Diane K. Bergquist, Karen A. Testori, P. 
Jane Braxmeyer, Pamela R. Page, Sharon S. Emig, 
Debi D. Lauck, Kimberly J. Moore, Mitsy M. White, M. 
Elaine Warren. SECOND ROW Kimberly S. Fisher, 
Beverly J. Benda, Cathy J. McCosh, Lina J. Buchanan, 
Shelly J. Gayle, Polly A. Nichols, Cheri D. Cox, Ann M. 
Zimmerman. THIRD ROW: Linda D. Sundgren, Jane A. 
Five, Linda K. Thomas, Marilyn I. Rudeen, Rita B. 
Debrick, Julie A. Juno, Mary A. Barnes, Carla F. Taylor, 
Jody A. Cheatum. BOTTOM ROW. Joan A. Queen, Ann 
C. King, Kristie L. Hudson, Nancy L. Smith, Marki M. 
Rush, Cynthia D. Twietmeyer, Janice A. Smith, Patricia 
A. Mahoney. 




M 



little sisters of theta xi 




TOP ROW: Jana B. Blythe, Kim M. Denton, Sue E. 
Bridgewater, Renet A. Olson, E. Darlene Wiley. SEC- 
OND ROW: Jan L. Nedwed, Bev J. Kongs, Venette R. 
Kolman, Janet L. Hernott. BOTTOM ROW: Denise L. 
McVey, Patricia J. Given, JoAnne Fagan, Pam S. Grovt. 



TOP ROW: Freddie E. Adkins, Jennie L. Graves, Terry 
D. Revels, LuisaC. Edmonson, Frances A. Gunn, 
Lynda C. Dotson, Ruby Brown, Kim D. Henderson, 
Peachiey Davis, Vanessa R. Barrett, Lorand Brecken- 
ridge. SECOND ROW: Pamela L. White, Karen K Wil- 
liams, Gwendolyn S. Macon, Latessa R. Jackson, 
Norma J. Thomas, Denise Davis, Mitzi Stuart, Hilda R. 
Houston, Shawn D. Gibson, Vester D. Davis. BOTTOM 
ROW: Robin E. Walker, Beatrice A. Johnson, Linda K. 
Morris, Frankie I. Thomas, Cherrie L. James, Linda K 
Thomas. 



TOP ROW: Jacque K. Berkley, Lorraine R. Weis, Sally 
A. Heller, Elizabeth D. Peach. Sharon L. Butcher, Mar- 
cia J. Rector, Teresa F. Baughman, Rhonda S. Noel, 
Anna G. Piland, Paula K. Meyers. SECOND ROW: Lora 
J. Shehi, Marcia L. Sutton, Valerie A. Vedros, Cynthia 
D. Pistora, Kathy A. Bailey, Carol A. Meyers, Ellison 
Rainsberger. BOTTOM ROW: Mary B. Shivers, Barbara 
A. Sadowski, Debbie A. Dreiling, Jacquelyn R. Ayres, J. 
Jill Britegam, Christine M. Stout. 



phi kaptives 



TOP ROW: Karen E. Wimmer, Julie L. Walker, Marsha 
K. Henke, Nancy J. Henke, Mary A. Good, Jane A. 
Peters. SECOND ROW: Marjorie J. Hedger, Rose M. 
Jilka, Sandy A. Brooks, Marcla E. Hicks, Crystal L. 
Wiley, Cylinda L. Anderson, Debora A. Nordhus. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Linda M. Atwell, Mary E. Mead, Eloise M. 
Wmterscheidt, Mary E. Soltis, Karen J. Plegge, Susan 
E. Peters. 



TOP ROW: Karen R. Calhoun, Patti D. Whitt, Candie K. 
Cramer, Jean M. Plegge, Christy S. Shrum, Sheryl K. 
Wilkinson, Kenna S. Carson, Thena M. Bell, Debby M. 
Fountain. SECOND ROW: Amy L. Livingood, Lurenda 
E. Breckenndge, Ginger Cook, Vicki G. McEndree, 
Jane L. Dembski, Susie Edgerley, Vicky L. Teeter, San- 
dra L. Miller, Charliss A. Miller. THIRD ROW: Julie A. 
Stever, Kathleen A. Gillan, Peggy Granberry, Cindy L. 
Littleton, Valerie D. Hanning, Lynn L. Barrett, Jan S. 
Southard, Barbara J. Kelly. BOTTOM ROW: Jeanine 
Miller, Leslie J Allen, Jonna Bolan, Judy C. Weltsch, 
Nancy L. Harlan, Vicki F. Luttrell, Linda L. Zetazalo, 
Sheryll S. Gebhart, Kay D. Patrick. 



TOP ROW Diane S. Vock, Paula K. Byron, Sheril L. 
Johnson, Beverly White, Eve L. Rundquist, Gail L. 
Breen, Jan A. Harder. SECOND ROW: Maggie A. Rem- 
bleske, Shauna L. Kelly, Kay J. Bartak, Paula J. Thomp- 
son, Karen J. Kloster, Tresa L. Flora, Suzie May. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Barb E. Kessler, Kathy Mollett, Marby Ham- 
bright, Patty D. Dunn, Elizabeth A. Bearly, Jill Thayer. 




sisters of the maltese cross 




m 



sisters of the sphinx 




TOP ROW: Colleen G. Feese, Susan M. Schabel, 
Nancy L. Adams, Lori K. Ellis, Mary K. Robitaille, Deb- 
bie S. Smith, Cindy M. Robinson. SECOND ROW: Carol 
M. Medill, Dawn J. Dennis, Claudia L. Effland, Mary 
Beth Stallbaumer, Carrie A. Lawson, Deborah J. 
Mense. THIRD ROW: Kathy D. Burkhard, Pamela J. 
Kilby, Janet A. Goff, Nyla J. Aspelin, Christy L Hrabe. 
BOTTOM ROW: Kathleen A. OToole, Eleonore M. Ken- 
ning, Teresa A Phillips, Sheryl A. Ingram, Adrienne D 
Anderson, Mary S. Herbers. 



TOP ROW: Vicki L. Sollner, Nina M. Kelly, Susie 
McAndrew, Jane A. Reed, Jeanne M. Johnson, Jams 
A. Pack, Terry Dunaway, Janette E. Kaup, Paula K. 
Daylor, Cynthia L. Pixley, Jeannie Huettenmueller. 
SECOND ROW: Barbara L. Hotfman, Joan M. Pottorf, 
Sue A. Malone, Mary L. Hepperly, Patricia A, Bat- 
chelder, Karen S. Dammann, Jill E. Tobler, Jane E. 
Tobler, Marty Lewis, Deanna M. Karlin. THIRD ROW 
Mary K. Knudson, Michele Luckeroth, Joni L. Bergren, 
Cindy A. Joerg, Susie K. Lukert, Barbara J. Marksman, 
Sherry J. Ackerman, Linda J. Cook, Janet L. Noll. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Lisa J. Redtield, Barbara A. Kille, Joan 
Houghton, Mia Brewer, Mary Ann Weibert, Cindy C. 
McDaniel, Karen L. Wasinger, Paula M. Wasinger, Julie 
Sheik, D'Earl Danner. 



triangels 




TOP ROW: Marjone M. Neibling, Maureen L. Hall, Linda 
L. Neal, Cynthia J. Masters. SECOND ROW: Patti S. 
Hobson, Susan L. Hubbs, Beth Land, Connie Elsea, 
Lisa A. Telthorst. BOTTOM ROW: Nancy D. Bootman, 
Jane Koelsch, Jan E. Hardman, Margie A. Lohrentz, 
JaneE. Rowland. 




trooo^ 



Interest groups center their efforts on specific objec- 
tives. By inviting speakers, sponsoring field trips, hold- 
ing seminars, and providing special services to their 



members they aim to sharpen professional skills or- 
share common concerns. 

Often, members are assisted in ways otherwise una- 
vailable. For a minimal fee, the Council for Exceptional 
Children makes available $300,000 in liability insur- 
ance to prospective teachers. 

Several interest organizations serve community 
needs as well as their own, as with the Horticulture! 
Club aiding in campus beautification, or the several mil- 1 
itary organizations which work for bloodmobiles, i 
launch food drives, and entertain hospitalized soldiers 
at Ft. Riley. 

Musical and theatrical groups' performances repre- 
sent the University statewide. 



1 58 — interest groups 





ooDtMiB 



agricultural education club 



f! A 




agricultural mechanization club 




TOP ROW: Gregory V. Anderes, Kenneth E. Robson, 
G. Noel Park, Mick V. Morrell, Deanna L. Raab, Abdu D. 
Tofa, Stanton L. Newby, Judy K. Gress, Lea M. Borst, 
Velva C. Hale, Ronda J. Wilson. SECOND ROW: Robert 
J. Danler, Donnie D. Phillips, James W. Ramsey, Steven 
P. Schmidt, John W. Slocombe, Leroy W. Russell, Joe 
L. Eder. THIRD ROW: George B. Ebert, Ronald J. Wil- 
son, G. Mark Mayfield, Ray G. Flickner, Allen D. Kurtz, 
Richard C. Snell, John F. Graff, Rodney L. Nulik, S. 
Allen Konicek. BOTTOM ROW: Casey D. Garten, Larry 
A. Gossen, Dale D. Hostinsky, Michael W. Catlin, Rob- 
ert D. Lauber, Donald L. Rhine, Ralph G. Field. 



TOP ROW: Martin E. Herbers, Stanton J. Janssen, Jef- 
frey L. Levin, Jeffrey E. Noll, Timothy A. Beim, Richard 
E. Dempster. SECOND ROW: David A. Dick, Wayne A. 
McKinney, Verne A. Hubalek, Ray Brunker, Gerald 
Link. THIRD ROW: Eldon D. Fehrenback, Craig H. Sto- 
ver, Thomas K. Hooper, Don E. Werner, C. David John- 
son, Curtis Willhite. BOTTOM ROW: James M. Harden, 
Keith B. Call, Tim A. Berglund, Shane Messenger, Jon 
E. Buckman. 



block and bridle 



TOP ROW: Brenda J. Hemberger, Deborah L. White, 
Beth G. Pringle, Amy L. Townsend, Susan C. Jones, 
Cynthia C. Craig, Deborah E. Clark, Margaret A. 
Schultz, Eva J. Vosler, Susan Thames. SECOND ROW: 
Steve A. Mayo, Carla J. Steeples, Julie A. Hamma, 
Aline G. Nelson, Deadra L. Cauble, Martha A. Vanier, 
Douglas G. Zillinger, Thann Boyum, Joel W. Wimer, 
William L. McGee. THIRD ROW: Larry Poss, Bruce A. 
Schlickau, C. Ray Ladd, Beverly F. Droge, Ted J. 
Nighswonger, Brett A. Prochaska, Rodney L Nulik, 
Kim M. Fawcett, Kathleen A. Klein, Douglas K. Claas- 
sen. BOTTOM ROW: Rick Olson, Alan J. Ladd, Regi- 
nald S. Phillips, Clayton J. Story, William Q. Gattshall, 
Rodney B. Peters, Raymond B. Hawn, Richard D. 
Scott, Raebern L. Nelson, Steven W. Miles. 



TOP ROW: Judy K. Gress, Alice J. Phillips, Ann E 
Mueller, Suzanne C. Shaw, Gayle L. Davis, Betsy L 
Pfefter, Lynette K. Bond, Mary L. Steele, Barbara S 
Seers, Debbie L. Holt. SECOND ROW: Ann J. Leach 
Tern S. Reinhardt, Cindy M. Macy, Sue Herwig, Pat L 
Krehbiel, Pam Kilby, Katie A. Blunk, Elizabeth I. Evans 
Debra L. Bennett, Lindsay A. Friend. THIRD ROW: Paul 
W. Merklein, Terry L. Weeden, Terry W. Henry, Rex A 
Hoskinson, Leon E. Sylvester, Zane D. Kiracofe, Diane 
K. Glover, Penny S. Burger, Brenda Landritn, Elizabeth 
C. Stevens. BOTTOM ROW: Craig A. Good, Chris A. 
Strait, Bruce D. Rinkes, Pat K. Herrmann, Richard H. 
Brensing, Michael A. Collinge, Charles P. Collins, Philip 
E. Beesley, Robert S. Adam, Daniel S. Hale. 



TOP ROW: Debbie Ericson, Shelly D. Thompson, Gwen 
S. Johnson, Susan M. Gatz, Rick L. Peterson, Martha L. 
Voigts, Melissa A. Forbes, Cecelia A. Tandy, Mary A. 
Bradford, Kim J. Curry. SECOND ROW: Emily M. Dans- 
kin, Leah S. Price, Cassandra D. Utz, Mary M. Hurlburt, 
Lesa J. Schwanke, Joleen D. Moden, Linda L. Collinge, 
Ruth A. Schweitzer, Donita L. Whitney, Liz Folger. 
THIRD ROW: Donald H. Kropf, Debbie K. Fox, Cathleen 
J. Langton, Patsy L. Houghton, Jimalene R. Jeffery, 
Annette K. Bredthauer, Chris Sankey, Joseph L. Koe- 
chner, Jay Sheldon, Gary R. Rider. BOTTOM ROW: 
Charles E. Oleen, Randall R. Gruber, Gary E Poss, 
Lynn R. Holt, Steven F. Russell, Chris A. Melson, Peter 
R. Fish, Robert G. Haynes, Nancy S. Whisman. 



TOP ROW: Frank G. Healy, Paula J. Petersen, Greg C. 
Clark, Fred W. Marmor, Linda S. Bringham, Larry V. 
Kaster. SECOND ROW: Brent D. Rains, John M. Yost, 
Steve M. Irons, Tony C. Schmid, Dan A. Ball. THIRD 
ROW: N. Dean Stoskopf, Philip A. Hodson, Larry E. 
Schilling. BOTTOM ROW: H. Derrick Blocker, Loarn L. 
Bucl, Barry D. Rowland, James F. Schesser. 




crop protection club 



iFB©ooOft[if 




160 — interest groups 



dairy science club 




TOP ROW:. Lynda S. Davis, JoEllen Arnold, Cindy S. 
McAllister, Kathleen A. Klein, Keith A. Heikes. SECOND 
ROW: Bob D. Knight, Paul C. Schmidt, Peter S. 
Fletcher, John C. Coen. THIRD ROW: Daniel W. Sex- 
ton, George C. Pretz, Ben J. Smith, Phillip J. Stroupe. 
BOTTOM ROW: C. L. Norton, Tom S. Strickler, Ty L. 
Compton, Galen L. Larson. 



TOP ROW: Fred J. Deneke, Michael J. Adams, Patricia 
L. Graybeal, Nancy A. Vathauer, Mary A. Marsh, Candy 
K. Spielman, Jon A. Moser. SECOND ROW: Dana L. 
Hamm, Karen A. Stout, Wendy L. Benefiel, Tom W 
Conroy, Lynn E. Thurlow. BOTTOM ROW: Peter N. 
Miller, Bruce D. Wood, Tapley W. Kent, Richard J. Suel- 
lentrop. 



grain science club 




TOP ROW: Robert D. Ricklets, Stephen H. Combs, 
Richard L. Helvey, Bryan J. Warren, Mark L. Vollbracht, 
Patrick B. Aydt, Robert A. Blaida. SECOND ROW: Dale 
Eustace, Lauren J. Larson, Gary E. Wietharn, Blaine K. 
Holder, Pat C. Dreese, Ahmed A. W. Abed. THIRD 
ROW: Joe M. Pistora, William C. Cramer, Frank P. 
McFarland, Jayson B. Seymour, William M. Gross, 
David D. Green, Craig E. Hogue. BOTTOM ROW: 
Eugene Farrell, Randal W. Baker, Timothy J. Dodd, 
Darryl L. Engelhardt, James K. Musil, Randy L. Wehl- 
ing. 



interest groups- 



horticulture club 



TOP ROW: Cari S. Leman, Anita L. Heacock, Vickie S. 
Hase, Cheri J. Church, Jane A. Wittmeyer, Linda K. 
Johnson, Joseph M. Jackson, Lindsay B. Arnold, 
Heather K. Johnson. SECOND ROW: Lee K. Anken- 
man, Virginia S. Shirer, Michele R. Warmund, Marsha 
K. Baugher, Jeanene G. French, Crystal L. Wiley, Joe- 
lyn K. Squires, Evelyn S. Bergkamp. THIRD ROW: Carol 
J. Maggard, Cathryn S. Badger, Rick J. Wenger, Sandy 
K. Holcom, John P. Breault, Keith E. Turner, Lawana G. 
Clements. BOTTOM ROW: Susan F. Montgomery, Matt 
J. Knilans, Thomas E. Mance, Gary L. Fanning, Freddie 
E. Palmblade, Bill R. Zimmer, Bruce A. Relihan, Marvin 
B. McKenzie, Rick L. Davis. 



TOP ROW: Tamara R. Lowry, Carol E. Goss, Becky L. 
Durst, Teresa G. Owens, Sheila D. McKain, Larry G. 
Parker, Harley S. Holliday. SECOND ROW: George C. 
Watts, Darrell D. Parks, Thomas L. Taylor, Stewart R. 
Duncan, Anthony W. Sharp, Baron J. Shively, Gary A. 
Schuler. BOTTOM ROW: Ben D. Mahaffey, Michael E. 
Oppitz, Michael W. Bonham, Walter B. Jordan, James 
T. Fleming, Raul R. Morfti, Orville W. Bidwell. 



TOP ROW: Loren L. Seaman, Arlen E. Wilcox, Gary C. 
Peterson, Norman D. Johns, Paul F. Stich, James W. 
Eubank, Michael R. Grogan, Francis A. Kelsey, William 
D. Moore. SECOND ROW: Gregory W. Morrical, Carl 
W. Matousek, Aden E. Joy, Wallace C. Leavitt, Jay H. 
Holste, Bryan D. Evans, Duane W. Frasier, James M. 
Burton, Tom W. Cott. THIRD ROW: Lyman L. Nuss, Eric 
S. Sevatson, James R. Marietta, William H. Slater, Jim 
S. Beason, Barry D. Rowland, Gregory A. Sarensen, S. 
W. Ehler. BOTTOM ROW: Dean A. Graber, Duane W. 
Drees, David D. Green, Elissa R. Levine, Stanley G. 
Freyenberger, William J. Harmon, Joe H. Bunck, Rich- 
ard W. Stumpf, L. V. Withee. 




natural resource management club 




wheat state agronomy club 



: 



8UAaJUf«f 




COOdflDftODE 



1 62 — interest groups 




trfi© ©mesa ©@nn© 



arts and science council 




TOP ROW: Terri G. Crowe, Bryce F. Haverkamp, Rob- 
ert E. Hall, Phil F. Palma, Andy L. Oswald, Terry C. Mat- 
lack. BOTTOM ROW: Lisa Foster, Mary Jo Prochazka, 
Greg D. Olds, Emilie K. Smith, Mary E. Flanagan, L. 
Gay Linvill, Mark S. Lee, Steve F. Twietmeyer. 



interest groups — 163 



association of computing machinery 



TOP ROW: Mary L. Love, Haroon U. Rashid, Steve P. 
Keller, William E. Shea, Catherine Neal. SECOND 
ROW: William F. Weber, John E. McCormick, Stanley 
Wileman, David Neal, John W. Shellenberger. BOTTOM 
ROW: Harvey A. Long, Randolph P. Johnston, Bryan D. 
Harold, Thomas L. Cofran, Tom L. Gallagher. 




biology club 



TOP ROW: Sherry L. Williams, Linda S. Deitrick, Daniel 
E. Headnck, Steven E. McCormic. SECOND ROW: 
Dana J. Orten, Robin A. Ladner. BOTTOM ROW: Rob- 
ert R Laforge, Randy A. Smith, Keith D. Taylor, Ann E. 
Kammer. 







in tenebris association 



TOP ROW. Cindy L. Ediger, Nancy S. Anstaett, Paula 
K. Meyers, Robert A. Percy, Terri L. Bechtel, Keith W. 
Schlaegel, Pam Kreutzer. BOTTOM ROW: Chad L. 
Perry, Ayn M. Uilliland, Eugene G. Malcolm, Kathy K. 
Garrelts, Cindy E. Rogers, Don D. Froebe, Helen J. Wil- 
liams. 




trG© m\(o\ ©@n©i© 



1 64 — interest groups 



ksdb-fm staff 




TOP ROW: M. Emme Smith, Marcia G. McGraw, Carrie 
E. Stapleton, Marlene S. Adkison, Paul M. Gaston, 
Michael Haberkorn, Kathryn M. Thomas. SECOND 
ROW: Susan L. Griftith, Lynn E. Cress, Roger W. Han- 
natord, John R. Stauffer, John C. Feldmann, Adel L. 
Visser. THIRD ROW: Les A. Younger, Mark D. Haden, 
Steven A. Herrs, Gordon V. Hibbard, Kent M. Taylor. 
BOTTOM ROW: Philip R. Arnett, Marlene K. Hender- 
son, Richard S. Smalley, Philip F. Grossardt, Scott L. 
Jacobsen, Jerry D. Schnacke. 



k-state players 




TOP ROW: Susan K. Griftin, Laurie D. Johnson, Teresa 
S. Haftener, Connie Jo Doebele, Cynthia M. Helferstay, 
Pamela S. Evers, Natalie K. Green. SECOND ROW: 
Gregory P. Mitchell, Alica E. Krchma, Curtis G. Gra- 
ham, Nancy K. Baker, Dennis T. Reh, Doug S. Pender- 
gast. BOTTOM ROW: Brenda J. Clark, Mark M. Gustaf- 
son, Michael J. Byington, Tim L. Blacker, Matt W. 
Smith 



ksu wildlife society 




TOP ROW: Janet J. Block, Mary J. Davis, Malia J. 
Weide, Thomas J. Snodgrass, Terry Z. Riley, Roger D. 
Vancil. SECOND ROW: Steven E. McCormic, Gary D. 
Frint, Paul C. Martin, Sheila D. Bahruth, Rick L. Moss- 
man. THIRD ROW: Daniel F. Ronnebaum, Mack E. 
Byard, Robert R. Laforge, Mark D. Collinge, David W. 
Beck. BOTTOM ROW: John C. Jaques, Dennis E. Wil- 
son, Michael L. Peterman, Greg A. Wingfield, Albert F. 
Sutlick, Randall A. Smith. 



medical technology club 



TOP ROW: Sheri L. Richardson, Carol L. Hahn, Lora A. 
Heptig, Jill E. Mueller, Lora J. Shehi, Joyce L. Frey, 
Susan R. Seely. SECOND ROW: Brenda A. Raile, Janet 
K. Fowles, Kathryn L. Bortz, Janet A. Stigall, Kristine L. 
Regier, Debbie R. Yaussi. THIRD ROW: Kern J. West, 
Deborah S. Stover, Karen D. Swander, Lea A. Wiltse, 
Kirk L, Cates, Charlotte D. Paulsen, Barry S. Hardman. 
BOTTOM ROW: Jeffrey J. Sutton, Mitchell C. Moheng, 
Ted G. Betzen, David P. Franken, John S. Anderson, 
Mark E. Coughenour. 




microbiology club 



TOP ROW: Charlotte D. Paulsen, Carl Batt, John J. 
Voegeli, Scott M. Dennis. BOTTOM ROW: Jane E. Lar- 
sen, Kirk S. Anderson, Barb J. Dudrey, Bill M. Shafer, 
Jerry S. Knapp, Randy D. Milby. 



TOP ROW: John A. Davis, Steven J. Coloney, Gary L. 
Norton, Kent N. Scarbrough, James B. Heathman, 
John D. Layne. BOTTOM ROW: Stephen G. Batsell, 
Roger L. Facklam. 




trft© m\$ ©©pirn© 



166 — interest groups 



pre-med club 




TOP ROW: Cathie Silva, Barbara A. Kocour, Katherine 
A. Pertsch, Hannah W. Robinson, Sallie K. Davis, 
Judith L. Weber, Bonnie G. Howard, Jane A. Fore. 
SECOND ROW: Martha L. Hurley, Jill M. Burris, Roger 
. C. Mickelson, John D. Marteney, Daniel E. Headrick, 
Deana C. Paulsen, Sherri L. Hooper. THIRD ROW: Bar- 
bara A. Bell, Mark A. Smith, Daniel C. Schiessler, Rich- 
ard A. Burton, Mary L. Meengs, John M. Cooper, John 
G. Kite, James C. Schieten. BOTTOM ROW: Herbert C. 
Moser, Martin E. Sellberg, Harry C. Stenvall, John D. 
Hughes, Robert L. Sweet, Michael E. Michel, James W. 
Baker, Richard J. Kueker. 



pre-nursing club 




TOP ROW: Elaine L. Case, Deborah A. Combs, Lynn A. 
DeBarge, Terri D. Lungren, Kayla J. Nelson, Bev J. 
Hoff. SECOND ROW: Jill M. Burris, Sheryl A. Ingram, 
Teresa J. Parmely, Rita B. Debrick, Mary D. Nivens. 
BOTTOM ROW: Brenda K. Zwick, Beth A. Skidmore, 
Linda L. Neal, LuAnne Faubion, Therese Blanchon, 
Charlotte A. McKee. 



pre-physical therapy club 




TOP ROW: Martha J. Shook, Paula J. Mohler, Linda E. 
North, Glenda E. Julian, Kathleen A. Minor, LoEtta M. 
Waters, Lissa F. Windhorst. SECOND ROW: Marlene K. 
Wilkerson, Deborah K. Dlabal, Deborah S. Koch, 
Katharine D. Grout, Janice M. Mueller, Mary C. Keat- 
ing. THIRD ROW: Laurel C. Combs, Joan E. Elling, 
Carol A. Moore, Dana L. Denyer, Kathy L. Sparks, Gara 
L. Burnette, Kathryn M. Shippers. BOTTOM ROW: Tim 
N. Bowe, Rick L. Jones, Greg B. Miller, John O. Tucker, 
Ann E. George, Tom J. Knoll. 



interest groups !<■ 



TOP ROW: Linda A. Reed, Linda B. Brozanic, Paula K 
Meyers, Colleen M. Smith. Maggie Lee, Catherine M 
Jilka, Susie Edgerley. SECOND ROW: Tim J. Janicke 
Judy L. Puckett, Marilyn I. Rudeen, Karla J. Carney 
Cindie D. Dalton, Sherry L. Spitsnaugle. THIRD ROW: 
Bill E. Brown, Susan K. Pickler, Sara J. Severance 
Greg S. Doyle, Michael R. Scott. BOTTOM ROW: W 
Russell Harris, Mark T. Eaton, Mark A. Furney, Lee C 
Stuart, Samuel J. Brungardt, Victor J. Winter. 



sigma delta chi 




social work club 



TOP ROW: Rick Selig, D. Duane McGuire, Sam Stan- 
ton, Tom Moore. BOTTOM ROW: Sonia S. Anderson, 
Susan K. Olson, Connie S. Canfield, Cathy J. McCosh, 
Holly J. Tuttle, Paula K. Daylor, Cathalene Newton, Eliz- 
abeth R. Nelson, Rosemary Chapin. 




women in communications, inc. 



TOP ROW: Linda A. Reed, Linda M. Brozanic, Paula K. 
Meyers, M. Emme Smith, Carol J. Doyen. SECOND 
ROW: Sherry L. Spitsnaugle, Susan K. Pickler, Sara J. 
Severance, Cindie D. Dalton. BOTTOM ROW: Uteva E. 
Powers, Geralynn L. Johns, Marty M. Snyder, Connie 
J. Doebele, Susie Edgerley. 




[b^©^ 



businesss council 




TOP ROW: Robert W. Parker, Beverly J. Benda, Dan C. 
Ruda, William R. Patton, Steven J. Hoffman. SECOND 
ROW: David W. Perky, Katherine L. Reeder, Lesley K. 
Whitehead, Vicki F. Luttrell, Don A. Folkerts, Larry D. 
Fox. BOTTOM ROW: Norman C. Pishny, David B. Zoel- 
ler, Mark S. Eagleton, Hugo G. Dahlstrom, Jeff A. Craw- 
ford. 



phi chi theta 




TOP ROW: Laura I. Hoisington, Amanda S. Roderick, 
Gale D. Thierolf, Joyce M. Kramer, Janinne M. Murray, 
Gail D. Holtman, Karen S. Brunnenkant, Ann M. Dusin. 
SECOND ROW: Kathleen A. Malone, Ann L. Lockyer, 
Alesia J. Ball, Julie L. Hampl, Anne M. Keehn, Mary S. 
Davis, Lisa M. Evans. BOTTOM ROW: Mary L. Ginn, 
Kathy S. McVay, Lily J. Nelson, Susan E. Peters, E. 
Diane Blackburn, Judy K. Haskins, Irva K. Streit. 



interest groups — 1 69 



<p]Qfl©@fin@i 



council for exceptional children 



TOP ROW: Patti L. Leonard, Ann C. Tollefson, Mary L. 
Napier, Jocelyn D. Dunmire, Marilyn K. Funk, Nancy L. 
Adams. SECOND ROW: Carol E. Holmes, Linda L. 
Holeman, Debbie L. Fisher, Marcia R. Kohake, Alicia A. 
Rues, Nancy L. Vickers, Mary F. Morris. BOTTOM 
ROW: John W. DeMand, Walter E. Knapp, Robbie A. 
Campbell, Janet R. Lowdon, Vicki L. Garrison, Cindy L. 
Powell. 



TOP ROW: Deborah D. Solomon, Jocelyn D. Dunmire, 
Mary L. Napier, Cheryl L. Wisdom, Linda L. Hurt, Leslie 
A. Walker. SECOND ROW: Donald C. Barnes, Mary A. 
Robben, Susan R. Schrock, Robbie A. Campbell, Ann 
C. Tollefson. BOTTOM ROW: Carl W. Kirkpatrick, Linda 
J. Spicer, Vicki L. Garrison, Judith J. Mathewson. 




education council 




student education association 



TOP ROW: Lynne E. Bessier, Coleen A. McNerney, 
Gina C. Ramsey, Ann C. Tollefson, Nancy K. Hedrick, 
Pamela S. Kinast, Jill A. Hinkel, Jureta L. Ragel, Patti L. 
Leonard. SECOND ROW: Ann E. Mueller, Susan R. 
Schrock, Mary A. Robben, Terrie L. Lafferty, Sharon D. 
Johnson, Sharon K. Graves, Linda L. Holeman, Mary F. 
Morris. THIRD ROW: Robie R. Watson, Ruth E. Howard, 
Marcia R. Kohake, Rose M. Carver, Jeanette L. Neu- 
mann, Gail A. Lundgren, Linda K. Mealman. BOTTOM 
ROW: Carol J. Hansen, Linda A. Robinson, Virion N. 
Unruh, Randolph P. Johnston, Robbie A. Campbell, 
Michael F. Ortmann, Anna M. Kroeger, Sharon L. 
McCrary. 



1 70 — interest groups 




! Di]gTO®(i[rnoiM 



american nuclear society 




american society of agricultural engineers 




TOP ROW: Teresa A. Wise, Joan E. Gregory, Brenda J. 
Laakso, Terry L. Cellmer, Dwaine R. Pucket, Ronald A. 
Kite, Kord S. Smith. SECOND ROW: Jeffrey C. Ryman, 
Trudy D. Rempel, Steven T. Nichols, Robert W. McGriff, 
Dennis C. Wegener, William G. Houf. THIRD ROW: Cyd 
A. Harris, Richard D. Flannigan, Ronald S. Rather, 
Terry L. Shill, Randy R. Nason. BOTTOM ROW: Her- 
mann J. Donnert, Christopher A. Grier, Bruce A. 
Napier, Terry A. Jansen, Larry W. Stevens, David L. 
Stucker. 



TOP ROW: Maynard M. Herron, Kent A. Casey, Steven 
L. Phillips, Edwin W. Radatz, Nancy J. Cooper, Daniel 
P. Spare, Francis V. Robbins, James G. Leiszler, Kyle 
D. Swart, Do Sup Chung. SECOND ROW: L. Leon Hob- 
son, Joe A. Haffener, Mark S. Olson, George R. Thor- 
sell, Daryl Heronemus, Howard Zimmerman, Harold R. 
Blume, Dennis Stucky, David Skinner, Larry K. Boldt, 
G. Alan Johnson. THIRD ROW: Gregory A. Gartrell, 
David R. Masters, Charles C. Nixon, Lester F. Young, 
Philip A. Harden, David H. Weast, Samuel M. Babb, 
Dale L. Burnick, Duane H. Mueting, Craig J. Ramsey, 
Nicholas F. Koch. BOTTOM ROW: Ray A. Dilts, Danny 
H. Rogers, Mark A. Locke, David L. Malm, Edward L. 
Janke, Glen M. Schmidt, Steven L. Blume, Alan G. Van- 
Nahmen, James V. Schletzbaum, Matthew L. Birzer. 
David A. Corn. 



interesl ,;i.^v- 



american society of mechanical engineers 



TOP ROW Virginia A. Unruh, Stan L. Williams, Dody L. 
Demuth, Wayne E. Buhrer, Jon J. Held, Terrill J. 
Munkres, John D. Rinkenbaugh. SECOND ROW: Joe 
A. Ragole, Steven D. Johnson, Randy L. Gary, Clar- 
ence A. Hill, Wayne F. Sloan, Dwight A. Schoneweis. 
THIRD ROW: Robin D. Drumm, Alan J. Atkinson, 
Edward T. Socolotsky, Martin D. Barker, Kervin Brun- 
gardt, Dale E. Vogel, Larry R. Redd. BOTTOM ROW: 
Daniel J. Olberding, Mike D. McCoy, Stephen G. Stout, 
Chris Kuchem, Gerard F. Meitl, John C. Lindholm. 




associated general contractors of america 



TOP ROW: Ray A. Christy, Vince R. Zawistowski, Timo- 
thy M. Burke, Leslie D. Lindenmuth, D. Craig Nelson, 
Richard A. Tortora, Norris Slupianek, Pat Bartko. SEC- 
OND ROW: Verney D. Lehrman, Jack R. Ernst, John W. 
Rohrer, Frank J. Sauerwein, Dennis W. Helmer, David 
A. Garrett, Ronald Fowles, Gregory B. Fyfe, Dennis D. 
Deweese. THIRD ROW: Daniel R. Haworth, Merle F. 
Jantz, Willone E. EuBanks, Christopher Gartner, James 
R. Lambie, Jeffrey Schroeder, Dick A. Wise, Allen 
Walker, Randy K. Hurlburt. BOTTOM ROW: Merrill 
Blackman, Robert Esch, John R. Williams, Michael R. 
McGivern, Robert V. Pester, David W. Bower, Joseph 
S. Graney, Chet Brians, Charles Koehn. 




engindears 



TOP ROW: Cindy M. Snow, Debbie S. Connolly, Cathy 
Sullivan, Debra S. Higgs, Mary Ann Robben, Thelma G. 
Mueller. SECOND ROW: Kimberly A. Dean, Marsha P. 
Ramsey, Linda L. Etherly, Martha F. Bohannon, Kathe- 
rine L. Reeder, Debora M. Louk. THIRD ROW: Deborah 
J. Stadel, Dana L. Denyer, Jennifer A. Jungmann, 
Linda L. Zatezalo, Karen G. Evans. BOTTOM ROW: 
Vicki F. Luttrell, Carol B. Engel, Joan A. King, Maureen 
L. Hall. 




1 72 — inleresl groups 



engineering student council 




TOP ROW: Richard A. Vilander, Gary A. McNaughton, 
W. Craig Rundle, Larry N. Phillips, Steven T. Bram- 
baugh, Tim L. Heiman, Gary L. Adams. SECOND ROW: 
Debora M. Louk, Joe A. Haffener, Steven L. Phillips, L. 
Leon Hobson, Susan M. Myers, Stephen W. Koenig, 
Kord S. Smith. THIRD ROW: Alan J. Atkinson, David R. 
Masters, Lawrence R. Redd, Donald E. Rathbone, Ste- 
ven L. Blume, Clay G. Jones, Nicholas F. Koch. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Keith D. Tucker, Peter Cooper, Robert D. 
Williams, Charles E. Koehn, Matthew L. Birzer, Edward 
L. Janke. 



ieee 




TOP ROW: Debra K. Miller, Michael L. Uhl, Munehiro K. 
Doe, Kala J. Marietta, John H. Yoakum, Donald D. Fire- 
stone, Gary A. McNaughton, Sharon A. Feightner, Ken- 
neth A. Ward, Janusz Pawlus. SECOND ROW: Daniel J. 
Burk, Glenn E. Funk, Mac A. Cody, Thomas A. Beery, 
Philip N. King, Michael F. Silady, George F. Detar, Wil- 
liam N. Dowling. THIRD ROW: Richard M. Kelsey, 
Susan M. Myers, Edward H. Perry, Scott A. Boster, Jeff 
S. Barth, David I. Rhodes, Douglas D. Fowler, James P. 
Moore, David E. Kimble, Bruce G. Bailey. BOTTOM 
ROW: William R. Lear, Dwight D. Dupy, Thomas L. 
Hopkins, Delbert G. Riebe, Stuart L. Claassen, Edwin L. 
Rehme, David M. Barnett, William R. Goodman. 



society of women engineers 




TOP ROW: Debra A. Royse, Peggy A. Gilliam, Mary L. 
Stout, Cindy M. Bowen, Theresa M. Quigley, Karen S. 
Chandler, Jennie L. Graves, Greta F. Nelson, Teresa A. 
Wise, Mary A. Kramer. SECOND ROW: Lisa A. Tel- 
thorst, Dena E. Mezger, Tina M. Foust, Sherri D. Taylor, 
Debra S. Higgs, Amy L. Armstrong, Page Puckett, Les- 
lie L. Elliott, Virginia A. Unruh. BOTTOM ROW: DeAnn 
C. Humes, Sandra K. Siebert, Susan M. Myers, Susan I. 
Galyardt, Marianne Ives, Judith A. Nutter, Cynthia A. 
Bily, John C. Lindholm. 



^©DTnl® d 



©©UDODUDd© 



american society of interior designers 



TOP ROW: Judy L. Wilson, Del G. Hoge, Linda K. Can- 
non, Sarah J. Will, Julie M. Thielen, Brenda J. Lala, 
Carolyn L. Graves, Joann A. Loflin. SECOND ROW: 
Bari A. Garst, Luanne Beardmore, Wendy W. Hum- 
phreys, Shelly J. Gayle, Karen L. Reed, Paula K. Hood, 
Judy M. Matyak, Sue E. Dieckhoff. THIRD ROW: Bonnie 
L. Stueve, Cindy L. Gough, Teresa M. Kruse, Pamela J. 
Mathews, Katherine Berentz, Dianne J. Bondank, David 
Hachinsky. BOTTOM ROW: Carol L. Miller, Pamela E. 
Hoffman, Cheri S. Spener, Debbie L. Adams, David R. 
Smith, Dave Clark, Ted Murphy, Fran Newby. 



TOP ROW: Denise J. Dahl, Ruth M. Sawin, LaDonna L. 
Thurlow, Denise L. Glick, Victoria M. Swift, Sharon A. 
Boehm, Debra A. Lundquist. SECOND ROW: Sandra A. 
Brooks, Susan J. Furnish, Cynthia A. Williams, Lisa C. 
Poison, Lisa K. Mawhiney, LuAnn Holmes. THIRD 
ROW: Debbie K. Ash, Lana J. Woolery, Sheri K. Tomp- 
kins, Wendy L. Babington, Jana K. Clark, Lillie R. 
Brown. BOTTOM ROW: Debora A. Nordhus, Darlene 
C. Vinduska, Marilyn A. King, Mary C. Stiles, Jane D. 
Lowdon, Martha K. Smith. 




clothing, textiles and interior design 




family and child development 



TOP ROW: Nancy L. Overstreet, Lynn Y. Schroeder, 
Patricia A. Colby, Susan L. Specht. SECOND ROW: 
Lina J. Buchanan, Carol J. Wolf, Kay Bartak, Cheryl J. 
Keller. BOTTOM ROW: Jody A. Cheatum, Lynne Stout, 
Susan J. Johnson. 



1 74 — interest groups 




home economics council 




TOP ROW: Mary G. Hornung, Sherilyn S. Henderson, 
Denise S. Russell, Mary C. Sharp, Nancy J. Henke, 
Beverly E. Holman. SECOND ROW: Rita K. Fowles, 
Carolyn Hoener, Carol J. Barnett, Stacey J, Miller, Ann 
R. Johnson, Cheryl J. Keller. THIRD ROW: Sherry 
Evans, Rebecca R. Canny, Janet M. Stoffer, Paula A. 
Felder, Marlene S. Stum, Lorene K. Wohler. BOTTOM 
ROW: Brent F. Akright, Barbara I. Roe, MaryAnn E. 
Channel, Mary E. Moser, Starla J. Krause, Brenda J 
Funk, Martha K. Smith. 



home economics education club 




TOP ROW: Susan C. Jones, Denise S. Russell, Chris- 
tine K. Loewen, Mary C. Sharp, Janet M. Houk, Nancy 
J. Henke. SECOND ROW: Melissa K. Hathaway, Bev- 
erly E. Holman, Kay S. Kowalzyk, Kathryn L. Hullman, 
Beth Warner, Joyce Diveley. THIRD ROW: Rebecca R. 
Canny, Janet M. Stotfer, Connie J. Seaman, Holly M. 
Dean, Dee A. Lewis. BOTTOM ROW: Cindy M. Macy, 
Mary E. Whitmer, Lorinda S. Holbrook, MaryAnn E. 
Channel, Laura S. Carnes, Deborah L. Peters. 



extension professional section 




TOP ROW: Nancy Jelinek, Carol S. Hamm, Sheri A. 
Hunt, Christine Chestnut, Marlene Burr, Barbara Zwey- 
gardt, Jeanine Miller, Catherine A. Gillett, Jill A. Ster- 
ling, Peggy M. Jensen. BOTTOM ROW: Nancy A. Ham- 
ilton, Amy L. Townsend, Janice E. Unruh, Cinda A. 
Hatcher, Karen L. Bahr, Doris J. Ohrens, Susan C. 
Jones, Ann R. Johnson. 



professional foods club 




TOP ROW: Barbara A. Betzold, Nancy E. Moore, Jams 
K. G. Loo, Wendi E. Mlinek, Andrea M. Murphy, Paula 
A. Felder, Susan E. Bowe. SECOND ROW: Denise A. 
Conoway, Olinda G. Pfost, Angela M. Callahan, Bonnie 
H. Schmidt, Janice E. Friesen, Carol A. Swartzendru- 
ber, Kim J. Curry. BOTTOM ROW: Rebecca A. Wil- 
liams, Karla K. Engel, Carol E. Reder, Janet L. Back- 
hus, Susan B. Japp, Pamela J. Snyder, Kaye L. Klema. 



DTfQJ pgiry 



TOP ROW: Cari S. Leman, Jana M. Jones, Debbie D. 
Ward, Jean A. Harris, Carol J. Doyen, Theresa M. Kier- 
nan, Melissa K. Hathaway. SECOND ROW: Connie J. 
Doebele, Patricia L. Rutt, Beth A. Glanville, Connie A. 
Haffener, Deborah F. Hobble, Mary L. Hepperly, Jane 
E. Sedlacek. THIRD ROW: Shelly C. Conn, Carla J. 
Steeples, Deborah L. Peters, Lisa M. Priddy, M. Lisa 
Baumgarten, Deborah J. Stadel. BOTTOM ROW: 
Sherry M. Nave, Maura M. Miller, Susan D. Apley, 
Nancy S. Whisman, Emily J. Simunac. 



TOP ROW: Frank D. Meacham, Steven L. Stambaugh, 
Jack W. Swank, Gary R. Mitchell, Richard M. Seitz, 
Rodney E. Nally, Erick L. Sallman. SECOND ROW: 
Clarence S. Clarke, Dale K. Dickson, Terrence R. Kratt, 
Ronald P. Jones, Larry Lawrence, Steven J. Coloney, 
Robert O. Wating. THIRD ROW: Gordon A. Brest, 
Wayne L. Thompson, David W. Alvis, Joseph B. Con- 
nell, Charles W. Armour, Randall L. Rathbun, Samuel 
B. Shamburger. BOTTOM ROW: Michael G. Flouer, 
Bruce E. Barrett, Steven J. Wagoner, Floyd A. Badsky, 
H. Thomas Jackson, Gerald M. Feeney, Richard E. Fel- 
ton. 



TOP ROW: David W. Alvis, Frank W. Meyer, Dale K. 
Dickson, Leigh A. Marshall, Jere L. Dodge, Jack 
Swank, Richard Seitz, Shanan Schultz. SECOND ROW: 
Kenneth E. Stachelbeck, Ronald P. Jones, Larry L. 
Lawrence, Andrew V. Duftin, James J. Buchheister, 
James W. Mack, Allan B. Hundley. THIRD ROW: Mark 
A. Kisner, Alan D. Alspach, Homer D. Caine, Randall L. 
Rathbun, Morris C. Dozier, Gerald M. Feeney, Gordon 
A. Brest. BOTTOM ROW: Donald E. Jones, Greg A. 
Degi, David L. Blackwood, David G. Burnett, H. 
Thomas Jackson, Kevin E. Bradfield, Floyd F. 
McSpadden. 



angel flight 




arnold air society 



1 76 — interest groups 




cadet corps airforce rote 




light brigade 




pershing rifles 




TOP ROW: Maura M. Miller, Frank D. Meacham, She-_ 
rylyn F. Baay, Debbie L. Dobson, Steven L. Stam-" 
baugh, Richard E. Felton, Howard W. Tuttle. SECOND 
ROW: Terrence R. Kraft, Terry J. Adamson, Jeff L. 
Gross, Steven A. MacLaird, Marvin Mason, Erick L._ 
Sallman, John L. Stupica. THIRD ROW: Clarence S." 
Clarke, Stanley R. Miller, Alan J. Engle, David M. Rog- 
ers, Charles W. Armour, Coy S. Baxley, James C. Mur- 
ray. BOTTOM ROW: Glessner J. Wagner, Bruce E. Bar- 
rett, Michael G. Flouer, Steven J. Wagoner, Floyd A. 
Badsky, James A. Mercer. 



TOP ROW: Teresa C. Holthus, Stefni L. Weeks, 
LaDonna L. Thurlow, Debra M. Foster, Terry L. Erwin, 
Diane M. Buck, Linda B. Williams, Marjorie C. Collier. 
SECOND ROW: Susan R. Schrock, Suzanne L. Fee, 
Deborah S. Koch, Sandra K. Elliott, Sheri K. Tomp- 
kins, Judy L. Puckett, Terrie L. Lafferty, Veronica S. 
Kasten. BOTTOM ROW: Peter Cullen, Rose M. Kai- 
ser, Cynthia D. Twietmeyer, Mary C. Stiles, Denise L. 
Kettler, Linda J. Spicer, Susan M. Glotzbach. 



TOP ROW: Rita M. Screen, Carol S. Lawrence, Charles 
S. Tyler, Gloria A. Atkinson, Steven L. Boeh, Jane M. 
Peterson, Dennis V. Lacey, John W. Hildebrand. SEC- 
OND ROW: Lee B. Fleischman, Scott J. Pearson, Mikel 
R. Carter, Greg L. Musil, Joseph J. Kolman, Ross M. 
Flin, Greg E. Couch. BOTTOM ROW: Darrell E. Herrm- 
ann, Howard H. Depew, Roger D. Duwe, J. Michael 
Kinsey, Charles E. Herrmann, Terry A. Schmidt, Kermit 
O. Taylor, Thomas L. Hopkins. 



scabbard and blade 




TOP ROW: Rita M. Screen, John E. Glasgow, Carol S. 
Lawrence, Loren A. Semrau, Lee B. Fleischman, 
Joseph E. Faubion. SECOND ROW: Nicholas L. 
Kinsch, Dennis V. Lacey, Gloria A. Atkinson, George B. 
Hansen, Thomas R. Veleker, Steven W. Archer. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Darrell E. Herrmann, Dan A. Riedl, Dan E. 
Chatelain, Gary M. Gottschalk, Darrell R. Riekenberg, 
Robert J. Wiesner. 




[EfDCffl®!!© 



chamber orchestra 




TOP ROW: Jeanne E. Hansen, David K. Melgaard, 
Beth Snyder, Michael E. Flaherty, Tony Walker, W. 
Randall Detrick, Scott D. Reed, Michael K. Boss, 
Laurel A. Nevins. SECOND ROW: Lyndal Nyberg, 
Marilyn Cunningham, Janice Albright, Tye White, 



Scott L. Jacobsen, Diane K. Legge, Trudy D. Rem- 
pel, James H. Jatko. THIRD ROW: Louis Pigno, Eliz- 
abeth E. Criss, LeRoy Johnson, Kathrine L Cole- 
man, Brian J. Graul, Lisa G. Rempel, Lizabeth A. 
Slinkman, Nancy K Nickell, Mark I. Holt. BOTTOM 



ROW: Stephen P. Easterday, Carolyn J. Thayer, 
Marsha L. Curtis, Roxanna M. Fundis, Paul Tara- 
bek, Patti L. Allen, Jeanette F. Slinkman, Dave 
McClelland, Sally A. Blomguist. 



178 — interest groups 



collegiate chorale 




TOP ROW: K. Douglas Matson, Bernard Franklin, 
John Olson, David Rogers, Mark A. Pennington, 
Dave C. Atwell, Joe L. Frasier, John C. Burk, Doug 
D. Bowers. SECOND ROW: Chuck V. Adams, Steve 
D. Dietz, David W. Hunt, Kevin C. Webster, Russ D. 
Anderson, Tim I. McCool, Karl Fabrizius, Richard J. 



Sheahan, Rylan J. Bebermeyer, Jack Frost, Kevin 
C. Ericson. THIRD ROW: Paula S. Winter, Carol 
Grier, Nancy S. Whisman, Doti L. Jacobs, Colleen J. 
Meyer, Jane K. Schultz, Suzanne E. Schlender, 
Gwen McMillen, Barbara J. Bodecker, Judy K. 
Whearty, Donna D. Brown. BOTTOM ROW: Lisa C. 



Montgomery, Karen L. Roth, Vickie Kellenberger, 
Deb D. Parsons, Heather McCaustland, Carolyn J. 
Thayer, Ruthie J. Oman, Melinda K. Foreman, Linda 
S. Henderson, Mary Lou Bowers, Ann M. Zimmer- 
man, Debbie K. Krehbiel, Kathy D. Hensley, Paula J. 
Hoisington. 



concert choir 




TOP ROW: Ed F. Gwin, Greg S. Herzog, Ralph G. 
Weber, Vincent N. Baskin, John A. Holmes, Noel D. 
Sylvester, Robert A. Calhoun, Greg D. Olds, Steve 
N. Thomason, Robert G. Eaverson, John Barnes, 
James Hamilton, Bruno F. Tschannen. SECOND 
ROW: Tom Faulkner, Dennis J. Schatfer, Duane E. 
Williams, Keith A. Wright, Steve E. Chellgren, Roy 



C. Lashbrook, Gary L. Tolle, Dallas D. Hainline, 
Steve P. Larkin, Bill G. Woodard, Matthew W. Smith, 
Larry Bommarito, Martin H. Prettyman. THIRD 
ROW: Lisa Good, Alice F. Schneider, Nancy Martin, 
Jean M. Peterson, M. Susan Eisiminger, Ginny E. 
Fuller, Robin J. Rives, Connie Nutter, Cindy Dieck- 
grafe, Heidi M. Surber Anne K. Lacy, Wanetta Col- 



lins, Ann C. Tollefson. BOTTOM ROW: Patti D. 
Whitt, Pennie Parcel, Sue Yocum, Audrey K. Span- 
nuth, Jeanette F. Slinkman, Gina D. Cox, Lee Ann 
Paulson, Jonna Bolan, Debbie K. Sullins, Annetta 
M. Kemper, Lauren A. Reed, Janet R. Lowdon, 
Kathy D Burkhard. 



interest groups ■ 



marching band 




FLUTES: Gary A. Anderson, Charlotte L. Bevens, 
Tana J. Billingham, Patricia J. Bruey, Gara L. Bur- 
nette, Marcee L. Buchner, Shelli L. Darrow, Bonnie 
G. Dickerhoof, Susan Garinger, Saundra E. Gould, 
Debbie Hawk, Susan Hill, Kathryn Jorderberg, Mary 
J. Kent, Janet S. Kerwin, Renee S. Marcotte, Shelia 

D. McKain, Phyllis A. Murphy, Karen Z. Nations, 
Wendy Parks, Debra C. Pearson, Audrey D. Percy, 
Sulynn J. Richards, Patricia G. Roberts, Debra J. 
Romberger, Becky Smith, Tracey L. Smith, Candy 
L. Spacek, Joy D. Swallow, Cindy A. Stearns, Lisa 
L. Tharp, Kerri J. West, Sandra C. Wendt, Judy K. 
Whearty. CLARINETS: Susan M. Bahre, Chris A. 
Biegler, Melanie J. Bowden, Douglas D. Bowers, 
Susan J. Burden, Vicki Carmell, Terri Clark, Cindy 
A. Cunningham, Marty R. Currie, Terry S. Godfrey, 
Pamela S. Gray, Rose Jilka, Randy E. Keil, Patricia 
Lynam, Laurie J. McGinty, Scott M. Miller, Peggy J. 
Nightengale, Bruce A. Noe, Cynthia M. Page, 
Susan K. Pickler, Pamela K. Rader, Ann E. Reising, 
Barbara Riedel, Mary K. Robitaille, Mary E. Rogge, 
Kathryn M. Shippers, Susan K. Pickett, Susan A. 
Treiber, Dana J. Woellhof, Deborah L. Hunt, Janice 

E. Knopp, Nancy J. Koukol, Nancy J. Naethe, Mari- 
lyn K. Wagner. ALTO CLARINET: Gale D. Theirolf. 
BASS CLARINETS: Randy Cain, Lorinda M. Duch, 
Max E. Gump, Nita L. Havel, Jane E. Knoche. 
TENOR SAXOPHONES: Melvin R. Cairns, Larry W. 
Durant, Kevin C. Ericson, Richard N. Rogers, Diane 
Sebesta, Kirk Shippers, Gay L. Stewart, Joleen M. 
Wary. BARITONE SAXOPHONES: Daniel M. Davis, 
Nancy E. Nutter. ALTO SAXOPHONES: Cynthia L. 
Andrew, Marlene Buris, Constance S. Butin, Jon K. 
Chestnut, Ronald D. Conner, Dean A. Cox, Rhonda 
R. Engelland, Kenna S. Fincher, Brenda M. Finni- 
gan, Carol Hahn, Lisa L. Hittle, Debra J. Hopkins, 



Kent E. Ketterman, Susan K. Latta, John D. Lee 
David S. Londeen, David A. McLeland, Tim Nichols 
Rita A. Oltjen, Jan K. Peterson, Terri S. Reinhardt 
Cynthia R. Siemens, Janice Shadday, Cynthia L 
Stroh, Jeffrey J. Sutton, Michael K. Snyder, Brian C 
Short, Nancy S. Whisman, Donna P. Simon. MEL 
LOPHONES: Cherie A. Brinkman, Douglas J. Cech 
Jackie E. Durant, Stephen L. Foerster, Lisa D. 
Henry, Roy C. Lashbrook, Jana K. Muchow, Steven 
Rector, Cinda L. Roberts, Richard Shearer, Robert 
M. Willis, Linda J. Young. TROMBONES: Dick 
Anderson, Charles B. Baker, Roma L. Baldwin 
Dwane M. Beckenhauer, Lyle J. Cain, William R 
Carpenter, John M. Cater, Randall L. Crow, David 
T. Duensing, Rodney M. Funk, Wesley R. Hay, 
Charles E. Herrmann, Wyatt A. Hoch, Gevin C. 
Kidd, David L. Lee, Becky A. Malin, John W. Marks 
Ernest L. Mason, Myron Molzen, Russell W. Palmer 
Larry K. Rhodes, Timothy R. Shook, Bruce E. Sny 
der, Michael L. Spearman, Sharon J. Spiller, Wesley 
D. Strowig, Jim Tutman, Richard A. Vilander, Ran 
dell G. Wagner, Ralph G. Weber, Kent M. Willis, Ste 
phen T. Carr, Eric A. Schroll. TRUMPETS: Russell 
D. Anderson, Rebecca J. Ballew, Alexis J. Beamer 
Rylan J. Bebermeyer, Mark A. Bichel, Bill Boaldin 
Randa Gallion, Gary F. Garten, Keith W. Graber 
Donald Hanna, William D. Harding, Richard B 
Henoch, Marilou Huxman, Douglas W. Irvin, Mon- 
trula Johnson, Karen M. Kirkendall, Joan C 
Kroupa, Forrest C. Lawson, Steven J. Lundberg 
Michel A. Maddux, Douglas R. McKaig, Pat Minnis 
Paula J. Mohler, Bill A. Ogle, David R. Owen, Ste 
phen H. Pomeroy, Kraig M. Post, James A. Reim 
und, Alan L. Remick, Richard A. Roenigk, Steven J 
Rowel, Terry A. Schmidt, Martin E. Sellberg, Joce 



lyn K. Sheets, Robert J. Shideler, Dale W. Stiles, 
Doug L. Stiles, Gary D. Strohm, Eric Sutton, Mike 
Thompson, Wayne L. Thompson, Kenneth A. Ward, 
Randall E. Ward, Spencer T. White, Terry York, Dor- 
othy A. Terry, William T. McCann, Cecilia V. Ver- 
schelden. BARITONES: Dennis J. Brinkman, William 
L. Cummings, Margaret A. Duwe, Marjorie M. Nei- 
bling, James A. Nyquist, Karl D. Paxton, Ken Pow- 
ell, Thomas B. Reed, Scott O. Sickler. BASS: Cheryll 
A. Becker, Bart Blickenstaff, Bradley C. Colburn, 
Robert D. Foster, John B. Godfrey, Chad W. Hain- 
line, Timothy F. Schliekee, Kirby A. Shineman, 
Anthony C. Walker, John P. Jilka. PERCUSSION: 
Steve Adams, David L. Altenbernd, Scott Anderson, 
Rick L. Aubrey, Charles Bey, Sally A. Blomquist, 
Scott A. Bohning, Edward Gonzales, Joseph R. Har- 
grave, John Hecht, Terry A. Hull, Jeffrey L. Keeler, 
Delaine K. Kleiner, Michael A. Leonard, Vicki 
Olandt, John Pendleton, Judith L. Roberts, Darrel L. 
Schwilling, Richard S. Smalley, Lucy Stout, Keith D. 
Thomas. K-STEPPERS: Melissa Moore, Annette 
Anderson, Rebecca A. Frye, Darcy L. Frye, Kittie V. 
Hargrave, Karen L. Hay, Corrine K. Riniker, Lori A. 
Rose, Julie K. Tucker, Donita L. Whitney, Jane Wil- 
cox. FEATURE TWIRLERS: Kim Stegman, Karen 
Wilson. MANAGERS: Darrell E. Herrmann, Joseph 
M. McAfee, Gale J. Rose. DRUM MAJORS: David E. 
Cink, Jane L. Dembski, Michelle A. Lewis, David H. 
Livingood. SECRETARY: Nancy K. Kongs. STU- 
DENT ASSISTANTS: Tommy J. Taylor, Thomas L. 
Zercher. FLAGS: Patricia L. Cooper, Shirley L. Fine, 
Cheri L. Fiscus, Teresea R. Hecht, Carol Klopfen- 
stein, Marilyn E. Lacey, Martha L. Minturn, Maryann 
Stalcups Susan K. Veach, Christy Hrabe, Mary S. 
Herbers, Sally L. Sharp. 




1 80 — interest groups 



symphonic orchestra 




TOP ROW: Steve H. Hitt, Ann E. Bidwell, Craig R. 

Biegler, Robert W. Wisecup, Debra A. Boyd, Jeff R. 

Frost, Dennis R. Jones, Patrick D. Heinz, Daryl J. 

Batchelor, Wesley D. Strowig, Debra J. Fromme, 
j Randy L. Crow, Chad W. Hainline. SECOND ROW: 
i Janice Albright, Vince N. Baskin, Brock Dale, Beth 
I Snyder, Ty White, Nita L. Havel, Lila E. Ahlquist, 

Susan A. Treiber, Lionel C. Noel, Suzan Hall, Mic- 



helle A. Lewis, Mike E. Flaherty, Chris Banner, 
Anthony C. Walker, W. Randy Detrick, Trudy D. 
Rempel. THIRD ROW: Lyndal Nyberg, Marilyn Cun- 
ningham, Scott L. Jacobsen, Nancy L. Stover, Lisa 
L. Tharp, Elizabeth I. Evans, Bret Tomasch, Renee 
S. Marcotte, Carol J. Campbell, Deadra L. Cauble, 
Mitzi C. Maddux, Rich Brunner, Scott D. Reed, Mike 
K. Boss, Laurie A. Nevins, Jim H. Jatko, Florence H. 



Schwab. FOURTH ROW: Lisa Criss, David K, Mel- 
gaard, Leroy Johnson, Kathy L. Coleman, Brian J. 
Graul, Liz A. Slinkman, Nancy K. Nickell, Mark I. 
Holt. BOTTOM ROW: Steven P. Easterday, Louis 
Pigno, Marsha L. Curtis, Roxanna M. Fundis, Paul 
A. Tarabek, Patti L. Allen, Jeanette F. Slinkman, 
Dave McClelland, Sally A. Blomquist, Paula J. Hois- 
ington. 



symphonic wind ensemble 




TOP ROW: Jack A. Flouer, Craig R. Biegler, Allen L. Anderson, Kim A. Harrison, Patrick D. Heinz, Keith L. Havel, Jefferson M. Brown, Robert W. Wisecup, 



I Carter, Stephen H. Hitt, Michael A. Leonard, 
jTommy J. Taylor, Joseph R. Hargrave, Rick L. 
j Aubrey, Timothy F. Schlieker, Michael K. Boss, 
Marjorie M. Neibling, Rebecca J. Ballew. SECOND 
ROW: Melissa Moore, Laurie J. McGinty, Chris A. 
Biegler, Kathryn A. Hess, Eric Sutton, Russell D. 



M. Hinman, Jon M. Hutchison, Debra J. Fromme, 
Thomas L. Zercher, Lisa L. Hittle, Sara S. Goldber- 
ger, Mary A. Stone, Bryan C. Brown, Cynthia L. 
Andrew, Florence H. Schwab. THIRD ROW: Susan 
A. Treiber, Cynthia M. Page, Nancy E. Nutter, Nita 



Debra A. Boyd, Jeff R. Frost, Ann E. George, Janice 
Shadday. BOTTOM ROW: Deborah K. Marshall, Lila 
E. Ahlquist, Lionel C. Noel, Deadra L. Cauble, Mitzi 
C. Maddux, Carol J. Campbell, Suzan Hall, Jane E. 
Tobler, Lisa Tharp. 



american choral director association 



TOP ROW: Jonna L. Bolan, Heather C. McCaustland, 
Mary J. Weber, Kerry K. Binford. SECOND ROW: Deb- 
bie K. Krehbiel, Barbara A. Floyd, Pennie E. Parcel. 
BOTTOM ROW: Noel D. Sylvester, LeeAnn Paulson, 
Kent D. Matson. 




concert jazz ensemble 



TOP ROW: Robert G. Montogomery, Joseph R. Har- 
grave, Allen L. Carter, Tommy J. Taylor, Thomas L. 
Zercher, Debra J. Fromme, Michael L. Spearman, John 
Burlington, Wesley D. Strowig. SECOND ROW: Scott D. 
Reed, Steve J. Rowel, Martin E. Sellberg, Michael M. 
Esau, Randall E. Ward, Keith W. Graber, Daniel Bald- 
win, Phillip W. Hewett. BOTTOM ROW: Randy Dedrick, 
Michelle A. Lewis, Cynthia L. Stroh, Cynthia L. Andrew, 
Jon K. Chestnut, Lisa L. Hittle. 




k-state singers 



TOP ROW: Gerald Polich, Sharon A. Wilson, Mike P. 
Oliver, Debra L. Andrews, Kevin E. Koch, Andrea J. 
Curry. BOTTOM ROW: Ray L. Witthuhn, Kent S. Wil- 
liams, Denise M. Jackson, Denise L. Craig, Catharine 
A. Brown, Joni L. Dittemore, Mark R. Keller, Robert A. 
Langenkamp. 



GiM©Q© 




1 82 — interest groups 



men's glee club 




united black voices 



^^Lj 




women's glee club 




TOP ROW: James F. Compton, Tindel K. Jenmson, 
Daniel J. Schrader, Jerry L. Frees, Scott R. Wible, John 
R. Campbell, Joseph L. Koechner, Dana G. Olson, 
John T. Olson, James W. Eubank, James E. Reese. 
SECOND ROW: Terry L. York, Jack W. Roddy, Calvin J. 
Glasco, Ronald P. Jones, Kent S. Williams, G. Richard 
Munson, Michael T. Geisert, Robert W. Sanford, 
George H. Pearson, Timothy L. McDiffett. THIRD ROW: 
Leon E. Sylvester, Gary L. Walker, Tony A. Wilbeck, 
Christian A. G. Loschcke, Gary W. Fisher, Steven L. 
Zielke, Samuel C. Lefever, Steve J. Miller, Norman D. 
Brown, Gerald S. Polich. BOTTOM ROW: Richard H. 
Brensing, Gary L. Michels, Richard B. Strunk, Daniel H. 
Roberts, Guy M. Seiler, Robert J. Dahl, Lawrence R. 
Moehlenbrink, Lee L. Stuart, Kevin E. Koch, Stuart C. 
Brubaker, Janet S. Deines. 



TOP ROW: Janice M. Murry, Rose J. Downs, Rosalin 
Willis, Cherrie L. James, Tami E. Farr. SECOND ROW: 
Emily A. Levell, Bernard W. Norman, Pamela J. Bayn- 
ham, Frances A. Gunn, Micah A. Ross, James D. Mer- 
cer. BOTTOM ROW: Norma Thomas, Ernest Downs, 
Ezell A. Blanchard, Billy Williams, Gary L. Robinson, Gil 
Alexander. 



TOP ROW: Candace K. Cramer, Eydie R. Matz, Karen 
A. Dunne, Cindy A. Wilcox, Renet A. Olson, Mary M. 
Hartig, Teresa K. Klaumann, Wanda L. Wainwright, 
Teresa M. Costello, Gwen K. Chase. SECOND ROW: 
Jana J. Redeker, Ruth E. Howard, Tressa A. Mikesell, 
Rita A. Oltjen, Janet L. Myers, Jacquelyn R. Ayres, 
Kathleen A. Youngblood, Judith A. Nutter, Carol S. 
Goodsell. THIRD ROW: Mary A. Williamson, Barbara J. 
Hixson, Shelli L. Darrow, Janet A. Mahoney, Sara E. 
Ehret, Marcy L. Denyer, Wilma L. Masters, Gerald S. 
Polich. BOTTOM ROW: Gayle M. Rauscher, Nancy K. 
Baker, Cindy A. Wesson, Cindy S. Grisham, Donna D. 
Brown, Pamela E. Hoffman, Jamie L. Compaan, Gay L. 
Stewart, Patricia A. Macke. 



interest groups — 183 





FWO© 




Service organizations contribute to the well-being of 
both the University and the community-at-large. Their 
members help the elderly and youth, work in hospitals, 
help run bloodmobiles, and participate in such projects 
as the Walk for Mankind. 




184 — service groups 



alpha phi omega 




TOP ROW: Sherry L. Harber, Jerrilee Williams, Julie M. 
Thielen, Belinda A. Pfeifer, Janice A. Staats, Beverly A. 
Urbanski, Kevin C Hensley, Daniel J Landon, Paul N. 
Briggs, Kathy J. McDonough. SECOND HOW: Darrell 
D. Spoon, Daniel E. Speed, Donald D. Firestone, Bev- 
erly A. Brzuchalski, Ronald A. Kite, Janet A. Mahoney, 
Jill M. Burris, Michael J. Sauber, Judith J. Mathewson, 
A. Thornton Edwards. THIRD ROW: Pamela A. 
McGuire, Lon R. Seaman, Bryce A. Tolin, Dell J. Klema, 
William L. Boeh, David E. Adams, Michael G. Berry, 
James T. Grimwood, Glenn D. Marshall, Michael W 
Thompson. BOTTOM ROW: Reginald A. VanPelt, Paul 
J. Prosser, D. Glen Gee, Michael W. Murphy, Patrick R. 
Schwab, Paul W. Burns, Gordon A. Brest, Don E Wer- 
ner, Thomas N. Roane, Charles W. Brzuchalski. 



circle k club 




TOP ROW John E Glasgow, Steven E. Hill, Jamie- 
Leigh Compaan, Kathryn J McDonough, Elizabeth C. 
Stevens, Rodney M. Funk SECOND ROW: Edward P. 
Call, Rodney B. Peters. BOTTOM ROW Carol S 
Hamm, Mary C. Holder, Janet L. Edwards, Barbara A. 
Betzold. 



delta sigma theta 




TOP ROW: Gurner F. Stuart, Lynda C. Dotson, Debo- 
rah A. Combs. BOTTOM ROW: Terri A. Combs, Gay- 
nelle A. Jennings, Dedria L Dane 



Stvvu .' groups 






Reflecting the diversity ot cultural and social interests 
at K-State are many organizations which help to 
emphasize cultural identities, unify people with com- 
mon concerns, and familiarize other students with their 
unique qualities. 



Much like other foreign student associations, the 
African Student Association is designed as a means for 
Africans on campus to meet socially and realize com- 
mon goals. Among the association's activities are the 
All African Night and special events sponsored by stu- 
dents from individual African nations. 

Veterans on Campus offers services suited to the 
special needs of veterans. It is active in promoting legis- 
lation on both federal and state levels, offers orientation 
programs to incoming veterans, sponsors a book 
exchange, and holds veteran group life seminars. 

Kappa Alpha Psi, a black fraternity, seeks to provide 
educational and social activities on a university-wide 
basis, with an emphasis on black culture. The fraternity 
sponsors the Sickle Cell Walk-a-thon and the Dean 
Harris Scholarship. 



TOP ROW Rebecca F. Kolo, Erne C. Nkugba, Seth L. 
Musisi, Bassey E. Ossom, Bartholomew I. Muruli, S. E. 
K. Muwanga-Zake, Joseph N. Sama. SECOND ROW: 
Adamu A. Warra, Bashir H. Teirab, Timothy A. Gbodi, 
Adrian W. Mukhebi, Abdu D. Tofa, Umaru Hassan. 
BOTTOM ROW: Samuel K. M. Kiggwe, Zaiyanu Z. A. 
Abdullahi, Babatunde Ajakaiye, Gyang, Isidore N. 
Timti, Yoramu J. Ajeani. 



TOP ROW: Mark D. Atzenhoffer, Alan M. Goldstein, 
Stanley A. Wileman, Ira P. Gutchin, Lee B. Fleischman. 
BOTTOM ROW: James C. Galitzer, Steven J. Galitzer, 
llene Gutchin, Michael Dubrott, Charlotte Edelman. 



african student association 




b'nai b'rith hillel 




vici.il club', 



collegiate 4-H 




TOP ROW: Shirley R. Smith, Carol J. Peckman, Cynthia R. 
Siemens, Deb L. Drake, Judy K. Gress, Joy E. Dunback, 
Nancy R. Olsen, Joleen D. Moden, Gayle L. Davis, Linda S. 
Peterson. SECOND ROW: Alice J. Phillips, Karma J. Over- 
miller, Debbie J. Williams, Ann R. Johnson, Cecilia M. Kasl, 
Rose M. Kaiser, James L. Cooper, Barbara I Roe, Annette 
J. Conners. THIRD ROW: Douglas K. Claassen, Beverly F. 
Droge, Gary D. Anderson, James L. Gordon, Robert R. 
Kellogg, Adel L. Visser, Randy L. O'Neal, Cathleen J. 
Langton. BOTTOM ROW: Lyle J. Cain, Vernon L. Waldren, 
Rex W. Harbison, Clayton J. Story, Deryl E. Waldren, Karl 
W. McNorton, Mark E. Henley, Stanley A. Konicek, 
Theresa M. Gleue. 







t&JU® 


r J-: y§iji'j 


ir/^ Cr ^^mi 


9 ^ -' CjB *^ 

i 4 A 1 



TOP ROW: Sara J. Mertz, Elizabeth D. Aust, Denise J. 
Dahl, Barbara A. Betzold, Emily G. Rest, Julie L. 
Govert, Nancy S. Montort, Carol A. LuKert, Kristi J. 
Hardman, Shirley F. Cowen. SECOND ROW: Lisa A. 
Sexton, Mary J. Smith, Christa J. Fagan, Joyce K. 
Haskett, Rebecca J. Tanner, Linda K. Richter, Mary L. 
Milberger, Kathy K. Lindholm, Janet K. Musick. THIRD 
ROW: Susan K. Gartrell, Melody Leigh Compaan, 
Peggy M. Jensen, Paula K. Ritter, James A. Lobmeyer, 
Kaye L. Klema, Jamie Leigh Compaan, Susan D. Apley, 
Kathi M. Albright, N. Dean Stoskopt. BOTTOM ROW: 
Daniel W. Sexton, Steven K. Riffel, Donnie E. Bolt, 
Richard C. Snell, Carl H. Garten, Curtis R. Willhite, 
Casey D. Garten, Leon E. Sylvester, Gary L. Baehler. 



kappa alpha psi 




TOP ROW: Ivan E. Harrison, Arthur L. Alexander, Larry 
E. Thaw, Karl Townsend, Cornell C. Hill. SECOND 
ROW. Wayne L. Franklin, Hiawatha Turner, Gorenzo A. 
Matthews, Solomon Tafesse. THIRD ROW: John R. Wil- 
liams, Lawrence I. Combs, Roger A. Williams, Tyron S. 
Thompson, Robert G. Watson. BOTTOM ROW: Joseph 
Copes, Curtis Lee, Vance D. Roland, Alan D. Moore, 
Darnell Smith. 



social clubs — 187 



k-laires 



TOP ROW: Carol L. Hahn, Bonita A. Lassman, Susan 
C. Jones, Deborah E. Clark, Beverly E. Holman, Angela 
C. Rexwinkle, Mary L. Milberger, Judy K. Gress, Kim J. 
Curry. SECOND ROW: Janis K. G. Loo, Elaine C. Hefty, 
Terry S. Godfrey, Janef K. Musick, Cindy A. Auen, 
Cindy M. Macy, Jean A. Dunn, Pamela J. Snyder. 
THIRD ROW: Karen L. Johnson, Daniel J. Landon, 
Diane M. Robson, Laurie K. Schroeder, Beverly F. 
Droge, Kathleen A. Klein, Vince R. Zawistowski. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Thorn L. Felton, John E. Shearer, David H. 
Weast, Danny H. Rogers, Kay S. Conkwright, Curtis R. 
Willhite, Rex W. Harbison, Paul D. Clark. 




TOP ROW: Jody S. Johnston, Treva J. Rader, Christy 
A. St. Clair, Shelly D. Thompson, Gwen S. Johnson 
Barbara S. Seers, Debbie J. Williams, Suzanne C 
Shaw, Catherine A. Gillett. SECOND ROW: Jan R 
Bohn, B. Jean Gruber, Bonnie H. Schmidt, Malia J 
Weide, Mian H. Rehman, Ronald B. Crosier, Brad Ham- 
ilton, Rab N. Khan. THIRD ROW: Penny S. Burger 
James L. Dempster, Richard E. Dempster, Pam Mose 
ley, J. C. Wright, Drew I. Lowrey, William L. McGee 
BOTTOM ROW: Randall R. Gruber, J. Michael Kiwiey 
Arlan E. Bentz, Shane A. Soeken, Harry C. Stenvall, C 
David Johnson, Kenneth J. Stoss, Mark R. Corbin. 



A ^m.^^5l Vj# &-?^^ 




I ' "'~PH 


Urn 


"j^TlM Mh ^ i 




' M 


HI |[i - 



mecha 



TOP ROW: Rebecca M. Leon, Joanna I. Smith, Carolyn 
F. Rosales, Maria M. Chavez. SECOND ROW: Maria A. 
Rivas, Stephanie M. Elmore, Lucas M. Herme, Teresa 
M. Guillen, Lucinda M. Gonzales. BOTTOM ROW: Ger- 
ardo Jaramklo, Manuel C. Munoz, Art B. Rays, Arthur 
C. Munoz. 





188 — social • Jut,-. 



phi kappa trakka 




pigma sti 




veterans on campus 



^ © 




TOP ROW: Alice M. Wheat, Teri L. Anderson, Mary L. 
Muehlbach, Leesa M. Wallace, Sharon L. Stinson, Jane 
A. Wittmeyer, Becky A. Watts, Diana J. Shaw, Cindy J. 
Young, Renee S. Urish, Dona J. Werkmeister. SECOND 
ROW: Sharon A. McKee, Jacolyn E. Bowman, Teresa 
L. Everett, Veronica McGillick, Austin B. Campbell, 
Joyce R. Urish, Carla K. Nealy, Cathy R. Nealy, Diane 
K. Moeller, Melony L. Beneke. THIRD ROW: Janice A. 
Smith, Ann C. King, Kevin Sloan, Chris J. Muehlbach, 
Jett W. Schemmel, Doug E. Knauss, Bob L. Prince, 
Mark R. Denning, Raymond J. Hamilton. BOTTOM 
ROW: Ted F. Settle, James G. Nicolay, Joseph F. Ryan, 
Roger B. Winter, Tim R. Davis, Larry D. Beesley, Greg- 
ory L. Schlatter, Kent L. Adams, Michael J. Braden, 
Donald L. Akin. 



TOP ROW: Doug R. Gfeller, Mike D. Relihan, Bruce A. 
Relihan, Doug A. Davidson, Dave Moreland, Phil S. 
Yerby. SECOND ROW: Gregg T. Barnes, Broc Sears, 
Eric L. Lavine, Dave E. Roesler. BOTTOM ROW: Nick A. 
Sottler, Mike D. Rousselot, Wayne E. Buhrer. 



TOP ROW: Michael R. Sheely, Doral E. Leasure, Patri- 
cia R. Pritchard, Harold D. Weathers, Richard Brun- 
gardt. SECOND ROW: Donald R. Bock, Norman E. 
Bradley, Jack A. Curtis, Harold D. Howlett, Ronald L. 
Samuels. BOTTOM ROW: Charles F. Schneider, Mitc- 
hell B. Gerlaugh, Fredric L. Davis, Carl E. Smith, 
George W. Sanneman. 




Whether pursuing a physically demanding hobby, 
promoting the competitive spirit, or representing K- 
State across the world, sports oriented organizations 
aid in creating vitality on campus. 

Both beginners and experienced shooters can 
sharpen and demonstrate their skills by joining the 
Rifle Club. The basics of handling weapons safely 
are taught by club members and individuals of 



exceptional ability participate on the club's team, which 
competes on local, national, and international levels. 

The Scuba Club gives K-Staters the opportunity to 
explore underwater depths, with instructions on the 
proper use of scuba equipment and trips to different 
diving sites. The Fencing Club makes available 
another recreational endeavor and sponsors tourna- 
ments for beginners. 

Pep Coordinating Council is responsible for main- 
taining school spirit. The Council selects cheerleaders 
and Willie the Wildcat, as well as coordinating pre- 
game rallies. 

Pridettes, the K-State drill team, entertains the crowd 
during half-time at football and basketball games. Help- 
ing to attract quality athletes to play those games are 
the Kitten Kruiters, who familiarize prospective players 
with the campus. 



190 — sports oriented 




cheerleaders 




TOP ROW: Robert L. Harper, Terry L Walker, Deborah 
L. Bell, Jeffrey R. McDade, Gerald W. Janssen, Gerald 
R. Stites, Greg L. Baker, Jon E. Portell, Gary Brelpohl. 
BOTTOM ROW: Kerry Binford, Robin E. Walker, Ann E. 
Wiggins, H. Daniel Bufler, Shan A. Shalala, Chrisfy 
Schrum, Marfha L. Parsons, Sheryl M. Sasenick, Susan 
Conard. 



diamond darlings 




TOP ROW: Deb L. Bell, Janet S. Deines, Lee A. 
Schutte, Jan A. Saunders, Susie Burrus. BOTTOM 
ROW: Mary E. Glidden, Cathy A. Reiland, Dianne Feild, 
Carrie Henderson, Jan Southard. 



fencing club 




TOP ROW: Denise Elliott, Charles A. Matley, Dick Hay- 
ter, John P. Odell, Richard Eyestone, Joseph B. 
McCullough. BOTTOM ROW: Steve W. Koenig, Lucia 
K. Smith, Elaine B. Haynes, Paul Briggs, Gary A 
McNaughton. 



sports oriented - 



kitten kruiters 



TOP ROW: Cheryl A. Charles, Lynne M. Rieger, Lisa L. 
Gerstner, Shelly R. Heinen, Inga Z. Walker, Pam Y. 
Green, Paulette Ketter, Connie A. Wray, Vicki L. Helms. 
SECOND ROW: Cynthia L. Rischer, Bobbie L. Bessette, 
Julie K. Tucker, Vicki J. Brougher, Donna J. Blue, Amy 
L. Snider, Joanna Reed, D. J. Mense, Karen Ingram, 
Juanita Alexander. THIRD ROW: Cindy L. Woods, Kim- 
berly S. Fisher, Christina J. Kleweno, Judy C. Weltsch, 
Miriam L. Hicklin, Ellen Upton, Debra E. Jones, Jonette 
R. Genchan, Penny S. Burger. BOTTOM ROW: Cindy 
S. Grisham, Sandra L. Oldberg, Candi J. Gaplinger, 
Marty K. Beaston, Pamela S. Grout, Lilly J. Nelson, 
Eileen E. Grossardt, Laura L. Burnett. 




pep co-ordinating council 



TOP ROW: Mary E. Glidden, Lisa M. Flynn, Shann A. 
Shalala, Pam Green, Cheryl A. Charles, Kimberle J. 
Rule, Janet S. Stephenson. SECOND ROW: Lisa M. 
Schlueter, Paul A. Heuermann, Daniel J. Landon, 
Gregory E. Bogue, Paula J. Neugent, Gerald W. Jans- 
sen. BOTTOM ROW: Phillip W. Hewett, Roderick A. 
Kline, Ronald E. Ringer, Bradley L. Rothermel, David E. 
Cink. 



TOP ROW: Susan J. Foley, Kathleen A. Mitts, Debbie 
Johnson, Kathryn L. Kraft, Debra L. Hastings, Debbie 
Byarlay, Debra L. Ogden, H. Jill Thayer, Georgiana 
Beverly, Cynthia E. Ott, Joan D. Vogts, L. Lynn Cox, 
Susan E. Rohles, Sandra L. Miller, Pam L. White, 
Rebecca A. Brewer, Lisa L. Arnone, Teresa J. Bosch, 
Teresa M. Costello, Debra J. Martin. BOTTOM ROW: 
Cinde Doby, Suzanne K. Woolery, Barbara J. 
Bodecker, Cheryl A. Charles, Lori A. Griffith, Kym L. 
Cline, Deborah A. Andrew, Charlotte A. McKee, Gwen 
S. Macon, Gyll Bates, Thena M. Bell, Debbie Barker, 
Sheila M. Bright, Suzan G. Holcomb, Su M. Townsend, 
Joni M. Blanding, Kimberle J. Rule, Eydie R. Matz, Amy 
Walters, Teresa L. Myzer. 





192 — sports oriented 



rifle team 




TOP ROW: Evan Parsons, Rick S. Stubbs, Bill W. 
Ahrens, Lamont A. Ross, Margaret J. Schoap, Byron 
W. LeClerc. BOTTOM ROW: James H. Owens, Mark A. 
Fanty, Leo P. Matzeder, June E. Bryan, Gregg L. Rein- 
hardt, Frank Vovk. 



TOP ROW: Bill Burmeister, Greg B. Young, Barry R. 
Heller, Dave M. Hachinsky, Robert L. Dye. BOTTOM 
ROW: David R. Stone, Greg D. Stonecipher, Brentton 
G. Stoller, Dennis L. Wilder, Stephen L. Foerster, Greg 
C. Clark. 



sports car club 




TOP ROW: Melvin D. Dale, James L. Carter, John R. 
McKay, Larry L. French, Jim E. Nail, Eric R. Thompson. 
SECOND ROW: Case A. Bonebrake, Ken Sidorowicz, 
Matt McGill, Jon J. Held, Cris T. J. Castaneda. THIRD 
ROW: Kevin T. Knutson, Rick Raymond, William C. 
Hofelt, Harry E. Kimball, Irvin S. Greer, Scott R. Downie. 
BOTTOM ROW: Michael S. Brannan, Warren F. Roseb- 
raugh, Siegfried D. Benson, Scott A. Kessler, Keith E. 
Boyer. 



sports oriented - 






Central to the campus organizations, and providing 
funding for most, is the Student Governing Association. 
SGA gleans its funds from student activity fees and allo- 
cates them according to need, largely through the aus- 
pices of the college councils. 



Other services offered to the general student body 
are a consumer-business arbitration board, and the 
Fine Arts Council, which brings as much entertainment 
to campus as possible. 

The Interfraternity Council and Panhellenic Council 
serve as channels of communication between inde- 
pendent greek chapters. Through workshops, cooper- 
atives, and other joint activities, greeks work together 
without sacrificing chapter diversity. 

Residence halls provide similar advantages for stu- 
dents through KSUARH, the associated residence hall 
governing board, which regulates policies and pro- 
gramming. 



TOP ROW: Colleen G. Feese, Elizabeth A. Leech, Joan 
K. Calhoun, Karen S. Matson, Norma J. Claassen, Mark 
A. Rogers. SECOND ROW: Elaine R. Suderman, Linda 
K. Houghton, Sherry K. Pigg, Bryce F. Haverkamp, Jo 
A. Farney, Maria J. Zarda, Becky A. Watts. THIRD 
ROW: Jean A. Strathman, Larie L. Schoap, Annette L. 
Thurlow, Thomas R. Crook, Brenda S. West, Barbara J. 
Doebele. BOTTOM ROW: Cathy A. Butts, Kenneth E. 
Allen, Deb Haifleigh, Dave Davidson, Mark Hilyard. 



TOP ROW: Eddy J. Van Meter, Carole A. Francq, Con- 
nie H. Batson, Sylvia J. Blanding, O. John Seltridge, 
Draytford Richardson, Dorothy L. Thompson, Judy 
Miller. SECOND ROW: Milton L. Manuel, Lowell E. 
Brandner, James C. Carey, Ross Mickelsen, Frank Ora- 
zem, Carol L. Miller, Phoebe J. Samelson, Bernard 
Franklin, Amy L. Button, Christopher Badger, David E. 
Schafer, Donald L. Figurski, Floyd H. Price, James J. 
Albracht. THIRD ROW: Keith H. Christensen, Orville W. 
Bidwell, Margaret N. Nordin, Thomas L. Brown, Law- 
rence R. Jauch, Kenneth L. Fox, Charles B. Corbin, 
Robert L. Gorton, Richard R. Gallagher, Kendall F. 
Casey, John T. Pence. FOURTH ROW: M. Betsy Ber- 
gen, Roscoe Ellis, John K. Strickler, Paul F. DeWeese, 
Neil V. Anderson, William E. Moore, Naomi B. Lynn, 
Page C. Twiss. BOTTOM ROW: Warren V. Walker, Leo- 
nard E. Fuller, Ray A. Keen, John M. Marr, Robert L. 
Johnson, Robert W. Schoetf , Theresa A. Perenich, 
Jack L. Lambert. 



consumer relations board 



(j'r/Wnihf) |» „'jp|', 




fine arts council 




LEFT TO RIGHT: Harold J. Nichols, Robert Melnick, 
Jerrold Maddox, John Chalmers, Mark H. Ollington, 
Deb G. Haifleigh, Jim Hamilton, Robert Steinbauer. 



ice council 




«* i 



TOP ROW: Shin L, Yu, Hong W. Lee, Bartholomew I, 
Muruli, Francis Y. Huang. SECOND ROW Yoramu J. 
Ajeani, Ekramul Hague, Mohammad Ganjidoost, Rath 
Ben, Abdu Benhallam. BOTTOM ROW: Robert E. Hall, 
Suzanne Bruce, Allan Brettell, Kobie C. Coetzee. 



interfraternity council 




TOP ROW: Bruce E. Brinkman, Marc S. Connor, Allen 
L. Sneath, Edward K. Kite, Terry E. Denker, Scott D. 
Stuckey, Mark G. Snyder, Charles M. Kramer. SECOND 
ROW: Lowell R. Mitchell, John C. Marietta, Terry J. 
Garvert, Milo M. Unruh, Steven D. Johnson, Larry C 
Reed, Kent L. Zernickow, Robert M. Adrian. THIRD 
ROW: Stephen W. Rankin, Larry A. Berning, Alan H. 
Hipps, Gary W. Hansen, W. Russell Harris, Paul D. Har- 
rison, Jerry A. Lilly, Philip A. Harden. BOTTOM ROW: 
Stephen E. Cordes, Merlin B. Chestnut, Philip C. Krug, 
Patrick P. Mudd, William K. Bell, Scott J. Martin, P. Gntf 
Hawkmson. 



governing boards — 1 95 



ksuarh 



TOP ROW: Rhonda J. Brown, Mary T Chase, Janice K 
Heikes, Mary J. Prochazka, Lorinda L. Robb, Becky 
Smith, Maggie A. Vinmg, Becky A, Blackmer, Julie L 
Hampl, Mabel B. Strong. SECOND ROW: Nancy S. 
Chattee, Mary D. Nivens, Sandy K. Johnson, Nancy J. 
Hansen, Barbara J. Heimer, Carol J. Maggard, Thomas 
S. Hollinberger, Jeffrey L. Stafford, Nancy V. Benignus, 
Peggy J. Morgan, M Fran Morris. THIRD ROW: Karen 
L. Johnson, Linda M. Rudeen, Patrick B. Aydt, Karen J. 
Keeler, Teresa E. Biery, Pamela E. Hoffman, Douglas L. 
Franklin, Gregory Goforth, Deb A Collins, Clifford S. 
Lewis. BOTTOM ROW Donald E. Roof, Steven W. 
Lloyd, Mark E. Weddle, Terry W Brungardt, Mark J. 
Paschal, James H Kealmg, Ralph L Ungles, Gene 
Bransgrove, Rob D. Carr. 



TOP ROW: Sheryl A. Trump, Paula K. Byron, Carol A. 
Hillebrandt, Pam R. Page, Joan K. Waeldm, Chris M. 
Egan, Virginia A. Ray. SECOND ROW: Kathy L. Sparks, 
Audrey L. Rein, Shauna L. Kelly, Debi R. Swenson, J. 
M. Besch, Susan J, McClure. THIRD ROW: Donna M. 
Williams, Karen G Evans, Jean C Sharp, H Denise 
Carpenter. BOTTOM ROW Veronica S. Kasten, Jan E. 
Kaup, Karen A Teston, Charlotte M. Sontag, Amy J, 
Rundquist. 



TOP ROW Mike R. Waters, E. Bernard Franklin, Terry 
A Lober. BOTTOM ROW Sue Sandmeyer, Fran L. 
Egan, L. Gay Linvill, Susie Edgerley, Samuel E. Mathis. 




panhellenic council 




sga cabinet 




1©W©[TTO(|) fe@fM 



1 96 — governing boards 



sga executive committee 




TOP ROW. Craig A. Swann, Chris Badger. BOTTOM 
ROW: Amy L Button, Keith D. Tucker, Jane E. Kittner, 
Mark T. Dolliver, Pat M. McFadden. 



TOP ROW: James J. Hamilton, Curtis Doss, Stanley F, 
Watt, Stephen J, Hoffmann, Walt Smith, Donald 
Montague. BOTTOM ROW: William H. Honstead, Fran- 
ces L. Egan, Christine M. Egan, David A. Schoneweis, 
John T. Pence, Rory O. Turner. 



union program council 




TOP ROW: Pat Mallory, Dana Elmer, Rory Turner, Rob 
Cieslicki, Margaret Smith, Angie Rosselot, Carrie Sta- 
pleton, Mark Wille. BOTTOM ROW: Samue! J. Cox. 
Wayne Franklin, Harold Vandeventer, Steve Hermes, 
Keith Tucker, Don Montague. 



oowtniik! [•. !'.:■ 




M©^ 




Informing the campus community through a variety 
of channels is Student Publications. The Board of Stu- 
dent Publications governs policy for the Collegian, the 
Royal Purple, and the student directory. 

The board annually hires the editors of the Royal 
Purple and the three Collegian staffs. It is funded par- 



tially by SGA and receives the bulk of its revenue from 
advertising and subscriptions, Bill Brown, director of 
student publications, said. 

Additional board responsibilities include receiving 
bids for the printing of the Royal Purple. The board 
consists of three students and two faculty members, 
and is chaired by Walter Bunge, head of the journalism 
and mass communications department. 

Both the Collegian, the campus newspaper, and the 
Royal Purple, the yearbook, have won numerous hon- 
ors in previous years. The Associated Collegiate Press 
has awarded all-American ratings to the Collegian the 
last five times it was entered. The Royal Purple took the 
same honor for 38 consecutive years. It is the highest 
rating given. 




Murlent publications 



board of student publications 




royal purple adviser 



director 



student publications — 199 



royal purple staff 




iftta@]®iJDft ^)Qi][o)Do©©ftB@l 



200 — student publications 



royal purple writers 




royal purple business staff 



LEFT TO RIGHT: Terri A. Phillips, Ann Benson, Doug R. 
Fink. 



LEFT TO RIGHT: Marilyn S. Miller, Michele K. Kissing, 
Karma J. Overmiller, Debbie A. Albers, Paul W 
Rhodes, David R. Kaup, Mary Jane Smith, Jett B. 
Anderson 




student publications — 201 




nhrYfrhnrarth^rc TOP ROW: Grant Ringel, Matt Klaassen, Jeff Cott, 
pilUliiyiapildO Tim J. Janicke, Brenda H. Smith, Vic J. Winter. 



BOTTOM ROW. Tom N. Bell, Dan L. Peak. 



iMciGTjG [p)OJfeDB©@Gn(Q)[n] 



202 — student publications 





summer 


collegian ad staff 








4 








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L£F7 70 R/GH7: Stefni L. Weeks, Les W. Cary, Janet 
Klema. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: Ted Ludlum, Steve A. Menaugh, 
W. Russell Harris, Margaret G. Beatty, Larry Steel, 
Gloria Freeland, Victor J. Winter, Judy L. Puckett, 



Sherry Spitsnaugle, Kathy Kindscher, Janet Klema, 
Kristin Clark. 



summer collegian staff 



student publications — 203 



fall collegian staff 



TOP ROW: Don R. Carter, Steve A. Menaugh, Mark T. 
Eaton, Mark A. Furney, Judy L. Puckett, Mary Jo Lane, 
Richard N. Roe, Sherry Spitsnaugle, Scott C Kraft, 
Karla J. Carney, Lorna M. Salter. BOTTOM ROW: Brad 
E Catt, Colleen M. Smith, Kathy Kindscher, Jim H 
Brock. 




fall collegian ad staff 



TOP ROW. Brent Conger, Les W. Cary. BOTTOM 
ROW: Cindy G. Loucks, Donna E. Standley, Marilyn S. 
Miller. 




student publicat ions 



204 — student publicatic 



spring collegian staff 




TOP ROW: Brad E. Catt, Steve E. Suther, Judy L. Puck- 
ett, Scott C. Kraft, Colleen M. Smith, Paul J. Hart, Susie 
Edgerly, Steve A. Menaugh. BOTTOM ROW: Lee C. 
Stuart, Karla J. Carney, Casey M. Scott, Sherry Spit- 
snaugle. 



spring collegian ad staff 



■ 




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wj 

1? 


f 


»f 


LEFT TO RIGHT: Brent Conger, Rita A. West, Les W. 
Cary, Dian Burns, Gail L. Breen, Chuck J. Hilger, Linda 
J. Cook, Lorna M. Salter, Connie L. Beals. 




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student publications — 205 



sports 






wv, \ \ t 




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V 



Spring Sports 




above: Dan Johnson displays the concentration 
that won him the second spot on the K-State men's 
tennis team. 

right: Lynn Barrett won eight ot ten varsity singles 
matches during spring and tall competition. 



The K-State men's tennis team managed a 6-1 1 dual 
record during the spring of 1 975 and placed sixth in the 
Big 8. 

The netters beat two of their seven conference oppo- 
nents — the University of Nebraska and Iowa State 
University. Iowa State was unable to win a match 
against the Wildcats. The tables were turned though, 
against the consistently tough University of Oklahoma 
team and the University of Missouri, the conference 
champions. 

Traveling to Texas, the netters could only establish 
one victory against what Coach Karl Finney described 
as some "tough" southern teams at the Hardin-Sim- 
mons Invitational. The victim was Trinity, which fell six 
matches to three. 

In season play, Mike Lynch, the Cats' top netter, won 
10 of 20 matches. Dan Johnson, number two for the 
Wildcats, won seven and lost 13. Ron Dreher and 
Lynch teamed up to go 8-1 1 in doubles competition. 

"We took players with no full scholarships and beat 
people like Nebraska," Finney said, adding that 
Nebraska offers full scholarships. "Most of our players 
come with no support. Only two had their in-state tui- 
tion paid." 

When rating Big 8 teams on a national scale, John- 
son said the conference compares favorably, noting 
the relative success of some conference players in 
national tournaments. 

"Most of the competition generally get their players 
from out of state," Johnson said. "K-State and Iowa 
State were the only teams without out-of-state 
players." 

With the end of the 1975 spring season, the tennis 
team ceased to exist. Tennis was among the minor 
sports to lose Intercollegiate Athletic Council funding, a 
fact which Finney strongly laments because of the 
small amount of money the team spent in relation to 
other sports. 

Johnson's only hope was that the situation would be 
temporary. The same is true for Finney, who has 
coached the team for 20 years. 



210 — tennis 



Financial lows impose net limits 



With rackets ready and hopes still high trom an unde- 
feated tall season, six returning Wildkitten netters 
opened their spring tennis season on home courts in 
early April. They were looking for a winning start 
against Nebraska and were not disappointed by the 6 
to 3 score. 

A week later, coach Beverly Yenzer took her team to 
Columbia, MO, for their first tournament, the Stephens 
Invitational. There, the K-Staters tied for second place 
with rival University of Kansas. 

This was not the sole confrontation with the KU team, 
however. Back on home ground, the Kittens faced the 
Kansas team April 1 6 and emerged victorious, 8 to 1 . 

After traveling to Baldwin City where the Kittens 
rolled over Baker and Graceland with 8 to 1 and 9 to 
victories, the women headed for Lawrence once more 
for the final play of the season — the Missouri Valley 
Tournament. Exhibiting the strength and depth that 
carried the team to one of its finest seasons ever, the 
Kittens placed sixth out of 1 7 schools. 

Although the women's team had been on campus for 
more than four years, the spring season was the first 
with scheduled participation in an out-of-state tourna- 
ment. 

"Our toughest competition was against the 
Stephen's team," Yenzer said, adding she was disap- 
pointed with the regular season competition. 

"Our team was the best around with any depth," she 
said. "All the girls played excellently. We had a fine 
team effort. I was very pleased with their matches." 

The only serious problem of the season's scheduling 
resulted from too many tournament offers and not 
enough money to cover them. 

"I had to turn meets down," Yenzer explained, 
"because our budget didn't allow for them. But the 
competition is there if you can afford it." 




spring sports 



Crew: 
mixes frustration and satisfaction 



Which of the following are inseparable? 

a. soup and sandwiches 

b. Romeo and Juliet 

c. Don Rose and the K-State crew 
There was a time at K-State when the 

conclusion between "a" and "b" would 
have been contested. Don Rose, it 
seemed, would fight forever to hang on to 
the crew he had built. 

Going into the summer of 1975, Rose 
had been fighting for 12 years, only paid 
for his coaching duties the last two. 

Why would he quit at 1 2? 

K-State no longer had the money to 
continue Rose's meager $4,800 salary. 
The new Intercollegiate Athletic Council, 
starting its duties with a $400,000-plus 
debt, was unable to support a rowing 
coach on its payroll. So Rose, declining 
to work again for nothing, terminated his 
job on July 5. 

Rose's last season had its disappoint- 
ments, but should be remembered for the 
progress made toward improving the 
future of rowing at K-State. 

Highlighting the year was the first regu- 
lar season of competition for women's 
crew. Other "firsts" were the Kansas 
State Rowing Championships on April 1 9, 
and the next day's Eat 'Em Up Day 
against the University of Purdue. Another 
premier was the Big 8 Rowing Champion- 
ship. 

The 1975 schedule included nine 
regattas, the largest number of races in a 
season for any K-State crew. 

Lingering ice and high winds on Tuttle 



Creek held the crew a month behind in 
preparation for the season. Only days 
after the crew got on the water, a rusty, 
but veteran varsity crew and K-State's 
unpolished freshmen easily handled up- 
start Oklahoma State University in the 
March 22 regatta at Stillwater. 

In the crew's first year of collegiate 
competition, the Wichita State University 
Shockers shocked the host Wildcats by 
winning the varsity, junior varsity, wom- 
en's, and freshman eight races at the 
state championship. The wealthy 
Shocker crew had spent its spring break 
rowing in Texas and had been rowing on 
the calm Arkansas River as the Wildcats 
struggled with Tuttle Creek. Ironically, 
Tuttle Creek was too rough to row on, so 
the regatta was held on the River Pond. 

Eat 'Em Up Day found K-State rowing 
better, but not well enough to keep from 
being nosed out by Purdue in all but the 
freshman race. 

The following week, at the Midwest 
Sprints, the regional championships in 
Madison, Wl, Purdue found what the 
stern of K-State's varsity boat looked like 
as the Wildcats took second in a seven- 
boat field, losing only to national cham- 
pion University of Wisconsin. 

Shawnee Mission Park Lake was the 
sight of the Big 8 Championship. A fired- 
up University of Nebraska crew, turning 
the tables from the Midwest Sprints, 
became the first to beat K-State. The 
margin of victory was less than a boat- 
length. 



The Wichita River Festival, May 10 and 
1 1 , was a relief for the frustrated K-State 
crew. The varsity avenged the season's 
disappointments by defeating the field 
which included Wichita State's varsity 
and junior varsity, Nebraska, Oklahoma 
State, and K-State's junior varsity. 

The women's crew was estatic as they 
came from behind to capture their first 
win — 0.4 of a second over the Wichita 
State women. 

On the way to the invitational national 
championships in Syracuse, NY, the 
crew stopped in Lincoln and again 
defeated the Cornhusker crew. The Wild- 
cats overpowered all comers at the Me- 
morial Day Regatta in Minneapolis, MN. 

Of the national championships, Don 
Rose later said, "I should have been 
aware of the feelings of our crews at Syr- 
acuse. I'm not a K-State graduate, so I 
have never had any feelings of being 'out 
of our league' at the nationals. We had 
just rowed a great convincing victory (at 
Minneapolis) and our workouts at Syra- 
cuse were more than adequate. ' ' 

The varsity crew finished thirteenth in 
the fourteen-team field. K-State's fresh- 
men were twelfth of 13 and the Wildcat 
junior varsity was a distant last place of 
13 entries. 

Unlike the story book ending, the var- 
sity crew did not "win it all" in what 
turned out to be the last race for the out- 
going coach. 

As Rose saw it, his crews had choked. 





left: The K-State women's crew steams toward 
their first victory. With a finishing sprint at 41 strokes 
per minute, the women defeated Wichita State on 
the Arkansas River at Wichita. 

below: Coxed by Ron Pepperdine, oarsmen 
Dave Chamberlin, Brad Myers, Cliff Elliott, and John 
James carry the stern of the varsity-eight shell after 
a victory over Wichita State. Martha Wherry of K- 
State women's crew looks on. K-State defeated 
Wichita State in every race the schools had in Wich- 
ita, avenging early season losses at the state cham- 
pionships in Manhattan. 




crew — 213 



spring sports 




Tape doesn't break for runners 



As they headed for the mile run finish in the Big 8 
Track Championships at the University of Oklahoma, 
three runners were neck and neck. All wore purple jer- 
seys. 

Jeff Schemmel, Keith Palmer, and Ted Settle were 
about to finish one, two, three for K-State. It really 
wasn't anything new for Schemmel. A little over two 
months before, he had won the Big 8 indoor title. Or for 
Settle either — he had been behind Schemmel, finish- 
ing second. And Palmer? Well, he holds the fastest mile 
time in K-State track history. They had all been there 
before. Still it was a fitting reward to what had been a 
long, hard 1 975 season. 

Head coach DeLoss Dodds was returning a strong 
Wildcat team — the defending Big 8 indoor champions 
and second in the outdoor championships. Dodds 
knew the potential was there, but there was a tough 



schedule to face and competition in the conference 
appeared to be even stronger. 

On January 25 at the Sooner Indoor Relays, the Cats 
placed second. Three meets later, the Cats were in 
Kansas City to defend their Big 8 indoor title. It was a 
tough battle but when it was over the Cats had finished 
second. Though failing to repeat as champions, it was 
a good performance. 

There was Vance Roland, who after undergoing an 
off-season operation to remove scar tissue from a leg 
muscle, proceeded to win the 60-yard high and low 
hurdles. If the operation had slowed Roland it was not 
apparent this day, nor would it be for the remainder of 
the season. In 17 outings, senior Roland captured 12 
firsts including first in the 120-yard high hurdles at the 
Big 8 outdoor championships, (more) 




left: Jeff Schemmel is starling to move on the 
crowd in the four-mile relay at the Kansas Relays. 
Schemmel, Keith Palmer, Chris Perez, and Ted Set- 
tle took second place in the event 

above: Lennie Harrison has the satisfaction of 



breaking the tape in K-State's only relay victory of 
the year — the two-mile relay, which was won in 
7:28.8 at the Kansas Relays. Ted Settle, Jim 
Hinchliffe, and Bob Prince were Harrison's team- 
mates. 




Schemmel and Settle battled it out for top miler in 
the Big 8 indoor circuit. When it was over Schemmel 
had nudged his senior teammate by three-tenths of 
a second with a time of 4:08.1 . 

There was one more K-State champion at the con- 
ference indoor. Sophomore Bob Prince scampered 
to a first-place finish in the 880-yard run. After an 
impressive freshman season, Prince looked strong 
again. 

The indoor season concluded with a twelfth-place 
finish at Detroit in the NCAA Championships. Then it 
was on to an extremely competitive outdoor sched- 
ule. 

The outdoor season progressed slowly for the 
Cats. The team couldn't seem to put together a con- 
sistent performance. As the season drew near an 
end, one thing was obvious — the luster was gone 
from K-State's distance relay teams that had made 
the nation take notice with victories at the Texas, 
Kansas, and Drake Relays in 1974. This season the 
relay team could manage only one victory, that com- 
ing at the Kansas Relays. There were no excuses to 
be offered; that winning touch was lacking. 

For the fifth straight year, K-State finished second 
at the Big 8 outdoor. 

"We're at the point at K-State now that when we 
go into a meet we want to win it," Dodds said. 

With an operating budget half that of some Big 8 
schools, the success of the K-State track men is 
miraculous. 

"We shouldn't be second, but we want to be 
first," Dodds concluded. 




-"^*m 




spring sports 



far left: Bob Prince takes the baton trom Jim Hin- 
chliffe on one of the handoffs of K-State's winning 
two-mile relay. 

left: Jeff Schemmel catches his breath after 
anchoring K-State's second-place distance medley 
relay team at the Kansas Relays Schemmel ran 
with Roger Winter, Chris Muelbach, and Keith 
Palmer. 

below: In spite of the great effort, long-jumper 
Darryll Bennett failed to place at the Kansas Relays 
with this jump of 23'6%". 



JH" 




• ♦ 



spring sports 




Kittens run tenth nationally 



With the return of the entire team that finished ninth 
nationally the previous season and with an addition of 
talented underclassmen, the Wildkitten track team was 
again competitive on a national level in 1 975. 

The Kittens opened their indoor season by dominat- 
ing two meets hosted by Kansas University — defeat- 
ing the Lady Jayhawks 81 .5 to 1 9.5 in a dual and win- 
ning a quadrangular that included Kansas, Southwest 
Missouri State, and Northwest Missouri State. 

The indoor schedule ended with a trip to Kearney, 
NB, for a dual with Kearney State. Competing in Kear- 
ney's unusual sprint relays, the Kittens were dropped, 
50 to 46. 

Outdoor competition brought the Southwest Missouri 
State Interstate Meet at Springfield, MO. Powerful Iowa 
State won with 195.5 points; K-State was second with 
135. 

The Wildkittens defeated the in-state competition at 
the Wichita State Relays, almost doubling second place 
Dodge City Junior College's score. 

The strength of the Kittens was again proven at the 
Kansas Relays. Winning the 100-yard dash, 220-yard 
dash, and the shot put while taking four second places 
and two thirds, the Wildkittens finished in a tie for sec- 
ond. 

The Kittens were able to avenge the earlier indoor 
loss to Kearney State by hosting them in an outdoor 
dual and winning it, 68 to 59. 

Iowa State, a team which later would finish sixth 
nationally, was again too much for the Wildkittens when 



the schools met in the Big 8 championships. K-State, 
however, greatly outdistanced third-place Oklahoma 
State. 

K-State women's track team was at its peak as it fin- 
ished tenth in the AIAW national championships at Ore- 
gon State University, an event they would be hosting in 
another year. Few of the 104 other schools repre- 
sented had more individuals qualify for the champion- 
ships than K-State, which had 10 — a tribute to the 
depth of the Wildkitten squad. 

K-State's performance was highlighted by Marsha 
Poppe and Susie Norton who took second and third 
respectively in the javelin throw. Poppe threw 1 49'1 1 ", 
with Norton IV2" back. 

The javelin wasn't the Wildkittens' only impressive 
showing. Diane Grout, Sharon McKee, Jan Smith, and 
Lesa Wallace teamed to claim fifth in the 800-meter 
medley relay in 1 :47.4. Shirley Mitzner took seventh in 
the shot put, with Joyce Urish eighth in the mile and 
eleventh in the 880-yard run. 

"It was a good season," Barry Anderson, the Wildkit- 
ten coach said, "although we had some bad luck at 
nationals and could have done better than tenth." 

K-State's mile relay team, which had never finished 
lower than third in the two years of the team's exist- 
ence, was disqualified. When a baton was dropped on 
a handoff in the qualifying heat, it was picked up and 
tossed instead of handed to the next runner. Although 
the team finished third in the heat, K-State's chances 
for additional points were gone. 




far left: Wildkittens Diane Grout (foreground) and 
Jan Smith cross the finish line of the 1 00-yard dash 
together at the Wichita State Relays. Each was 
timed at 11.1, but Grout was pronounced the win- 
ner. 

left: Wildkitten first baseman Betsy Locke warms 
up. She was also the Kittens' number two pitcher. 



Diamond girls fail to shine 



Inexperience and a lack of depth outlined the 1974- 
75 Wildkitten softball season, and brought a 5-1 1 over- 
all record with a 2-3 conference tally. 

"We had a completely new team," Vicki Edmonds, 
right-fielder, said. "It was the first time a lot of us 
started. Inexperience was our biggest problem." 

The inconsistency plaguing the team's performance 
throughout the season surfaced April 10 in the first 
game, against the University of Kansas. Played in Man- 
hattan, the KU softballers stole the first game of the 
double-header, 5 to 3. The Wildkittens, however, rallied 
in the second game to squeeze by the Jayhawks, 3 to 2. 

Following a tight 18-game itinerary which spanned 
the month of April, the Wildkittens dropped to South- 
west Missouri, 2 to 9, and to Central, 5 to 6, in Spring- 
field, MO — the team which won the national baseball 
title. 

Hosting the University of Nebraska-Omaha at Man- 
hattan, the Kittens continued their losing streak by fall- 
ing in a double-header, 6 to 8 and 1 to 1 0. 

On April 19, the K-State squad headed to Hays for 
conference competition with Hays and Emporia. Incon- 
sistency again found its way into the Kitten scoring, 
winning against the stronger Hays team, 7 to 3, while 
admitting defeat to Emporia State, 8 to 1 2. 

A conference win over Wichita State University and 



with losses to Northwest Missouri and Washburn took 
the Kittens up to April 26 and the Grand View College 
Invitational Tourney in Des Moines. Making what 
several team members considered to be the strongest 
showing of the year, the Kittens beat Grand View and 
the University of Northern Iowa to earn first place hon- 
ors. 

The K-State softballers ended the season in Manhat- 
tan against John F. Kennedy University on a losing 
note. The team from Wahoo, NB, claimed both games 
of the double-header, 1 2 to and 1 2 to 5. 

"There was a lot of tough competition during the 
season," Edmonds said. "Sometimes we played well 
and other times we messed up with errors. We were 
just inconsistent." 

A second team weakness was the lack of pitching 
depth, as the team started its season with two pitchers 
and ended with only one. 

The weather provided neither a boost of morale nor 
smooth scheduling for the Wildkittens. Because of April 
rains and late snows, five games were cancelled. 

"We have high hopes for going to the national soft- 
ball competition next year," Edmonds said, "and the 
hopes are realistic ones. We'll have more returning 
starters and also some talented beginners. We'll be 
able to work better as a team." 



spring sports 




above: This K-State runner has a close call at 
second against Bethany. 

right: Freshman second baseman Greg Korbe 
waits for a throw to put out a Bethany runner. Korbe 
turned down professional baseball offers to play at 
K-State. 



220 — baseball 




Mediocrity strikes Cat diamond 



After finishing 1974 with its best record ever, the 
Wildcat baseball team entered its 1975 spring practice 
on an optimistic note. After all, it had just come off a 
season with a 31-16 record, finished second to power- 
ful University of Oklahoma, and was returning several 
starters. 

Head coach Phil Wilson believed improved pitching 
had been the key to the Wildcats' past success. The 
1974 team received strong throwing from Andy Replo- 
jjgle, Ted Powers, Stu Lindell, and Les Sutton. Lindell 
jhad graduated but Dale Allerheiligen, Dave Tuttle, and 
Iseveral other unproven but promising young pitchers 
were there to take his place. 

If there was an obvious question mark about the 
upcoming season it would be the infield. Only Steve 
Anson, the first baseman, was returning. Still, the pic- 
ture looked bright for the Wildcat baseball team in the 
I spring. 

As the days began to wind down before the opening 
series at the University of Arkansas the picture had 
changed somewhat. Tuttle was gone with a leg injury 
and, after this series, Powers would also be lost for the 
rest of the season. 

The season opener at Arkansas got the team off to a 
good start as Replogle fired the Cats to a 3 to victory. 
The rest of the series was to set a pattern that the Wild- 
cats would follow for almost the entire season. Arkan- 
sas won the next two and the Wildcats the last one to 
salvage a split in the four-game series. This pattern 
'asted for 39 games, until the Wildcats put together a 



six-of-seven winning streak at the end. 

Though the 24-22 overall record and 9-9 conference 
mark was somewhat of a disappointment, there were 
many bright spots in the 1975 campaign. Junior first 
baseman Anson put together another outstanding sea- 
son, batting .357 with seven home runs and 37 runs 
batted in. 

There was catcher Craig Cooper whose solid hitting 
and play behind the plate helped the Wildcats through- 
out the year. Senior outfielder Dave Specht ended his 
combination baseball-football career by hitting .271 
with six home runs and 29 RBIs. Freshman second 
baseman Greg Korbe showed his potential by batting 
.31 9 with four home runs and 31 RBIs. 

One outstanding pitcher was Andy Replogle, who 
had a strong 9-4 season and ied the team in strikeouts 
by fanning 71 Wildcat opponents. After the season, 
Replogle signed a professional contract with the St. 
Louis Cardinals. 

Scott Mach turned out to be the big surprise of the 
season. Freshman Mach was the ace of the bullpen, 
making 14 total appearances and compiling a 5-0 
record. He also started seven games, one of which was 
a two-hit victory over University of Kansas. Mach 
proved himself to be one of the top young hurlers in the 
Big 8. 

Though Phil Wilson's third season was somewhat 
disappointing, the Wildcats finished strong and with a 
large group of talented young players returning, once 
again, could look with optimism toward next season. 



baseball 21 



spring sports 



below: Substitute goalie Pat Carpenter stops 
tield goal attempt. 

right: Third year tullback Dennis Martin kick 
around one-third of team's equipment — a soccer 
ball. 

far right: Golfer Steve Kaup makes a long drive 
the Manhattan Country Club. 





Soccer owns title without funds 



Sneaking past exceptionally strong 
Oklahoma State University in the semi- 
finals, the K-State soccer team captured 
its second consecutive Big 8 champion- 
ship at the end of the 1975 spring sea- 
son. 

K-State's tournament play was aided 
by veteran Dean Zagortz, who was 
named the Big 8's most valuable offen- 
sive player for the second year straight, 
and by goalie Robert Gahagen, who 
allowed only three goals in three games. 

The Big 8 tournament and the Kansas 
City tournament, in which K-State took 
second, culminated a 7-1 season. During 
the season, K-State beat the University of 
Kansas twice — 3 to 2 at home and 4 to 
1 in Lawrence. 



"The team had a slightly better defense 
than offense," Frank Sauerwein, veteran 
player, explained of K-State. "In the really 
tight games, the defense did better than 
the offense." The team lost three of its 
four defensive starters to graduation at 
the end of the spring season. 

Despite the successful season, the 
club was plagued with severe financial 
difficulties during 1975. Money had 
always been a problem for the team but 
the Student Senate's cut of the soccer 
team from allocations in 1974 com- 
pounded the problem. 

As in previous years, the club was 
invited to join larger leagues and organi- 
zations, such as the NCAA, but was una- 
ble to as it lacked traveling money. 



To stay afloat, the club received mone- 
tary aid from a local tavern. Because of 
their financial plight, soccer players could 
not afford a paid coach or trainer. The 
team had no first aid supplies and at the 
height of the season, the club's equip- 
ment consisted of three soccer balls. 

Having no faculty adviser and conse- 
quently not recognized as a campus 
organization, the team could not legally 
reserve or play on any University fields. 
Soccer players also caught criticism for 
their unbusinesslike manner. 

"We didn't keep records or anything 
like that. We just did what we had to do 
and we won games," John Dietchmann, 
the team coach, replied. 



222 — soccer 




Efforts fall 
under par 

It was another disappointing season for 
the K-State golfers. Participating in only 
two tournaments in the fall, the Cat golf- 
ers strugged in both. 

"We had some bad weather and all the 
other teams went down south to play," 
Steve Kaup, golf team member, said. "It 
was kind of a bad hit against us." 

At the Mid-American Intercollegiate in 
St. Louis, MO, K-State placed in the mid- 
dle of a 36-team field. Then at a tourna- 
ment that brought together top teams in 
the state, the golfers put together one of 
their best performances of the year by 
placing third. 

The spring brought cold, wet weather 
and like the season, the Cat golfers just 
couldn't seem to get going. 

Playing six tournaments, the Cats 
never managed to place higher than sev- 
enth — this finish coming at the Drake 
Relays tournament and the Great Plains 
Invitational in Wichita. 

In the Big 8 championships at Norman, 
OK, the disappointment continued as the 
golfers wound up last. The Cats were led 
by Terry Brennan who finished 22 strokes 
off the pace. 

Bad weather turned out to be only one 
of the "hits" against the K-State golf 
team in 1974-75. With the financial woes 
of the athletic department mounting, all 
scholarships for non-revenue sports, 
including golf, were dropped in Decem- 
ber. 

The question for 1 975-76 had changed 
from can we win, to will we have enough 
money to compete? 



goll — 223 



spring sports 



far right: The Ruggers, in the striped shirts, 
defeated Wichita State, 7 to 4, and finished their fall 
season undefeated. 

right: K-State's Ruggers sing a traditional rugby 
song as a pre-game warm-up. 

below: Kicked, beaten, scratched, and bruised, 
the KSUFR Rugby Club prepares to inflict the same 
on their opponent. 




; I ' i 




1 M | 










^^^^f* ^H ^fl ^H 


■ ji 


A 




» 

Rugby approaches seriousness 



The K-State-Fort Riley Rugby Club 
i opened their spring season as a rebuild- 
ing year, with inexperienced but enthusi- 
astic and talented personnel. 

Weather was the primary competition 
jat the season-opening Big 8 Rugby Tour- 
nament as on the second day the playing 
tield was mud — crusted with ice and 
snow. After taking the tirst-round game 
from the University of Nebraska and los- 
ing to the University of Missouri, the third- 
place game was forced to postponement 
until fall. In that contest, the University of 
Oklahoma rolled by the K-Staters, 31 to 
10. 



In addition to several duals, the season 
included two other tournaments — the 
KU Round Robin Tournament, where K- 
State finished third of four, and the Sun- 
flower Tournament, hosted by KSUFR in 
Manhattan. Twelve teams came for the 
event, which was blessed with good 
weather and playing conditions. The bat- 
tered Wildcat team went 1-2 in their tour- 
nament. 

The Sunflower Tournament brought K- 
State's season to a close with a 10-6 
record. In fall competition, KSUFR fin- 
ished 14-8. 

The women's rugby team, the "Rug- 



gers", saw a fair amount of competition, 
in their second regular season, including 
the country's first women's rugby tourna- 
ment at the University of Iowa. 

Starting as a joke with girl friends of the 
men's team who played in a powder puff 
rugby game, women's rugby has since 
matured to attract more athletically 
inclined women who take the sport seri- 
ously. The record of the women reflects 
the improvement of the team as the Rug- 
gers wound up the spring 1 975 season 2- 
5, and by fall were good enough to go 
undefeated in six games. 



rugby — 225 




226 — leisure sports 



Leisure generates competition 



It used to be that "getting in shape" was something 
male high school, college, or professional athletes did. 

Enter the 70s. Women showed up on the athletic 
scene in droves and the government's physical fitness 
program was starting to sink into the minds of those 
who had been sitting dormant for years. Intramural and 
recreational programs sprung up and grew almost 
overnight across the country. 

Frank Anneberg, director of Manhattan's Recreation 
Commission, said the number of participants in the city 
program has more than doubled since 1 970. 

During the summer of 1 975 alone, 3,000 people par- 
ticipated in the commission's fitness activities. Anne- 
berg attributed the upswing to public cooperation, con- 
stantly improving facilities, and local clinics which help 
people improve various athletic skills. 

Anneberg said an increase in leisure time was, in 
addition to the emphasis on fitness and women's par- 
ticipation, a major reason for the recent increase. 

At K-State, the intramural program also reflects the 
national trend toward individuals leading more active 
lives. Raydon Robel, director of Recreational Services, 
said that 42 per cent of the full-time students partici- 
pated in at least one intramural activity during the 
1975-76 school year — a total of almost 6,500 per- 
sons. 

"There is a trend away from being a spectator and 
toward being a participator," Robel said. "People are 
aware that if they're fit, they'll be more productive, live 
longer, and feel better." 

"There is the social dimension, too," Robel contin- 
ued, "like going out and playing tennis with your neigh- 

left: A chess player concentrates while participat- 
ing in the Association of College Unions — Interna- 
tional Tournament. 



bor. Sports are a common ground that people can talk 
about on the college and professional levels. Now they 
are starting to talk about their own activities." 

Charles Ballard, who has owned a sporting goods 
store in Aggieville since 1951, has witnessed many 
changes in sports participation. 

"It used to be, we had four types of shoes — one 
each for football, basketball, track, and baseball. Now 
we stock over 80 different kinds," Ballard said. "It was 
adequate 20 years ago to have a $2,500 inventory. You 
couldn't attract any customers today with an inventory 
less than $125,000." 

Ballard said women's increased activity in sports was 
responsible for most of the recent rise in his business. 

"I think the trend will continue because of all the 
national organizations established," Anneberg said. 
"Plus, the kids are seeing their parents (get in shape) 
and are becoming involved in the movement, too." 

Not all individuals involved in leisure-time competi- 
tion are motivated by physical conditioning. Indoor 
sports, such as foosball, chess, bowling, and billiards 
are also rising in popularity. 

The K-State Union participates in a tournament spon- 
sored by the Association of College Unions — Interna- 
tional. The tournament starts with competition on the 
campus level, then the search for an international 
champion progresses to sectional, regional, national, 
and international levels. 

"It gives students a broader variety in their 
activities," Bob Yecke, director of the Union's recrea- 
tion area, said. 



leisure sports — 227 



The 'purple' bleeds into red 



When Big 8 officials informed K-Stafe thaf if would 
need a minimum of six recognized intercollegiate 
sports to stay in the conference, one University com- 
mittee heeded the call. 

The Intercollegiate Athletic Council moved quickly in 
adding another sport to the University's repertoire of 
five. 

It wasn't hard, though, because less than a year 
before, the K-State athletic department had displayed 
nine such sports: 

But, that was the kind of year it was for athletics at 
this University. 

K-State athletic news snared, and held, the spotlight 
from its birth in early 1975 through 1976. While still an 
infant, the council was saddled with reducing and/or 
eliminating a nearly $400,000 debt in the department. 

The facts — a $35,000 bank balance and nearly 
$1 65,000 in unpaid bills — would probably have been 
damning enough. But the department had borrowed 
$200,000 against advance football ticket sales. 

One thing led to another and another, until, well . . . 
until the K-State men's athletic department just wasn't 
the same. 

Ernie Barrett, men's athletic director, was charged 
with lopping some $200,000 from the current year's 
budget. He subsequently found a convenient way to 
eliminate $185,000 of that budget — terminate golf, 
tennis, and wrestling as varsity sports. Golf was later 
reinstated to bring the University up to the six-sport 
limit. 

Cutting wrestling wasn't that hard; the coach had 
been fired during the spring months, apparently for 
overspending. 

Barrett's valiant attempt to save the department was 
overshadowed by the deficit — much of which was 
accrued during Barrett's six-year reign. 

At the end of the fail semester, Barrett was relieved of 
command by yearling President Duane Acker. Barrett 
accepted, and later spurned, an offer to serve as assist- 
ant to the president for special projects. 

While still athletic director, Barrett had told a reporter 
he had seen belt-tightening coming four or five years 
before, but few serious attempts had been made to cut 



back. 

"The handwriting was on the wall then," he said. 
"We have been drawing from advance ticket sales to 
balance previous budgets. We didn't feel we could cut 
back then because of the adverse publicity." 

Adverse publicity created by the questionable admin- 
istration of the department's budget and the removal of 
Barrett depressed alumni donations and was discon- 
certing to many K-State supporters. 

Acker did not hesitate to respond to criticism of his 
decision. 

"I was fully acquainted with the problems. There had 
been management problems in the department," Acker 
said. 

Acker had offered the fund-raising position to Barrett 
because, he said, he recognized that Barrett was a 
good fund-raiser. Barrett announced he would quit that 
post less than two weeks after he accepted it. 

Several things attributed to Acker's athletic deci- 
sions, and more decisions were forthcoming. He asked 
the IAC to create, at least on paper, one athletic depart- 
ment by combining the men's and women's depart- 
ments. It agreed. 

The effect of Title IX legislation (calling for equal 
funding of women's athletics) was being bantered 
about. Where it would take K-State, and all universities, 
was anyone's guess. 

But the first steps for implementation had been taken 
at K-State. The department had been consolidated and 
a new athletic director was being sought to head the 
joint department. 

The public had been made aware of the depart- 
ment's financial situation. That Barrett was ultimately 
responsible for the debt and its coverup was obvious, 
yet some alumni began to withdraw their donations. 
They were fearful of the advent of Title IX and women's 
sports into the limelight. 

The next step was uncertain. A stairway with blinding 
lights and inpenetrable darkness marked the lAC's next 
move. But whether the stairway would lead up or down 
was a question no one could answer. 

It's that limbo that has characterized K-State sports 
in the past and looks to continue in the future. 

right: Willie the Wildcat stares down the barrel 
representative of K-State's financial debt. As money 
was raised to cover the debt, the barrel was propor- 
tionately painted purple. 



228 — intercollegiate athletic council 




mti'K-oileqi.ile athletic council — .V9 



FOOTBALL: 

always on the defensive 



Consistent with tradition, the Wildcat 
football team was picked to go nowhere 
in 1975. 

According to prognosticators, an out- 
standing crop of defensive players and 
coach Ellis Rainsberger's new Slot I 
offense wouldn't make the Wildcats win- 
ners in Rainsberger's first season at K- 
State. 

Admittedly, there was reason for pessi- 
mism. 

The few offensive linemen returning 
from the worst offensive team in the Big 8 
of 1 974 were backed by young and inex- 
perienced players. 

Steve Grogan, the league's fifth-lead- 
ing passer in the previous season, had 
graduated and gone to the New England 
Patriots. Grogan's understudy, Arthur 
Bailey, had been dismissed from the 
team during the summer. 

All but one running back, Dave Specht, 
returned from the 1974 team, but to 
Rainsberger's disappointment, none of 
the returnees would emerge as a consist- 
ent, premier "bread and butter man". 

The defense, which in the previous 
season had spent enough time on the 
field to become the seventh worst in the 
Big 8, had the potential to prove the prog- 
nosticators wrong. Seventeen of the top 
22 defenders of 1 974 were returning. 
The defensive line, linebacker, and end 
positions were all manned by exceptional 
athletes. More good athletes on the sec- 
ond string added depth to a good squad. 

This defense didn't have to wait long to 
be tested. 

The University of Tulsa's Golden Hurri- 
cane was riding on a seven-game win- 
ning streak and a 1974 Missouri Valley 



Conference championship. Quarterback 
Jeb Blount and the nation's leading 
touchdown receiver, Steve Largent, 
returned with four other all-conference 
selections to the optimistic, perhaps 
cocky, Tulsa team. 

A crowd of 34,000, the second largest 
in Tulsa's history, went to Skelly Stadium 
expecting to see the Hurricanes break 
their string of five consecutive losses to 
the Wildcats. 

But the Wildcat defense disappointed 
the partisan crowd by stopping three seri- 
ous Hurricane drives in the last six min- 
utes of the game preserving the final 
score, 17 to 16. 

In addition to an interception which 
halted Tulsa's last drive, K-State line- 
backer, Carl Pennington had six unas- 
sisted and nine assisted tackles, broke up 
an attempted pass, and dropped ball car- 
riers behind the line of scrimmage twice. 
He was voted Big 8 defensive player of 
the week. 

The home crowd was impressed with 
their first look at Ellis Rainsberger football 
as the Wildcats rolled by Wichita State 
University, 32-0, on a beautiful autumn 
afternoon. 

The defense was superb — holding 
Wichita State to 1 62 total offensive yards 
— while the offense cruised for 393. 

Although the Wildcats scored 1 5 points 
in the first half, it wasn't until the third 
quarter that the offense really got going. 
The Wildcats became victims of late hits, 
one giving Jim Couch a knee injury that 
brought his season to a quick close. 

"We got tired of cheap shots and got 
tired of being pushed around," Tom Mer- 
rifield, backup quarterback, said. "The 



offensive line really picked up then and 
carried us through." 

Merrifield replaced Joe Hatcher in the 
third quarter, when Hatcher suffered a 
recurrence of a rib injury. 

In addition to K-State's victory, every 
other Big 8 team defeated their non-con- 
ference opponent on Saturday, Septem- 
ber 20. It was the first time in the history 
of the conference for a clean sweep. The 
next weekend, the Big 8 would do it 
again. The conference finished 28-4 
against regular season, non-conference 
opponents. 

About a year before the Wake Forest- 
K-State football clash in Winston-Salem, 
Sports Illustrated stated that next to K- 
State, Wake Forest had the worst all-time 
football record of any major college. With 
this in mind it seemed the clash would be 
more like a bump — two incompetents 
struggling but remaining the worst in the 
country. 

Such was not the case. 

Under third-year coach Chuck Mills, 
the Demon Deacons in three games were 
averaging 325 yards a game and had 
upset well-regarded North Carolina State. 
The Wildcats were averaging 354 yards a 
game and holding the opposition to 216 
yards per contest. 

Wake Forest scored a touchdown with 
2:19 remaining to pull within one, 17 to 
16. Electing to go for the two-point con- 
version and the win, Deacon quarterback 
Jerry McManus dropped back to throw to 
Alan Zeglinski, but Wildcat linebacker 
Carl Pennington knocked the pass down 
and the Wildcats had won another 
squeaker, more 



»» 




left: Bill Sinovic (6) gets one of his three extra 
points against Wichita State. Sinovic also had an 
8-yard field goal against the Shockers in addition 
to salvaging two points out of a high snap on an 
extra point attempt. Retrieving the loose ball, he 
passed to quarterback Tom Merrifield, wl o ran the 
ball in for two. 

below: The K-State defense established itself as a 
power early in the season. A Tulsa ball carrier has 
attracted linebackers Carl Pennington (55) and 
Gary Spani (59), Marvin Switzer (32), and safety Jim 
Lembright(17). 




far right: Tailback Carlos Whitfield picks up a few 
of the 1 2 yards he gained on three carries against a 
stingy Texas A&M defense. 

right: A young fan reflects the crowd's concern 
about the Wildcat offense. 

below: Quarterback Joe Hatcher, Verdell Jones 
(34) and Carlos Whitfield (1) prepare to go against 
the Iowa State defense. The three accounted for 
1 83 yards rushing against the Cyclones. 





FOOTBALL 



With the shaky win over Wake Forest 
tucked away, thoughts turned to the 
Texas A&M Aggies, the upcoming Band 
Day competition. The sixth-ranked 
Aggies boasted the top detense in the 
country and, behind the running of half- 
back Bubba Bean and efforts of quarter- 
back David Shipman, an offense which 
averaged nearly 400 yards a game. The 
Wildcats were undefeated and the 
defense very impressive, but because of 
the competition to this point in the sea- 
son, were unranked and considered 
untested. 

A record non-conference crowd of 
37,1 00 witnessed a classic defensive 
football game. The Wildcat defensive 
squad proved they were for real by hold- 
ing the larger Aggies time after time. With 




the help of four dropped K-Stafe passes, 
A&M held for the entire game, winning 1 
toO. 

It wasn't until there were less than five 
minutes left in the third quarter that the 
Aggies, who previously averaged 30 
points a game, got on the scoreboard. 
The only other score came on a 36-yard 
field goal for the Aggies, who started the 
drive only 37 yards from the end zone. 

"Our defense was outstanding," 
Rainsberger said. "Now, we gotta get our 
offense cranked up. We didn't receive 
any big plays from our big-play people. 
We dropped four passes which were 
catchable, and you don't get that many 
opportunities against a great team like 
Texas A&M." 

After playing Texas A&M on an equal 
basis, the fans seemed convinced that 
Rainsberger had brought respectability to 



K-State football. The days of 63 to and 
52 to 15 losses to high-caliber competi- 
tion seemed to be gone. It was hoped, 
too, the days of losses to teams of equal 
caliber were also behind. 

But Iowa State University brought a 
grim reminder that a coach can't totally 
erase a tradition with four games. 

For most of the Iowa State contest, K- 
State's defense was again superb. The 
Wildcat offense nearly matched the 
Cyclones on the ground. Like the old 
days however, penalties, fumbles, and 
poor execution forced the Wildcats to 
settle for one touchdown and their sec- 
ond consecutive loss. The one touch- 
down followed a fumble recovered by the 
Wildcat defense on K-State's 20-yard 
line. 

"Iowa State was the first time this sea- 
son that I have been disappointed in our 



football team. Apparently we just didn't 
recover mentally from the Texas A&M 
game," Rainsberger said. "Offensively, 
we just can't seem to get it clicking. Our 
quarterbacks haven't thrown the ball well 
short, and receivers haven't caught it well 
long. Inexperience has tremendously 
hurt the execution of the passing game. 
Plus, we have continuously halted our- 
selves with mistakes and penalties." 

Rainsberger had one week to pull his 
Wildcats together and prepare for Joe 
Washington and company — the sec- 
ond-ranked University of Oklahoma 
Sooners. 

Coming into K-State's Homecoming, 
the Sooners had not lost a game in 34 
outings, although some of their awesome 
mystique was tarnished. They had won 
their last three games by a total of only 1 1 
points, more 



right: Linebacker Gary Spani (59) throttles 
Oklahoma haltback Horace Ivory. Spani had 1 1 
tackles against OU, three less than his final season 
average. 

above center: Missouri cornerback Kenny 
Downing stops slotback Mike Harris, who could 
gain just three yards on three carries against the 
Tigers. Harris guit the team a week and a half later. 



below center: Ellis Rainsberger's youngest son, 
Michael, empathizes with offensive guard Shelby 
Henderson. 

left: Linebacker Carl Pennington (55) and defen- 
sive end Vic Chandler (87) crunch Oklahoma's star 
halfback, Joe Washington Washington was held by 
the K-State defense for the worst day of his OU 
career. 





> W «1 



FOOTBALL 

Oklahoma was still a tremendous chal- 
lenge tor the Cats. In the previous tour 
meetings between the schools, the Soon- 
ers had averaged more than 61 points a 
game, while shutting out K-State twice. 

The first 1 1 minutes of the game went 
as expected; the Sooner Wishbone rolled 
to a 1 4 to lead, with the apparent ability 
to score at will. 

But it was the same K-State defense on 
the field which had throttled Texas A&M's 
Wishbone two weeks earlier. For the las* 



48 minutes of the game, the defense held 
OU to three field goals. All-American 
Heisman-trophy candidate Joe Washing- 
ton experienced the worst game in his 
four seasons as a Sooner, finishing with 
just 49 yards rushing. 

The Wildcat offense was again ineffec- 
tive, scoring three points and losing two 
on a safety in a drive that started at K- 
State's three. The Sooners won, 25 to 3. 

With a crack defense, it seemed the 
Wildcats could at least hope for a to 
tie going into fifteenth-ranked University 
of Missouri's homecoming game. 



This is not to say Missouri was 
expected to be easy. Quarterback Steve 
Pisarkiewicz and running back Tony Gal- 
breath had led Missouri to a 4-2 record 
including a season-opening 20 to 7 upset 
of Alabama, then ranked second nation- 
ally. 

Galbreath, because of an ankle injury, 
didn't play a down, but his replacement, 
Curtis Brown, rushed for 141 yards and 
two touchdowns in slightly more than two 
quarters. 

Yes, even the Wildcat defense failed to 
pull through against Mizzou. By the end 




of the first quarter, Missouri had more 
than half the yards rushing that other 
teams averaged against K-State in a 
game. At the end of the game, the Tigers 
had outscored the Cats 35 to 3. 

The offense was again throttled. When 
the Cats did move the ball, it was never 
far enough — a fumble inches from the 
Missouri goal line was the most painful of 
the many stops. 

Physically battered before the game, 
the Wildcats were further set back with a 
knee injury to tailback Carlos Whitfield, a 
re-bruised shoulder to fullback Verdell 



Jones, and bruised ribs to both quarter- 
backs, Joe Hatcher and Tom Merrifield. 

"We missed a lot of tackles, which is 
uncharacteristic of our aggressive 
defense," Rainsberger said, following the 
loss. "Offensively, we are still having 
trouble moving the ball. Our offense 
needs something good to happen to it 
. . . something to help it gain confi- 
dence. I thought it was going to get a 
shot in the arm when we drove to Mis- 
souri's one-yard line in the fourth quarter. 
Then we fumbled on the goal line. That 
touchdown really would have meant a lot 



to our confidence." 

It looked pretty bad. The Cats had 
been defeated and outscored 13 to 87 in 
the last four games. Nebraska, Oklahoma 
State, and Colorado — all currently 
ranked in the top twenty — remained to 
be played in addition to the immediate 
game with arch-rival Kansas. 

At this low point, it was fortunate to be 
preparing for an emotional game, such as 
with the University of Kansas, where past 
failures wouldn't hinder the team's men- 
tal attitude, more 



far right: Linebacker Carl Pennington (55) stops 
Nebraska quarterback Vince Ferragamo. 

right: Coach Ellis Rainsberger picks up a new 
wrinkle as the Wildcat offense is thwarted by 
Nebraska 

below left: Kansas center John Morgan throws a 
block for Scott McCamy, one of four KU quarter- 
backs to play against K-State. 

below right: These K-State band members' 
expressions generally represent the football season 
— three frowns for every smile. The Pride of Wildcat 
Land played at nine of K-State's 1 1 games. 





FOOTBALL 

Like Missouri, Kansas was led by an 
outstanding junior quarterback — Nolan 
Cromwell. Cromwell, converted from a 
safety the previous year, was the Big 8's 
leading rusher. 

Kansas ran a Wishbone offense, the 
third of the season to oppose the Wildcat 
defense. Because the previous two — 
Texas A&M and Oklahoma — had been 
contained so well, there was optimism 
going into the KU game. 

K-State's battered offense was held 
scoreless by KU's also battered, but 
fired-up defense. The Wildcats managed 
51 offensive plays, while the Jayhawks 
ran 94. 

For the second week in a row, the Cat 
defense was lacking its potential rugged- 
ness. 



The Jayhawks won 28 to 0, in a 
week would stop Oklahoma's unbeaten 
streak at 37 games. 

"We were up for the game," Jim Lem- 
bright, senior strong safety, later said, 
"but the offense couldn't score and we 
just physically got beat." 

"The loss to Kansas was an extremely 
big one for us," Rainsberger said. "We 
realize that we are limited on what we can 
do offensively, so we plan to work very 
hard on what we can do . . . well. Also, 
we realize the importance of staying posi- 
tive, mentally." 

It was a beautiful, warm day in Manhat- 
tan Saturday, November 8, as the other 
four football Saturdays had been this sea- 
son. 

Undefeated, third-ranked Nebraska 
had rolled into town with 10,000 red-clad 
fans, all expecting to feast on the lowly 



Cats. When the Cornhuskers scored nine 
points on their first two possessions, it 
seemed roast Wildcat was indeed the top 
item on the menu. 

But K-State's once proud defense 
became proud again. In spite of amass- 
ing 372 offensive yards, the Huskers 
were forced to go home with a humble 1 2 
to victory. 

As he had most of the season, K- 
State's Manhattan product, sophomore 
linebacker Gary Spani led the tough 
defense in tackles. This time he came up 
with 19. For the second time in his 
career, Spani was named the Big 8 
defensive player of the week. 

"I couldn't have been more proud of 
our defense," Rainsberger said. "Against 
Nebraska they played as well as they can 
possibly play . . . nobody really had a 
bad day on our defense." more 



far right: Linebacker Gary Spani (59) goes after 
Cowboy quarterback Charlie Weatherbie (15). As a 
sophomore, Spani was named to the first all-Big 8 
and third string ail-American teams. 

right: Rainsberger calls for another Wildcat to try 
and slow the Cowboys. 

below: Cheerleader Kerry Binford and Willie the 
Wildcat find it difficult to cheer about the game in 
Stillwater. 






FOOTBALL 



Although Oklahoma State University 
ran a potent offensive machine and one 
of the better defenses in the conference, 
'Wildcat hopes were again up. If K-State 
could play their best against a team just 
slightly less than the best, it seemed a 
victory wasn't out of the question. 

When K-State led 3 to after the first 
quarter, a conference victory did, indeed, 
seem a possibility. It was also possible 
the Cowboys would outscore the Cats 56 
to in the last three quarters, but that 
had crossed no one's mind. 

The Cowboys were stopped on their 
first three possessions before touted 
quarterback Charlie Weatherbie entered 
the game. Weatherbie, who had missed 
most of the last six games because of 
injuries, was known for leading the pow- 
erful Oklahoma State ground attack. He 
was not known as a passer and only 
threw nine times against the Wildcats. Six 
of the nine were caught for three touch- 
downs and 237 yards. 

"Prior to our game," Rainsberger said, 
"Oklahoma State hadn't thrown the ball 
well all year. There were a couple of times 
when our defense didn't adjust, and we 



didn't cover well, but there were other 
times when we did adjust, and they still 
completed the pass for sizeable gains." 

The Cowboys also ran for 370 yards 
enroute to demolishing K-State, 56 to 3. 

"Let's face it," Rainsberger reflected, 
"Oklahoma State was bigger, stronger 
and quicker than we were. They just 
physically whipped us." 

Ninth-ranked and Astro-Bluebonnet 
Bowl bound University of Colorado would 
bring an end to the Cat's miserable foot- 
ball season. Big, talented, and physical, 
the Buffaloes had lost only to Oklahoma 
and Nebraska in ten games. K-State, 
which upset the Colorado team two years 
straight, had not scored a touchdown in 
22 quarters. A third consecutive upset 
was, at best, unlikely. 

Colorado's Bill Waddy ran the opening 
kick-off 102 yards to put the Buffaloes 
ahead 7 to with 1 4 seconds gone in the 
game. 

Yes, it was another dreadfully long 
afternoon for the Wildcats, this time los- 
ing 33 to 7. There were, however, a few 
bright spots. The offense had its best day 
in many weeks, by accumulating 258 
yards of total offense and, most of all, 
scoring a touchdown in the fourth quar- 



ter. This stopped the string of quarters 
without touchdowns at 25. 

Consistent with tradition, the Big 8 
doormat was purple in 1975. The Wild- 
cats finished the year 3-8 overall and 0-7 
in the conference. 

"It's been a frustrating year, particu- 
larly with the injuries and all," Rainsber- 
ger said. "But I can honestly say that this 
team never lost its competitiveness, its 
ability to hustle or hit. As long as you 
compete and do the best you can, you'll 
never be a loser . . . you'll be a winner in 
life." 

In spite of the season, Rainsberger's 
ambition, realism, and sincerity retained 
his popularity with K-State supporters. 
The fans were aware that there was prob- 
ably no one who could have made K- 
State a winner in 1 975 with K-State's 
schedule. Five of the eight losses were to 
bowl-bound teams — Texas A&M, 
Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, and 
Nebraska. 

"We need to recruit big, fast football 
players in order to compete with the other 
teams on our schedule," Rainsberger 
said. "But we don't intend to overlook the 
fine players we already have. We will 
build with them." 




Home town heroes lose headlines 



Each year K-State recruits high school 
football stars from all over the country. 
They come to K-State with outstanding 
credentials, unbelievable cockiness, and 
the determination to become another ail- 
American. 

But before they discover the glorious 
life of a college football star, the young 
jocks must experience the lesser thrill 
known as junior varsity football. Coming 
straight from high schools where each 
individual was a leader, the young ath- 
letes are soon thrust into a new situation. 
Competing against the finest athletes in 
the nation, the JV football player soon 
finds out what K-State football is all 
about. Playing in stadiums that hold thou- 
sands, the men soon find themselves 
revealing their talents to crowds number- 
ing in the hundreds. There are no bands 



playing the Wabash Cannonball, there 
are no cheerleaders yelling for a victory. 
The only support comes from the handful 
of loyal individuals who watch with inter- 
est the formation of K-State's future foot- 
ball team. 

The young JV football player is a giver 
of the self. Straining with every fiber of his 
being, thinking of the day that he may be 
glorified. Until that time comes, JV play- 
ers must play in the shadows, striving for 
their own personal goals. Even if their 
goals are not always reached, their pride 
remains knowing at least that they have 
tried. 

Because of a NCAA rule passed two 
years ago that cut football scholarships 
back by one-third — a limit of 30 a year 
— many schools have eliminated their 
junior varsity programs completely. 



Because of this cutback, the primary pur- 
pose of K-State's junior varsity is to help 
the varsity teams prepare for competition. 
The JVs run the upcoming competitors 
offensive and defensive formations for 
the varsity to practice against. There is lit- 
tle time for the JVs to practice together as 
a team. The lack of practice was evident 
as the JVs went 0-2 in 1 975. 

Opening in Manhattan against the Uni- 
versity of Nebraska, the Wildcats were 
outgunned 30 to 0. K-State could man- 
age just 166 total yards while the Corn- 
husker offense rolled for 361 . 

Hosting the University of Kansas in the 
only other game of the season, the Wild- 
cats led early, but trailed 24 to 20 at the 
half. The game continued to get worse for 
the Cats, as they finally lost 44 to 20. 



left: Clyde Brinson (30) makes one of the six 
ackles he had against KU. Brinson also broke up 
hree Kansas passes. 

below: K-State's Mike Nunn (88) and Mike Merri- 
ield (1 8) prepare to crunch a Jayhawk. 





Rainsberger tries for Cats ... again 



In 1967, K-State hired what was 
needed to get a football program going. 
One of the world's greatest promotional 
men, Vince Gibson, came to Manhattan, 
waved a purple wand in the air and 
almost overnight came up with a new ath- 
letic dorm and football stadium. Wildcat 
football teams did better than they'd ever 
done before, but fell short of what Gibson 
had made the fans crave. He resigned 
and K-Staters began looking for a coach 
who could average better than four wins 
a year. 

On December 20, 1974, a former K- 
State academic all-American football 
player, Ellis Rainsberger, agreed to try to 
make the Wildcats winners. In a sharp 
contrast to his predecessor, Rainsberger 
promised no pie in the sky — just that he 
would try his hardest. His quiet, confident 
manner instilled confidence in the prom- 
ise-weary Wildcat fans. 

His immediate goal was "to build a 
solid foundation on which to grow and be 
successful," and his basic goal was to 
have winning football at K-State. With the 
honest realism that soon came to be his 
primary trademark, he wouldn't say how 
long it would take to be consistently com- 
petitive with the best in the Big 8. 

"The most important thing is to com- 
pete with most of the people in the con- 
ference," he said. "Then you go from 
there." 

Rainsberger said the biggest obstacle 
for winning K-State football was, of 



course, the high-caliber competition of 
the Big 8 conference. The athletic depart- 
ment's financial problems, which came to 
light shortly after his arrival, are his sec- 
ond biggest headache. 

"Although the conference makes it 
hard to win, it is also good to be in the 
best football conference," Rainsberger 
said. "There are good facilities and good 
people here." 

Rainsberger said it would take just 
three to four top-notch athletes to turn 
the program around. 

Rainsberger described himself as 
being between the extremes of a strict 
disciplinarian and the relaxed, happy-go- 
lucky type. He prefers coaching self-dis- 
ciplined players over enforcing discipline 
because of the longer-lasting effects of 
self-discipline. 

One aspect of coaching Rainsberger 
particularly enjoys is recruiting. 

"I enjoy talking to the athletes in their 
homes, hearing their goals and aims, 
then watching those goals and aims 
grow. 

"It's hard work," Rainsberger said, of 
his profession. "But the next day you're 
ready to get up and get after it again. It's 
something I enjoy doing. It's not a job, it's 
my hobby." 

Rainsberger was captain of K-State's 
1956 and 1957 teams. He was twice 
named to the all-Big 7 football team and 
was also a Missouri Valley heavyweight 



wrestling champion despite weighing less 
than 200 pounds. 

In 1957, Rainsberger became K- 
State's first representative to the Fellow- 
ship of Christian Athletes. 

Following graduation from K-State, 
Rainsberger went to Drake University, 
where he was an assistant until becoming 
head coach at Washburn University in 
1962. While at Washburn, he guided the 
Ichabods to an 8-1 season, and the 
school's first conference championship 
in 31 years. 

Rainsberger then went to Kansas Uni- 
versity as an assistant for a year before 
moving on to Southern Illinois University 
as head coach for the 1 966 season. 

The University of Illinois then hired 
Rainsberger. He served as their offensive 
and defensive coordinator for six sea- 
sons, before becoming the University of 
Wisconsin's offensive and recruiting 
coordinator. Wisconsin's 1 974 team, 
which finished 7-4, was eighth in the 
nation in scoring and second in the Big 
10 in total offense. 

To Rainsberger, K-State has improved 
considerably since his days as a student. 

"The facilities and aesthetic beauty 
have improved continually. They are the 
best around," he said. "Throughout the 
changing times, the University has 
retained the medium-sized college 
atmosphere with friendly, down-to-earth 
students." 



Hewett's enthusiasm tunes band 



Imagine a K-State basketball game 
without the pep band. Or a football game 
without the "Pride of Wildcat Land". The 
cheerleaders would look pretty funny 
doing their "Wabash Cannonball" rou- 
tine and the crowd would be very much 
like a herd of sheep without a shepherd. 

The enthusiasm generated by pep and 
marching band members is largely a 
reflection on their director, Phil Hewett. 

The K-State band program had no uni- 
versity financial support when Hewett 
arrived in 1968 and has since only 
received funds from the sale of K-Block 
football tickets and donations. 

Without money, Hewett resorted to a 
free commodity to gain success. 

"The K-State students and alums are in 
favor of the band," Hewett said. "That in 
itself was a pretty good sell job." 

Hewett relied on the simple force of 
enthusiasm to gain support. 

"If somebody is in the band and they 
enjoy it, then they talk about it. It just 
snowballs," he explained. 

And the enthusiasm has gained 
momentum and rewards. K-State's 
marching band, the largest in the Big 8 
conference, is the only marching band in 
the league without scholarship musi- 
cians. 

Hewett's jazz ensembles have won 
many jazz festivals, played in the national 
finals in 1973, and were selected to be 
among 20 international ensembles to 
compete in Switzerland in July 1 976. 

In addition to the support of students 
and alums, Hewett said the University is 



the second asset to the marching band. 

"There are just more outstanding stu- 
dents here," Hewett said. "I've traveled 
all over the country to various clinics and 
always come back thinking how lucky I 
am to beat K-State." 

The finances are the biggest drawback 
to directing at K-State. Money needed for 
uniforms, instruments, and basic opera- 
tion is just not available as at other 
schools. 

Hewett said the high schools at which 
he directed before his arrival at K-State 
were always in unusually bad financial 
situations. 

"It seems to be my lot to be in tight 
financial positions," Hewett said. "But, I 
always seem to be able to raise the 
money by hook or crook or whatever." 

Hewett told of an offer he received to 
direct at the University of Georgia. He 
was offered a $7,000 raise over his K- 
State salary and a $100,000 band 
budget. Hewett declined, feeling a strong 
lack of emotional support for the pro- 
gram. 

"The atmosphere is worth a whole lot 
more, as far as I'm concerned," Hewett 
explained. "I could have all the money I'd 
want, but without the enthusiasm it just 
wouldn't be the same. I felt if I stayed 10 
or 1 5 years, I wouldn't have the support I 
have here." 

When considering a career, Hewett 
was torn between being a minister, foot- 
ball coach, or band director. He partici- 
pated in sports in high school and while 



in the Navy played on the baseball team 
which won the 1953 All-Navy champion- 
ship. Hewett decided by directing bands, 
he could have the best of three worlds — 
helping kids and being somewhat 
involved with athletics while participating 
in music. 

"The challenge is to try to help people 
find the way," Hewett said, referring to 
the many college students looking for a 
direction in life. "If I can help those indi- 
viduals somehow, then that's what it's all 
about." 

Hewett received a bachelor of music 
education degree from Texas Christian 
University, then taught high school in 
Fort Worth, TX. At Paschal High School, 
his jazz bands won national titles in 1966 
and 1967. In 1967, Paschal's marching 
band received a first-place rating in 
marching and fifth in concert at the 
Washington, DC Cherry Blossom con- 
test. The following year, Paschal's band 
was selected from national competition to 
play at the opening of San Antonio's 
Hemisfair. 

That fall he came to K-State on a grad- 
uate teaching scholarship just in time for 
Nichols Gym (which housed the music 
department) to burn. 

"After that, I decided we were gonna 
build a band, anyway," Hewett said. 

By the next spring, 60 students were 
left in the band that had many instru- 
ments destroyed by the fire. 

"But, out of it," Hewett recalled, 
"came a spirit that's just tremendous." 



244 — phil hewett 



below: Phil Hewett directs the K-State marching 
band at a Wildcat tootball game. 

left: Hewett, an avid sports tan, disagrees with an 
ofticial's call at a K-State basketball game. 

below right: With his purple crutches at his teet, 
Hewett directs the pep band trom a wheel chair. 
Hewett suffered a ruptured bone three years ago. 
After faulty medical advice set back recovery, Hew- 
ett expects to be off the crutches soon. 




phil hewett — 245 



far right: Freshman Sheryl Sasenick displays 
concern over a tight game. 

right: From left, Kerry Binford, Robert Harper, 
Susan Conrad, and Christy Shrum enjoy the bas- 
ketball game. 

below right: Head cheerleader, Shann Shalala, 
left, and Anne Wiggins cap the line of cheerleaders 
which is so familiar to K-State football and basket- 
ball fans. 

below: The sister-brother cheerleader combina- 
tion of Robin, left, and Terry Walker perform a rou- 
tine. 





246 — cheerleaders 




Squad survives 'sixties syndrome' 



As homecoming queens and big men 
on campus fade quickly into the past, few 
landmarks of the glorious college tradi- 
tions remain. 

Still thriving across the country, 
though, are the smiling, attractive girls 
and well-groomed guys who continue the 
tradition of traditions — cheerleading. 

Though criticized as "rah-rahs" with 
mighty egos, the response of the thou- 
sands who attend athletic events still indi- 
cate wide-spread awareness of the 
cheerleaders' performances. 

Traveling to all of K-State's Big 8 foot- 
ball and basketball clashes and those 
non-conference games within driving dis- 
tance, the cheerleaders lead busy lives. 
Their uniforms, travel, and lodging 
expenses are paid from the $3,000-plus 
budget that comes from the sale of K- 
Block football tickets. 



"All of a sudden you're thrust in front 
of a huge crowd," yell-leader Terry 
Walker said, describing the first sensa- 
tions of leading a crowd. "They're all 
watching you. After awhile, though, you 
realize that they're not so much and you 
can relax. 

"It demands work and dedication . . . 
and a lot of ham. It's a big show with a 
bunch of hams. You have to be a ham or 
you don't do that sort of stuff," he said. 

The squad practices 1 2 hours each 
week. 

"People don't realize it's a lot of work, 
but it is," Walker said. "You want to work 
hard because you don't want to make a 
fool out of yourself." 

Walker saw the cheerleading squad's 
purpose as two-fold. The primary goal is 
to instill crowd spirit, "letting the team 



know you're behind them 1 00 per cent." 

Crowd control is their second goal. 

"It's not as significant, but I think it's 
pretty important," Walker said. If the 
crowd gets too worked up, the cheer- 
leaders make an effort to divert attention 
from the game to a cheer or the band. 

Walker believes it was important for the 
squad to travel to games outside Manhat- 
tan. 

"The team will see us and know we're 
there. They'll wink at the girls, smile at the 
girls. They know . . .."hesaid. 

In the fall, a national cheerleading 
organization rated 264 major colleges 
across the country, and chose K-State's 
as sixteenth. 

"Collectively, we can all do something 
real well," Walker said. "And that's what 
makes us good." 



cheerleaders — 247 



Harriers make tracks in country 



If 1975's Big 8 cross country champi- 
onship scores had been recorded in two 
columns — "K-State" and "Other 
Seven" — the Cats would have won, 25 
to 30. 

With what coach DeLoss Dodds 
described as the best cross country team 
K-State has ever had, the Cats' 25 total 
points were a conference record for the 
lowest winning score. 

Paced by senior Jeff Schemmel's lead, 
which set a new record for the course in 
Boulder, CO, five Wildcat distance men 
finished in the top eight places — first, 
third, sixth, seventh and eighth. Seniors 
Don Akin, Keith Palmer, and Chris Perez 
and freshman Larry Beesley joined 
Schemmel in the team championship. 

September saw the team open the sea- 
son with a victory at Wichita. Then came 



K-State's invitational meet at the Man- 
hattan Country Club. K-State won the 
meet with the second, third, fourth, fifth, 
seventh, eighth, and ninth places. 

The Cats then proceeded to win duals 
with both Wichita State and Nebraska. 
The following meet, a dual at Missouri, 
was the turning point in the attitude of the 
team. 

"We went into the meet thinking we 
could win the conference title, and when 
we left, we knew we could," Dodds said. 
K-State won the meet taking the first, 
third, and fourth places. 

The next trial for the team was the Big 
8 meet. K-State's team so distinctly won 
there that it went to the NCAA finals with- 
out going to the qualifying meet. Before 
the season had started, Big 8 cross coun- 
try coaches had picked K-State as the 



conference favorite. But according to 
Dodds, later in the season and particu- 
larly before the Big 8 meet, the title was 
considered to be wide open. He added 
that this was definitely the best overall 
cross country year the Big 8 had ever 
had. 

Taking only twelfth in the NCAA finals 
at Penn State was a disappointment to 
Dodds. He attributed the successful sea- 
son to four good seniors who wanted to 
win. The two main pre-season objectives 
for the team were to keep the seniors 
healthy and to bring along a younger 
man as a fifth. 

The season passed without a serious 
injury. Freshman Larry Beesley, who did 
not make the team until the second or 
third meet, rose to be the third man on 
the team by the season's end. 




248 — cross country 







i. 


\ f 










ft A ^w^r 


left: First-place finisher, Jeff Schemmel, holds the 
Big 8 cross-country team trophy. Schemmel is 
joined by Chris Perez, center, and Keith Palmer, 
right. 

below left: Approaching the championship fin- 
ish, Jeff Schemmel moves to take the lead. 

below: Schemmel was at the head of the pack 
throughout the Big 8 championship in Boulder, CO. 




cross country — 249 



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he 



above: Dodds talks to sprinter Hiawatha Turner. 
above right: Dodds works with a sprinter on a 
start. 



250 — deloss dodds 




Dodds attracts responsibilities 



Prior to DeLoss Dodds' appointment as 
K-State's head track coach in 1963, the 
University's track reputation and facilities 
left much to be desired. 

Since that time, Dodds has helped 
bring about one of the finest outdoor 
track facilities in the nation, and has also 
made the K-State squad one of the top in 
the country. 

Dodds' K-State coaching career has 
had many highlights — the Big 8 Indoor 
Championship in 1974, his team's four 
Big 8 cross country championships, the 
world record of K-State's distance med- 
ley relay team in the 1971 Drake Relays, 
and Ken Swenson's American record in 
the 880 yard run at an NCAA tournament 
at Drake in 1969. 

Swenson, who was on the 1972 U.S. 
Olympic team, was one of three Dodds- 
coached men to reach the Olympics. 
Conrad Nightingale made the team in 
1968, with Jerome Howe serving as an 
alternate four years later. 



As head coach, Dodds has led his 
team to 1 7 titles over the past five years 
on the Texas-Kansas-Drake relay circuit. 
This is nearly twice as many as the sec- 
ond place school. 

Besides the exceptional coaching 
results over the years, Dodds has shown 
his leadership abilities in other areas. 
When K-State Athletic Director Ernie Bar- 
rett was dismissed in December 1975, 
President Duane Acker asked Dodds to 
assume the job until a new full-time direc- 
tor could be found. 

"I was surprised to get the job," Dodds 
said, "but I was willing to help out in any 
way President Acker thought I could." 

Dodds said as athletic director his 
goals were to work closely with the stu- 
dent body, keep K-State's alumni and 
friends behind the athletic department, 
and continue to improve the University's 
sports programs. 

Dodds is currently chairman of the 



prestigious NCAA Track and Field Rules 
Committee, as well as serving on the 
NCAA Marketing Advisory Board. 

While school is in session, he instructs 
several track and field classes and spon- 
sors an annual Wildcat track and field 
camp during the summer months. 

"I've really enjoyed the years I've 
spent at K-State. There seems to be 
something that holds people around," he 
said. "I think it's the type of students we 
have here. There is a great deal of differ- 
ence between student bodies throughout 
the country. We just happen to be lucky 
with the types of students we receive." 

As for his future plans, Dodds believes 
he should remain at K-State. 

"I believe that as long as I can contrib- 
ute something to the K-State track pro- 
gram, I should continue coaching," he 
said. "I brought the track program up to a 
respectable level and I'm not about to 
leave it." 



deloss dodds — 251 



\FJLJ-J-i SFOFLTSI 



Spike goes 
wrong way 



The season started and ended on win- 
ning notes. But what happened between 
is a different story. 

K-State's women's volleyball team 
opened their season November 4, with 
tournament play in Stillwater, OK. 
Although the Kittens were defeated by 
Tulsa YMCA and Oklahoma State Univer- 
sity, they won both matches against the 
University of Tulsa, 15 to 7 and 15 to 2. 
The team had hopes of additional wins in 
the matches to come. But somehow they 
just couldn't do it. The girls ended the 
month-long season with a 2-37 record in 
match play, and an overall game record 
of 9-75. 

The season saw the Kittens entered in 
tournaments that matched them against 
the toughest competition they'd ever met. 
And with only one returnee from the pre- 
vious successful year, the young team 
had no chance for survival in the league. 

Although there were a lot of freshmen 
on the team, three junior college trans- 
fers provided what depth the team had. 
But inexperience still kept the team from 
top performance. Knee injuries also 
by Mary Phyl Dwight. 

Although the games were played with a 
team effort, Nancy Garnder became 
known as the team's best spiker, with 
Patty Berry providing exceptional set- 
tings. 

The Kittens had more home meets than 
in previous years. 

"The team has a tremendous amount 
of potential," one team member said. 
"There's a good chance that next year's 
team will be better because we have 
played together before. This was a 
rebuilding year and we all learned a lot." 

right: The Kittens won their last two games of the 
year. They defeated Tabor College for two of their 
nine victories in 84 games. 

far right: A race prepares to get underway at K- 
State's natatorium. Four of the swimming team's six 
meets were in Manhattan. 




252 — volleyball 




Swimmers gasp for fresh breath 



"No Swimming!" 

Those words rudely greeted Mike Witt- 
lieff, Wildkitten swimming coach, on his 
arrival at K-State, just one day before fall 
registration. When he unhappily informed 
his team, they reacted with shock, disbe- 
lief, and anger. Especially anger. 

Wittlieff called the Association of Inter- 
collegiate Athletics for Women to see if 
the group could compete in AlAW-spon- 
sored events as a sports club. Yes, came 
the reply, if the athletic director would 
okay scholastic eligibility and a few other 
items. The athletic director refused. 

The swimmers appealed to the IAC. 
After much ado, the council conditionally 
granted approval — if the team could 
prove they could pay their own way. 
Some $2,600 in pledges resulted from a 
long distance "swim-a-thon" (about 75 
per cent of it was collected). Another 
$1 ,000 was expected from a contract 
with the men's athletic department to 
| work at football and basketball games 
and concerts. 

In November, swimming became the 



sixth Wildkitten sport. 

Life brightened, but not much. Practice 
time had been drastically cut, and several 
potential swimmers had made other com- 
mitments. Despite such handicaps, the 
Kittens managed a 4-3 dual record. 

Wittlieff is high on swimmers Kathy 
Koontz and Rita Buchanan. Koontz 
already holds the school record in the 
200-yard breaststroke. Wittlieff thinks 
she's the "most promising" of his squad. 
He calls Buchanan a hard worker. She 
competes in the middle-distance free- 
style, the butterfly and individual medley, 
and holds the school record in the 200- 
yard butterfly. 

Clare Thorn was the mainstay of the 
squad. Though this is her last year of 
competition, she holds four school 
records and two pool records — the 1 00- 
yard butterfly and the 200-yard individual 
medley. 

Wittlieff was satisfied with the Kitten's 
season, given the reduced number of 
competing swimmers and the late start. 
However, he was displeased with the lack 



of attention his swimmers received, point- 
ing his finger directly at the sports media. 

"Most people didn't know we com- 
peted second semester," he said, 
"because the newspapers and radio sta- 
tions didn't even mention us." 

The future of the swimming team once 
again is in doubt. Though the women's 
athletic budget requests funds for swim- 
ming, the combined budgets for intercol- 
legiate athletics at K-State for 1976-77 
are more than $500,000 over the pro- 
jected income. The axe has to fall some- 
where. 

Wittlieff hopes swimming won't be the 
victim. He thinks K-State is an ideal site 
for building a swimming program. 

"We probably have the best facility in 
the Midwest," he declared. "There's a lot 
of potential for making money." 

In fact, he's already looking to 1978, 
when the AIAW national swimming cham- 
pionships are scheduled for this area. 

"I'd like to see us submit a bid," he 
said. "These facilities are optimal for per- 
formance." 



swimming — 253 




254 — women's sports 



Women's sports: 
created unequal 



,by Jan Garton 



Room 1 01 , Men's Gymnasium. 

Today, it's the home ot women's athletics. Tomorrow 
.? 

The status ot women's athletics here can be graphi- 
cally described in one word — limbo. 

In a tew short years, the women's athletic program at 
K-State has grown trom disorganized chaos into a visi- 
ble, viable, and nationally-recognized torce. Less than 
four years ago, the department did not exist, but was 
loosely connected to the intramural department and 
governed by the Intramural Council, now the Recrea- 
tional Services. The women operated out ot the gym 
basement, confined to a partitioned area roughly 8 by 
1 feet. 

But today, room 101 is a complex of several offices, 
carpeted, draped, and actually pleasant. Yeah, baby, 
you've come a long way. 

The prime mover and shaker behind this amazing 
transformation, of course, has been Judy Akers. Her 
goal is not, as many alumni have loudly asserted, to 
destroy men's athletics. She is totally and unequivo- 
cally committed to equality of opportunity for women 
athletes. Period. 

Because of that commitment and the efforts of a very 
few of the University's officialdom, K-State can boast a 
winning Wildkitten tradition. Over the past three years, 
Wildkitten teams have finished among the nation's top 
10 teams six different times, the best a third place tro- 
phy in the 1 974 cross country championships. 

Individually, Teri Anderson, Janet Reusser, and 
Joyce Urish have all been named Missouri Valley AAU 
woman athlete of the year — Teri Anderson twice. 



Susie Norton and Marsha Poppe captured second 
places in 1974 and 1975, respectively, in national jave- 
lin competition. Wildkitten softball and volleyball coach 
Mary Phyl Dwight is a member of the 1976 U.S. team 
handball squad. 

K-State played host to the AIAW National Basketball 
Championships in 1974, and to the National Track and 
Field Championships in May, 1 976. 

Women's athletics at K-State are not "up and com- 
ing" — the Wildkittens have arrived. 

Then what's the talk of limbo? 

The Wildkittens are facing one of the more critical 
points in their seven-year saga. Their future will not be 
determined by superb performances in the playing 
arena, nor by discipline, practice, aches, pains, or 
sweat. Instead, the attitudes of the person selected to 
head the new Intercollegiate Athletic Department will 
rule the day. 

The Wildkittens' success so far has been achieved 
on a shoestring budget. (Any department that pays for 
a basketball coach and assistant, and then expects 
them to run the department for free qualifies as 
"shoestring".) But the emergence of Title IX has forced 
many schools to substantially beef up their women's 
athletic budgets. If the new director at K-State chooses 
not to keep pace with other schools, the Wildkittens' 
winning tradition will quickly die. 

So what does the magic mirror say? It shows the man 
in Anderson Hall with the power of decision. President 
Acker's selection for director could signal a revolution- 
ary change in the University's attitude toward women 
athletes, or it might continue to perpetuate the myth of 
women's second-class athletic status. 

In this bicentennial year, I vote for revolution. 



IUM1HM1 -, ',;'>"!'■ 



right: Morgan attends to Shelby Henderson. 
below: Morgan has been helping out K-State ath 
letes for 25 years. 




Tapes for 25 years 

Porky: a K-State institution 



If an athlete spends more than two or three years on 
the bench, many might question his value. 

An athletic trainer, though, is another matter. Proba- 
bly no one would question the value of Porky Morgan, 
K-State's first trainer, who has been sitting on the 
bench for 25 years. 

Since arriving at the Big 8 conference and K-State in 
March, 1951, Morgan has witnessed athletic changes 
that are primarily results of the emphasis put on win- 
ning athletic programs. 

Occurrences of medical problems normally not asso- 
ciated with sports are increasing. Although the number 
of cases is small, Morgan has seen gout, ulcers, and 
allergies resulting from big scholarship programs and 
pressure from coaches. 

Another change the veteran trainer has witnessed is 
a steady decline in the number of two- and three-sport 
collegiate athletes since training seasons for sports 
have been expanded. 

But Morgan claims the quality of athletes has gener- 
ally improved as high school training programs have 
become more sophisticated. 

He has seen a major change in Big 8 football. In 
1951 , the then Big 7 conference was totally dominated 
by the University of Oklahoma, and was known as "OU 
and the Sorry Six". When Oklahoma State University 
joined the conference in the late 50s, the nickname 
changed to "OU and the Seven Dwarfs". 

"Today," Morgan said, "the difference between one 
and eight is a whole lot less." 

The Big 8 schools are a close-knit group — closer, 
Morgan said, than other conferences around the coun- 
try. The schools get along well and have a good work- 
ing relationship which carries over to the training 
rooms. If a visiting team needs training supplies, they 
are available on a "help yourself" basis. 

"Basically, everybody's just trying to help the athlete 



do a better job," Morgan said. "The color of an 
athlete's uniform makes no difference ... by a few 
happenstances, he could have gone to your school." 

Morgan's generous attitude also applies to K-State 
athletics, where he is willing to help all athletes — 
including women and those involved in non-revenue 
producing sports. 

"Most of the good competitors are good to work 
with," Morgan said, "no matter what race, creed, color, 
sex, or whatever the hell you have." 

Though Morgan leads a busy life, it wasn't until 
November 3, that he had a full-time assistant. Eugene 
Benner, the former head trainer at the University of Cin- 
cinnati, couldn't have been hired at a better time. 

Five days later, Morgan suffered a serious knee 
injury on a sideline play in the third quarter of the foot- 
ball game with the University of Nebraska. Morgan tore 
all the ligaments in his right knee, in addition to break- 
ing both cartilages and the bone just below the knee. 

It wasn't Morgan's first injury in the line of duty. In the 
early 50s, he was involved in an automobile accident 
on a track trip and suffered a broken back. 

Morgan's first training job was at a East Moline, IL, 
high school in 1 935. And except for a stint in the Army 
from 1941 to 1945, he has been a trainer. He enrolled 
at St. Ambrose College in Davenport, IA, in 1939 and 
was a student trainer there before becoming the head 
trainer at The Citadel the same year he entered the 
Army. Morgan returned to St. Ambrose, and received 
his degree in 1 949. During the 1 949-50 basketball sea- 
son, he was the trainer for the Tri-City Blackhawks, a 
professional basketball team. 

Morgan was one of eight trainers from across the 
country to serve in the 1 967 Pan American games. 

In 1974, Morgan was inducted into the Helms Hall of 
Fame at the annual National Association of Athletic 
Trainers' convention. 



porky morgan — 257 




Recreation is complex matter 



The intramural program at K-State is growing at a 
phenomenal rate. The facility situation, however, is not. 

In an effort to lose extra weight, maintain teenage 
physiques, and keep halfway fit, K-State students flood 
the intramural facilities. 

With the increased interest in intramural activities, 
faculty, and students are finding little success in obtain- 
ing available space. According to Raydon Robel, recre- 
ational services director, the problem is growing at an 
increasing rate. 

"The problem will not get any better. Right now we 
just don't have the space or facilities to accommodate 
all of the participants," Robel said. 

"The biggest problem stems from having to share the 
facilities with other organizations. Since the whole 



intramural program has grown to such an extreme over 
the past three years, time conflicts have become inevi- 
table," Robel added. 

According to Robel, the only solution to the problem 
would be the addition of a new recreational complex. 

"The fact is that we are in need of a new facility. Par- 
ticipation on campus and the national scene have 
shown that the intramural activities are on the way up. If 
we are to solve the shortage problem, we must find the 
money for a new complex," Robel said. 

The possibilities for a new complex increased sub- 
stantially in the February 18 general SGA elections, 
when 71 per cent of 5,342 students voted in favor of a 
referendum to the proposed complex as a line item. 



.",>'. i ilr.imi jr. il 





above: Delta Tau Delta's houseparent, Mary 
Belle Chappell, cheers on one of her boys at the 
intramural swimming championships. 

above left: Careful planning is put into the next 
football play of these intramural participants. 

far left: The form might not be that of O.J.'s, but 
that's what intramurals are all about. 

left: A swimming champion is determined. 



mtnmurals — 259 



right: Cowboys clown around before settling to the 
serious practice. 

below: A rodeo club member prepares to rope a 
calf. 

below right: A female equestrian practices one of 
three women's events in rodeo, barrel racing. 




260 rodeo 




The gate opens ... a blur of motion explodes from 
the chute . . . and in eight short seconds the bull and 
rider become one. With a volley of spins, jumps, and 
changes, the bull tries to shake the rider from his back, 
to no avail. Victory belongs to the rider today. 

This is a part of rodeo, a sport . . . and yet an art — 
to members of the K-State rodeo team. It is a vigorous 
sport requiring physical coordination and quickness 
along with a certain mental dexterity. 

The typical rodeo cowboy has long been regarded as 
"dumb" with the "anybody can do that" attitude. 
There is much more to it than that though, according to 
Randy Fisher, the men's team captain. For while react- 
ing to an animal's movements, the cowboy must also 
anticipate its next possible move, in order to correctly 
react. This holds true for all events. 

Events for men include: bareback and saddle bronc 
riding, bull riding, calf roping, and steer wrestling. 
Three events are open for women: break-away calf rop- 
ing, goat tying, and barrel racing. 

There are nine members of the rodeo team — six 
men and three women chosen from performances in 
previous rodeo competition. Those persons who have 
consistently placed in the most events are chosen for 
the team, with positions always open for change. The 
team members must also be full-time students carrying 
a 2.0 grade point average and members of the National 
Intercollegiate Rodeo Association. Their coach is Bob 
Clore, an art instructor and former Professional Rodeo 
Cowboys Association bareback rider. 



The cowboys practice every day, weather permitting, 
at facilities outside Manhattan. There they polish roping 
that calf, striving for the fastest time yet. Or ride the 
bronc anticipating its moves while spurring it on the 
shoulders. 

They practice long and hard, for rodeo is a sport of 
every season. Intercollegiate competition begins in the 
fall, continuing through the spring when K-State com- 
petes against 25 teams from across Kansas and 
Oklahoma. In the fall of 1 975, the team placed fourth in 
the region, putting K-State near the top as was consist- 
ently done in the past. 

Like other minor sports at K-State, the team receives 
no financing from the University. Gas mileage to rodeos 
is paid by the Rodeo Club with all other expenses 
footed by team members. This includes entry fees for 
every event participated in. Therefore, all winnings go 
to the individual — if he or she places. 

Even though it's possible to earn money, one should 
remember the added expenses involved. All equipment 
— saddles, ropes, riggings — are furnished by the 
individual. Each must also furnish and board a horse 
and practice stock, along with providing practice facili- 
ties, such as chutes and pens. 

Why then, if obstacles are so many and the risk of 
injury so great, does a person get on the back of a wild 
bull? Or, race at breakneck speeds around the barrels? 

It's hard to say — the cowboy can't pinpoint a rea- 
son — except that it just gets in your blood. 

By the looks of it, there's no stopping it at K-State. 



Akers' efforts reap rewards 



Sandy Hick had coached a small-time women's 
basketball team at K-State for a few years until 1968, 
when she decided to go to Europe for a year. Unless a 
volunteer came along to take her place, it seemed 
almost no one except the team members cared if the 
team went on. 

A former player of Hick's, Judy Akers, had gradu- 
ated from K-State in 1 967 and had spent a year teach- 
ing in Concordia. Akers had always enjoyed and 
excelled in athletics and agreed to return to K-State, 
attend graduate school, and coach the women's bas- 
ketball team while Hick was abroad. 

On a scanty $240 budget, the women practiced 
early in the morning or in the evening when the men's 
team had finished with the athletic facilities. Akers' 
first team went undefeated against regional competi- 
tion, then went to the national play-offs, where they 
were "slaughtered" as Akers put it, by Wayland Bap- 
tist. 

In the meantime, Hick had returned and ended her 
coaching career to try her hand at something else. 

Akers continued coaching four sports a year for 
several years before she was paid for her time. In 
1 972, she was named coordinator of women's athlet- 
ics and in 1 974, women's athletic director. 

Today, the K-State women's athletic department 
directly employs 1 people and Akers' "only" respon- 
sibilities are athletic director and head basketball 
coach. Because women's basketball has expanded to 
include scholarships and recruiting, Akers said both 
positions are full-time occupations. 

To say Akers, president of the recently-formed 
National Basketball Academy, merely supports wom- 
en's athletics, is an understatement. She cites two 
reasons why women's sports are important to K-State. 

"I like to see as many girls as possible get involved 
in athletics," Akers said. "The development of a self- 
concept and the ability to make decisions are really 
enhanced by athletics. Your own value system can be 
enhanced through competition. Any opportunity you 
have to learn about yourself and other people is a 
good experience." 



Akers believes women's athletics serve not only to 
motivate individual students, but to enhance the repu- 
tation of K-State. 

"It serves as an arm, an outlet, for the University," 
she said. "Anything we do as long as we do it in qual- 
ity is good for the University. " 

One way of involving women in athletics is through 
the Wildkitten Basketball Camp for which Akers is 
known throughout Kansas and the Midwest as 
founder and featured instructor. The camp had 250 
participants in the summer of 1 975. 

Akers is further involved in women's athletics by 
serving on the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics 
for Women Basketball Committee. 

Her interest and determination haven't gone unre- 
warded. Akers' basketball teams have won five state 
titles, one regional championship, and made appear- 
ances in three of the five AIAW National Champion- 
ships — capturing fifth in 1973, hosting the affair in 
1 974, and finishing fifth in 1 975. In 1 976, Akers' Wild- 
kittens finished second to William Penn College in the 
regional finals and hosted and won the first Big 8 tour- 
nament championship. In eight years, her teams have 
a cumulative 1 43-57 record. 

Akers had considerable success as an athlete 
before she entered coaching. In 1967, she was 
selected as the national all-star catcher in the National 
Women's Softball Championship and finished third in 
the national Women's Bowling tournament in 1 $72. 

"I was more lucky than good," she explained, with 
a laugh and shrug of the shoulders. 

When asked what she didn't like about coaching, 
Akers had to stop and think for several seconds. 

"I suppose the traveling," she finally answered. "It 
wears me out. It is the method of travel that is so 
exhausting. I have to come home from a trip and get 
right at both jobs. I guess it's a hazard of the occupa- 
tion. 

"I like tremendously working with people that have 
good skill," Akers continued. "It makes anything that 
you dislike minute." 

left: Judy Akers, who has been involved in athlet- 
ics since first grade, said there's nothing she'd 
rather do than coach. 



262 — judy akers 




ludy akers — 263 



■ .. .... : . ■ . ■ • , ' ... , 





' ■,■ 






* . \ 



To feel the freedom 

of flight 



has spread 



BBIfc 



; — hang-glid- 
- that in themselves 
may be safe but, with an equipment failure or a 
moment's panic or carelessness, have the potential to 
bring violent death. 

Hills of the Manhattan area are ideally suited for one 
of these sports — hang-gliding. 

"If you learn to fly a kite in Kansas," Monte Nieden- 
thal, a local participant, said, "you can fly any place in 
the world." 

When the greatest vertical drop of a hill in the, area is 



400 feet, a fast,reaction time is demanded. The higl. 
winds of the area also force a pilot \6 be constantly' 
alert. * 

The number of eastern Kansas*enthusiasts has 
increased from a mere handful to roughly one hundre( 
inayeaf'stime. * 

It takes no psychologist , Jo find why these people 
become dedicated to the sport. It is something that dis- 
tinguishes participants from others — they # have done 
something relatively few have done. The excitement of 
depending upon one's instincts, reflextfs, arm skills to 
stay in flight is a thrill like, they say, no other experi- 
ence, i 

Or as Niedenthal said: "It's the ultimate sport." 



wildcat bosketba 

--shining hopes tarnish 



In the spring of 1975, K-State basket- 
ball fans fell in love with the team that was 
supposed to go nowhere, but did. 

Except for forward Doug Snider, the 
team that could dribble on water was 
back in the fall. The nationally-famous 
Purple Popgun Duo of guards Chuckie 
Williams and Mike Evans was returning. 
The leaping, talented forward, Darryl 
Winston was back. Rugged, enthusiastic 
Dan Droge was returning with forward 
Bobby Noland. The third guard, Mark 
Baxter, was back as was the man K-State 
coach Jack Hartman labeled the quickest 
center in the country, Carl Gerlach. The 
team was joined by talented newcomers, 
who were expected to help 1975's fif- 
teenth-ranked team finish even higher. 

Like the local fans, the national pre- 
season basketball polls were expecting 
great things of the Wildcats, placing them 
between sixth and fourteenth. 

In time, always-conservative Hartman 
was proven correct in his prognosis of 
the season. 

"The carryover of our success a year 
ago has to help us," Hartman said. "We 
gained valuable experience — winning 
experience in key games. Last year, 
though, we may have been at somewhat 
of an advantage because we were young 
and not a great deal was expected from 
us. We may have slipped up on a few 
people. That won't be the case this year. 
Everybody will be pointing for us . . . 
we'll have to be ready for an ambush." 

Who would be better suited to set an 
ambush for the high-flying Wildcats than 
a bunch of Red Raiders? 

A particular Red Raider was about all 



Texas Tech University needed to spoil K- 
State's anticipated shiny record from the 
start. Tech's center, Rick Bullock, the 
Southwest Conference's most valuable 
player of the previous season, hit 14 of 
20 from the field against the Cats, fin- 
ished with 32 points and grabbed nine 
rebounds to do in the Cats, 66 to 58. 

Licking their wounds, the Wildcats 
returned to Manhattan to play in a much 
friendlier place — Ahearn Field House. 

Louisiana Tech was in a tough posi- 
tion, coming to Manhattan to face a good 
K-State team which wanted to prove it 
could play defense. Considering K- 
State's defense forced the Bulldogs into 
32 turnovers, Louisiana Tech was fortu- 
nate to lose by no more than 37 points. 
K-State used the turnovers to lead 45 to 
1 7 at the half and win 86 to 49. 

In the opening game of the Vanderbilt 
Classic in Nashville, TN, Chuckie Wil- 
liams put on a scoring show the Holy 
Cross University basketball team would 
not soon forget. 

Scoring 47 points, Williams broke six 
K-State and Vanderbilt Classic records, in 
addition to tying Vanderbilt's Memorial 
Gymnasium record of 22 field goals in a 
game. The man Williams guarded scored 
four points and was forced into seven 
turnovers. 

K-State, ranked eighteenth by the 
Associated Press at that time, defeated 
Holy Cross 89 to 85 in overtime. 

In the championship game the follow- 
ing night, K-State lost 80 to 81 to the Uni- 
versity of Southern California on an off- 
balance, last second shot by a reserve 
guard, (more) 



266 — basketball 




> 






above: Mike Evans passes over Arizona guard 
Jim Rappis. Evans scored 25 points in the game. 

above left: A fan exhibits her appreciation of a 
good Wildcat effort. 

left: Students wanting non-reserved tickets 
crowd Ahearn's doors. Except for the Tulane game 
during Christmas break, all home basketball games 
were sold out before the season started. 



basketball — 267 



bosketbo 



It was back home for the Cats to whip 
then eleventh-ranked Arizona, 71 to 61 . 
And in their fourth game in six days, the 
Cats blasted Northern Illinois, 86 to 59. 
Central Missouri State and Northeast 
Missouri State came to be K-State's 
third and fourth consecutive victims. 

There were no clear-cut favorites for 
the Big 8 pre-season tournament. K- 
State and Missouri were the schools 
mentioned most frequently, while Kan- 
sas and Nebraska were also considered 
possible winners. 

K-State hadn't won the tournament 
since 1 963. The Wildcats' first-round 
opponent, Iowa State University, had 
knocked the Cats off in the second 
round for the last two years. 

With Iowa State entering the tourna- 
ment carrying an 0-7 record, it seemed 
a third upset was unlikely against the 
Wildcats. When the Cats led the 
Cyclones 32 to 12, with 8:30 left in the 
first half, it seemed K-State was in for a 
laugher. 

But with the score 38 to 35 at the half, 
the game wasn't too funny anymore — 
the Cyclones had shot 61 per cent and, 
the fans remembered, had upset the 
Cats before. But several great individual 
performances led K-State to an 81 to 67 
win. Carl Gerlach hit seven of 10 from 
the floor and had 1 7 rebounds. Chuckie 
Williams had 24 points and Mike Evans, 
19. 



Missouri, 8-2, and the Cats' next 
opponent, had squeaked by Oklahoma 
State 81 to 79 in their first round game. 
The Cats were flat against an outstand- 
ing Missouri team. In front of almost 
17,000 bi-partisan Kemper Arena fans, 
the Tigers developed an early lead. With 
all K-State comeback efforts falling 
short, it ended as an embarrassing 66 to 
86 loss for the Wildcats. 

Colorado's Buffaloes led most of the 
way against the Cats before finally sur- 
rendering 55 to 60 in the battle for third 
place. 

The Colorado victory was Jack Hart- 
man's one hundredth as a Wildcat 
coach against 49 losses in little more 
than five years. 

"I thought we played pretty well in the 
tournament. . . for the most part," 
Hartman said. "At times, however, we 
didn't move as well or play with as much 
intensity as I would like. 

"Some of our obvious weaknesses 
were exposed," Hartman continued. 
"We're just not very tall or physical 
inside, so we will have to do a better job 
of blocking out, and in our shot selec- 
tion. Our frontline people wouldn't win 
many arm-wrestling contests." 

Mizzou won the tournament, defeat- 
ing the University of Kansas, 79 to 69. 

Chuckie Williams, who scored 65 
points in three games, was named a 
first team, all-tourney selection, (more) 




268 — basketball 





basketball — 269 



bosketbo 



The Wildcats were 8-3 going into the 
Tulane game in Ahearn Field House 
where Wildcat basketball squads had 
won 50 of their last 52 contests. Led by 
Williams' 32 points, the Wildcats rolled 
the Green Wave home, 81 to 69. 

The Cats' last regular-season, non- 
conference game with Creighton in 
Omaha, was a classic. The Wildcats ran 
into a team that shot 75 per cent from the 
field in the first half — 65 per cent for the 
game. In spite of hitting just eight of 16 
free throws, K-State played well and lost 
by only three in overtime, 79 to 76. 

"We had chances to win it, they had 
chances to win it," Hartman said. "What 
else can you say? It was just a whale of a 
ballgame." 

The Cats' conference opener was a 
biggie. 

They were at home on regional televi- 
sion against the University of Nebraska, a 
team which had won eight of their last 
nine games. The Cornhuskers were the 
last team that beat the Wildcats in Ahearn 
— during the 1 974 conference race. The 
Cats had since won 1 8 straight at home. 

"Nebraska has played tougher at our 
place than any other Big 8 team in the 
last few years," Hartman said, before the 
game. "They really get motivated and we 
don't seem to enjoy much of a home 
court advantage." 

The Huskers were undoubtedly moti- 
vated for this game, being tough on the 
Cats all the way. In a shoot-out with 
Chuckie Williams, Nebraska's standout 
guard, Jerry Fort, hit 15 of 20 from the 
field and was perfect with his four free 
throws to lead the Huskers to the second 
victory in three years at Ahearn. The 
score was 65 to 59. 

"I thought at times we had opportuni- 



ties to gain control of the game, but we 
just weren't able to do it," Hartman said. 
"But then, that's been a pattern with us 
all season." 

Hartman had been hinting of a major 
line-up change for a week or two. The 
Purple Popgun Duo, with forwards Darryl 
Winston and Bobby Noland, and center 
Carl Gerlach had been starting all sea- 
son. Dan Droge and all-American juco 
transfer Larry Dassie had been shuffled 
into the line-up at the forward spots regu- 
larly. Red-shirt sophomore Dan Hickert 
and sophomore transfer Jerry Black had 
spent some time spelling Gerlach. 

When the Wildcats came on the floor 
against the University of Colorado, Black 
was playing at center, with Gerlach and 
Droge at the forward spots. 

The fans were impressed with Hart- 
man's innovation. The Cats were blowing 
the Buffaloes out at the half 44 to 22 — it 
looked easy. Like several other games of 
the season, though, the Cats couldn't 
hold it together for an entire game. Hart- 
man used the words "totally flat" to 
describe the second half of their perform- 
ance. Colorado charged back at an 
alarming rate, but the game was over 
before the Cats could lose. The Buffs fell 
short 70 to 63. 

Relief. 

The Cats could play well for an entire 
game, after all. With excellent play from 
K-State's front line and a team shooting 
effort of 60 per cent, the Wildcats whip- 
ped the University of Oklahoma in Nor- 
man, 65 to 51 . 

"We got control of the game and main- 
tained control," Hartman reflected. "We 
managed it like we wanted to. That's 
what we will need to do the rest of the 
season." (more) 



basketball 



- I 



I 



left: Carl Gerlach (43) pulls down a rebound 
against Colorado. Dan Droge, right, led the team 
with eight rebounds against Colorado. 

below left: Carl Gerlach battles Oklahoma's Billy 
Graham tor a loose ball. Gerlach had 12 rebounds 
against the Sooners in the game at Norman. 

below: Jerry Black (32) and teammate Dan 
Droge stretch for the ball. 



m - 






hosketbo 



At home again, the Cats made a few 
mistakes against Iowa State, but they 
basically continued to play well, whipping 
the Cyclones, 84 to 66. Mike Evans led 
the team in scoring with 24, the first time 
in nine games Chuckie Williams failed to 
be the team's top scorer. 

By this point of the season, the four 
pre-season favorites for the conference 
crown had emerged at the top of the 
heap. Missouri and Nebraska were tied at 
4-0, K-State was 3-1, and Kansas was 
fourth at 2-2. If the Cats could put the 
Jayhawks away in the upcoming shoot- 
out, they would remain in excellent posi- 
tion to take the lead while at the same 
time do tremendous damage to KU's 
hopes of repeating as conference cham- 
pions. 

In addition to being one of the greatest 
rivalries around, the KU-K-State game 
was, as usual, important in sorting out a 
Big 8 champion. 

After falling behind 10 to 0, the Cats 
fought hard and made good shots 
throughout the game. The problem was 
that just 37 per cent of the shots went 
through the hoop. For the third straight 
year, the Cats were beat in Lawrence — 
this time 57 to 62. 

It is unusual for K-State basketball 
teams to be in a bad position in the Big 8 
basketball race, but now the Cats were 
hurting. They were 3-2 and traveled next 
to the University of Missouri to play in 
Hearnes Center, where the Tigers had 
won 23 in a row. 

After defeating Nebraska, thirteenth- 
ranked Mizzou was alone on top the con- 
ference standings and was riding an 1 1- 
game winning streak. There were few 
people betting on the Cats. 

The Cats were fighting for their lives, 
and they played as if they were. Jerry 
Black, as a matter of fact, was ejected 
from the game for fighting before seven 
minutes of the game had elapsed. K- 
State was also thrown to a disadvantage 
when Droge and Noland each fouled out 



with seven minutes left in the game. 

In spite of the setbacks, though, the 
Wildcats put in a tremendous effort in 
fighting oft the Tigers to win 85 to 81 and 
jump back in the conference race. 

"They played just like we've been play- 
ing," Mizzou's coach Norm Stewart said. 
"They were intense and did what they 
had to do. They played a helluva game. 
They deserved to win." 

"Our win over Missouri was . . .one of 
the biggest we have enjoyed while I have 
been at K-State," Hartman said. 

Chuckie Williams scored 32 points to 
pass Jack Parr and become the second- 
leading scorer in K-State history. Mike 
Evans had his third straight 20-point 
game to become K-State's sixteenth- 
leading scorer — as a sophomore. 

Williams was averaging 22 points a 
game going into the upcoming Oklahoma 
State University contest, with Evans at 1 5 
points. Darryl Winston and Carl Gerlach 
were also scoring in double figures. But 
more impressive than their total points, 
was their accuracy from the field. Win- 
ston was hitting 51 per cent, and Gerlach 
an incredible 56.7 per cent. Gerlach was 
by far the best shooter in K-State history, 
carrying a 56.8 per cent career average. 

Jack Hartman had defeated his alma 
mater 1 of the 1 1 times he had coached 
against Oklahoma State. The Cowboys 
were not expected to be a push-over, 
though, as they came to Manhattan with 
big and talented frontline personnel. 

O-State led throughout most of the 
game, with the Cats lurking in the shad- 
ows until the middle of the second half, 
when K-State took the lead and put the 
game away for good. 

The 60 to 55 win was Hartman 's 250th 
as a major college basketball coach. It 
was his 400th win, including his victories 
as a junior college coach. 

The K-State win was also a big one for 
Mike Evans, who scored 31 points, a 
career high. Evans was named Big 8 
player-of-the-week. (more) 

above right: Jerry Black tries to gain control of 
the ball. Oklahoma State's Lafayette Threat (32) 
and Dan Droge are among those moving in. 

far right: Chuckie Williams does strange things to 
his shoes as he puts a move on Kansas' Clint John- 
son. 

right: Oklahoma guard Eddie Fields watches a 
Mike Evans pass fly by. 



272 — basketball 






basketball — 273 



basketbo 



The start of the second half of a tight 
conference race found Wildcats battling 
Buffaloes at the University of Colorado in 
Boulder. 

Colorado was holding down the wrong 
end of the conference standings, with a 
1-4 record, but Jack Hartman wasn't 
expecting the Buffaloes to roll over and 
die. 

"Colorado has already played us too 
close twice this year," Hartman said, 
"and they always have scared me out 
there." 

The Buffaloes scared Hartman and his 
Wildcats again, hanging close until the 
middle of the second half. The Cats 
pulled away, though, and presented Hart- 
man with his thirteenth consecutive win 
over Colorado, 57 to 47. 

Starting with Carl Gerlach and Jerry 
Black on the Wildcat front line, Larry Das- 
sie contributed 10 rebounds and 13 
points to the effort against Colorado. 
Mike Evans continued to be red-hot, toss- 
ing in 28 points. Chuckie Williams, mean- 
while, scored seven points, failing for the 
first time in 49 games as a Wildcat starter 
to score in double figures. 

Elsewhere in the Big 8, Missouri stayed 
a step ahead of K-State by sneaking past 
Oklahoma State, 72 to 71. 

For Valentine's Day, the Wildcats 
decked Ahearn's visitor bench in red and 
white and presented their fans with, as 
Hartman later said, "a heck of a ball 
game." 

Starting three freshmen, a sophomore, 
and a junior, Oklahoma University had 
won four games in a row when they 
entered Ahearn — where no OU team 
had ever won. 

Like other recent Oklahoma-K-State 
games, it was an exceptionally exciting, 
well-played contest. 

K-State shot 52 per cent from the field, 
the Sooners 55 per cent. Together, the 
teams committed just 22 turnovers. Wil- 
liams and Evans each had 22 points, with 
Dassie scoring 20 as the Cats whipped 
Oklahoma, 75 to 70. 

Time for the shootout with Nebraska 
had arrived. Since the Cornhuskers had 
damaged the Cats' hopes a month ear- 
lier, the trip to Lincoln had been on the 
minds of all. The teams were tied for sec- 
ond at 7-2 and had identical 16-6 overall 



274 — basketball 



records. 

Like many other K-State games of the 
season, it was a tight struggle until the 
Cats pulled away late to win, 65 to 53. 

Bobby Noland, noted for his hustle and 
tough defense, joined Gerlach and Das- 
sie on the ever-changing starting front 
line against Nebraska. Sophomore Man- 
hattanite Scott Langton was at the same 
time establishing himself as a strong third 
guard. 

But it was Mike Evans who continued 
to play in the limelight. After a 30-point 
performance against Nebraska, Evans 
was named the Big 8 player-of-the-week 
for the second time in two weeks by the 
Associated Press. This time, Evans 
shared the honor with Missouri's Willie 
Smith. 

The only way Kansas University hurt K- 
State's title hopes during the remainder 
of the season was by losing 61 to 60 to 
Missouri in Allen Field House. Against K- 
State's tremendous defensive effort 
which forced them to 23 turnovers, KU 
was helpless — perhaps helpless 
enough to heal K-State's scars from the 
91 to 53 loss in Lawrence a year earlier. 

K-State fans seemed to want KU in this 
match-up more than usual in the highly 
emotional super-series. Some students 
holding non-reserved seats were camp- 
ing on Ahearn's doorstep Wednesday 
afternoon before the Saturday game. In 
the usual tradition, K-State fans threw 
four red and blue chickens on Ahearn's 
court during KU's pre-game introduction. 
Later delirium broke out in response to 
Mike Evans' unbelievable behind-the- 
back pass from a mid-air leap to Larry 
Dassie who promptly put the ball in, plac- 
ing the score at 59 to 35. 

If there was a hero in the tremendous 
effort by the Wildcats, it was Carl Gerlach 
who hit seven of 1 2 field goals, five of six 
free throws, and grabbed eight rebounds 
against the bigger but slower Jayhawks. 
Evans and Williams combined for 33 
points, contributing to the entertainment 
for the regional television audience. The 
69 to 54 victory was the Wildcats' sixth in 
a row. 

Missouri continued to win by narrow 
margins, this Saturday it was in overtime 
against Nebraska, (more) 






far left: A scene typical of the year, where quick, 
slender Carl Gerlach darts around a heavier man to 
score. Here, Gerlach is moving on Oklahoma's Rick 
McNeil. 

left: Chuckie Williams is challenged by Kansas' 
Clint Johnson. 

below: Dan Droge passes around Oklahoma's 
Billy Graham. 

below left: Larry Dassie looks for some help in 
getting around Kansas' Herb Nobles. Dassie had 
nine rebounds against KU. 



Msk.Mlull 



bosketbo 



Perhaps K-State's greatest threat 
going against Iowa State, 2-22, was the 
Cats' mental attitude. The Wildcats were 
coming ott the tremendously emotional 
KU game and in five days, Missouri would 
be visiting Manhattan, giving the Cats a 
chance to tie for the league lead. But K- 
State rolled to an 80 to 67 victory. 

By noon, the next day, students could 
be found with tents, sleeping bags, and 
books outside the southeast door of 
Ahearn Field House. They were waiting 
for the doors to open for the Missouri 
game — four days away. While the Cats 
were winning at Iowa State, the Tigers 
were finally knocked off — by Oklahoma. 
This left the Tigers and Wildcats tied for 
first. The upcoming game was probably 
for the Big 8 championship. 

While the K-State students waited for 
the Tigers, Missouri coach Norm Stewart 
had his team practicing in front of the 
noise machines and volunteer students 
banging pots and pans in an effort to pre- 
pare for the K-State crowd. 

The Cats were generally favored to 
defeat the Tigers, who were 22-4 on the 
season. Jimmy the Greek predicted the 
Cats would win the regionally televised 
game by three. 

In the opening minutes, it seemed the 
Cats would win by 20. But Missouri 
fought back and led 45 to 42 at halftime. 
To the extreme frustration of the 1 1 ,100 
noisy K-State fans, Missouri rode on the 
lead for most of the second half. A jump 
shot by Mike Evans, who finished the 
game with 24 points, brought the Cats to 
within a point with three minutes to go. 
But the Wildcats went cold and watched 
the game slip through their fingers as the 
Tigers pranced on to win, 81 to 72. 

As a team, Missouri hit 23 of 26 free 
throws while the Cats shot just seven free 
throws — and missed three of those. 

Carl Gerlach, honorably mentioned on 
the all-Big 8 team, was deadly from the 
field, finishing with 21 points after hitting 
10 of 13 from the field. He also grabbed 
1 2 rebounds in the losing effort. 

It had been the understanding during 
the week prior to K-State's conference 
finale with Oklahoma State that an NCAA 
at-large bid would either go to K-State or 
the runner-up in the Western Athletic 



Conference, the University of Utah. Utah 
was upset by Wyoming the night before 
the Cats' game at Stillwater, and it 
appeared all K-State needed to do to 
obtain the bid was win. 

The Cats played well in defeating 
Oklahoma State. If they hadn't, the red- 
hot Cowboys would have undoubtedly 
won the hard-fought 82 to 78 overtime 
game. First team all-Big 8 guards Wil- 
liams and Evans combined for 52 points. 

The Cats shot 55 per cent from the 
field and 1 6 of 1 7 free throws. The 
Oklahoma State win was like the Cats' 
loss to Missouri three days earlier, with 
the winner nabbing the game by way of 
free throws. 

Missouri clinched its first undisputed 
title in 46 years by defeating Colorado, 95 
to 60. The Wildcats, 20-7, were in sole 
possession of second place. 

Wildcat fans who sat back to wait for 
the NCAA invitation were stunned the 
next day to learn that DePaul University, 
a team with a 1 9-8 record and only casu- 
ally mentioned before, received the bid. 

The National Invitation Tournament 
soothed the irritation of the fans, though, 
by inviting K-State to attend and giving 
them a fourth-place seeding and a bye in 
the first round. 

K-State opened its fifth consecutive 
post-season tournament against the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky, a young team, which 
after a slow start, had won eight games in 
a row. Kentucky had beaten Niagara in 
the first round of the NIT. 

After a tight battle, the Cats pulled 
away to lead 63 to 51 with 13:44 to go. 
To the delight of K-State's pep band, 
cheerleaders, and television-viewing fans 
at home, the Cats seemd to have tucked 
the game away. 

But a 10-point counter-charge by Ken- 
tucky left the Cats shaken and unusually 
out of control. Late turnovers and missed 
shots doomed the Cats to an eventual 78 
to 81 loss. 

Kentucky went on to win the tourna- 
ment. 

For K-State, the loss, like the season, 
made one think of what could have been. 
But, then, a 20-8 season wasn't really 
much to brood over. 



276 — basketball 



4 



C- 



't* 



\ 



below: Mike Evans goes high to shoot over Mis- 
souri's Willie Smith. Although Evans finished the 
game with 24 points, Smith stole the show by bom- 
bing the Cats' title hopes with 38 points. 

right: Darryl Winston and Willie Smith rest during 
a pause in the action. 

below right: Bobby Noland guards Missouri's 
standout forward Kim Anderson. Noland, who cut 
his lip playing Iowa State, finished with 10 rebounds 
against Missouri. 





bosketbo 

JVs escape untouched 



If K-State's junior varsity basketball 
team had a problem during their 1975-76 
season, it was a lack ot competition that 
could keep up with the young Cats. 

The junior varsity finished their 1 1 - 
game schedule with the first undefeated 
season in K-State's history. On the aver- 
age, the team won each game by 24. 
points. 

"We were fortunate to have a group of 
young men who were talented and 
played together as a team," Jim Eads, 
junior varsity coach, said. "Many times at 
this level of competition, a high percent- 
age of the participating athletes have 
received numerous individual honors and 
find it difficult to remove themselves from 
the role of stars to the team aspect. That 
was not a problem." 

The Wildcats opened their all-home 
schedule with Allen County Junior Col- 
lege, trouncing the visitors 85 to 44. 

The next game with Emporia State's 
junior varsity was important for the Cats, 
according to Eads. 

"They didn't play well, and got 
behind," the coach said, "but, they got 
some intensity in the last four or five min- 
utes and came back to win (77 to 71). 
After that game, they got started as a 
team." 

The junior varsity then cruised by New- 
man Center, 103 to 59; the Alma Chefs, 



1 1 1 to 83; and Whiteman Air Force Base, 
93 to 58. 

Coffeyville Juco, which has had an 
outstanding basketball tradition since K- 
State's Jack Hartman coached there in 
the middle 50s, seemed to pose more of 
a threat to the Wildcats than earlier oppo- 
nents. But an inspirational team effort 
subdued Coffeyville, 74 to 47. 

Kansas Newman's junior varsity, Kan- 
sas City Community College, and Dodge 
City and Pratt Jucos then fell before the 
Wildcats. 

A basketball team from Fort Sill, in 
Lawton, OK, was supposed to be the 
toughest test on K-State's schedule. 
Lawton Army Base had gone 28-3 on the 
year. The older, more experienced team 
had defeated the junior varsity teams of 
Oklahoma State and the Universities of 
Oklahoma and Oklahoma City. But again, 
K-State's talented junior varsity prevailed, 
winning 87 to 73. 

"We played with the most intensity that 
we played with all year," Eads said. "We 
played excellent defense, ran a con- 
trolled offense, and ran the fast break 
when the opportunity presented itself." 

The junior varsity enjoyed balanced 
scoring over the course of the season, 
with 10 players averaging at least 8.0 
points a game. Only two team members 
played in all 1 1 games. 

above center: Freshman Keith Frazier avoids an 
aggressive defender. Frazier, who played in varsity 
games, averaged 10 points a game for the junior 
varsity. 

above right: Sophomore guard Scott Langton 
brings the ball upcourt. Langton finished the season 
finding considerable playing time as the varsity 
squad's third guard. 

far right: Scott Langton, an exceptional ball han- 
dler, scored more than 1 5 points a game on the jun- 
ior varsity. 

right: Freshman forward Henry Morton ended the 
season averaging 1 points a game. 



278 — junior varsity basketball 





lunior varsity basketball — 279 



bosketbo 



Jack's a winning bet 



Controlled. Patient. Confident. Suc- 
cessful. 

All describe K-State basketball. 

All describe K-State basketball coach 
Jack Hartman. 

Jack Hartman has coached for 21 sea- 
sons on the junior college and major uni- 
versity levels. Fifteen times his teams 
have participated in post-season tourna- 
ments. 

"I've always wanted to coach," Hart- 
man explained. "I think everybody is 
impressed at an impressionable age. I 
was very much impressed with my high 
school basketball coach and my college 
coach, Henry Iba." 

Coaching is natural for Hartman. If it 
hadn't been basketball, it surely would 
have been football. 

Hartman left his home of Shidler, OK, 
to attend Oklahoma State University on a 
basketball scholarship. He had never 
played high school football, but became 
a two-sport athlete by going out for the 
sport anyway. 

He enjoyed each sport for two years, 
then needed to make a choice. He chose 
football and later was named an all-Mis- 
souri Valley quarterback. 

Upon graduation from Oklahoma State, 
Hartman went to the Canadian Football 
League — Saskatchewan. He was 
named all-league in his rookie season. 

Then, he started coaching football and 
basketball in Plainville, KS, and Shidler 
and Wagoner, OK, before returning to 
OSU as a graduate assistant under Iba. 

Why didn't he stick with football? 

"It's just the way things turned out," 
Hartman replied. He said he has won- 
dered what he would have done if he 
hadn't become a coach, but "never 
came up with anything." 

"I enjoy watching young kids develop 
and watching them learn how to handle 
extreme emotional and pressure situa- 
tions, and watching them become men 



from these experiences," Hartman said. 

In addition to being a coach, Hartman 
said his job required him to be a speaker, 
scheduler, recruiter, and counselor. 
Speaking engagements at banquets, clin- 
ics, and alumni and booster clubs are 
regular parts of his schedule. 

Hartman said frankly he doesn't like 
recruiting. 

"I don't enjoy trying to talk a high 
school senior into coming to my school," 
Hartman said. "I want him to want to 
come to my school." 

Hartman stresses the academic 
aspects of school to his players, while try- 
ing to stay personally uninvolved. 

"I don't have a real close relationship 
with them," Hartman said. "It's difficult to 
remain objective with close, emotional 
relationships." 

Although Brad Rothermel, assistant 
athletic director, is primarily responsible 
for future basketball schedules, Hartman 
has to approve the schedules. In the past, 
he has done all the scheduling himself. 

At 1975's national basketball finals in 
San Diego, Hartman was named as one 
of 1 1 members of the board of directors 
of the national basketball coaches' asso- 
ciation. This board consumes more than 
two weeks of his time each year. 

In the spare moments he manages in 
the summer, Hartman plays golf — in the 
middle and lower 70s. 

As he looks toward the future, Hartman 
said he might be interested in coaching 
professional basketball. He has had 
opportunities to coach the pros in the 
past, but only recent improvements in the 
pros have made the job seem desirable to 
him. 

But, for now, Hartman is content. 

"I don't have any thoughts about leav- 
ing K-State," Hartman said. 

That's good news — but only to K- 
State basketball fans. 



above right: With his glasses reflecting Noble 
Arena's out-of-bounds stripe, Hartman concen- 
trates on his team's first game in Oklahoma Univer- 
sity's new arena. 

above center: Assistant coach Marvin Adams 
and Hartman's attention shifts from the court during 
a pre-game warm-up. 

below center: Hartman talks to his players during 
a time out. 



280 — jack hartman 






hartman — 281 




Opponents find the Kittens vicious 



Any team that finishes 24-9, as the 
Wildkitten basketball team did in 1975, 
leaves a hard act to follow. 

But in 1976, the Wildkittens rolled to a 
glossy 28-6 season and, had it not been 
for William Penn College of Oskaloosa, 
IA, the season could have been consider- 
ably better. The teams met three times 
during the season, with Penn causing 
two of the Kittens' five regular season 
losses. 

Then came the regional tournament 
which would qualify one team for national 
competition. The rivals met in the 
regional finals and the First Ladies pre- 
vailed for the ninth time in the 11 -game 
series with the Kittens, bringing an other- 
wise tremendous season to an abrupt 
halt. A year earlier, on the way to the 
sixth place national finish, the Wildkittens 
had defeated Penn. 

Eight veterans returned from that sixth- 
place team in addition to a host of tal- 
ented newcomers who contributed to the 
Kittens' continuing success. 

There were 10 home games, several 
invitational tournaments, and the first Big 
8 tournament, hosted by K-State — the 
best schedule, according to coach Judy 
Akers, since her arrival at K-State in 
1968. 



The season opened with a Thanksgiv- 
ing tournament hosted by Southwest Mis- 
souri State in Springfield, MO. The Kit- 
tens, ranked tenth and twelfth by two 
leading pre-season publications, won the 
tournament by defeating always-tough 
Grand View College in the finals, 73 to 
72. 

Team captain Susie Norton, with Janet 
Reusser, Greta Sigel, Marsha Poppe, and 
freshman Tami Johnson started for the 
Kittens, though many other women 
would see playing time as the games 
progressed. 

The Kittens were at home as they 
opened their conference race by defeat- 
ing Wichita State, 65 to 45, and demolish- 
ing Fort Hays State, 1 05 to 28. 

Then eighth-ranked William Penn 
came to Manhattan, defeating the Kittens 
65 to 58 and the next night, sixth-ranked 
Wayland Baptist beat the Kittens by 
three. A trip to Texas saw K-State win the 
Temple Classic before losing again to 
Wayland Baptist. Tournaments seemed 
to be the Kittens' cup of tea as they 
returned to Kansas to win the Kansas 
Classic at Lawrence. 

Except for William Penn, Central Mis- 
souri State was the only team to beat the 



Wildkittens in their last 21 games. The 
wins included championships at the Illi- 
nois State Tournament and in the Big 8. 

As the season ended, the Wildkitten 
team left many marks on the record 
books. 

Senior guard Janet Reusser finished 
her career with records in 10 categories, 
including all-time leading scorer (1 ,227 
points), career scoring average (1 1 .9 
points a game), and career highest free 
throw percentage (.70). 

Senior Susie Norton ended her career 
as third on K-State's all-time scoring list 
(1,036), despite missing 10 games her 
senior year with an ankle injury. 

Second on the all-time scoring list was 
claimed by a junior, Marsha Poppe, who 
had 1 ,067 points. Poppe led the team in 
rebounds from her forward spot during 
the season, with 8.4 rebounds a game. 

"I think we had a good season as far as 
our improvement and playing some good 
basketball were concerned," Akers said. 
"Of course, the disappointment was not 
finishing well enough to go on to the 
nationals. We beat four or five teams that 
are in the tournament. I think there's defi- 
nitely a fallacy in the way teams are being 
chosen," she said. 



282 — wildkitten basketball 



far left: Senior center Greta Sigel accepts the Big 
8 tournament trophy tor her team and coach, Judy 
Akers. 

left: Freshman center Margo Jones (30) brings a 
rebound down with a teammate. The Kittens won 
this game against Iowa State, 1 05 to 80. 

below: Judy Akers gives her team instructions 
during a time out. 

below right: Team captain Susie Norton (32) 
closely guards an opponent from Southwest Mis- 
souri State. 




wildkillen basketball — 283 



Scores are criticized for smothering the 
"fun" aspect of sports, for sometimes 
vaguely describing the actual events of 
a game. 

But, what better indicates the talent, 
preparation, and motivation of a com- 
petitor? 




sports scores 




housing 



286 — houtfng 




homing — 287 



acacia 



HAUSER.W MAXINE Houseparent 

BADSKY.FLOYDA Oberlin 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

BEVER. DENNIS W Sedan 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 

BLATTNER, THOMAS L. Rozel 

Engineering ... Freshman 

BLEVINS, MICHAEL F Topeka 

Architecture Senior 

BOLT, DONNIE E Goodland 

Agriculture Freshman 

BRASHEAR, STEPHEN A Cotteyville 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

BRUNING, KEITH D Ellsworth 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

CAUGHRON, RICHARD N Dodge City 

History Junior 

CHEEK, RANDY K, Emporia 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

COLONEY. STEVEN J Wichita 

Physics Junior 

GREENE, EARL F Manhattan 

Speech Senior 

GRIFFITH, STEVE J Topeka 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

HAPGOOD, CURTIS R McPherson 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HEIMKE, ROBERT H Overland Park 

Pre-Medicme Freshman 

HOGAN, TERRY L Kinsley 

Engineering .... Freshman 

HUELSKAMP, CLINTON A Garden City 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

IRWIN, JOHN W Wichita 

Architecture Senior 

JACKSON, H. THOMAS Topeka 

Horticulture Senior 

KARNES, HOWARD A Hoxie 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

KEIL. TERRY D ' Russell 

Engineering Freshman 

KRIZEK, BRIAN E Ellsworth 

General Freshman 

KRIZEK, CRAIG L Ellsworth 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 

LINDENMUTH, LESLIE D Sahna 

Construction Science Junior 




f$BH 





MARVEL. RANDALL W Wichita 

Engineering - Freshman 

McALISTER. DAVID L Sedan 

Pre-Forestry Freshman 

McCLAIN, DAVID D. Russell 

General Freshman 

McCLAIN. GARY D Russell 

Accounting Junior 

McNEIL, RICHARD I Wichita 

Journalism and Business Senior 

MOHENG, MITCH Wakeeney 

Medical Technology Junior 

NELSON, ROD A Salma 

Radio and Television Junior 

NEWKIRK. ALAND Shawnee 

Physical Education Junior 

OBI II JiiER, WARREN G Wichita 

Construction Engineering Freshman 

PATTERSON, J PAUL Salma 

Radio and Television Junior 

PAULSON, CHARLES A Gorham 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

PENNINGTON, GARRY W Chanute 

Pre-Design Protessions Sophomore 

ROGERS, JAY W Beacon, NY 

Business Management Senior 

SCHNEIDER ROB R Ellsworth 

General Freshman 

SCHOTT, L. JOHN St. Louis, MO 

Architecture Senior 

SCHWAMBORN, KENNETH J Ellinwood 

Pre-Law Senior 

SELLBERG, MARTIN E McPherson 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

SHARP. MAX D Dighton 

Accounting Freshman 

SNEATH, ALLEN L Kanopohs 

Civil Engineering Senior 

STABLES, DAN R Wichita 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

STABLES, MICHAEL C Wichita 

Corrections Administration Freshman 

STACHELBECK, KENNETH E Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

TURNER, JEFFREY L Bern 

Accounting Sophomore 

WAGONER, STEVEN J Harper 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 




let it fly 



While the studious college student is 
sharpening the brain, others choose to 
bone up on alternate skills — like tossing 
trisbees. Such talent abounds in the Aca- 
cia house. 



alpha chi omega 

BECKER. EVELYN E JfKk. - '^JM Jt^--. Ww£m Hr^*^flfl HHtik 

ALLEN. LISA A Overland Park 4r^9ft%'' Jr "^^fl\ Br irlflfll WiT/H I ■/ iBj 3*Bk 

Secondary Education Sophomore M\ Btt* VflJ / MI i i „ '-4^1 ^k 

ANDERSON. JANET K Wichita '•• ' <M M * ffiflB L. _1SB1 ■ F * fHM ^~ ~B 

Horticulture I - - Q jfl M * ^ "» i /" *» I 11 B !>!»■ L 1 

ANDERSON KRISTENK Topeka ^ ^ ■■ 4C4fe|M BB M \ 9 ''' L ' ' V ^«B MrJfll^MBI 

Art Education Senior . i ^Cjjp^M BK. '%*""'" * 1 k Jk i uML J^k. 

ANDERSON, NANCY L Mission k. BflMflflflfl/ Hfl^JSflfll k„ V W^dF W "^Bfl^^flflfll 

Business Administration Freshman 'jllL S/->» W > jfii liflnf^l & flfljf^^flflr 

ARMSTRONG. AMY L Shawnee Mission i Vf.H fl^fe. 

Chemical Engineering Freshman aBL >fl/ ' 1 / Jflfl/ zflflj SB 

ARMSTRONG, TER! A Prairie Village -*k^. ***" Ok 

Special Education Sophomore Jpf .. HFJKHj | !* " J* ^/^ ! ^m .M 

BACHMAN.AMY'D Moundndge ^ .1 |» ^B Hf JBk <^# ^flH KT ^k ; '[ lflflk 

^ -sS Am .--if- -1 i m utm tlm, 

BANNISTER, DIANE M Prairie Village flft. ~~JHfl V- * J&- PL 4fcj JA - ' JSP L/ - '■-■■I K "~* i 

Fashion Design ! ^Bk««J«I * vflF Hk Bfl Cf-f ^B7 /BL ' jflL ^^flflflfl* 

BARLOW ANDREA L Leawood flflttflfl **7 ' fj-' iiifl J Ok «^ ^jflB ^^ 

Interior Design flflfll BB ' 'i^flflW^ 1^ BBJ BBJBB I- "fc-^flBJP* ~ ".5»" J 

BARNDS CLAUDIA S Overland Park "Pfk BB fll BBl 'A , B HflflflJ rfHH 

Business Junior ; KHittF i - BBBMBI flflBBflfl» *^~< ' J M WM 

BEARLY. ELIZABETH A Olalhe /! *»fcy ^KS^ 

Clothing and Retailinq Senior KtfB^Sflfl * *$B X^jflBk Brjf<*^l 

BERRr. ELIZABETH J W: M \9lBI flflW Bl Bflv flfl] Hi HflBHflfli / flflflk if 

Computer Science Freshman f '-* "'IqJBjjj / BBiBM 

BOWEN. BETHS , ^ "~B« HY^ Cflfl Hf®? Sr*flB f * #*lflfl I iB 

Elementary Education Sophomore MB dfl] B fll Mrtt HI I? ~ H I «i « Bflf 

BUTCHER. SHARON L HI <^M I m^lHfll BL JF F "4 - > P V^flfll ■ ' '4. ' ' ^ JP^ 

History Education Sophomore * k ■' MF : SBk Bfl Bk " jflfljV ;"%-"# Jk ^1 I ^Kk^i^flHJ 

CABLE. KAREN L Cedarvale Bk^jdfl i flBk^ifll I flBkJ ^^M^l 

Family and Child Development Senior Bl ' ^ 

CLARK, ANN M Salina HSfifc ^S ' "^ftMflflBfe < *^8i I ^JflBB 

Textile Research Junior I Tr^ffi ■■ ^R 

COCHENNET CARRIE A Emporia rf^few 

* Bk IBT fBflfll' 

CORNWELL. NANCY Joplm. MO HjT ^flfl 

Interior Design Senior BBI BH ^flflj I Wktj*. „^flfli 

,'•''"" d'nne ^'Smln i' "P *' * ■ « "lfl 

DICKERSON.SARAF Prairie Village Ba.^"^! BL^^BI ■ < SL V "5fl« 

Modern Language Senior Bflkv "^Bb BBk ^BBl I liflV. A .' ,i 

DONOHUEANNE Sioux Falls. SD "J? : i" ; k 3, 'flBL , fl«pflJB 

Physical Education Senior Iflk^BjOEgB , 

DURST, BECKY L Emporia 

Pre-Denlistry Junior 

EHRSAM. JULIE A Bern 

Social Science Senior 

ELLISON. SUSAN K I i ,. jj*^ v>A 4 •" **•> "|> I ~- ^A" 1 I '> 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 7 B I L ', V If ■ 

FARLEY. BROOKE A Overland Park |« ■ BB i -- ' ~ N # ! i 4- -C" I " - ^ flfl fcf 

Elementary Education Freshman F JF^k»laiW Bj |» Bk "^H Hi 

FELDKAMP. CINDY M Manhattan |^k_3 H L^HmmHH 

Business Education Sophomore 

GEBHART.SHERYLLS Kansas City 

Special Education Freshman 

GIGERDEBRAL ^H^. B^^lflflH A. 

Art Junior ^~ BBk I "fl^fljk Bf ^BflflJ Bf ^1 ^flk. 

GRUBER. CYNTHIA D Concordia BP ^A 1/ ^B\ , V J&M WlMjf flfll / uflli 

HAACK.PAMLAJ Bird City 1 1 » '«* ffl if, fM I Bj " 

Fashion Marketing Senior i I al:«4k/^^^Bl 1 

HARDER. MELINDA Garden City 1 ,-<* k\ ; 

Political Science Senior 

HAY. KAREN L Overland Park 

Home Economics Freshman 

HERWIG SUE A Leawood 

Home Economics Freshman HB m BBBBflflBBB 

HOEFGEN. DEBRAK Topeka 

BflflflBBfll • ^ak . _3sBt^k 

IRELAND. TARAR Overland Park jBx^^H I I iH HT ^H I ' 4^*^9BI 

Home Economics Freshman BY ^flk 1 B *H» 

JENKINS. NANCY J Greensburg BJ ■-* .^Bl ! I' "■ *■ . #5 — T£ 

Home Economics Freshman ' I Bk j 1 fll I i , - E U ' "*"* B 

.HERIH line Village fll * jfi B^ L , ».^"" J / »' " 

Physical Education Sophomore 

EVI RLY A Olathe 

Pre-Design Protessions luninr 

II iNI . UFBRAE Concordia 

General Freshman 

HANI I Olathe 

' ii neral Freshman 

UHM/i[l Holcomb W W- H ■■CJ' ^H 

Junior f^ ^' 11: >tV L W& BBk " k « ""' 

KNETTER, PAULA P i ,-.,.s City - T.~ v«| Tj — ""^H I f * Bflflflfl PI''* 

Junior I — BJ ! If 4 ^ flflk ■ < ti B Bl II ^^H P Bf 

^"* "" ,Bj| 4 ' ' rli !. ■ I T'44^flflfl 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

KOt mi.' KATHRYNL Wichita 

Biology 1 reshman 

;ANM Shawnee M 

' :hem» alEng 1 reshman 




. ' 




S LARSON. CHARYL D Medicine Lodge 
Early Childhood Education Senior 
L aPIM LARSON. KRISTINEL Pretty Prairie 
WtMr '• IB ^""1^^ ' J Business Administration Freshman 
" St. Paul. NB 
ft i rJH .^H Dietetics Sophomore 
t/ft .">• ^» S LUEKER. DEBBII St Joseph, MO 
f^^fc^^'W "^ )K^F . : Elementary Education Junior 

Hfe^tfH JO^^m^ MATTSON.LISAL Overland Park 
Speech Pathology Freshman 
McGRANAGHAN, MEG A Overland Park 
Business Education Senior 

MESSMER. DEANENE S Norwich 

Accounting Senior 

MORSE, ROANNA L Joplin, MO 

Fashion Marketing Senior 

MOSELEY, PAMELA K New City. NY 

Biochemistry Sophomore 

MOSS, MISSY C Prairie Village 

Philosophy Junior 

MUSTOE, N. DALENE Rexford 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts Senior 

rO'ROURKE MAUREEN P Overland Park 

Elementary Education Junior 





alpha chi omega 




PALUCH. CAROL M Wichita %Kk&L 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman ' S 

PARMEL/, TERESA J LeRoy MM ^ BW 1 ^. * 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore I tSSI 3 MfL %* Wm. 

PARSONS. DEBRA D Manhattan ■■ MM M m ■ "' MJk 

Music Freshman H»<~" ■ Lfi ' i ■ JB 

PEACH. ELIZABETH D Topeka ^BV ~^mm§ ■ fcm* * r ~" ^MB 

An Sophomore j^ ^HBjk %. H '■'•< 

PETTYGROVE, LYNNEL Concordia 

General Freshman Hf ^"KHP 

QUINN. COLLEEN M Prairie Village 

Social Work Sophomore 

REED. KATHLEEN M Salina 

Physical Education Freshman 

RIST. BRENDAA Liberal 

Pre-Law Freshman 

ROUGHTON, KAREN L Newton 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

SANDERS, ANNE K ' Overland Park 

Accounting Junior 

SHERMAN. RENEE I Coldwater 

Psychology Freshman 

SHULL. DEBBIE Overland Park 

Modern Language Freshman 

SILCOTT, JEANNINE Wichita 

Special Education Senior 

Chesterfield. MO 

Geneseo B f " - 

Junior E V* 3Ls 

STOVER, BARBARA J Wichita 

Family and Child Development Senior 

STUART. SUSAN K Olathe 

Music Education Senior 

rRUMI HI Wichita 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

VEDROS. VALERIE A Shawnee Mission 

Business Administration Senior 

/INC! HI I INDAI Garden City 

limn if 
ANCIEB St Joseph. MO 

Clothing and Retailing Junior -i • 

■'•'Alii II MAi in '•■ Bloomington. IL » - 

lucalion Junior 

YOUNG, LINDA J OverLii ,. I I Mil- 

Pre Design Professions I ;opho 

2AROA, MARLAJ Kansas City 

Consumer Interest Senior 



ilpha i in omega 



alpha delta pi 



% <fi> lw 




BOVARD, ANNA-MARIE Houseparent 

ALBRIGHT, JULIE C Winfield 

Business Sophomore 

ANSTINE, MARY F Bartlesville, OK 

Accounting Senior 

BABB. ANNE R . Leawood 

General Freshman 

BACHMAN, MELISSA J Centralia 

Business Administration Senior 

BAETZ, CINDY L Salma 

Social Work Sophomore 

BAUMAN, JUDITH A Overland Park 

Art Freshman 

BECK. JENNIFER L Kinsley 

Early Childhood Education Freshman 

BOSCH. TERESA J Council Grove 

Fashion Design . . . Sophomore 

BREWER, BECKI A Council Grove 

Art Freshman 

BURKDOLL, MARCIAA Topeka 

General Freshman 

BYRON, PAULA K Prairie Village 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

CARPENTER. DENISE . . Overland Park 

Fashion Marketing Junior 

CARR, PAMELA L Mulvane 

Elementary Education Senior 

CASSING, NANCY E Mernam 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

COON. SHELLY C Stockton 

Foods and Nutrition Junior 

COOK, GINGER Overland Park 

Recreation Senior 

COSGROVE, SARAH J Council Grove 

Art Freshman 

CRAIG, KELLEE A Overland Park 

Psychology . . . . Freshman 

CRAMER. CANDACE K Glasco 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

CRISS. ELIZABETH D Wichita 

Biology Freshman 

CURRY, ANDREA J Topeka 

Speech Pathology Senior 

CURRY, BETH A Topeka 

Elementary Education Freshman 

DALE, MICHELLE M Prairie Village 

Fashion Marketing Sophomore 

DOYEN, CAROL J Concordia 

Horticulture Therapy Senior 

DUNN, PATRICIA D. Overland Park 

Lite Science Junior 

EMIG, SHARON S Abilene 

Business Junior 

ENGEL, MARYANN Hays 

Home Economics Extension Senior 

ETZEL, KATHLEEN A Topeka 

Special Education Freshman 

FOUTS,AMYL Prairie Village 

General Freshman 

FREWEN. CYNTHIA J St Francis 

Medical Technology Junior 

FRY, CYNTHIA L Topeka 

Home Economics Sophomore 

GILLAN. KATHLEEN A Garden City 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

GILLETT, CATHERINE A Kinsley 

Home Economics Extension Senior 

GLANVILLE, BETH A Kansas City 

Family and Child Development Junior 

GRANBERRY, MARGARET L Fairport, NY 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

GRICE, CARA M Topeka 

Accounting Senior 

GRISSOM, JONI F, Wichita 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

HAERTLING, SALLY A Overland Park 

General Sophomore 

HARTMAN. DAVYS Manhattan 

Modern Language Freshman 

HASTINGS, DEBBI L Council Grove 

General Freshman 

HELMS, VICKIL. Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HOFFMAN, SUSAN L , Leawood 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

HOTCHKISS, JULIE A Emporia 

Home Economics Freshman 

HRABE, CHRISTY L Plainville 

General , . . lopti - 

IVES, MARIANNE Overland Park 

Engineering Freshman 

KESSLER. BARB Overland Park 

Speech Pathology Junior 

KIERNAN. THERESA M Salma 

Pre-Law Junioi 



.ilph.idi'IMpi "'-: 



alpha delta pi 



LAMBIE, BARBARA J Overland Park 

Home Economics Freshman 

LAWSON. CAROLYN A Leawood 

Math Education Freshman 

LAY, LINDA K Wichita 

Home Economics Junior 

LUCKEROTH. MICHELE Seneca 

Business Sophomore 

LUTTRELL, VICKI F Great Bend 

Accounting Senior 

MAY, SUZIE Overland Park 

Mathematics Senior 

MEDILL, CAROL M Seneca 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

MENSE. DEBORAH J Overland Park 

Home Economics Freshman 

MILLER, MARY A Collier 

Family and Child Development Senior 

MILLER, SANDRA L Topeka 

Elementary Education Junior 

MILLS, MARGARET A Gordon, NB 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

MOORE. SUZANNE K Caney 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

MUELLER, THELMA G Hanover 

Business Senior 

MURRAY, JERE L Salina 

Home Economics Extension Senior 

MYER, MELINDAA Kansas City 

Psychology Junior 

NELSON, GRETA F St Joseph. MO 

Engineering Sophomore 

OLIVER. SARA Hutchinson 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

PETERSEN. PAULA J Lee's Summit, MO 

Entomology Freshman 

PRIDDY.LISAM Junction City 

General Freshman 

PRINGLE, BETH G Yates Center 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

RAILE.BRENDAA Edson 

Medical Technology Freshman 

REYNOLDS. REBECCA S Wmtield 

History Senior 

ROBB, REBECCA L Kansas City, MO 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

SANDERS, GINAL Wichita 

Fashion Design Sophomore 




do not open 



Looks like someone found a great gift 
and decided to share it with all her 
friends. The recipients had better unwrap 
them all at once — or forget the surprise 
bit. 



294 — , il| I 



SCHRAEDER. LEANN Timken 

Accounting Sophomore 

SMITH, DEBORAH S. . Shawnee Mission 

Business Freshman 

SHELLEY D Lake Quivira 

General Freshman 

SPITSNAUGLE, SHERRY L Wakeeney 

Journalism and Mass Communications 

STEINER, SUSAN K. 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

STUCK. LAURA L Shawnee 

Fashion Marketing ... Freshman 

SUMMERLIN. JOHNNIE M Overland Park 

Accounting Sophomore 

SWAGGERTY, SARAH N Ulysses 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

TEHEL. TERRY L Overland Park 

Physical Education Junior 

THAYER, HOLLY J Belleville 

Fashion Marketing Sophomore 

TRUE, RONI M Shawnee Mission 

Dietetics Junior 

TUREK. SALLY A Overland Park 

Elementary Education Junior 

WALSH, MARY J Onaga 

Journalism ami Mass l ■< immunications Junior 

WARNOCK, MARY F. Roeland Park 

Social Work Sophomore 

WELLS. STEPHANIE J Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

WHITE, CAROLYN K. . . . Topeka 

Fashion Merchandising . Freshman 

WILLIAMS. DEBBIE K Shawnee Mission 

Fashion Marketing Sophomore 

WINSKY, DEBBIE A Merriam 

Accounting Senior 

WOODS, CINDY L Shawnee Mission 

Fashion Merchandising Freshman 




alpha gamma rho 



ADAM. ROBERTS Holcomb 

Horticulture Freshman 

BEARNES. BYRON K . . Culver 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

BEESLEY. PHILIP E Quinter 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

BEYEA. KURT W Springview, NB 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

BROWNBACK. SAMUEL D . Parker 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Sophomore 

BUCHANAN, SHANNON L Little River 

Accounting Senior 

CARLSON, MARK W Smolan 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

CHESTNUT. ALLAN B Clay Center 

Animal Science and Industry Graduate Student 

CHESTNUT, MERLIN B Clay Center 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

COMBS. STEPHEN H Paradise, PA 

Feed Technology Senior 

COTTON, TERRY A Ellinwood 

Agriculture Senior 

DANLER. ROBERT J Holcomb 

Agricultural Education Freshman 

DEVLIN, DANIEL L Smith Center 

Agriculture Freshman 

DILL, THOMAS A Olathe 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

DUNCAN, STEWART R Olivet 

Nalural Resource Management Sophomore 

EDER. JOEL L Leoti 

Agricultural Education Freshman 

FISH, PETER R Cedarburg, Wl 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

FLETCHER, PETERS Westford, MA 

Dairy Production Junior 

FLICKNER, RAYMOND G Moundndge 

Agricultural Education Junior 

GALLE.JACKG Moundndge 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

GEORGE, PHILIP D Lebo 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

GIGSTAD, ALFRED O Nebraska City, NB 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

GREEN. DAVID D Melvern 

Agronomy Junior 

HOLSTE, JAY H Norton 

Agronomy Senior 

HOLT. LYNN R Wintield 

Animal Science and Industry ... Sophomore 

IDOL.KEMS Rolo. NB 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

KELLER, DANIEL J St. Francis 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

KLAASSEN, MATT K Whitewater 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

KLINE, RODERICK A LeRoy, IL 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

KOECHNER. JOSEPH L Wright 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine . . . Freshman 

KONICEK, S. ALLEN McPherson 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

LADD. CARL R Humboldt 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

LARSON, CRAIG A . Marquette 

Agriculture Freshman 

MARSTON.TWIGT Canton 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Junior 

MAYO. STEVE A Garden City 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

McCORGARY, LARRY W Geuda Springs 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

McGEE. WILLIAM L Normal, IL 

Agriculture I ii-.hin.ni 

MELSON.CHRISA ...... Potwm 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

MILES. STEVEN W. Burhngame 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

MORGAN, THOMAS H Greeley 

Agricultural Economics Graduate Student 

MORRELL, MICKEY V Blue Mound 

Agricultural Education Freshman 

NIELSEN. DANNY L St. Paul, NB 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Junior 

NOLL. MARK T Reserve 

Animal Science and Industry ,. >[>ti< >rn< up 

PARK, G.NOEL Protection 

Agricultural Education Junior 

PETERSON, RICK L Assaria 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

PRICE. JOHN R Weir 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

POSS. GARY E Richmond 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

POSS. LARRY D Richmond 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 




t Q % &%.% 




"Hi. You don't know me but . . ." 
When the papers are written and the 
chapters outlined, dial tones come into 



style and cradles are robbed of their 
receivers. This AGR leans into a comfort- 
able conversation. 



a gentleman caller 




&* .?.!£ 





& Q th ft 



PRITCHETT. MICHAELS Overland Park 

Agriculture Freshman 

REECE. EDWARD G Phillipsburg 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

RHINE, DONALD L Narka 

Agricultural Education ... Sophomore 

ROCKERS. CHRISTOPHER J. Garnett 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine . . Freshman 

ROENBAUGH. JOHN B Lewis 

Agronomy Junior 

RUSSELL, LEROYW Eureka 

Agricultural Education Junior 

SCHLICKAU. BRUCE A Haven 

Anirri.il Si icn. <-■ ,ind Industry Sophomore 

SCHOEN. RODNEY R Downs 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

SEILER. KEN J . .. Colwich 

Ai|iu ultiir.il I i i »iii mill ■■ Junior 

SORRICK, WILLIAM A Eskndge 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

STRICKLER, THOMAS S lola 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

STUMPF. RICHARD W Axtell 

Agronomy Freshman 

SWADER.TERRYA Gardner 

Animal Science and Industry , Freshman 

THOMPSON, MIKE D Little River 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

WELTMER. KENTON L Smith Center 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

WINTFR BRIAN F Andale 

Agriculture Sophomore 

WINTER. KENT T Andale 

Agricultural Economics Junior 



alpha gamma rho — 297 



alpha kappa lambda 



ATWELL. DAVID C 
Electrical Engineering 
BARRETT. BRUCE E 



Overland Park 

Junior 

Randall 

Agronomy Junior 

BRANDENBURG, ALBERT L Wakeeney 

Interior Architecture Senior 

BREITENBACH, CHARLES Belpre 

Pre-Law Freshman 

BREITENBACH. MARJAIN L . . . Belpre 

Agronomy Junior 

CRANE, JAMES B . . Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 




Lewis 

Freshman 

Kingman 

Freshman 

Kingman 

Sophomore 

Hutchinson 

Freshman 

. . Scandia 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Sophomore 

FEHR, DAVID L Topeka 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 



CROSS. JOHN H 
Industrial Engineering 
DUTTON.ANDYD 
Computer Science 
DUTTON. EDWARD E 
Agricultural Business 
EDWARDS, FLOYD W 
Chemical Engineering 



GORDON, STEVE J 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology 

GROGAN, MICHAEL R 

Agronomy 

HENNESS, TIMOTHY C. . 

Electrical Engineering 

HINSON, DONALD J 

Engineering 

HOLMES, DAVID K 

Business 



. . .Winfield 

Sophomore 

Winfield 

Freshman 

Kansas City 

Freshman 

Winfield 

Freshman 

Wichita 

Freshman 



HOSTIN, GARY L Olathe 

Business Administration Senior 



JACOBS, CARL L 

Mechanical Engineering 

JENKINS, ROBE 

Mechanical Engineering 

KINSLER, ROSSN 

Agriculture 

KRAFT. SCOTT C, 

Journalism and Mass Communications 



Augusta 

Graduate Student 

Montrose, IA 

Sophomore 

Spivey 

Freshman 

Wichita 

Junior 



KRAMER, CHARLES M Norristown, PA 

Physical Education Senior 

METZINGER. JOSEPH W Dexter 

Pre-Velermary Medicine Sophomore 



8M & H 

rtij k 

V./J 9% ^W V?F 





IB— Ik 





298 — alph.i > 




MIDDLEKAMP, RICK Overland Park 

Computer Science Junior 

MORELAND. RICHARD C Manhattan 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

NALLY, RODNEY E Wmlield 

Engineering Freshman 

OPPITZ, LAWRENCE W Topeka 

Architecture Senior 

OPPITZ, MICHAEL E Topeka 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

POPP, CHARLES J Boston, MA 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

POTTER. JON H Wmfield 

Civil Engineering Junior 

ROOD, KEVIN L Winfield 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

SHEAHAN, RICK J Randall 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

SWOB, BRUCE C Albert 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore 

TURNER, KEITH E Lindsborg 

Horticulture Senior 

WATERMAN, JOHN K Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

WRIGHT, RONALD E Trenton, MO 

Geology Senior 

ZAWISTOWSKI. VINCE R Greenville. PA 

Construction Science Junior 

ZIMMERMAN. GERALD L Nashville. TN 

Accounting Graduate Student 



treadache 

Ever since Henry turned out the first 
one, the automobile has been nothing 
but a heap of trouble — besides a con- 
venience and status symbol. Some, like 
these AKLs, even enjoy the trouble. 



alpha kappa lambda — 299 



alpha tau omega 

*;■•-. '{ Am .ft ;\ 

ft -ft ft ^L^L 



ACHTEN. PHILIP B 

Journalism and Mass Communications 

AKERLY. JEFFREYS 

Business 

AKRIGHT. BRENT F 


Wetmore 
Sophomore 

Leawood 
Sophomore 

Leawood 


ANDERSON, STEVE D 
Business 

ARMSTRONG. KENT W 
Animal Science and Industry 
BARRON. GREGORY C 


Belleville 
Freshman 

' . ( ..'ki 
Freshman 

pi'ki 






















General 

CHILDS. JAMES A 
Architecture 
COMPTON GILBERT E 
Pre-Design Professions 


Freshman 

Belleville 

Junior 

Wichita 

Freshman 


Interior Architecture 


Senior 



DEGENHARDT, RICHARD K Leawood 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

DEUTSCH, JOHN L Hoismgton 

Business Administration Junior 

DUNBAR. STEVEN D Valley Center 

Microbiology Junior 

EIKENBERRY, KENT R Leoti 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

ENGEN.ROBL Wichita 

Civil Engineering Junior 

FORSYTH. BRAD Medicine Lodge 

Business Administration Senior 



FREEMAN. DAVID W 
Mechanical Engineering 
GARRISON, STEPHEN J 
Agricultural Economics 
GLATT, ANDREW K. 
Industrial Engineering 



Overland Park 

Junior 

Osborne 

Sophomore 

Salina 

Senior 

Overland Park 



HILDERHOF, GARY Overland Park 

Architecture Senior 

HILTON. BARRY P Leawood 

Architecture Senior 



HUSCHKA, JAMES A 
Agronomy 
KEITH. RAYE 
Architecture 
KOGLER. LARRY R 
Agricultural Engineering 
LARSEN. PETER E 
Pre-Dentistry 
MARITAN, MICKEY J. 
Business Administration 
MASON DAVID P 
Business 



MATHEWS. MARK R 
Animal Science and Industry 

McClelland, jeff D 

Elementary Education 
McCOY, T MIKE 
General 

McFALL.RONNYD 
Business Administration 
MEEKS. HERBERT L 
Landscape Architecture 
MEINKE. MICHAELS 
Pre-Vetermary Medicine 



MEVER, DAVID I 
Interior Architecture 
MORTS. R SCOTT 
Architecture 
NORTH. LARRY J 
Construction Science 
ORR.DENNISW 
Accounting 

POTTORFF, MICHAEL L 
Pre-Medicine 
ROBERTSON CURT L 
Pre-Desigri I 



SCHMIDT JEI FRI < I 
Business Administration 
SHROPSHIRI 



Garden City 

Junior 

Chillicothe, MO 

Junior 

Salina 

Sophomore 



Overland Park 
Senior 

Wichita 
Junior 



snaron 

Junior 

Kansas City 

Sophomore 

Wichita 

Freshman 

Sabetha 

Junior 

Lee's Summit, MO 

lurnr I 

Bonner Springs 

' ,- ,| li. him Hi' 



Kansas City 

Junior 

Chillicothe, MO 

Junior 

Kansas City 

Freshman 

Wichita 

Freshman 

Wichita 

Freshman 

Leawood 

Freshman 



Overland Park 
Freshman 



'.TRUNK RANDALL J 



/•'jfl' jll Jl.il I </)!!' Ill 



100 ilpha lauomega 



Manhattan 
Junior 
Salina 

Junior 











§^ Q( Q ft ^ j 
tomHf f am 






m %\\ t 




THOMPSON, PETER L Overland Park 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

TINDLE. MARK G Overland Park 

Biology Sophomore 

WALLACE. ROGER W Luray 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

YOUNG, STEVE B Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 




Comfort furnishes the setting for quiet 
reading in the living room of the ATO 
house. The fraternity made the move 



from the former address of 1 408 Denison 
to this McCain Lane house in August of 
1970. 



study circle 



.llph.l t.ii nrgj V ' 



alpha xi delta 



RYAN. LOUISES Houseparent 

ADAMS, DEBORAH L Overland Park 

Interior Design Senior 

ALBERS, PAMELA D Bendena 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

AMRINE. ROBIN D Kansas City 

Social Science Senior 

ATWELL, LINDA M Norton 

Community Services Junior 

BAKER. CHERYL L Shawnee Mission 

Special Education Junior 

BARNES. MARY A Sedan 

Business Management Freshman 

BEAL. SANDRA L Overland Park 

Speech Pathology Freshman 

BECKERLE, HOLLY L Shawnee Mission 

Business Junior 

BELL.CARLAS Great Bend 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

BELL. MARY G Wichita 

Public Relations Sophomore 

" ERNER. KATHRYN M Overland Park 

Medical Technology Freshman 

BLOMQUIST, DENISE I Assana 

Mathematics Junior 

BLUE DONNA J Wichita 

Home Economics Freshman 

BORNHEIMER. MARYANN Prairie Village 

Special Education Freshman 

BOYD.DIANNEM Hutchinson 

Accounting Freshman 

BOYD. JEAN A Overland Park 

Elementary Education Se 

BROUGHER, VICKI J Great Bend 

Business Freshman 

BRUNIN, CAROL A St Marys 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

BURIK. KIMBERLY A Ottawa 

Accounting Sophomore 

CAPLINGER. CANDRAJ Effingham 

Business Administration Freshman 

CARLSON. JENNIFER L Smolan 

Fashion Marketing .Sophomore 

CARR. CAROL A Wichita 

Home Economics and Journalism Freshman 

CHANDLER. KAREN S Richmond 

Engineering Freshman 




I <■>, <i delta 








&a§&M 




JMi 




COOPER, KAREN L Garnett 

Interior Design Freshman 

CRAMER, JANE L Wichita 

Special Education Senior 

DAVIS, DEBORAH D Hays 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

DENZEL, SUSAN J Leawood 

Social Science Senior 

DIKEMAN, SANDY A Syracuse 

[ icnt.il I l/qinne Sophomore 

DREHER. TERESA L tola 

Business Freshman 

EDWARDS. JANICE A Manhattan 

Special Education Junior 

ELSEA. CONNIE D Manhattan 

Interior Design Sophomore 

ERWIN, TERRY L Kankakee, IL 

Elementary Education Senior 

EYMAN, BECKY J Shawnee Mission 

Engineering Freshman 

FARHA. CONNIE A Wichita 

Graphic Arts Junior 

FEE. SUZANNE L Stillwell 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

FLYNN, MARY K Leawood 

Speech Senior 

FORSBERG. ROCHELLE L Lmdsborg 

Social Work Sophomore 

FOSTER. DEBRA M Overbrook 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

FOUST.TINAM Bucklm 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 

GARRETT. ELAINE G Shawnee 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

GRIMES. GAIL M " Cimarron 

Home Economics and Journalism Sophomore 

GUNZELMAN, RITA J Topeka 

Accounting Sophomore 

HENDERSON, SUSAN B Kansas City 

Home Economics and Journalism Senior 

HUTTON. LACINDA G Overland Park 

Fashion Marketing Sophomore 

ISAACSON, MARSHA R Belleville 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

JUNO, JULIE A Prairie Village 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

KAPPELMANN, MARY F Topeka 

Restaurant Management Sophomore 

KELLY, KAREN L Overland Park 

Elementary Education Senior 

KILBOURN, SHARON K Sterling 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

KILLE. BARBARA A Hardtner 

Fashion Marketing Sophomore 

KROUPA, SHARON L Marion 

Music Senior 

LAFFERTY, TERRIE L DeSoto 

Elementary Education Junior 

LALA, BRENDA J Smith Center 

Interior Design Senior 

LAMOREUX. SHERRY L Shawnee Mission 

General Freshman 

LARSEN, LINDA Manhattan 

Political Science Sophomore 

LEWIS. PEGGY J Syracuse 

Speech Freshman 

LOWE. SHEREER Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

LUNDSTROM, GAYLE D McPherson 

Business Freshman 

LYNTON. SUZANNE L Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

LYON, BARBARA J Salina 

Physical Education Senior 

MARSH, DEBRA K Manhattan 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

MATLACK, ROXANNE Clearwater 

Modern Language Senior 

MATTINGLY. KATHY A Clay Center 

Accounting Sophomore 

McDANIEL, PAMELA D Hutchinson 

Special Education Senior 

McLEOD, DEBBIE S Wichita 

Family and Child Development Senior 

MEAD, MARY E .', ' : 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

MEHL, KAREN A Prairie \ llage 

Computer Science Si iphi imi in 

MYZER. TERESA L Topeka 

Physical Education i - ' ■■■ i 

NELSON. CATHY L. Olathe 

Pre-Medicine Junior 
NELSON, KARLAB 

Interior Design Sophomi re 

NELSON. SALLY G Long Island 

Home Economics Freshman 



alpha xi delta 








a 


f 








I^^^^Hl^ A J 








ft \ « 


fp0f.. d % ** , *^» m 


fej. 








^HUZ^^B^ '- « 




when you hear the beep 


• 


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is jh^*-- 




Notes telling who is where and called 
when but won't be there then. Confusing 
to the messenger but not the messagee, 
slips containing vital information can 
bridge the gap between school and the 
social world. 











OLANDER, JANE A Little River 

Elementary Education Senior 

PARKS, CYNTHIA L Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

RHOADES, DEBORAH L Wakeeney 

General Sophomore 

RUNDOUIST. AMY J Assaria 

Speech Sophomore 

RUNDQUIST, EVE L Assaria 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

SAINICH , MONICA R. . . Kansas City 

Biology Freshman 

SCHEETZ.SUZIJ Norton 

Home Economics Freshman 

SCHLINTZ. JANE L Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications ... Freshman 

SHIELDS. CYNTHIA M Overland Park 

Physical Education Senior 

SHORT. KAREN A Stamford. CT 

Clothing and Retailing , Sophomore 

SMITH, STEPHANIE L . Leawood 

Special Education , Freshman 

SNIDER. AMY L Wichita 

General Freshman 

SONTAG, CHARLOTTE M Derby 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

STEINMEYER, DENA M Wichita 

Sociology Senior 

STILES, MARY C . . Jefferson City, MO 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

TJADEN, DENAS Clearwater 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

TOMPKINS, SHERI K Topeka 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

TWIETMEYER, CYNTHIA D Goddard 

Bus i ess A.dm ■ ii Iral i m ' .< >i i» mi »<■ 

UKENA, KAREN S Manhattan 

Business Administration Senior 

VANDER DUSSEN, CATHY L Cherry Hill, NJ 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

WHITE, PEGGY M Kansas City 

Music Education Senior 

WILCOX. JANE L Junction City 

Theatre Sophomore 

WRAY, CONNIE A Norton 

Fashion Marketing Freshman' 



304 — alpha xi delta 




beta sigma psi 






m 

fL© v.* ^ 

mi A HIP Q ^ / nliii :: - #, 






BIEHL. CINDY K Houseparen! 

BIEHL, DAVID L Lexington, NB 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

ADAMS, R. DAVID Salina 

Sociology Senior 

BAREISS, LOREN D Atchison 

Physics Sophomore 

BECKER, CURTIS J Garden City 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

BOMAN, ROGER J Garden City 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 





















. Salma 


Civil Engineering 

CASPERS, STEVEN L 


Junior 






















DEUTSCH, STEVE L 








EBERTH, KEITH A 




































Industrial Engineering 


Sophomore 






































KARST, STEPHEN 
Engineering 

KIRCHHOFF STEVE P 


Rush Center 
Sophomore 














KRUG.JOHNR, 








KRUG, PHILIP C 


Hoisington 






LIETZ, RICHARD G 
Pre-Design Professions 
LUCKE, GREGORY A 
Speech 


Paxico 

Sophomore 

Girard 
Junior 



LUPTON. JAMES W Hazlet. NJ 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

LUST, KEITH M Hoisington 

Building Construction Senior 

MARSCHMAN, KENT L Marysville 

Political Science . Sophomore 

McLELAND, DAVID A. Wichita 

Music Education Junior 

MEIN, STEVE A Leavenworth 

Horticulture Senior 

MEYER, ALLEN D Hiawatha 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 



Mt Hope 
Junior 

MILLSAP. TIMOTHY M Bonner Springs 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

MURPHY. DANIEL D Alton 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

PETERS, BRUCE L Ellmwood 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

PITMAN, PAUL A Wichita 

Labor Relations Senior 

REESE, MARK C Salina 

Psychology Senior 







Electrical Engineering 


• ophomi in 






















VVAi iNI R HANOI 1 L G. 




Iiutii' In il 1 m iiiiiviinq 














beta sigma psi — 30b 



beta sigma psi 

WILMS. DAVID E Topeka 

Natural Resource Management Freshman 

WILMS. RICHARD N Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

WINCHELL, JOHNS Prairie Village 

Accounting , Freshman 

WISE, SCOTT G Tonganoxie 

Animal Science and Industry . .. Sophomore 

WRIGHT, JOHN L Pawnee Rock 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 




Mi 




■ 




all the trimmings 



It wouldn't be Christmas without the 
tree — and the usual twisted cord of 
lights to untangle. These Beta Sigs seem 
to have found that decorating for yuletide 
brings out the "kid" in "old college peo- 
ple". 



"I.i . i ' jr r 1. 1 [isi 



beta theta pi 




v £> 




t$ -I ^ Q © 
iZk . Ilk < 




k4 ^> JLEL^ 




ADAMS. HELEN K 
AELMORE. JOHND 
Business 
ANDERSON, BERT D. 


Houseparent 

Greensburg 

Freshman 

Ottawa 














































Pre-Law 


Junior 


Business 

BROWNLEE, JAMES W 

Journalism and Mass Communications 


Sophomore 

Paola 

Senior 


















Agricultural Economics 


Sophomore 


Business 


Junior 






FAULKNER. TOM 

Journalism and Mass Communications . 


Manhattan 
Sophomore 


















Pre-Design Professions 


Sophomore 










Nuclear Engineering 

GAST, CHUCK 

Animal Science and Industry 

GOLD. DAVID N 
Electrical Engineering 


Sophomore 

Manhattan 

Senior 

Goft 
Sophomore 


Electrical Engineering 


Sophomore 






HALL, TRACY 
Business Management 
HAMILTON. JAMES J 


Overland Park 

Sophomore 

Wakeeney 










HANSON. DIRK A 


Concordia 






Accounting 


Junior 






III III 11 KM )N hi VIN '. 
Pre-Vetennary Medicine 


Almena 
Sophomore 














IIIIMI'HKI VS. HANI 11 B 


Lake Winnebago. MO 










h.. -I. ".' r .i ].■ nl 


Newton 
Sophomore 










Animal Science and Industry 

Pre-Dentistry 


Senior 

Wichita 
Junior 


Mix h, inn al 1 nun ng 


Sophomore 
Overland Park 


l'n' 1 ii».n|ii 1 'i,)li",snms 


Sophomore 


Natural Resource Management 


Senior 


















OTTO. DANIEL L 


V ''.;'. ■ '.: 




betatl etapl — 307 



beta theta pi 



PARKE. PATRICK P. Wakeeney 

Engineering Freshman 

PEARSON. GEORGE H Prairie Village 

Business and Pre-Law Sophomore 

PRIDDLE. HARLANDG Hutchinson 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

PRINSLOW, KURT D Arlington Heights, IL 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

REICH. TIMOTHY D. . Paradise 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

REINHARDT. RANDALL D Great Bend 

Pre-Optometry Junior 

RIDDELL. M GATZ McPherson 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

ROBINSON, PATRICK R Cedar Point 

Business Administration Sophomore 

SARGENT. PATRICK C Wichita 

Accounting Freshman 

SCHLAEGEL.DAVIDA Olathe 

General Freshman 

SCHWENSEN, JOHN C Clay Center 

Business Administration Senior 

SHEARER, RICHARD M Wichita 

Geography Sophomore 

SPENCER. LANCE J Great Bend 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

STITES, JERRY R. Manhattan 

Business Administration Junior 

STONE, THOMAS W Sabetha 

General Freshman 

SWEET, ROBERT L Hutchinson 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

TEICHGRAEBER. ART C Eureka 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

THOMPSON, GREG Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

VOOS, JON M Russell 

Secondary Education Senior 

WAMPLER, JEFFREY W Overland Park 

Political Science Junior 

WATERS. CLARENCE E Junction City 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

WELBORN.JAMESJ Manhattan 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

WILSON, GARTH W Kansas City 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

ZIELKE, STEVEN L Wichita 

Pre-Medicine Senior 




calculated guess 

A plastic, battery-operated wonder that 
can turn any struggling calculus enrollee 
into a mathematical genius — the calcu- 
lator. At last technology has come to the 
aid ot this Beta and brought teasibility to 
previously insoluble formulas. 




306— beta theta pi 




mwm 



boyd hall 



COWLEY, CRAIG R. Axtell 

Agronomy Graduate Student 

ALLEN, MARY L Valley Center 

Guidance and Counseling Graduate Student 

ANDERSON, JOLEEN Morganville 

Family and Child Development Senior 

ANGEVINE, HELENE M Stamford, CT 

Fine Arts Freshman 

BAAR.JULIAA Zenith 

Home Economics Freshman 

BELL, SUSAN M Wichita 

General Freshman 

BENSON. REBECCA J Clay Center 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

BENTLEY, JANE K Chanute 

Psychology Senior 

BESSETTE, ROBERTA L Wichita 

Home Economics Freshman 

BEVERLY, GEORGIANA Topeka 

Sociology Senior 

BISCHOFF.GRETCHENM Junction City 

Social Work . . . , Sophomore 

BLANCHON.THERESEA Bucyrus 

Pre-Nursmg Sophomore 

BLANKENSHIP, JANET R Salma 

Business Freshman 

BOTTIGER, MARY E Denton 

Special Education Junior 

BROWN, KAREN L Mission 

General Freshman 

BUCK, PAMELA A Overland Park 

General Freshman 

BYARLAY, DEBBIE J Lincoln 

Physical Education Sophomore 

CADWELL, EILEEN M , , . Brea, CA 

Home Economics Education Junior 

CALDWELL, BRENDA K Burlington 

Business Freshman 

CARR, CAROL A Shawnee Mission 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

CARVER, ROSE M Kennedy, NY 

Mathematics Education Senior 

CASHIER, YVONNE M Shawnee Mission 

General Sophomore 

CASTELLI, CYNTHIA A Carlisle. PA 

Elementary Education Freshman 

CHESTNUT, CHRISTINE Clay Center 

Home Economics Extension Sophomore 

COMBS. DEBORAH A Hiawatha 

Pre-Nursmg Sophomore 

COMBS, TERRI A Hiawatha 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

CONKLING, JUDITH E Partridge 

Foods and Nutrition Junior 

CONWAY, MARY A Hoxie 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

COWLEY, KAYE Logan. UT 

Interior Design Graduate Student 

CROSLEY, DEBBIE A Pretty Prairie 

Home Economics Education Senior 

DAHL.DENISEJ Webber 

Fashion Merchandising Freshman 

DELIMONT, BARBARA G Stamford. NB 

Home Economics Extension Junior 

DICKERHOOF, BONNIE G. . . . Chanute 

General Freshman 

EDENS, JENNIE L Wmfield 

Phys.cal Education Junior 

EMIG, KATHLEEN L. Hutchinson 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

ERICKSON. JUDITH M ...... Salma 

Marketing Freshman 

FENGEL. JANISM , . Oakhill 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

FOLTZ. DEBORAH L. Garnett 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

GARTRELL, SUSAN K, Logan 

Business Freshman 

GEE.KIMBERLYK Wichita 

General Freshman 

GLICK, DENISE L Topeka 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

GODFREY. TERRY S. Marysville 

Speech Pathology Junior 

GREEN. MARCIA B. Newton 

Physical Education sophomore 

HEENE, PAM M Roxbury 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts Sophomore 

HERBERT. SUSAN L. Prairie Village 

General Freshman 

HICKLIN. MIRIAM L Lawrence 

Cic Design f'n-iti'ssions Freshman 

HOLEMAN, LINDA L Seneca 

Special Education Senior 

HOLLE. BARBARA R Ludell 

Home Economics Education Senior 



tvullull :,■■' 



boyd hall 



HOLT. KATHRYNA Overland Park 

General Freshman 

HOTCHKISS. JULIEA Emporia 

Home Economics Freshman 

HOYT. TINA M Shawnee 

General Freshman 

JAMES. MERILU h.pii.i 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

JELINEK, NANCY A Blulf City 

Home Economics Senior 

JOHNSON. DEBRAS New York City. NY 

Horticulture Sophomore 

JOHNSON. KAREN L Hutchinson 

Medical Technology Junior 

KARLIN. JULIE A Grmnell 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

KELLER. LAURA L St Francis 

Home Economics Freshman 

KIRKENDALL, KAREN M Norton 

Music Education Freshman 

KNACKENDOFFEL. NANCY A Norton 

Pre-Nursmg Freshman 

KROEGER, ANNA M Marysville 

Elementary Education Senior 

KROEGER, HEDDY E Marysville 

Recreation Junior 

KURFISS. BRENDA K Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

LADD. SALLY J Overland Park 

Elementary Education Freshman 

LALLEMENT. LINDA J Wichita 

Mathematics Senior 

LAMAN. RENE J Concordia 

General Freshman 

LANDRITH. BRENDA J Bartlett 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

LANDRITH. MELANIL A Bartlett 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

LEAR. NANCY L Overland Park 

Home Economics Sophomore 

LEWIS, JANENE Emporia 

Community Services Junior 

LUNGREN.TERRID Hays 

Pre-Nursmg Freshman 

MACK.ALYSONB Overland Park 

English Freshman 

MARTIN. CHRISTINA K Wichita 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

McCLURE.GAY Kingman 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

McCOWAN. DIANA L Lenexa 

Dietetics Sophomore 

McCREIGHT. JANE Wichita 

General Sophomore 

McGIVERN. TONI M Topeka 

Interior Design Freshman 

MEEHAN, BARBARA L Abilene 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Senior 

MIKESELL.TRESSAA Manchester 

General Sophomore 

MONKS, ANDREA J Overland Park 

Special Education Freshman 

MUCHOW. JANA K Paola 

Biology Freshman 

MUGLER, CONNIE S Hutchinson 

Interior Design Sophomore 

MYERS, KRISTY A Hutchinson 

History Senior 

NACE, DIANE M [npek, 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

NELSON. DEBORAH L Sylvan Grove 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

NICHOLS. BECKY J Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

NUTTER, NANCY E Los Alamos. NM 

Chemistry Freshman 

PERCY. AUDREY D Shawnee Mission 

Music Education ..Junmr 

PETERS. JANE A Shawnee 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

PETERS. SUSAN E Shawnee 

Accounting Junior 

PRATT. PAMELA P Shawnee 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

PROCHAZKA, MARY J Atwood 

Political Science Junior 

REBER. PAMELAS Newton 

Interior Design luriiui 

REED, KAREN S Ottawa 

Community Services Senior 

RICKS, CHERYL 1. Topeka 

Family and Child Development ',o|>h imun- 

RICKS, ROBIN L Topeka 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

ROBERTS, PATRICIA G Norton 

Sophomore 




310 — boyd hall 




ROTHMAN, CHERYL A Prairie Village 

Home Economics Education Senior 

RUDEEN. LINDA M Osage City 

Elementary Education Freshman 

SAWHILL, RHONDA R Valley Center 

Family and Child Development Senior 

SEBESTA, DIANE M Wilson 

Mathematics Sophomore 

SEXTON, LISA A Abilene 

Computer Science Freshman 

SHANK. DEBRAD Abilene 

Fashion Marketing Sophomore 

SHAUGHNESSY, CATHERINES Oberlm 

Sociology Junior 

SHEETS. JENNIFER L. Topeka 
Art . . . . Freshman 

SHOOK, MARTHA J Mission 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

SLINKMAN, JEANETTEF Manhattan 

Music Education Junior 

SMITH, MARTHA K Topeka 

Textile Research Junior 

SMITH, ODILE Inman 

Fashion Design Freshman 




Opening a door and walking into a wall 
of newsprint can really get Monday morn- 
ng off to a thrilling start. A favorite gag 



among dormies, door-papering provides 
pranksters with a chuckle and Boyd 
maids with a pain. 



boyd hall 




SNYDER. PAMELA J Parsons 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 
STANLEY, LISA J Independence, MO 

Interior Design Freshman 

STEELE, VICKIE J Kansas City 

Computer Science , Freshman 

STEVER, JULIE A Topeka 

General Freshman 

TERRY, DOROTHY A , , Great Bend 

Home Economics Education Freshman 

THAMES, SUSAN E Emporia 

Agricultural Journalism Freshman 

VOSLER. EVA J Morse Blutt, NB 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

WALSH, BARBARA A Overland Park 

Business Freshman 

WARREN. M ELAINE Galva 

Accounting Sophomore 

WATSON, SHIRLEY A Leawood 

Pre-Medicme Freshman 

WEBSTER, ELAINE L Overland Park 

Recreation Senior 

WILCOX, CINDY A, Salma 

Interior Design Freshman 

WILKERSON, MARLENE K Manter 

Physical Therapy Jurm.i 

WILLIAMS, CYNTHIA A Osage City 

Home Economics Freshman 

WILLIS. BRENDAD Sterling 

Art Freshman 

WISECRISS Louisburg 

General Sophomore 

WRIGHT, ROXANE P Prairie Village 

Interior Design Freshman 

YOUNG. LESLEEL Rose Hill 

Elementary Education , Freshman 

ZIMMERMAN, ANN M Salma 

Elementary Education Freshman 




chi omega 



*l£^lk§il 




BRANNAN. MARY J Houseparent 

AALBREGTSE. CHRISTINE R . Leawood 

Medical Technology Freshman 

AALBREGTSE, SUZANNE H Leawood 

Home Economics Education Senior 

AARON, BILL IE M Leavenworth 

Special Education Junior 

ARMSTRONG, JAN P Overland Park 

Business Administration Senior 

BAKER, BRENDA G Topeka 

Business Management Senior 

BALDERSON, JOY A ' Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BARBER, SUE M Overland Park 

Fashion Marketing Junior 

BAUMGARTEN, FRITZ Hutchinson 

Public Relations Senior 

BAUMGARTEN, LISA , , .Hutchinson 

General Freshman 

BEYMER, LISA K Topeka 

Business Freshman 

BONTZ, EVAN L Wichita 

Social Work Sophomore 

BOOMER, KATHY L Portis 

Elementary Physical Education Senior 

BRAMMER, LIZ M Wichita 

Food and Nutrition Senior 

BROWN, JODI J Manhattan 

Music Theory . . , , Sophomore 

BROWN, SANDY L Salma 

General Sophomore 

BURKHARD, KATHY D Manhattan 

Music Sophomore 

BURNETT, LAURA L Overland Park 

General Freshman 

CHAPPELL, SUSAN L Prairie Village 

Interior Design Freshman 

COOPER, COLLETTE R Wichita 

Family and Child Development Senior 

COX, GINA D Overland Park 

Music Education Sophomore 

CUSHMAN, RHONDA R Belle Plaine 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

FEESE, COLLEEN G Wichita 

Consumer Interest Senior 

FLAMING, NANCY F Olathe 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

FOGERSON, DEBBIE M Manhattan 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

FOLTZ, BECKY L. Topeka 

Fashion Marketing Junior 

FREELY, DEBBIE L Overland Park 

Special Education Sophomore 

FULLER, DEBI A Shawnee 

Family and Child Development Junior 

GALYARDT, SUSANI. Lawrence 

Engineering Freshman 

GATZOULIS, PAULA L Prairie Village 

Business Sophomore 




chi omega 





il- c* 




GEHLBACH. DEBBIE L Shawnee - "*$3*l JrVf£99k. •■rf'lfch. 

Home Economics and Journalism Junior ■■■■■ jL0t£J^S^ki r ""^^k 4& : '-^^^ 

GERHARDT, AIMEEG Kansas City .flr^^Vl I il 9/ W 

Elementary Education Sophomore flB Jmm\ ■ YW If" > 19 II ^V » -9BHI 

GERSTNER.LISAL Wichita ■[ 'flj|l Jf 1 X jff «HH H ~ *"H 

General Freshman \ , XM W • ~~ "TjHK m'""-- 999¥ H > <)99t 

GREENBANK. JANET E El Dorado ^ • . ' ■ "*i IB yBk .^HH P. Ek~"^H9 

General Sophomore J . «3Hf 9k9E9999ft 999lJH91 L *•** >«^S9?7 

GRIFFITH, LORI A Topeka _ 3 f ffl L ^* > "HP ~9H r^vGV 

Fashion Marketing Freshman '*': d$MM ^p9r*^"^ 99kv 

HALL. MAUREEN L Overland Park Hi :' 9W '99 J Ilk 
Recreation 

HARNED, HOLLY A Wichita 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

HARSH. ALICIA K El Dorado 

Clothing and Textiles Senior 

HEINEN, MICHELLE R Concordia 

Psychology Freshman ^ , JkJHMHH HI I ^JM HV**9MHl IH*> 

HIRNING. MARYL Wichita \- #%, rSfc" ' 9H 'i» j/7H 4 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

HOFFMAN, JOAN K Hoismgton 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

HOOKER. HOLLY K Garden City 

Fashion Marketing Junior 

HOULDER. CAROL Overland Park ~, »,. _ *,««^Hk "^B» 

Business Freshman ^9JB^S9k a 9HHF 91 

HRONES. KAREN L Roeland Park l>i# 99B 4*"™ "9* '9T^ 1 JK9HpP- J9 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman HHBT ^B If . K ~* fJH 

HUMMER WHITNEY A Wichita HP" VM W *" **M *■"* *"*jHf HP ,Sr 

Physical Education Freshman If - .,M if V f -".;>» 

INGRAM. NANCY G Leawood M , * '- ^J9P 

, sen,or IWj * ~ya 

Pre-Nursing ^51 HHi 

JACOBS, MENDY S Leawood F$; $ «** ■ 

Fashion Marketing Freshman HH fll A-..^ 

■99BJIfl| ,_ 

Art Freshman .0 |mV % ■- "%. •' ^«^ ^^¥hW 

KELLY. NINA M Olathe M M 4.? "«fi99k 9k. M 99 f 99jl g 99k 

General Sophomore Mr f§ , §* ^"HB . / 99 1 > * 9R ' v 91 99 999 

KENNING. ELEONOREM Spring Hill |- -» ' ■ ~ ltf9JJ M l ' 'H 1 IS ft - «?■ M " **9Jfc 

Modern Language Sophomore % M — ,«f '*. V X . - flL, ^ IP ' %B - 91 

KNOPAMYJ Prairie Village HM ^^JF " ■ ". * J' JHt ^M. ^HHJ ) • f ■ TL - - JV 

Home Economics Education Senior (^ Hk. ^ 9k ^JtW aJ^'-^HI i , -«• ^ 

-He-"" ^K H^T HL I^HhW Si 99W ^B 

LEARY. KATHLEEN Mission Hills BHl B9k a *^Mr^ "^ l8 flfek 9H 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore H 1 HHi ' ' MMaHL^JH ' 9|p 

LINENBERGER. SUSAN A Garden City •* Jpf S, l|k ^.^jjr ^lk. ' ^9l9k ^9VH9k 

LINSCOTT.SARAHA Mission Hills Lf A / jT y \^ ■' ' 9B K**4V9J i. 

rOCY SHELLEY D MaSan 3" _'*^ M " A, « ^* ^ <1 ( ff '^H % * S ^ 1 ^ ' . ' 9 

LOUCKS, CYNTHIA G Manhattan ^Zjr HL. ^flll -4 ' ' A ■» C3HH1 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior '^j/ ^BL-»mI X^- J WSk T -^^HL. ki^^ 

MARTENS, BETH D El Dorado ■ ■ • fr 'JHHW 

Learning Disabilities Senior HBk ^9HW^ H9k 

McANDREW. SUSAN M Topeka B^. ilkk. 19\ 

Social Work Sophomore 

McCLURE. SUSAN J Topeka 

Business Administration Sophomore 

McCRILLIS. MARILYN E Wichita 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

MERTZ, SARA J Manhattan M ''99 91/ Os 999. / " 

General Freshman ^\ mat :i j9 B\'' V 99Sk i I 

MOSS.MELINDAA Shawnee Mission ..^ Hfc r 9J^ ' 3 ' m ^a, IT AT" 

Home Economics Journalism Sophomore 

MUSICK, MARTA A Overland Park 

General Freshman 

MUSICK. NANCY L Overland Park 

Microbiology Junior 

NUCKOLLS. JILL D Valley Center 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

OBERFELL. SUSAN D Wichita ,V"" 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman M V \iiM *$ 

PAPPAS. PAMELA K Overland Park I " ~ pj 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman ■■ / ^dfl |ft\ ^"^H 

PLAGGE DAWNETTL Tampa, FL 1 JV H9L."99l H9L. "9J 

Physical Education Senior i^^^^^P' k '■*-" 99 *^k » 91 

Garden City H9kw 991 19L. Bl 

RANALLO. PAULA M Leawood BB| 1 

uly and Child Development Senior 

RAY. VIRGINIA A Leawood / £ — -A .iT ^ ,^^ ^ ^Hk 

Elementary Education Junior / '*««|fc fF A F J\ -HLW 9q 

RENZ. MICHELLE E Manhattan Ar^^Bi 4^^ "99k A Jl\ L ^m / 99 

Fashion Merchandising MM . At 9Hi Hi ^ J' 91 J ** tSmmm 

= ^jL mm \M±*m l KJ 'V 

Family and Child Development Senior ■■ B^ BH BBfc M\ 91 M9k 

SCHABEt , SUSAN M Severna Park. MD i9\ H " '-k 

Elementary Education Senior | 






tinsel time 



Turkey dinners have been devoured 
and the first snow has fallen. It's time to 
decorate the spruce — or just spruce up 
for the holidays. Tinsel hanging from the 
ear provides a glittering touch to a Chi O. 




SCHMALE. ROBYNG Garden City 

General Sophomore 

SCHULTZ, JANEK . ... Leawood 

Music Education Freshman 

SHETTER, NANCY J Abilene 

General . . Freshman 

SIMCOX, MARCINE M. Salina 

Bir.inrv. Sophomore 

SMITH. KARENS Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

STANLEY, DEE ANN Topeka 

Business Sophomore 

TOBLER. JANE E Olathe 

General Freshman 

TOBLER. JILL E Olathe 

Modern Language Senior 

TRIPP, DEBORAH L Manhattan 

Elementary Education Senior 

UTTER. NANCY C Wichita 

Family and Child Development Junior 

WALLER, GAYLE L Overland Park 

Psychology Freshman 

WILSON, ALICE E Kansas City 

General Freshman 

WILSON, MICHELED Lawrence 

General Sophomore 

ZAHNER. BETH A Leawood 

Family and Child Development Senior 



clovia 



FRANCIS, LOUISE Houseparenl 

BAKER, DORIS R Erie 

Business Junior 

BALZER, NILA L Arkansas City 

Business Administration Senior 

BESSIER, LYNNE E Prairie Village 

Elementary Education Senior 

BORN. JOANNE M Eudora 

General Freshman 

BOYTS, PAMELA K Hesston 

Horticulture Junior 

CARNAHAN. NANCY S Wamego 

Home Economics Extension Junior 

CARTER, DEBRA L Emporia 

Home Economics Education Senior 

CASE. ELAINE L McPherson 

Pre-Nursing . Sophomore 

CAUBLE. DEADRA L Mt. Hope 

Music Education Senior 

CLARK, DEBORAH E Clinton, MO 

Baking Science and Management Senior 

CRAIG, CYNTHIA C Natoma 

Consumer Interest Senior 

DETTMER, DEBORAH J Leawood 

Home Economics and Liberal Arts Senior 

EDWARDS, JENNIFER K Olsburg 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

EYESTONE.GAILL Manhattan 

Radio and Television Sophomore 

FAGAN.CHRISJ Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

FISHER, MARY L Harper 

Home Economics Education Junior 

FREY, JOYCE L Goessel 

Medical Technology Junior 




budding baez 



Joan may not be in immediate danger 
of a musical oust, but then she doesn't 
have Clovia as a recording studio. Belting 



out a few tunes helps balance the har- 
mony between school and sanity. 






a: &it 




?3£9 






Mt2 



FRIESEN, JANICE E Hesslon 

Dietetics Junior 

GIBBS, SUE J Olsburg 

General Sophomore 

GOECKEL. CAROL L Washington 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

HADICKE. JONI L Arkansas City 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

HAGENMAIER. MARSHA A Randolph 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

HAMM. CAROLS , Winfield 

Home Economics Freshman 

HARBACH, EVELYN J Scott City 

Family and Child Development . Sophomore 

HEFTY, ELAINE C. Valley Falls 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

HEINIGER, SUSAN R Powhattan 

Home Economics Education , Freshman 

HERBERS. MARYS Holton 

Home Economics Education , Freshman 

HUCKE, BRENDAL . Mound Valley 

Home Economics Extension Junior 

HUNT. SHERI A Osawatomie 

Home Economics Extension Junior 

HUNT, TERI J Osawatomie 

Fashion Design Freshman 

JANSSEN.KIMBERLYD Leoti 

Computer Science Freshman 

JOHNSON, ANN R Scandia 

Home Economics Extension Junior 

JONES, SUSAN C Frankfort 

Home Economics Education Senior 

KAISER, ROSE MARY Hoismgton 

Oftice Administration Sophomore 

KETTLER, DENISE L Paola 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts Senior 

LATTA, SUSAN K Harper 

General Freshman 

MACY, CINDY M Alia Vista 

Home Economics Education Senior 

MADDUX, MITZIC Scott City 

Music Education Sophomore 

McCRARY, SHARON L Shawnee Mission 

Elementary Education Senior 

MEYER, DONNA R Hanover 

Home Economics Education Junior 

MURPHY, MARCIA A Lyndon 

Home Economics Senior 

NELSON, ALINE G Goodland 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts Senior 

NELSON, ANN K Emporia 

Horticulture Sophomore 

NORMAN, LAURIE A Waverly 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

OVERMILLER, KARMA J Bellaire 

Home Economics and Journalism Freshman 

PECKMAN.CAROLJ Paola 

Dietetics Junior 

REED, SARA M Salina 

Secondary Physical Education Senior 

ROBITAILLE, MARY K Carbondale 

Home Economics Extension . Junior 

ROBSON, DIANE M Abilene 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

SCHMIDT, BONNIE H Goessel 

Dietetics Junior 

SEAMAN. CONNIE J Abilene 

Home Economics Education Junior 

SHAW, SUZANNE C Topeka 

Horticulture Junior 

SPENCER. JANELLEE Argonia 

Accounting Sophomore 

STALLBAUMER. MARY E Frankfort 

General Freshman 

STEELE, MARY L Burdick 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

SWARTZENDRUBER, CAROL A Rocky Ford, CO 

Dietetics Junior 

TOWNSEND, AMY L Goodland 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts Senior 

TURNER, DIANA KAY Waverly 

Home Economics Freshman 

UNRUH, JANICE E Goessel 

Home Economics Education Senior 

VISSER, ADEL L Riley 

Housing and Equipment Senior 

WEDEL, VICKI D Tonganoxie 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

WILEY, CRYSTAL L Lawrence 

Urban Horticulture Junior 

WISE, PATRICIA A Emporia 

Physical Science Senior 

YOUNG, CARRIE ANN McPherson 

Medical Technology Sophomore 



delta chi 



BARRETT. JOHN T Hiawatha 

Civil Engineering Senior 

BERGNER. THOMAS W Pratt 

Crop Protection Junior 

BOKERMANN, NEIL C Overland Park 

Business Administration Junior 

BRANT, WES O Luray 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

CAMPBELL, WILLIAMS Kansas City 

Psychology l reshmai 

CATO. C RICHARD Prairie Village 

Pre-Design Protessions Sophomore 

CRIST, KELLY J Scott City 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

DAVIS. GARY R Kansas City 

General Freshman 

DAY. MICHAEL J Overland Park 

Business Sophomore 

FOSTER. JOHN S Horlon 

Business Administration Senior 

FULKERSON, KEVIN L Manhattan 

Civil Engineering Senior 

HAMLETT, CHARLES A Derby 

Business Administration Freshman 

HARTMAN, WILLIAM R Preston 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

HASS, JOE Lyons 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

HAYES, MARK R Kansas City 

Pre-Forestry Freshman 

KNOWLES, CURTIS J Salma 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 
KOLEGA. ROBERT M St Joseph, MO 

Architecture Junior 

MICK. PERRY J Tipton 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

MILLER. ROBERT E Kansas City 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

MOORE, TIMOTHY R Junction City 

Computer Science Sophomore 

MOSLEY, KIM D Kansas City 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

NILL, WILLIAM S Kansas City 

Radio and Television Senior 

NOYES. BRAD A Osborne 

Radio and Television Sophomore 

PALMER. MICHAEL L Derby 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

REAM, MICHAEL D Wichita 

Finance Sophomore 

SONTAG, WILLIAM M Derby 

Business luinm 

STROUSE, DWIGHT L Merriam 

Radio and Television Senior 

STUHR. JOHNC Overland Park 

Psychology , . . . Sophomore 

WARREN, STEVE R Ottawa 

Business Freshman 




sign on the line 



Little sisters always have to put up with 
big brothers — the same is true at col- 
lege. At a paddle party, Delta Chi little sis- 
ters were ordered to obtain the signa- 
tures of Delta Chis or ... or ... or 
what? 



ii ■ 




delta delta delta 




ALLEN, CHRISTINE A. Valley Center 

Special Education Junior 

ANDERSON, LAURA M Salina 

Art Freshman 

BELL, DEBORAH L Fort Scott 



Speech Pathology 
BETTISON. JUDY L 


Junior 
Leawood 


























BREHM, REBECCA L 


Hays 






Elementary Education 


Sophomore 










Pre-Nursmg 


Sophomore 














































DAVIS, CHERYL E 
Clothing and Retailing 

FIELD, AMY L 


Manhattan 
Sophomore 


Family and Child Development 


Freshman 


































French and English Education 

HALE, KAREN L 
Pre-Vetermary Medicine 


Senior 

Leawood 
Freshman 






HITZ, LOTTIE M 




Accounting 


Sophomore 






























JOHNSON, JANICE L 


Belle Plame 


















KORB, BECKY 
Veterinary Medicine 
KORB. TESSY K 


Stockton 
Freshman 
Stockton 






















Ottice Administration 

MALONEY, LUANNE E 


Sophomore 
Shawnee Mission 


MAUPIN, KIMBERLYA 


Manhattan 






























Psychology 
MODDRELL, NANCY A 


Junior 

Wichita 

Sophomore 


Special Education 


Senior 



MONTGOMERY, NANCY J Leawood 

Elementary Education Senior 



>1,-i!.l,1.-i!.uV!.l 



delta delta delta 



musically inclined 

Shakespeare and others lauded the 
romance of the moonlight serenade, but 
Romeo never had it so good. Tri Delts 
take a balcony stance to chivalrous 
chords. 



MOORE. KIMBERLY J Topeka 

Finance Sophomore 

MUCKENTHALER. TERRY M Overland Park 

Accounting Sophomore 

NEDWED, JAN L Manhattan 

Interior Design Sophomore 

NORTON, SUSIE M Manhattan 

Physical Education Senior 

OETINGER, CYNTHIA L Tacoma, WA 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

PETERS, C LEIGH Wichita 

Interior Design Junior 

PHELPS, LOU ANN Normal, IL 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

REAMES, DEBORAH E. Leawood 

Family and Child Development Junior 

REED, SALLY C Deertield, IL 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

RUCKER, DEANNA M Burdett 

Home Economics Sophomore 

RUMBLE. DEB A Great Bend 

Family and Child Development Junior 

SAGESER, SALL Y A Overland Park 

Radio and Television Freshman 

SAGESER, SUSAN J Overland Park 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

SAPP. ELLEN M Valley Center 

Recreation Sophomore 

SEAMAN. CINDY J Liberal 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

SEAMAN SUZANNE M Liberal 

Home Economics Freshman 

SILER. LISAS Turner 

Elementary Education Freshman 

SIMMONS. LEE ANN Olathe 

Elementary Education Junior 

SMITH. TERESA A Kansas City 

Secondary Education Senior 

SMITH IRACEYL Burlington 

Home Economics Freshman 

SOMMER. CINDY G, . Overland Park 

i ,, ■.',,, ,i 

STIGALL, JAN A St. Joseph, MO 

Medical Technology Senior 

STOCKHAM AUDREY L Salma 
nif •!.,! !,.• , <j.. Freshman 
STR! ETER JUDY A . Palos Verdes, CA 
Physical Therapy ' i ' < 



120 -- delta ri.-it.i .ir;it,i 






I!3t 





*' f 



SWENSON, DEBI R Salina 

Pre-School Education Senior 

THIES, SANDYS Salina 

Elementary Education Junior 

THOMAS, REBECCA J Overland Park 

Pre-School Education Senior 

UNGEHEUER, BETH L Centerville 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

VOLKER. SUSAN L Hays 

Elementary Education Freshman 

WAELDIN, JOAN K Salina 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

WALTER. DEBRAL. . Great Bend 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

WEAVER, KAREN A Overland Park 

General Freshman 

WEIDENHEIMER. M. BETH Kinsley 

Business Administration Freshman 

WIGGINS, ANNE E Minneapolis 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

WINKLER, NANCY C Salina 

Learning Disabilities Junior 

WOELK, TERESA D Rozel 

Home Economics Freshman 

WOELLHOF.DANAJ Oakhill 

Statistics , Junior 

YOUNGQUIST, GAIL Miami. FL 

Architecture Senior 



dciM di-it.i delta -321 



delta sigma phi 



ALISON. DALE Halstead 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

AL-MADANI. ABDALLAH A Saudi Arabia 

Gram Science Graduate Student 

ARENSMAN, MICHAEL G. . . . Southfield. Ml 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

BAKER. STEVEN W Overland Park 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

BASTIAN, ROBERT C Grand Haven. Ml 

Political Science Junior 

BILBREY, JOHNP Overland Park 

Psychology Sophomore 

BLEISH. STEVEN V Leawood 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

COLE, STEVEN M Auburn 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

CRUMP. RAYMOND P Concordia 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

CUMMINS. SCOTT Olathe 

Political Science Junior 

DENKER, TERRY E Pomona 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

DERR. DONALD D Atchison 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

DICKMAN. CHARLES E Webb City. MO 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

DUNTON. DOUGLAS K Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

DUNTON, LYNN F Manhattan 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

FOSTER. DON M Manhattan 

Building Construction Sophomore 

GERBOTH. DANNY L Abilene 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

GREIG. DAVID R Manhattan 

Social Science Freshman 

GROSSENBACHER, JEFFERY A Bern 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

HAMBELTON, JOHN J Shawnee 

Horticulture Freshman 

HAVER, DAVID P Concordia 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

HOWE. DAVID M Manhattan 

Psychology Sophomore 

INGRAM, JAMES R Overland Park 

Business Senior 

JOHNSON. ROBERTS Junction City 

Radio and Television Junior 

LeCLERC. BYRON W Wichita 

Biology Junior 

LOBER, TERENCE A Leavenworth 

Political Science Senior 

MAHAN, JESSE H Paragould. AR 

Horticulture Freshman 

MANN, GEORGE W Yorktown Heights, NY 

Physical Science Senior 

McGIVERN. MIKE R Topeka 

Building Construction Sophomore 

METCALF. BILL L Paola 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

PEPOON, MICHAEL D Paola 

English Senior 

PEPOON. STEVE Paola 

Radio and Television . .. Sophomore 

PIGIEL. JOHNP Bridgeport. CT 

Architecture Junior 

RASBY. RANDALL R Sutherland, NB 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

REINHARDT, GREGG L Bison 

Accounting Senior 

REIST, RANDALL D Seneca 

Computer Science Senior 

ROBERTS, ALLEN W Columbia, MO 

Architecture Junior 

SCHONEWEIS. DWIGHT A. Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering ',< jphumnM' 

SMITH, KORD S Rapid City, SD 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

SMITH, STEPHEN D Prairie Village 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

SMITH, WILLIAM L DeSotO 

History ',( i|iliiinii)ic 

STRATHMAN, TIMOTHY A Rocklord, IL 

Physical Education Senior 

STUMPFF. RONALD G DeSoto 

Agriculture Freshman 

STONE, DAVID R Manhattan 

Pre Medicine Senior 

TORTORA, RICHARD A Syracuse, NY 

Construction Science Senior 

VANDYKE. DAVID Tonganoxie 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

VELASQUEZ, NAT Garden City 

Civil Engineering Junior 

WALKER. ANTHONY C. Manhattan 

Business Education Sophomore 



322 — delta sigma phi 









®JLH £# 



WILSON. RODNEY L . Halstead 

Pre-Velermary Medicine Freshman 

WOLF. DAN W Prairie Village 

Civil Engineering ...... Freshman 




The round table is now square but men 
still gather around it for deep discussion. 
However, Delta Sigs surely tind their days 
a bit lighter than King Arthur did his 
knights. 



cozy camelot 



delta sigma phi — 323 



delta tau delta 



CHAPPELL, MARY BELLE Houseparenl ,/SflftL. J0j^ .4tE&±. *""^ 

r^™:..: s = '**\ tfWJk |F% pR| * J^ 

Construction Science jfr 3 1* **• | 5 Sr^» lL.-<^B * t i ' 

ANDERSON, MIKE Holton 1 ' W ^ - '» " - * 1*^ k W '! ~ ^W ^ 

Building Construction Senior <L "" ¥ ' l f $W -•■-#» fc i-;« * 

BABER, DOUGLAS L ' "' / '' Hk'^'IW^ ■fak"^!!^ * ~-*jP^ B^"'- 

Public Administration Junior "WKr [IBlM] rfQlltt _ lii.L. ,jj^ >• ""' Jr 

BAIRD. JIMR Logan F^ f ^^ «__ HP *7^ HPV^ ^*^^ HP** ^^ ^ * *Wm )\K 

Business 



Junior ■* \ s 

BERGER. RICK N Atchison ^* 

Pre-Law junior M |KV 

BLAKLEYGLENR Atchison » #^B 

Business Administration Freshman fiPBH^^b 

BLATTNER, STUART E. Rozel fR ^ , M^B 

Physical Education Senior Wl> Y--3B 

BOGUE.GARYL Wichita 'JJKJ^ 

General Junior -<^Bw 

BRUCKER. RANDY Valley Center ^^»*«I M&\ 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior W^ M 

BUSER. WILLIAM D Independence ^ 

Engineering Junior A fiVi 

CAREY, CALVIN M Sterling 

Business Administration Senior 

CHEATHAM, THOMAS K Oklahoma City, OK 

Radio and Television Junior 

CONRAD, KELLY E Clay Center 

Accounting Junior 

CONWAY, JOHN F Overland Park 

Business Management Senior 

COOK, CHARLES M Leawood 

Business Sophomore 

COOPER. RICHARD D Overland Park 

Business ■ Freshman 







^ fy f$ & 



a news snooze 



Among its attributes, the Collegian can 
provide shelter from rain and snow — 
and at times, the noise of the Delta Tau 
Delta house. 




324 — della tau delta 




lik 




&iM&?l 




#a&ftft 





COSSMAN. DOUGLAS T 


Baton Rouge, LA 






Agronomy 


Sophomore 



CURRIE, MICHAEL R Gypsum 

Dairy Production Senior 

CURRIE, RALPH A Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

DAVIS, CLARK H Overland Park 

Political Science Junior 

DIERKING.MARKC Atchison 

Business Administration Sophomore 



DROWN, BRADFORD D Overland Park 

Radio and Television Senior 

DUNNE, PATRICK J Manhattan 

Marketing Senior 



FARRINGTON.KIPE 


Chanute 


FOLEY. ROBERT L 


Atchison 


FRENCH, RUSSELL W 
































HENDERSON, MARK W 


Prairie Village 














Pre-Veterinary Medicine 


, , Freshman 














KELLY, MICHAEL J 


...... Leawood 










KNIGHT. JOEY D 
Mechanical Engineering 


. Salma 
Sophomore 






KUHN, STEVE A 
Business 


Manhattan 
Sophomore 



LARSON, THAYNE A Scandia 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

LIETZAN, CHRISTOPHER E Clay Center 

Accounting Senior 

MARTIN, M RAY Overland Park 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

MARTIN, SCOTT J Attica 

Business Junior 

MclLHON, STEPHEN J Des Moines, IA 

Pre-Law Senior 

MOORE, GREGORY D Holton 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology . . Sophomore 



MUELLER, LARRY H Overland Park 

Marketing Graduate Student 

NOLAND, ROBERT C Fayetteville, AR 

Marketing Senior 

ODELL, CHRIS L Westwood Hills 







OLIVER, MICHAEL P 
































































RIORDAN, ROBT 






















SANKEY. CHRIS 

Animal Science and Industry 


Sterling 

Sophomore 










Animal Science and Industry 

si in r mi i- n 


Senior 


Recreation 


Fifth Year Student 



lelta — 325 



delta tau delta 




SMITH. GREG V Burdelt 

Accounting Sophomore 

STEIN, CHRIS Gypsum 

Animal Science and Industry . Sophomore 

STEIN, DAVID E Gypsum 

Agronomy Junior 

STONE. BRUCE H Manhattan 

Pre-Medicme Freshman 

SULLIVAN, GREGORY A Salina 

Business Senior 

SULLIVAN, KEVIN F Salina 

General Freshman 

THOLSTRUP, DAVID B Salina 

Agronomy Junior 

THORNTON, ROGER D Coldwater 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

TODD. DAVID M Sabetha 

Civil Engineering Junior 

VEREEN. WILLIAM N Shawnee Mission 

Pre-Medicme Sophomore 

WAGNON. THOMAS L Coldwater 

Agriculture '.ophomorf 

WASKER, CHARLES F Des Moines, IA 

Pre-Law Senior 

WERNER, F. SCOTT Kansas City, MO 

Pre-Medicme Senior 

WINGI R J' -I A Prairie Village 

Marketing Junior 

WISE, DICK A Lawrence 

Construction Science Senior 

WRIGHT, KEITH A Topeka 

Pre-Medicme Senior 

/H I MAN JOHN J Leawood 

Fifth Year Student 

.indl'.irl- 

-if id Infill'. try Junior 










■ ; ! lUflf.'lt.l 



delta upsilon 



I if Mf 









f &&1& 




■id f 2M 





ANDERSON, STEVEN E Mentor 

Civil Engineering Senior 

ARNOLD, JERRY W Ashland 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

BAUER. BRAD L Burdett 

Horticulture Junior 

BAUMGARTNER, DAVID E Kansas City 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

BOKERMANN, BRIAN F Overland Park 

Biology Sophomore 

BOLERJACK, STEVEN M Shawnee 

Architecture Junior 

BOSWORTH.COLLISP. Overland Park 

Elec liK ,il Engineering Junior 

BRUMBAUGH, STEVEN T Hutchinson 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

BRYAN, DANIEL W Topeka 

Business Sophomore 

BUCK, FREDERICK E Hutchinson 

Geography Senior 

CARTER, STEVE Wichita 

Accounting Junior 

DAVIS, PHILIPS Lyons 

Economics Sophomore 

DRAKE. RICHARD L Sterling 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

EBRIGHT. ALAN J Lyons 

Business Finance Junior 

EDGERLEY, PAUL B Overland Park 

Accounting . . . Sophomore 

EGBERT, DOUGLAS D Dighton 

Engineering Sophomore 

ERHARDT, LARRY D Ellsworth 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

GRANBERRY, GEORGES. . Fairport, NY 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

HAYDEN. RICHARD G Wichita 

Psychology Junior 

HAYNES, STEVE S . . . Topeka 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

HEIMAN.TIML Seneca 

Architectural Engineering Fifth Year Student 

HENOCH, RICHARD B Topeka 

Elementary Education Senior 

HOFFMANN, STEPHEN J Overland Park 

Pre-Law Junior 

HURLEY. JAMES A Glasco 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

JOHNSON. DAVID O Hutchinson 

Electrical Engineering Graduate Student 

JOHNSON, MICHAEL D Lenexa 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

JONES, CLAY G Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

JONES, CLIFTON C Manhattan 

Microbiology Junior 

KERSHNER, CURTIS R . . . Scott City 

General Freshman 

KRISS. PHILLIP S Prairie Village 

Marketing Junior 

KUEBELBECK.RICKW Kansas City 

Business Sophomore 

KUTTER, DONALD L Emporia 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

LEWIS, JOHN G Gardner 

Accounting Senior 

MARSHALL, MARK L Minneola 

Architecture Senior 

McGRANAGHAN, THOMAS J Overland Park 

Business Sophomore 

McNORTON, KEVIN E Topeka 

General Sophomore 

MERILLAT, CHRIS H Topeka 

Construction Science Freshman 

MORRIS. JEFFERYB Topeka 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

MOWRY, STEWART Manhattan 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

MULCH, GARY L Scott City 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

MULLEN, KEVIN M Hutchinson 

Accounting Senior 

ORLOFF, DOUGLAS F Shawnee 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

PATRICK, KERRY L Leawood 

Economics Senior 

PLANK, CRAIG A Wichita 

Pie I H'Mgn I 'i, ill wiuiis , , . .Junior 

POTTER. BRADS Dighton 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

PRATT, ROBERT D , Topeka 

Pie Velenn,)l\ Medic me Sophomore 

REED, LARRY C Hutchinson 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

SCOTT, CASI i M Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 



delta upsilon — 3?7 



delta upsilon 

r 




SEILER. GUYM Mount Hope 

Accounting Junior 
SELL. RICHARD D Pacilic Grove, CA 

Business . Sophomore 

SHEELY, MICHAEL R. Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

STEIDER, TOMW Overland Park 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

STROBERG.JEFFERYA Hutchinson 

Industrial Engineering ■',, iphornurc 

SWENSON, JIMW Topeka 

Business Administration Junior 

TEETER, JOHN H Hutchinson 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

TENHOLDER, TIMOTHY N Topeka 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

THOMAS. DANIEL A Wintield 

Mathematics Freshman 

THOMPSON, TAD M Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

TOMPKINS. JOHN F Prairie Village 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

TSCHANNEN, BRUNO F Overland Park 

Radio and Television Senior 

TUCKER, KEITH D Wichita 

Civil Engineering Senior 

VAIL. WILLIAM A Wichita 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

WALKER, TERRY L Kansas City 

Music Education Senior 

WALTERS. DELBERT A Langdon 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

WEBER. BILL F Hutchinson 

General Freshman 

WESTLUND. TERRY L. Kansas City, MO 

Pre-Design Protessions Freshman 

1 NNISM Kansas City, MO 

Pre-Design Protessions Junior 

Ml. '.ON JON tola 

Political Science Junior 

WILSON. MARK D Mission 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine luniot 

//> 1 1 ZALO, MITCHELL D Kansas City 

Pre Medii ine 1 reshman 

Shawnee Mission 

Business Freshman 







trJP 




328 — d< •!' 



delta zeta 




JOHNSON. VEDA M Houseparent 

BARNES, SUE A Caldwell 

Accounting Sophomore 

BLANK, CHERYL M Hutchinson 

Home Economics Senior 

BROWN. ANNE K . Prairie Village 

Business and Finance Sophi ><•<■ ire 

BROWNELL, LOREE . Topeka 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

BURNS, CHERIE Manhattan 

Office Administration Senior 

COLE, KATHRYN E Garnet! 

Horticulture Freshman 

EVERS, PAMELA S Norton 

Theatre and Journalism Sophomore 

FARMER, FAITH A Manhattan 

English Education Freshman 

FERRIS, CONNIE A Kansas City 

Marketing Senioi 

GOBBER, JANAS Manhattar 

Retail Floriculture . Junioi 

GREEN. PAMELA Y Overland Pari 

Elementary Education Junior 

HART, LAURA E Leawood 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

HATHAWAY, CYNTHIA A . Kansas City 

Accounting Freshman 

HATHAWAY, MELISSA K Kansas City 

Home Economics Education Junior 

HOBBLE, DEBORAH F Wichita 

Political Science Senior 

HOLLIS, LAURAS Prairie Village 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

HURT, LINDA L Ellis 

Elementary Education Senior 

KENAGY, LEIGH ANN Shawnee Mission 

Business Education Junior 

LEMAN, CARI S. ....... . Sabetha 

Horticulture Junior 

MASTERS. CYNTHIA J Troy 

General Freshman 

MURRAY. JANINNEM Junction City 

Accounting Freshman 

NEIBLING, MARJORIE M Highland 

Music Education Senior 

ROACH, REBECCA A Topeka 

Accounting Freshman 

RODERICK, AMANDA S Garden City 

Office Administration Sophomore 

ROWLAND, JANE E Topeka 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

SIMUNAC, EMILY J Baldwin 

Modern Language Freshman 

STADEL, DEBORAH J . . . Riley 

Architecture Junior 

TELTHORST. LISA A . . Topeka 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

WALTERS, DONNA R Salina 

Education . . . . Freshman 



sentry duty 



Sun porches, balconies, and fire 
escape platforms offer the best in van- 
tage points. Whether scoping, catching 
rays, or eagerly waiting, DZs gather 
where the sun shines. 



delta zeta — 329 



farmhouse 




FRENCH. FAIRE Houseparenl ^fifllBk f fiPtkw i dttk H £~ 

BEBERMEYER, RYLAN J Manchester /&M ;*ft\ j^fJBl ■P^^^S '*£. ! '3fe 

Music Education Sophomore "' BBBw M^^^U Jl ■" BjB L 40 

BERGER. LONNIE D Waterville ' "^BBB ?T*» fSBI "tV* <*J BB B.«T* 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore B. ^BB '4 r flS^*' "^"^^B ((""*' H 

BUCK. JOHN B Andale BG^KBI \ / - %H L > _""-.•' "* -J 

Animal Science and Industry ^| / .£HKw laMB Jk. V% / tL ,^~-^ ~ v Bp — ' 

BOYINGTON. JOHN W. Goodland '^WmT T3m Wmn A. %■ 7 JPX 

Animal Science and Industry Senior ' ^|F J / - . .^Jr Bk. 

BRENSING. RICHARD H Stafford tPP^v / » ^ [ Mk ' Bk^ ^ BBI /< 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore \rY " E9Bi ^ ™Bw dtfflt^- AB *# 

BRINKMAN. BRUCE E Arkansas City <9JBw ^^BBBk 

Business Senior Bfi ^Bk Ji "k 

COTT, RICHARD H. Clay Center WF idMIW 

Animal Science and Industry Senior Jb _ ^SH SflBBJBB Jm? >» tfH 

COTT. THOMAS W Clay Center *| » • T ■T ** **? B^fiHi *Lf HF ^* 

Agronomy Junior ? / jfitaB ^^ ■* B iBB fH * imM 

DETERS. DAVID G Manhattan < ~~ Wm ■ JX .A JV ^W* — ~JB 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore «^Jfv ■-. -— S rU ' >v__ j 

DREITH.JONR Randolph ^^ ^^BBfe ^ : ^ik p^^ 

Animal Science and Industry Junior Sffiu -"^ ABJ wr ' > ^iBBBI 

ENGLER, VERLYNR Deerlield H fl\ ^ ,^k. i^ 

Agricultural Economics Senior Hi > 1A JBJKjj .- WB* ■ flk i 'Mr ^ ^^ 

ETHERIDGE, WARREN A Medicine Lodge ^"(Hl V A^BBk. j^BBBk. wi"""" 

Physical Education Junior ML ™ gk ilBi BBk J^W BBk */&* 

FLESKE. DAVID H Garfield M» dB **"BB f"*"^H Af** "« 

Accounting Senior BF i» .«7B M' v ? ^ lB ^r*'~'-' 

FRASIER.DUANEW Sharon Springs Hp -» fKV X-& *. W ii '****'» W-* 

Agronomy Senior fc - - JF / 

FRASIER. JOEL Wood row, CO W ^ f \| -*■■ ~~^W ^ —Br * «<l 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman y ^ 

FRITZEMEIER. RANDY J Stafford 2^ P^ . Nw^WNk. ' ,A **•**>»< ^k '-^W a " 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore lftk_1WE W A W Bek Kkw ^^ Bfc^ % MtN 

GARTEN. CASEY D Abilene BB BBk. £ Bhw I Ji JM^ ;| ... BB kj *? 

Agricultural Education Sophomore V ^ V P ■-. -J ^ ^H ||k / JH ■* Ml H < ^ Hi P A 

GARTRELL. GREGORY A Phillipsburg '*^Kb« -^B^. ^06^. "'If ^1^^. ^ 

Agricultural Engineering ,■ -^ K , v fll H ' X^Hm aim Vl 

GOOD. CRAIG A. Manhattan H^H ^^ !■ J^Pl |H ■Hi _)«% 

Animal Science and Industry Senior WL^"^Jl^F ^m^gfr _| BT* 3i ■ JaS^M ^r * BM. HW >J • ■» * 

GURNSEY, MICHAEL A Wichita ^fPTV /" T** 1 *"* IT flBrH'S I "* ^^BB W '^ f5 ■ 

Interior Architecture Senior ~- | »# M^*«3Bf J ^ J4.iflB> ^k Jki • \ ^*~ 

HENRY, TERRY W. Randolph ' — * .w ^ fV 1 'jBr *-*^aT>. V -»-*• 

Animal Science and Industry Senior " /v 

HILDEBRAND. DONALDS Stafford -k: A^. •s**' "2r ■ lb 

Agricultural Economics Junior „ * j|B%, Ak : .^gt ' ^^' BH 

HORNBAKER. KENNETH Stafford * x ^ ^A .^BB I / t_j «BI « BBJ 

Agronomy Freshman 1^ ^IbMBBB ! SS t ' BB A flffj 

HOSKINSON. REX A Stafford '*3BBk A '«& jMflBk 

Pre-Velermary Medicine Sophomore ^ flj BBk ^T, /'fflfBBk 

JACKSON. BRIAN C Elsmore ^jfejB WJBi ^MMhBB Be^BB\ 

Agricultural Economics Junior flv>^ 4HBk *^^ ^^ ^""" 

JULIAN, ARLYN D BT ^B ' fP^^m M~» <^9B 

Agricultural Education Sophomore ^ _JLBr , a. JB^ W ITTBP 

KNOPP.MAXE Chapman j§ jBB' -'I. i if 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore <BBL •«»■ *^ IJBr 

LINDSHIELD. CHARLES A Smolan ^SmBBW^ ^ ""^BPk. W 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore jBJ BM|j ^H& ^^ W j '•^ ^Bfe ^^ <n 

LINVILLE, RANDALL Holcomb ^ jB' | BB ^^Bl \ BBJ 

Agricultural Economics Senior «,V ^,BB MB M , flBJBt^BB 

MAYDEW, BRIAN J Lebanon 4^HBk - ^BMW. «BBBBt .^BBK 

Agriculture Economics Senior |H . yJb /aBB^. ^BJ BjBk » jBB BBk 

MAYER. GREG L Gypsum 1P^*1 "4BB\ ^fk MHPBjBI B^"*^Pi 

Accounting Sophomore BB ^» MB MMbillfBl K Bj mil ^JBjl I ■ 

McKINNEY, WAYNE A Weskan ■" JImS ,8/ -■<•► ***• ■ f^BB •»^ !f f^'i« 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior B§ , "*L i % •-♦ aflF 1 7 1 ■— /J 

McNICKLE.TIMA Stafford ^[ ~~T^ \ •<# ¥ -" - ' \ -^MT , ' / 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior i \fa, -I — *y| * / jilr 

McWILLIAMS.ROBL Sharon Springs -A ^f (^BV w'"W i^^BBf ■ ^^A *4flf 

Architecture Senior 1,^-A %fc^. •- T^BSfek^A ^^ Bk. ▼"" ' WSfci W 

MICHELS, GARY L Hunter BBV #mBk ' .|5Pi| ,-^ MBA| VAW BBM . flW 

Animal Science and Industry Junior Bj^ '^flVflB C^Baf^^f Bl ISf Bfl ^ iw ^ «Bfi Klflffll 

MILLER. KIM A Burdett ^ .JBBBL > 2^. #"^k ^BHBS. 

Landscape Horticulture Senior K J^ ' * ' BBk / V BBk BBk 

munden, david g Wichita \\ BBVBBBB Jf^j BB JL. hBB ^^HBBk 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior \\ - "-JBJ I^^BBB ^* «M S»3L ^^B 

MUNSON, G.RICHARD Junction City ^hB 1" "^wJ ^* BBBBf I >* ""*'*' H wfll 

Agricultural Economics Senior |kJ ^ r'^ BB \ 

NULIK. RODNEY L Arkansas City ^ i^ H \ -£V V ^BB^ ^t» BB \^-Z*T 

Agricultural Education Senior \ O-BfB' - ^ >- --' fll 

NUSS. LYMAN L Wilson V^lrW ^ -Jlv >^^W ^#L h: ^■V 

Agronomy Junior ^ ^BkBI ^SFW^ jf 1^^ ^^ ^BjW T^ 

O'Connor, william m ^^kch BB BBk *. BBi /^ BBB BBl ^ BBJ I A lw 

sophomore ^j^ flB H | < j || P f J| | ^ ^fffltk I 

OLSON. DAN S Morganville '^BBk ^BHW 

Electrical Engineering Senior BBk #Si BBl 

PARKER. JAMES W Mulvane luflBB «S^^ 'M 

Food Science and Industry Junior BP^^^JBBk 

RAMSEY, JAMES W Arkansas City • ' I") BBB WMtfG&HD 

Agricultural Education Sophomore T^ M"W \>^~~ J iJ 

RIFFM STEVEN K Stockton £?Wm 

Animal Science and Industry Junior \^f —*T W\ \"3»^V 

ROTH, ROBERT A Green > J _> ^ \^B^Bk 

Animal Science and Industry Senior A ^F^^ .' ^B' Assifc. ^^ AH 

RUNDLEW CRAIG Axlell' Bk X BB^ ^tM T^V ^^ A BB 

CI Engineering junior ^ ^Bj f/lk^A Ml M T 










330 — farmhouse 




SCANLAN, MARK K Abilene 

Milliruj ' ■< if'nr m anri Management Freshman 

SLOAN. CRAIG S Weskan 

I'lf . • t'-Fi'i i' r r.'V'liMn^ Sophomore 

SPEER, ROBERT W Mulvane 

Agricultural Education Senior 

STOSKOPF, DEAN Hoismglon 

Crop Protection Junior 

SUELLENTROP, RICHARD J Colwich 

Pre-Forestry Junior 

SYLVESTER, LEON E Wamego 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SYLVESTER. NOEL D Wamego 

Music Education Sophomore 

THOMPSON, STEVEN L Medicine Lodge 

Computer Science Senior 

VAN GUNDY, MIKE W. Amencus 

Agriculture Sophomore 

VOLKER, BOYD L Staltord 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

WALKER. GARY L Emporia 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

WEAVER. JACK R Hiawatha 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

WEEDEN. TERRY I. St Francis 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

WILSON. RONALD J Manhattan 

Agricultural Education Junior 




r^.1 -■WMMMMiiwiiM^ii' 




Like shelved trophies, those myriad 
late-night jam sessions are remembered 
and reflected upon. And like the 



awards, the conversation gradually loses 
its brilliance as the hours wear on. 



gathering dust 



larmhouse i; ' 



ford hall 



BECNEL.HARRr'P 
BECNEL MARY ANN 
ADAMS. JANEENA 
Accounting 
ADAMS JOD/E 
Fashion Marketing 
ADAMS. MALINDAM 
Anthropology 
AFFOLTER. JACLYND 
Physical Education 



ALMOND, DEBRA A 

Interior Design 

ANDERSON. DENISEK 
Floriculture 
ANDREW. CINDY L 
Music Education 
ANDREW. DEBORAH A 
Physical Education 
ANNAN. ALYSSA L 
Medical Technology 
ARMSTRONG. JODY 
Family and Child Development 



ARNONE. LISAL 

Biochemistry 

ASH. DEBRA K 

Fashion Marketing 

BABINGTON. WENDY L 

Clothing and Retailing 

BAJICH, HELEN 

General 

BARANGIK. KATHY M 

Business 

BARNETT. LINDA J 

Pre-Design Professions 



BELL. BARBARA A 

Pre-Medicme 

BENNETT. NEISHAL 

Pre-Law 

BERGKAMP, EVELYNS 

Horticulture 

BERGREN. JONIL 

Business 

BERKLEY. JACQUE K 

Physical Therapy 

BETZOLD. BARBARA A 

Institutional Management 



Director 

Director 

Freeport 

Freshman 

McPherson 

Freshman 

Salma 

Sophomore 

Mi irgan /illi 

Freshman 



Abilene 

Freshman 

Kansas City 

Sophomore 

Kansas City 

Junior 

Onaga 

Freshman 

Overland Park 

Graduate Student 



Topeka 

Freshman 

Newton 

Freshman 

Overland Park 

Sophomore 

Kansas City 

Freshman 

Shawnee Mission 

Freshman 

Wichita 

Freshman 



Holton 

Freshman 

Newton 

' .. i| 'In imi in 

Garden Plain 

Senior 



BIGHELMEYER. JANE C 

Pre-School Education 

BIL Y.CYNTHIA A 

Chemical Engineering 

BLACKABY, CHRISTINA L. 

Family and Child Development 

BLACKMER. REBECCA A 

Education 

BLAIDA, KATHRYNA 

Elementary Education 

BLEW, NANCY K 

Business Education 



Freshman 

Abilene 

Sophomore 

Nokomis. IL 

Junior 



Shawnee 

Sophomore 

Wichita 

Freshman 

Kansas City 

Senior 

Kansas City 

Sophomore 

Leawood 

Freshman 

Mount Hope 

Sophomore 



BLISS. ELIZABETH A 

BLOCK. JAYNI S 

Business 

BOEHM, SHARON A. 

Clothing and Retailing 

BOHN, JAN R 
Home Economics 
BOULA. KIME 
Accounting 

BRANDENBERGER. JAMIE L 
Elementary Education 



BRANDSBI KG, JILL L 

Biology 

BRINKMAN.CHERIEA 

General 

BRITEGAM, JOANNA J 

General 

BROOKS, SANDRA A 

Fashion Marketing 

BROOKS, SUSAN J 

Home Economics 

BUNCK, DEBORAH L 

Family and Child Developr 



BURNI [ i SARAH I 

i lome I i onomtc 5 wilh I iberal Art', 

BUTIN CONSTANCI S 

i lome Ecom 

CAMPBI I I CONNII '. 

1 lementary 1 dui atlon 

CAMPBELL, JAN L 

Fashion Marketing 

CAMPBI I I JUDITH A 
Architecture 
CANNI I I VICKI I 



Bonner Springs 

Junior 

Ankeny, IA 

Sophomore 

Olathe 

Senior 

Eskndge 

Freshman 

McPherson 

Freshman 

Mnuril Hu|»- 

Junior 



Olathe 

Freshman 

Topeka 

Freshman 

Salma 

Freshman 

Newton 

Freshman 

Horton 

' ,.,|,humi He 

Silver Lake 

■ ,.,|,h< imrire 



Kansas City 

Junior 

Halstead 

I r.". Inn, in 

Ati hison 

Sophomore 

Cheshire, CT 

Senior 

Overland Park 

Filth Year Student 

Montr.,' ,n (.(I 




m (Ha <i 



132 lord hall 




CANNY REBECCA R Johnson 

Home Economics Education Junior 

CARLSON. JILINDAL Little River 

Home Economics Freshman 
CARPENTER, JANET I Shawnee Mission 

Accounting Freshman 

CASTER. CATHE A Overland Park 

Home Economics Freshman 

CHAFFEE. NANCY Overland Park 

Elementary Education Junior 

CHAPIN. DENAL Wichita 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

CHARLES. CHERYL A Chicago. IL 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

CHARTRAND. LUCY A ,..,.-. : 

Humanities Junior 

CHEATUM. JODYANN Syracuse 

Family and Child Development Junior 

CLINE.KYML Kansas City 

Elementary Education Junior 

COMPAAN. JAMIE L Norton 

General Freshman 

COOVER. MICHELLE M Overland Park 

Dietetics Sophomore 

COWEN, SHIRLEY F Wamego 

Education Freshman 

COX, LESLIE L Prairie Village 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

CRAWFORD. GAY V . Rossville 

General Sophomore 

CROCKETT, GAYLE A Lyons 

General Sophomore 

CROSS. DEBORA L Kansas City 

Home Economics Education Junior 

CROUCH, MARTHA L Topeka 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

CURTRIGHT, PAULA R Leawood 

Accounting Junior 

DAMMANN, KAREN S Marysville 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

DAVIS. DENISE Junction City 

Fashion Marketing Freshman 

DAVIS. FAWN L Esbon 

Fine Arts Freshman 

DAVIS. GAYLE L Jetmore 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

DAVIS, RAMONA L Overland Park 

Fashion Marketing Freshman 




lord hall — 333 



ford hall 







































































Interior Design 


Freshman 


















Elementary Education 


Freshman 


















Dietetics and Institutional Management 


Freshman 


Pre-Vetennary Medicine 


Junior 






EVANS, KATHLEEN 


Hutchinson 






Home Economics Education 

FABRIZIUS, M JANICE 
Fashion Marketing 
FANKHAUSER. CAROL A 
Accounting 


Senior 

Hutchinson 

Freshman 

Elmdale 

Freshman 






FAUBION. LUANNE 


Smith Center 


FINNIGIN. BRENDAM 


. Beattie 










FORD. NANCY A 


Wakefield 










FRENCH. BRONAS 
Elementary Education 


Sublette 
Freshman 










Home Economics 

FROMHOLTZ. CINDY M 

General 

FULLER. CAROL D 


Freshman 

Shawnee 
Freshman 






GARINGER, SUSAN L 




































Pre-Physical Therapy 
GIBSON 'BARBARA M 


Sophomore 
















Lyons 


Social Work 
GOERING. DIANE S 


Freshman 






GOULD. SAUNDRAE 








GRAFF, BARBARA J. 








GREENE. JUDY L 


Overland Park 


GROSSARDT. ELLEENE 
















HANCHETT. TARAS 




HARLIN. MAUREEN C 


j ,1,1m hip iri/ 
Overland Park 


334 — lord hall 







&2tiiii\rl///u,JM 



HARRINGTON. NANCY K Overland Park 

Business Sophomore 

HATTRUP, DARLENE . Kinsley 

Psychology Freshman 

HAWKINS, TRUDY J McPherson 

Business Freshman 

HEDGER. MARSHA L Overland Park 

Secondary Education Freshman 

HEIMAN. JUDI M ... Baileyville 

General . . . . Freshman 

HEIMER, KATHYA Mernam 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

HENDERSON, SHERILYNS Eskridge 

Dietetics Junior 

HENG, MARILYN I Liberal 

Business Sophomore 

HENKE, NANCY J .. Shawnee 

Home Economics Education Junior 

HENSLER. PATRICIA J Lenexa 

Interior Design Sophomore 

HENTZLER, CAROL L Eskridge 

Interior Design Junior 

HERBERS, SUSAN K Rose Hill 

Recreation Senior 

HERNANDEZ, OLIVIA B Overland Park 

Accounting Sophomore 

HESS, CONNIE J Burns 

Family and Child Development Junior 

HEVERMANN. PAMELAS . Prairie Village 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

HICKS. DIANE L . Mount Hope 

History Freshman 

HICKS, JUDITH A Little River 

Early Childhood Education Freshman 

HIGGINS. JANEM , Lyons 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

HILL. MARYS Shawnee 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

HOENK, KAREN A Leawood 

General Freshman 

HOLCOMB, SUZI G Hutchinson 

General . Freshman 

HORNECKER, SUSAN L Topeka 

Interior Design Junior 

HORNER, KIMBERLYC Shawnee 

General Freshman 

HOUGHTON, LINDA K Topeka 

Consumer Interest Junior 

HUMES, DEANNC, Leawood 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

ISENBERG, CAROL E Overland Park 

Home Economics Freshman 

ISENBERG, MARGIE E Overland Park 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

JACQUES. PAULA R Salma 

Political Science Sophomore 

JAMES, JONI K Wichita 

General Freshman 

JENKINS, MARGARET J Prairie Village 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

JENSEN, MARJORIE A Norton 

Interior Design , Freshman 

JOHN, JERRIANNEG Argonia 

Physical Education Freshman 

JOHNSON, DEBBIE S Halstead 

General Freshman 

JOHNSON, KRIS G Wichita 

Business Education Freshman 

JOHNSON. LESLIE D. Atchison 

Home Economics Sophomore 

JOHNSON, SUSAN J . Lmdsborg 

Family and Child Development Junior 

JOHNSTON, BRENDA S Goodland 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

JOHNSTON, PAM J. Newton 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

JONES, DEBRA E Concordia 

General Freshman 

JONES, JANAM Washington 

Accounting Sophomore 

JOYCE, ANN Ulysses 

Special Education Freshman 

KAUFFMAN, NOREEN H , . Abilene 

Social Work Sophomore 

KAUFMAN, NATHALEA J Great Bend 

Math Education Senior 

KELLER, CHERYL J Halstead 

Family and Child Development Senior 

KILBY, PAMELA J Wichita 

Physical Education Sophomore 

KILGORE, TERRI Roeland Park 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

KING. DEBORAH J Newton 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

KLENKE.SUEM Hutchinson 

Physical Education Junior 



lord hall — 335 



ford hall 
/ 




sticky situation 



It's not exactly like sitting in front of a 
blazing, stone fireplace — but a candle 
gets the job done. Improvising Ford resi- 



dents treat themselves to the luxury of a 
smoky, melted marshmallow snack. 



KNIPHER. MARY B Shawnee 

Physical Education Freshman 

KNOEBBER, ELIZABETH M Shawnee 

Elementary Education Freshman 

KOMIN.KATHRYNM Overland Park 

Accounting Freshman 

KONGS, NANCY K Wetmore 

General Freshman 

KOSSOY. FAITH S. St Louis, MO 

Bakery Science and Management Sophomore 

KOSTELEC. MAUREEN A Kansas City 

Accounting Sophomore 

KRAFT. KATHRYN L Elmhurst, IL 

Home Economics . . . . Freshman 

KRAISINGER. SUSAN K Pratt 

Mathematics Freshman 

KREHBIEL, PEGGY A Kingman 

Commercial Art Senior 

KROENING, MARY L Overland Park 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

KRUEGER, KATHY A Yates Center 

Fashion Marketing Senior 

KUBIE, DIANE C Merriam 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

KURTZ. SUE L. Overland Park 

General Freshman 

LADNER, KRISTY L Solomon 

Elementary Education Freshman 

LALLY. KATHERINEM. Kansas City 

Home Economics and Journalism Freshman 

LANGTON.CATHLEENJ Perry 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

LEHNER, PAMELA J Shawnee 

Home Economics Education Senior 

LEWIS, DEE A Sharon Springs 

Home Economics Education Senior 




336 — lord hall 




mm 
























Clothing and Retailing 


Sophomore 






























LOWRY, TAMARA R 


Topeka 


























MALONE, KATHLEEN A 
General 


Overland Park 
Sophomore 



MARR, PATTY 

Fashion Design 

MARTIN, JACKIE A 

Family and Child Development 



Overland Park 

Freshman 

Assana 

Freshman 

MARTIN, NANCY A. Olalhe 

Family and Child Development Senior 

MASTERSON. CYNTHIA K Shawnee Mission 

Home Economics . Sophomore 

MATHEWS, D LEANNE Sharon 

Accounting Freshman 

MAUPIN, MICHELEA Hays 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 



MAYHEW, CYNTHIA A 
Elementary Education 
McAFEE, CHERYL L , 
Pre-Design Professions 



Hutchinson 

Junior 

Wichita 

Sophomore 



McAULIFFE, SUSAN B Shawnee Mission 

Special Education Senior 

McFALL, NANCY R Wichita 

Special Education Freshman 

McGRATH. JULIA A Overland Park 

Dietetics Junior 

McKEE, JUDY A Brewster 

Family and Child Development Senior 



McROBERTS, JEANETTE M 
Pre-Vetennary Medicine 
MILLER. KATHYW 
Clothing and Retailing 
MLINEK, WENDI E 

Home Economics 

MOORMAN, CATHERINE A 
Speech 

MOORS, MARY C 
Accounting 

MORGENSTERN. PAMELAS 
Elementary Education 



MORRIS, M FRAN 
Special Education 
MOSER, THERESA K 
Office Administration 
MUSE. RISAK 
Elementary Education 
MYERS, KATHLEEN A 
Early Childhood Education 
NEUFELD, JOLENES 
Medical Technology 
NEVINS. LAUREL A 
Physical Therapy 



NIGHTENGALE, CATHY L, 

Chemical Engineering 

NIGHTENGALE, PEGGY J 

Education 

NORMAN, SARA J 

Animal Science and Industry 

O'BRIEN, GINNY 

Liberal Arts 

OTTE, JANE M 

Family and Child Development 

PACE, CAMILLIAA 

Physical Therapy 



PAGE.BRENDAK. 

Physii al Therapy 

PAINTER, KRISTIE A 

Bakery Science and Management 

PARKS, WENDY L 

Mathematics 

PAULICH, CHERYL L 

I lemont.iiy I ducntion 

PEARCE, SHARON K 

General 

POLSON, LISAC 

Interii h I lesign 



Silver Lake 

Sophomore 

Prairie Village 

Junior 

St Francis 

Freshman 

Lyons 

Freshman 

McPherson 

Freshman 

Hoisington 

Freshman 



Minneapolis 

Junior 

Tribune 

Sophomore 

Sublette 

Freshman 

i iverland Pari 

Sophomore 

Newton 

Freshman 

Overland Park 

Sophomore 



Burns 

Freshman 

Cedar Point 

Sophomore 

Scott City 

Junior 

Leawood 

Sophomore 

Henngton 

Freshman 

Washington, DC 

Sophomore 



Henngton 

Freshman 

Shawnee Mission 

Junior 

eawi ii id 

Sophomore 

ln>\ 

Junioi 

Freshman 
Halstead 

i n 



lord hall- . ; .< ' 



ford hall 



POWERS. JEAN M Great Bend 

Home Economics Freshman 

PRESTA. PAULA S Scott City 

Pre-School Education Sophomore 

PRICE, LEAH S Perry 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

PRINGLE.BETHG Yates Center 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

PYPES. ELIZABETH R Prairie Village 

Pre-Pharmacy Sophomore 

QUINN, TERESA A Shawnee 

Elementary Education Senior 

REBER, CAROL L Newton 

General Freshman 

REDFIELD. LISA J Hardtner 

Physical Education Freshman 

REED. JANE A Topeka 

Elementary Education Freshman 

REED. KATHLEEN M Salina 

Physical Education Freshman 

REED, ROBIN R Lawrence 

Microbiology Junior 

REED. SANDRA L Wetmore 

Elementary Education Freshman 

REGIER.KRISTINEL Halstead 

Medical Technology Junior 

REID, SUSAN A Leawood 

Medical Technology Sophomore 
REITZ.JUDYK Medicine Lodge 

Business Freshman 

RICE, LETITIAA Overland Park 

General . Freshman 

RICHARDSON. KATHY L Salina 

General Sophomore 

RIZZA. KATHERINE G Halstead 

Home Economics Freshman 

ROBERTS, CINDAL Winfield 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

ROWLAND, VERA V Lenexa 

Horticulture Sophomore 

RUSCO, RHONDA L Great Bend 

Fashion Marketing Freshman 

RUTLEDGE.CINTHIAS Dover 

Pre-Nursmg Sophomore 

SAMUELSON, JOYCE A Overland Park 

Accounting Sophomore 

SANDMEYER, LISA C Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 



SANDY, MARCIA C Overland Park 

Home Economics Sophomore 

SASENICK.SHERYLM Overland Park 

Business Sophomore 

SCANLAN. VICKIL Agra 

Accounting Freshman 

SCHERER, LISAC Wichita 

Art Freshman 

SCHLUETER. LISA M Overland Park 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

SCHMIDT, YVONNE K Hillsboro 

Home Economics Education Senior 

SCHNEIDER, BRENDA J Summertield 

Physical Education Junior 

SCHOAP, LARIE Cottonwood Falls 

Consumer Interest Sophomore 

SCHROEDER, LYNN Y Pretty Prairie 

Home Economics Education Senior 

SCHROEDER. SHARI J Valley Center 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

SCHUETTE. SHARON S Manhattan 

Political Science Sophomore 

SCHULLER. MARYL Salina 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

SCHWARTZ, JILL R Hutchinson 

General Freshman 

JAN C Overland Park 

Home Economics Freshman 

SEDLACEK. JANE E Hanover 

History and Political Science Sophomore 

Abilene 

/■'.' minting Sophomore 

SHANKS, I ORIM Lenexa 

General Freshman 

mia // i/. til l Lakin 

eh/', i' ,ii ' ,c icni c i reshman 

SHf I III I '.I I INDAK Anthony 

I amily and Child Development Junior 

Mill LDS, MAR I HAM Olathe 

I loin'-' I c oiiuimm -. Willi I ibcral Arts Ju i 

Ml Bl Rl SANDRAK Pretty Prairie 

I ngii ring Freshman 

Halstead 

Animal ' cieni e and industry ' .1 >i ~\v >m< m- 

.-.11 1 1 rlandPart 

Junior 

Nl 1 A Baileyville 

Retail 1 lorn ulture 1 .< iphi imore 




'*£ % 







SMITH, CONNIE D Wichita 

Floriculture Freshman 

SMITH. JOYCE E . . Kansas City 

Adult and Community Counseling Graduate Student 

SNYDER, JILL K Auburn 

General Freshman 

SORENSEN, SUSAN E Ness City 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

SPARKE. JERRI A Prairie Village 

Home Economics Freshman 

STAPLETON, CARRIE E Kansas City, MO 

Economics and Journalism Senior 

STOKESBURY, DEBRA A Bonner Springs 

General Freshman 

STONE, LOUISE A Seattle, WA 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

STOUT, KAREN A Overland Park 

Pre-Forestry Freshman 

STOUT, MARY L Hutchinson 

Engineering Freshman 

STREIT, NADINE J Downs 

Textiles Research Sophomore 

STROH, CYNTHIA L Hutchinson 

Music Education . Freshman 

STRONG, TERRESA M Abilene 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine . . . . Freshman 

STUMP, SANDRA K Kansas City 

Labor Relations Sophomore 

SUNDGREN, LINDA D Kipp 

Horticultural Therapy Freshman 

SWANSON, JEANETTE M .' Newton 

General Freshman 

TEWELL, MARIAN P . . Bonner Springs 

Computer Science Freshman 

THOMAS, KIMBERLY A Salma 

Elementary Education Junior 




lord hall 139 



ford hall 



THOMAS LESLEEK Springfield VA 

Business Sophomore 

THOMEN. SHIRLEY K Gardner 

Computer Science Freshman 

TOPLIFF BECKY A Goodland 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts Sophomore 

TRAVIS. CHRISTY L Ni /vton 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

UEBELHART. CRISA Overland Park 

Fashion Design Freshman 

UMPHREY, ELIZABETH C Salina 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 





Overland Park 


Pre-Nursing 

VAN GUNDY. DIANE E 

Special Education 

VENN.TERRIK 

Medical Technology 

VENNEMAN.BETTIEA 


Freshman 
Ellsworth 
Freshman 
Mission 
Freshman 
Prairie Village 






Accounting 

VOGELMAN. TRESA D 

Bakery Science and Management 

WAETZIG, VALERIE L 

General 

WALLACE. LEESAM 

Health and Physical Education 

WALLERIUS. KAREN A 

Business 


Sophomore 

Burns 

Sophomore 

Wakarusa 

Freshman 

Barnard 

Sophomore 

Salina 

Freshman 

Topeka 


Physical Education 
WATKINS. HOLLY G 
Pre-Design Protessions 
WAUGH.MARCIAL 
Business 

WEISHAAR, ELIZABETH A 
Pre-School Education 


Freshman 

Wichita 

Sophomore 

Goodland 
Sophomore 

-.'.ill.', I ail-. 
Sophomore 








Oveii.iiii 1 I , id- 


General 

WELLER. LINDA J 

General 

WENDT. SANDRA C 

Elementary Education 

WENGER. MELANIE LYNN 

Business Finance 

WESSELMANN, MICHELE M 


Sophomore 

Gypsum 

Freshman 

Henngton 

Sophomore 

Newton 

Freshman 

Overland Park 










WESTERHOLD. DEBORAH A 
Pre-Design Protessions 


St Louis, MO 
Freshman 


Fine Arts 

WHITE CHERYL J 

Conservation 


Junior 

Topeka 

Freshman 

Colby 






WHITE. PAULA F 


Caldwell 


WIENCK, LINDA R 
Elementary Education 


Barnes 
Junior 


Pre- Veterinary Medir in.- 

WILLIAMS. EILEEN P 

Health 

WILLIAMS. JERRILEE 

Horticulture 

WILLIAMS, KRISTI A 

Applied Music 

WILLIS, ROSA! HI 
Special Education 
WILSON CARRIE A 

' magement 


Freshman 

Overland Park 

Freshman 

Abilene 

Sophomore 

Topeka 

Freshman 

Kansas City 

Junior 

Hutchinson 

Junior 

Abilene 

Shawnee Mission 






YATES, KATHI F HI A 
Physical Therapy 
YOUNG, ANN 1 

rOUNG i INDY .1 

; 

r-OUNG SUSAN M 
i ashion Marketing 
ZWICf BRI (IDA Y 
Pre Nursing 


Prairie Village 
Kinsley 

i 'retly Prairie 

1 ii -. Inn, in 

i iverlandPark 

i reshman 

■ .terlmg 

l reshman 




gamma phi beta 





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ANDREWS, KATHY J Kansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

BAALMAN, KAREN M Menlo 

Secondary Education Freshman 

BARKER, DEBRAK Manhattan 

General Freshman 

BARRETT, LAURA L Kansas City 

Recreation Sophomore 

BERGER, CARLA A Atchinson 

Business Senior 

BRAUN, DEBORAJ Atchinson 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

CHAMBLISS, TERRY A Lawrence 

Special Education Sophomore 

CHINN. JANELLEK Wichita 

Elementary Education Freshman 

CLARK, CRISTA C Norton 

General Freshman 

CONNOR, BRENDA C Prairie Village 

Interior Design Sophomore 

CORBIN, CINDY Leawood 

Recreational Therapy Junior 

DALLMAN, NANCY C Prairie Village 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

DANIELS, KATE Leawood 

Elementary Education Senior 

DEINES. JANETS Garden City 

Pri-' '.'.■!. i n.r, Wdicme Sophomore 

DEMBSKI, JANE L Overland Park 

Recreational Therapy Senior 

DEMING. SHAWN D Hutchinson 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

DIZMANG. BELINDA G Leoti 

Home Economics Sophomore 

DOMBAUGH, DENA R Wichita 

Horticulture Senior 

DOWNING, JONI R Overland Park 

General Sophomore 

DUNNE. KAREN A Manhattan 

Physical Education - Freshman 

EDGERLEY, SUSAN Overland Park 

English Senior 

EGAN, CHRISTINE M Salina 

Business Administration Junior 

ERICKSON, DEBRAJ Assaria 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

EVERETT, TERESA L Hutchinson 

Physical Education Freshman 

GAMBA, JULIE A Osage City 

Accounting Senior 

GARDNER, REBECCA C Derby 

Dietetics Senior 

GLOTZBACH, SUSAN M Leavenworth 

Business Management Junior 

GRAY, BARB J Overland Park 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

HARPSTER, LESLIE S Prairie Village 

Fashion Merchandising Freshman 

HASSIG, MARILYN Kansas City 

Home Economics Freshman 









number, please 




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made on a private line. Though it's some- 
what of a close call, the Gamma Phis evi- 
dently find operating a party line more 
conducive to conversation. 






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Overland Par 



HENDERSON, CAROL W 
Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

HENDERSON, SUSAN R Overland Park 

General Freshman 

HOGERTY, KATHRYN A Leawood 

Education Senior 

JONES, NANCI K Overland Park 

English Education Junior 

KARST, CATHY R Manhattan 

Recreation Sophomore 

KELLY, NANCY S Leawood 

Special Education Senior 



KERR, PATRICIA A Wichita 

Family and Child Development Senior 

KILL. COLLEEN P Overland Park 

Consumer Interest Sophomore 

KISSING, MICHELEK Overland Park 

Medical Technology Freshman 

KNECHT, LINDA K Shawnee Mission 

Social Science Senior 

KOEPKE, LESLIE A Wichita 

Social Work Senior 

KUNZ, THERESA Prairie Village 

General Freshman 



LEE. TANAS 

Recreation 

McKEE, CHARLOTTE A 

Pre-Nursmg 



Leoti 

Sophomore 

Colby 

Sophomore 



MERRIFIELD, CAROL L Leawood 

Recreation Senior 



OUSDAHL, KIMBERLYJ 

General 

PAGE. PAMELA R 

Journalism and Mass Communications 

PARKER, KIM J 

Physical Education 



Shawnee 

Freshman 

Wichita 

Sophomore 

Russell 

Freshman 



PARSONS, MARTY L 
Recreation 
PATRICK. KAY D 
Statistics 

PAULSEN. DEANAC 
Pre-Denlistry 
PAYNE, KAREN , 
Fashion Merchandising 
PETERSON, TANNAR 
Medical Technology 



Wichita 

Sophomore 

Leawood 

Junior 

Stafford 

Junior 

Overland Park 

Sophomore 

Macksville 

Freshman 

REUSSER, JANET K Viola 

Physical Education Senior 



ROBBEN, MARY A Oakley 

Elementary Education , Senior 

RONNING, LUCI L Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

ROOKS. MALLORY A Manhattan 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

SAUNDERS, JAN A Wichita 

Pre-Law Senior 

SCHROCK, SUSAN R Kiowa 

Art Education Senior 

SCHWARTZKOPF, LEE ANN . . . Ness City 

Home Economics Freshman 



SHORT. KRISTI D . Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications ' .' .; > 1 1 ( x r it >r r- 

SLOAN, MICHELE E Overbrook 

Consumer Interest Senior 

SNOW. CINDY M Wichita 

Speech Pathology Junior 

STANTON, BARBARA A Shawnee Mission 

Family and Child Development Senior 

STEPHENSON, JANETS Prairie Village 

Dietetics Sophomore 

STOCKTON, MARY D. Leawood 

Consumer Interest Sophomore 



THOMPSON, TONI M McPherson 

Fashion Merchandising Freshman 

TOWNSEND, SU M. . Leoti 

Recreation Junior 

TRAPP. DEBORAH L. Rochester. NY 

Psychology Freshman 

VARNEY, SUSAN R. . . Manhattan 

Computer Science Junior 

WINDSOR, LYNN Atchison 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

WINGER, JANE A, Prairie Village 

General Freshman 



WOOD, SUZANNE E Prairie Village 

Elementary Education Senior 

YEAGER, NANCY L Norton 

Interior Design Senior 

ZATEZALO, LINDA L , , Kansas City 

Math Education Sophomore 








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ABERLE, JEANETTE S. Troy 

Interior Design Freshman 

ADAMS. CYNTHIA J Frankfort 

General Freshman 

ALDRICH, LISAK Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

ALUMBAUGH, JANET Overland Park 

Psychology Freshman 

ANDERSON, ANNETTE K . . , Belleville 

Food/Science and Industry . Sophomore 

ANDERSON, DEBBIE R Hugoton 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

ANDERSON, KIRK B Whealon, IL 

Microbiology Senior 

ARMSTRONG. MECHELLEM - Onaga 

Physical Education Sophomore 

ASBURY, CINDY L Montgomery, AL 

Special Education Freshman 

ASPELIN. NYLA J Dwight 

Psychology Sophomore 

ATTEBERRY, KIM R Larned 

History Freshman 

BAHRE, SUSAN M Lyons 

Elementary Education . Sophomore 

BANKS, CAROL A Leavenworth 

Family and Child Development Senior 

BARBER. JULIE A Alexandria. VA 

Medical Technology Freshman 

BARE. MARK M , , Raytown 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

BARTROM. KREGEME E St. Louis. MO 

Dietetics Junior 

BASOM. TERESA R Larned 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

BEATTY. KAREN S Shawnee Mission 

Physical Education Freshman 

BERRY, RALPH C Prairie Village 

Environmental Science Junior 

BICHEL, MARK A Parkville. MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BIEBERLY, DAVID D Salma 

Pre-Design Profession Sophomore 

BLANDING, JONI M Douglass 

Sociology Junior 

BLOCK. JANET J Topeka 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

BOOTMAN, NANCY D Fairway 

Family Economics Freshman 

BRECHEISEN. KURT D Garnett 

General Freshman 

BRIGHT, BARI L Topeka 

Home Economics Sophomore 

BRINGHAM, LINDA L Meade 

Crop Protection Senior 

BROCK, SCOTT E Prairie Village 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

BROWN, RHONDA J Lansing 

Interior Design Junior 

BUCHNER, MARCEE L. Overland Park 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

BUEHNE. JANICE S Wichita 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

BULBA, MICAELA Bloomfield, CT 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

BUNCH, DEBRAE Independence 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

BURRIS, JILLM Wichita 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

BUSENITZ, DAVID L Whitewater 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

BUTLER, RETHA A Derby 

Psychology Junior 

CALDWELL, LOVINA M Culver 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

CAMPBELL. CHRISTOPHER C Overland Park 

Physical Education Junior 

CARRIER, DONNAS Mission 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

CARSON, SHAN J Ulysses 

Accounting Junior 

CASSLER, NANCY I ■ Iverland Fark 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

CHASE, MARY T Abilene 

Horticulture Junior 

CHURCH, CHERI J Haysville 

Biology Sophomore 

COCKERILL. RICHARD L Spalding. NB 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

COLLIER. AVA T Shawnee Mission 

Restaurant Management Sophomore 

COMBS. LAUREL C Lebanon 

Physical Therapy Junior 

COOK. TERESA M Gardner 

Horticulture Sophomore 

t ORNI I JUS. SANDYS Overland Park 

Home Economics Freshman 



goodnow hall — 343 



goodnow hall 



CORNETT, SHIRLEY D Scandia 

Home Economic Education Freshman 

CORNWELL. KELLEE A Ellsworth 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

CROWE, TERRI G Kansas City 

Political Science Senior 

DANNUCCI, KEITH J Morristown, NJ 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Freshman 

DARBY. LEORA L Burlingame 

Sociology Sophomore 

DENTON, DEBORAH D Prairie Village 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 



DESCHNER, KIM M Natoma 

Psychology Junior 

DIECKGRAFE. INDY Derby 

General Freshman 

DIPMAN, CYNTHIA K Lamed 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

DOBSON, DEBBIE L Topeka 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

DORSEY, JALENE D Haysville 

Accounting Freshman 

DOUD, VICKIE A Wakarusa 

Consumer Interest Senior 



DOWNING, KAREN S Atwood 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

DUDREY, BARBARA J Staftord 

Microbiology Junior 

DUESING, DENISE A Spearville 

Fashion Marketing Junior 

DUNTON, STEPHEN M Topeka 

Biology ... Freshman 

EDWARDS, JANET L Overland Park 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

ENGEL, GLENN R Merriam 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 



FAGAN, JO ANNE Wichita 

Natural Resource Management Sophomore 

FEARS, CARLA D Fairfield, IL 

Home Economics Junior 

FELTS. BARBARA A Lawrence 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

FISHER, KIMBERLY S Osawatomie 

Business Freshman 

FISHER, RITA A Wchita 

Interior Design Freshman 

FISHER, TENA I Preston 

Elementary Education Junior 



FLANAGAN, MARY E Kansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior. 

FOWLES, JAN M Clay Center 

General Sophomore 

FRYE, DARCY L Kingman 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

GARDNER, MICHAEL J Kansas City 

Engineering Technology Junior 

GATZ. SUSAN M Newton 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

GAYLORD, JEANETTE F Lenexa 

Accounting Junior 

GIBLIN, ANNE M Leawood 

General Sophomore 

GILLASPIE, JUDY M Rozel 

Recreation Junior 

GLEUE, THERESA M Marysville 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

GRAHAM, LYNN J Leavenworth 

Biology Sophomore 

GREEN, CHERYL E Kansas City 

Social Science Senior 

GREENWOOD. DEBRA A Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 



GREGORY, JOAN E Osborne 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

GREUSEL, DAVID B Kansas City, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

GRUBER, BETTY J Bennington 

Business Sophomore 

HABERKORN, MICHAEL R Topeka 

Radio and Television Junior 

HABIGER, MARY BETH . Bushton 

Early Childhood Education Freshman 

HAMPL, JULIE L Russell 

Accounting Sophomore 



HARDMAN, JAN E Hill City 

Dietetics Sophomore 

HARDMAN, KRISTI J Home 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

HARGUS. HERSCHELLA K Kansas City 

Textile Research Sophomore 

HARPER, MARK A. . Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

HARTER, PENELOPE K Kansas City 

Nuclei I ngineering Sophomore 

HAY. REBECCA J. Ottawa 

Microbiology Sophomore 





* £$& Q 



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344 — gooonowhall 




HAYES, MARY H. Independence 

General Junior 

HEIN, JOHN W Buhler 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

HENDERSON, BONNIE J Topeka 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

HETTRICK, BRIAN T Topeka 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

HUES, WILLIAM T Wilmington. IL 

Health Education Junior 

HILL, BRENDA J Plains 

Music Education Junior 

HILL, DEBORAH S Plains 

Special Education Freshman 

HILL, KRISTA M Newton 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

HILL, SUSAN E Acton, MA 

Music Education Junior 

HINDMAN, KRISTI L Junction City 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

HOISINGTON, PAULA J Salina 

Music Education Senior 

HOLBROOK, LORINDAS Washington 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 



rn — 



— - 




■■■Hnl 



When the sun comes out of hiding, so 
do basketballs, tennis rackets, and sag- 
ging muscles. Getting the game into 
shape might well do the same for the 
body. 



concrete evidence 



goodnowhall — 345 



good now hall 



HOLT, NANCY L. Highland 

Special Education . . . Junior 

HORNUNG, MARYG. Spearville 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

HUGHES, CYNTHIA C Wichita 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

HUGHEY, BEVERLY A Ottawa 

Music Education . , Freshman 

HUNG, PETER M. . Sydney, Australia 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

IMBODEN, KATHY B Clayton, MO 

Fashion Marketing Junior 

INGRAM, KAREN A. Salma 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

JAMISON, MONTE D Quinter 

Business Administration Senior 

JOHNSON. STACY A Olathe 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

KEIL, GLENDAR Russell 

Health Education Sophomore 

KEITH, KAREN G. Hoismgton 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

KELLY, SHARON S Derby 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

KEMPER, ANNETTA M Garden City 

English Education Senior 

KERWIN, JANETS Delia 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

KETTER. M. PAULETTE " Menden 

Accounting Freshman 

KIER. NANCY T Washington 

Fashion Marketing Freshman 

KIRKMAN. KATHLEEN J Overland Park 

Lite Science Freshman 

KLEMA, KAYE L Russell 

Home Economics Sophomore 




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KLING, DAVID L Lenexa 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

KNOCHE. JANEE. Gardner 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

KNOPP, JANICE E Girard 

Business Freshman 

KNOWLES, MELODIES. Kirwm 

Business Sophomore 

LARABEE, MARY M Independence, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

LAWRENCE, CINDY D Gardner 

Business Management Junior 

LEEBURG. JANE E Miller 

Early Childhood Education Freshman 

LEWIS, STEVE J Salina 

Business Management Sophomore 

LINDAHL, CAROL S Enterprise 

Business Management Senior 

LOADER, BARBARA A Junction City 

Elementary Education . . , Freshman 

LONG, JO ANN Hesston 

Pre-Law Freshman 

LOTT, MICHAEL L Minneapolis 

Pre-Pharmacy Sophomore 

LOUGH, SUSAN D Leavenworth 

Speech Therapy Sophomore 

LUKERT, CAROL A Topeka 

Agricultural Journalism Sophomore 

MACKEY. ROBERT J Hutchinson 

Radio and Television , Freshman 

MAHONEY, JANET A Dorrance 

Special Education Junior 

MALL, DENISE E Topeka 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

MARSTON, BARBARA D Canton 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

MATNEY, CONNIE M. Kansas City 

Medical Technology Freshman 

MATTHIS, JUDITH A Topeka 

Psychology Junior 

MATZEDER, LEO P Leavenworth 

Computer Science Freshman 

MAY, CYNTHIA E Shawnee Mission 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

McCORD, BARBARA J . Emporia 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

McCORMICK, SHARON K . . , Monett, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

McDANIEL, NANCYS Salina 

General Freshman 

McDIFFETT, SHELLEY L AltaVista 

General Freshman 

McGRIFF, P, SUSAN Liberal 

Business Junior 

McNERNEY, FRANCES M Hampton, VA 

Political Science . . . , Sophomore 

MEANS. CAROL J Hiawatha 

Pre-Pharmacy Freshman 

MEDILL, RHONDA L Leavenworth 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

MILBERGER, MARY L . Ellis 

Home Economics Education Junior 

MILES, MELODY D Wichita 

Psychology . . Freshman 

MILLER, COLEENN Alta, IA 

Physical Education Sophomore 

MILLER, JANE A Enterprise 

Physical Education Freshman 
MOELLER, DEBRA L Bonner Springs 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

MONTGOMERY, SUSAN F Burlmgame 

Horticulture Sophomore 

MONTGOMERY, THERESA L Lincolnville 

General Freshman 

MOORE, SUSAN K Wichita 

Pre-School Education Senior 

MORGAN, PEG Greeley 

English Junior 

MOSS. CINDY D Wichita 

Interior Design Freshman 

MUELLER. JANICE M Herington 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

MURET. WILLIAM E Winfield 

Education . Graduate Student 

MURRAY, JANE E Lawrence 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 
MUSICK, JANET K Bonner Springs 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

MYERS, LISA A Salina 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

NAUERT, CONNIE M Larned 
Home Economics 

NAVE, SHERRY M Belle Plame 

I h niie I ' urn iiiik ■■ ,111.1 Ji niin. ilr. m Junior 
NAYLOR, GARY L 

Physical Education Junior 






goodnow hall 



NEAL, LINDA L Wellington 

Pre-Nursmg . ■ Sophomore 

NEELY. DEBBIE K Topeka 

General Freshman 

NELSON, LILY J Sallna 

Business Sophomore 

NELSON. LYNNEC Salina 

Home Economics Sophomore 

NETHERTON. RENE M. . . Great Bend 

Psychology Freshman 

NEUGENT, PAULA J Wichita 

Dietetics Sophomore 

NICHOLS, STEVEN T Garden City 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

NICHOLSON. DONNA J ....... Colby 

Fashion Design Freshman 

NORRIS. STACY K Gladstone, MO 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine ...... Sophomore 

OELKERS, SHELLEY J McCracken 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

OLDBERG, SANDRA L Shawnee Mission 

Art Therapy Freshman 

OLLENBURGER, MAROLYN A. Hillsboro 

Business Freshman 

OLSON, BEVERLEY J, Wmfield 

English Education .......... Junior 

ORTH. GERRY D LaCrosse 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

OTT, TIMOTHY M : Lamont 

Agriculture Freshman 

OVERGAARD, MARCIA L . Luverne, MN 

Biology Freshman 

PEARSON, DEBRA C Monticello, AR 

Interior Design Senior 

PEELER, JULIE K Olathe 

Consumer Interest .Junior 

PEHR, SHELLEY B Overland Park 

Speech Pathology Senior 

PENNER, SUZANNE M Hillsboro 

General Freshman 

PETERSON, ANN L Clifton 

Special Education Freshman 

PETERSON, LINDA S Home 

Psychology Sophomore 

PFEFFER, BETSY L New Berlin. IL 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

PFEIFER, BELINDA A Topeka 

Fashion Marketing Senior 

PFEIFER. DIANE Garden City 

Business Freshman 

PREBYL, LORI L Topeka 

Dietetics Freshman 

RAUSCHER. GAYLE M Cotteyville 

Home Economics Education Junior 

RAYBORN.CHARLYNK Overland Park 

General Freshman 

REGAN. KATHY J Shawnee 

General Freshman 

REH. DENNIS T Natoma 

General Freshman 

REICH, JODY M Paradise 

General Freshman 

RIEGER. LYNNE M Kirkwood. MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

ROBERTS, L. KAY Council Grove 

Fashion Design . . . Freshman 

ROBERTS, ROBERTA R Council Grove 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

ROBINSON. CINDY M . ... Overland Park 

Horticulture Sophomore 

ROGERS, RICK A, Merriam 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

ROSE, LORI A Prescott 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

ROTH. JOAN L Oskaloosa 

Physical Education Sophomore 

ROUSE, MELINDA A. Wichita 

■ , ,■. ■-,!■■.■. I in 'JmI» ,i Junior 

ROWLEY. CHERYL A Eskndge 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

RUNDLE.JOHNA Axtell 

English Education Senior 

RUPE.JANISL U,,y< ; .-ntpr 

Physical Education Freshman 

RUPP.SYLVIEA Wakeeney 

Architecture Junior 

RUST, BARBARA A Richardson, TX 

Dietetics Senior 

SAETZ, PATRICIA E Bonner Springs 

Psychology and Speech Therapy Sophomore 

SANDS, DEBORAH A Wichita 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

SCHAD.JULIEA Milford 

Elementary Education Freshman 

SCHAEFER. ANN M Wichita 

Biology Freshman 



348 — goodnow hall 






SCHMIDT, DEBS Hesston 

General Freshman 

SCHMIDT, ROBERT W Wichita 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

SCHROEDER, LAURIE K Topeka 

Home Economics Sophomore 

SCHWERMANN, RITA M Beloit 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

SCICCHITANO. FRANCIS L Hudson Falls. NY 

Architecture Junior 

SEERS. BARBARAS Shawnee 

Agriculture Freshman 

SEVATSON, ERIC S Kansas City, MO 

Agronomy Freshman 

SEVERANCE, SARA J Beloit 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

SHEETS. JOCELYN K Lmwood 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

SHIPPERS, KATHRYN M Ft Leavenworth 

Physical Therapy Junior 

SHIPPERS, KIRK A, Ft Leavenworth 

Psychology Freshman 

SIDESINGER, TAMARAS Topeka 

Secondary Education Junior 

SKINNER, KIMBERLYR Overland Park 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine . Sophomore 

SOMES, LYNN M Wichita 

Horticulture Sophomore 

SORRICK, CINDY J Washington 

Accounting . . . Sophomore 

SPENCE, LORI A, Washington 

Dietetics Freshman 

SPRATT, DEBRA S Leawood 

Accounting Senior 

STANLEY, ILAROSE M Rose Hill 

General Freshman 



goodnow hall — 349 



goodnow hall 



STARCH, MIKES Wichita 

Chemistry Sophomore 

STENVALL, HARRY C. Walhngford, PA 

Biochemistry Freshman 

STEWART, GAY L Washington 

Music Education Sophomore 

STONE, WANDA L. . . . Washington 

Home Economics Freshman 

STRYKER, ROSSW Blue Rapids 

Pre-Optometry Sophomore 

SVATY, LYNN M Lucas 

Elementary Education Freshman 

SWARTWOUT. NANCY J Rockville, MD 

General Freshman 

TAPPAN, KIM A Leawood 

Art Freshman 

TAYLOR, MELODY B. Kansas City 

General Freshman 

TERRILL. LYNDA L Prairie Village 

General Sophomore 

THARP. TONI K Trenton, MO 

Correctional Administration Sophomore 

THIELEN. JULIE M Dorrance 

Interior Design Junior 

TOOR. BARRY M Hollywood, FL 

Restaurant Management Freshman 

TOWNSEND, STEVEN E Oberlin 

Business Administration Senior 

TUBBS. KEVIN L , - Long Island 

Business Administration Junior 

TUCKWOOD, THOMAS E Stafford 

Education Sophomore 

TURNER, ROBERT M Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

UMBEHR N KIHM , . , Singapore 

Pre-Nusmg Sophomore 

VASCONCELLS, ROGER A Lyons 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

VEACH, SUSAN K Abilene 

Bakery Science and Management Freshman 

VERNON. SUSAN K Topeka 

Horticulture Therapy . . . . Freshman 

VINDUSKA, DARLENE C Marion 

Fashion Marketing Senior 

VOGEL, CYNTHIA K Newton 

Business Administration Sophomore 

WADE, JACQUELINE L Topeka 

Art Education Senior 

WANKLYN, TIMOTHY E Franktort 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

WASINGER, KAREN L Ness City 

Recreation Senior 

WASSER, LESLIE V. Leawood 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

WAYLAND, KELLY R Washington 

Art Freshman 

WEBER, JUDITH L Hermgton 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

WEGMAN, ELAINE R Hoxie 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

WEISER, CATHY M Great Bend 

Interior Design Junior 

WEST, KERRI J Rush Center 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

WHITACRE, JERI A Olathe 

Business Administration Senior 

WHITE, PAMELA L Kansas City 

Fashion Merchandising Freshman 

WICK, LINDA K Hutchinson 

Fashion Marketing Sophomore 

WILLETT, CINDY S. Superior, NB 

Special Education Freshman 

WILLHITE, LISAK Elmdale 

Music Education Freshman 

WILLIAMSON. MARY A Mound City 

Home Economics Education Junior 

WILLIS, ROBERT M Topeka 

Accounting Junior 

WILSON, RONDA J Arkansas City 

Agriculture Freshman 

WILSON, SUE A Abilene 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

WOLTERS, JONI L Portis 

Elementary Education Senior 

WOOD, BRUCE D . . . Wichita 

Pre-Forestry ...... Sophomore 

WRIGLEY, LAUREL E Salina 

Sociology Senior 

WULLER, ROSEMARY L Overland Park 

Special Education Freshman 

YOUNG. DAVID A Oxford 

Marketing Junior 

ZERRER. MARY Leavenworth 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

ZIEGLER. CARLAJ Salina 

Business Freshman 



350 — goodnow hall 



hoi 






haymaker hall 

M^mH^. -^ J ~ WERRING, CHUCK J .Director 

z^yTB |Bw glBk ft ADAMS. CHARLES V Spring Hill 

B / IB |^r K& ADAMS STEVE O El Dorado 

t *bI fc^^T B^^W f-^B ^ET J S E a RR d V A C COUn,mg Hia^Z 

J ^ F ' " J * IB^ tL Jk iBBi Agricultural Economics Senior 

.JBjWw ^ H | | / ~ k r " - , JPBT V-^JPI ALSPACH, ALAN D Snellville, GA 

HB* i* ' ••^rWwmm 4ftBw t^w - » ■■ ■B ' B^. Agronomy Freshman 

, Bh ^r Am ANDERSEN, GREGORY B Shawnee 

I |H lm '.; ,-• ■ \ ^f.- General Freshman 

^^ -^^ ^^^ ANDERSON, JETT B Topeka 

SKV ^omH^Bk ^SKtwk ^J^^^^^k 4Bk^ Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

^ HB Mk B& jjjl wKk *wB& ANDERSON, MARVIN R. . . . Smolan 

■ ' '<3BJH BB BP*^B .'Him j \ Agronomy ... Junior 
l,|OI ■ fl-^^ MB Wm^^ ^m K^kf^B » J * <?1 ANDERSON, STEVEN M Overland Park 

V V -**• jBY '»■ Jf # Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

■ ^| B> ^ -* jHF S -JHr ^'-^sMB 8 * i jjB » ""~>f ANGELL, SCOTT W Atwood 

dm~ ~--^^^MZ ss^J « ~»3^ ^ V : s ■ Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

^kW -^wBP^> ^L. -_d^ **'^ ' "rJ| ARMAGOST, STEVE M . Cottonwood Falls 

^■kw |.» / BV 4B^ -.■r '-mm. IBv ARNETT, DOUG A. OverlandPark 

l^b >t bmb ^hi > """" 

^^_ ^^^^ ^^. 4^M^, ARNOLD, TERRENCE E Horton 

^^Km\ *^WWk ■ I^^^Bjk .^^SHW **^PHlBfc«. *"$ \ Civil Engineering Junior 

JF*2» W.. * ^ Bi "». f*mmk BB ATHERLY, RANDALL B Topeka 

Aj||a|MK j.:"*?* H\ jk^Alyl sB W* A s£ ** m Pre-Design Protessions Freshman 

tf*^BB wtKLM 1P^B\ rm B Wf ' * X: m * atkinson, ericj . . wintieid 

» -Q* 1 Sa a **■ g§F V, Radio and Television Sophomore 

^jLB H V *S W* "4rf 9 ■, f M ATTAWAY, JACK A El Dorado 

11 1 MF ▼ — -JV HrV. ""St * Animal Science and Industry Senior 

■ -"■ K i . «f*> C3lv ATWELL.LEONL Norton 
. ' BV^k^ V^V,.«k ■ Engineering Freshman 

I BTji ^MB ."W A FWOOD, WILLIAM D La Cygne 

I f- BW ■■ HL. jB? ^jSsSli \ i Agricultural Education Sophomore 

■■■^■■■■■■■■■■■■■i^HBmBi 

^^ ^^^ ^^^^ AYLWARD. ROBERT R. . . Solomon 

>> ><«««8fck, *^B^ .JlHBaBv Agriculture Freshman 

Bl B| BADGER, CHRISTOPHER J Carbondale 

'5a 3B* .: : Jl Agricultural Economics Graduate Student 

^JBf » j«fe <dR « -m, IIW *.~"*M ■- i **^B BADGER, DAVID A Carbondale 

H { " f5 * H Animal Science and Industry Junior 

gftfJBr fc '*T % •-* W «l ^M » BAKER, CHARLES B Topeka 

3 J ' "^BL * -- W^ *^W Education Junior 

MflT -JF W j #k. ** -^< BAKER, JAMESW Goodland 

^fr | ^ W^ flBB| ^g«\ *^BBfc "' ▼ P^A Pre-Dentistry Senior 

r ^gm JgJ Mi < t mmm . ••• A^k. > BAKER, MARC F Tecumseh 

r* |B k ' JHl Bfl V'V^lwi' ire B^ J Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

f^JfcW -^ ,^ 1 ^ BAKER, RANDAL W Overbrook 

JT: 4 ■■L ^k m, JP Milling Science and Management Senior 

A J B\ ™4 "^k ^ «B ^Ja BARNES, DONALD C. Kansas City 

■/^^^IB 4. i* History Education Senior 

t "».- J , B jf 1 " ll >• B fl* *»"B I '"^lll l|i BARRETT, JAMES A Cimarron 

- ■ " fj % Wr Architectural Engineering Freshman 

\^4M| /"*•*' » <-3 m "« 9 -"^ ^ BATTENBERG, JAY D Leavenworth 

m P^ ' ^flW I wJL ^■■■'"'jL. Business Management Senior 

-B\ ^ ' 1 /SI BAUER, EDWARD J Lenexa 

^*W . I • \ - lU ,-' J Accounting Sophomore 

AB v M A .'-Z W il' 1 -- N ^ , » Ml Sfar BAUER.JOHNW St Louis, MO 

Bk rB l * fll •' * fl A / K B'"iHII Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

bbbbI mKm m * h * .. I BjBf 

•^ ,f^ JSfltf^. BEAGLE, BARRY T Topeka 

' **. ^SjJVBV Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

_ , BHPIB BEIM.TIMA Phillipsburg 

4 Br^^ Agricultural Mechanization Freshman 

^1» ««■■ l^i.*^BB ' B ,,-, jsJI BERGHAUS, SCOTT A Elkhart 

1 j •rrVr'W General Freshman 

* / jBF ^ — -»• ^ : 4 - *- 1 * ""'--ir BERRY, ZACHARYJ Merriam 

. "^fB^ " V ™ "^^ Accounting Freshman 

l^^ N* p ^B^^'J I A -*& -*4f i WkfWT >"■ 'A BIGGS, BRYAN E Leavenworth 

BBjJJJJjV' ''"•'"^ ^1^ dflKk -*^Aw^ "^^ 4HT Journalism and Mass Communications Graduate Student 

■LI I m^ Bk. JlBlklk Vf r tik. '' k^A ^ A% BIRDSONG, DAVIDA Salma 

B\ ^A Itl iSfc.V^«l F F ■»■ •' t ^B* J »T T™4, Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

^^^^ ^MjJjW >v j^^. *— BIRKMAN, JEFFREY D Overland Park 

^MV JIBVjW VjJfV ^BEBV i^BvJAV ^M^BW Chemical Engineering 

Bk Bx tat j^^m ^^b 'BB «■■ Wichita 

MB ^B "^ BHk f^n^^M 3**JB*^B Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

JFT^Bl ,1 -*" JB I^Bjl T •# BLACK, JAMES D Indianapolis. IN 

\A jBr mB. kJ R'^Bjf I Jr *' ' - "■ 9 Recreation Freshman 

BjV ' 4BvJ W. " W ■ *< ^vJ^B^ V 'B^ AjW BLANCHARD. EZELL A St Louis. MO 

^| -Bv ' BT Bm "*■ 't Architecture Junior 

<WT ^J m. i SB^ Bk "*^Bi BLANDING, DAVID A Topeka 

,^V ( "^ W SB. ^ ^k. V^ ''jA 1 ' ' X^^BBw i *^ Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

il A IB\ illB 1 JB> T9A\ 1^4 BLUMANHOURST, MICHAEL B Murdock 

j|V ' \r • 'J 1 BV'U \ Agricultural Mechanization Freshman 

^^ ^BBBv BLUSH. GEORGE H Silver Lake 

^ABv AW * P^k Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

■. 1P1 aL^BB BOLLINGER. MICHAEL G W.chita 

ij| v *^^BB fl^^Bl Agricultural Economics Senior 

fl JtgB I' ' r, v*"'^TM BONNEWELL, ROBERT L Kiowa 

\ > I Pre-Design Protessions Freshman 

■b -* jw w ^k< BBr , ;Bf y 

7 ~^JL\^ Bl '^Bl/W BV^TBih fctl -^^■k— ' *^H BRADLEY. ROGER A 

i BIBPa ^'P'B^I BB ^^ Bfe \ ?T^B^ Pre-Vetennary Medicine 

A| B\ ^^ JVl I / / HBl A BB / \ / IBB BREAULT. JOHNP Concordia 

BV )Bv \ \ ■ WW Horticulture Therapy Senior 






nail— 351 



haymaker hall 



BRINK. WILLIAM A Tecumseh 

Geology Freshman 

BROWN, ALLEN J Topeka 

Engineering Freshman 

BROWN, BRADLEY V Leawood 

Crop Protection Freshman 

BROWN, LEON L Haysville 

Landscape Architecture Junior 

BRUNGARDT, TERRENCE W Atchison 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

BRUNKER, RAY Olathe 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

BUCHMAN, FRANKIE L Alta Vista 

Business Administration Sophomore 

BUNCK, JOE H Everest 

Agronomy Junior 

BUNNf I RANDAI I D Welda 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

BUNTING, CURTIS E Russell 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

BURTIS, JOHN O Shawnee Mission 

Speech ■ Junior 

CAIN, FRED L Topeka 

History Senior 

CAIN, LYLE J Halstead 

Music Freshman 

CALL, KEITH B Cedar Vale 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

CAMPBELL, GERALD G " Burrton 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

CAMPFIELD, MORRIS L. Centralia 

Feed Science and Management Sophomore 

CANNON. JOHN B Derby 

Journalism and Mass Communications Graduate Student 

CARL, TONY A Wilsey 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

CARPENTER, DAVID H Ottawa 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

CARTER, JOHN C Jamestown 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

CASE, JAMES G Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 

CECH, DOUGLAS J Liberal 

Music Education Freshman 

CHAPMAN, GREGORY P Kansas City 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

CHINEN, LEONARD T. Honolulu, HI 

Architecture Junior 

CHRISTY, RAY A Kansas City, MO 

Construction Science Senior 

CHUBB, RICHARD M Baxter Springs 

Agriculture Freshman 

CLINE, CHARLES K Shawnee Mission 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

COMBS, RONALD J Mission 

Business . . . . Junior 

CONWAY, KENNETH J Oakley 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

COOK, NILES J Fredonia 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

COUCH, GREGORY E Overland Park 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

CROSS, MICHAEL J. Kansas City 

Political Science . . Freshman 

CROSSON, RUSSELL D Minneapolis 

Math Education Senior 

CRUMRINE, RALPH S Olathe 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

DAISE, RICHARD L Kanorado 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

DALE, DUANE A Topeka 

Horticulture Therapy Sophomore 

DAVIS, MICHAEL D Kansas City 

Business Freshman 

DAVIS, RANDY N Lamed 

Pre-Dentistry Senior 

DEBENHAM, RANDY R Clay Center 

Speech Junior 

DEGI, GREG A Savannah, GA 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

DICK, RANDY L Rossville 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

\>\t ,Y',U\\ <>/■! I Y Hi.iw.ith.i 

Engineering Freshman 

DIODE, DAVID C Emporia 

Business Management Freshman 

DIVELE Y, R. RO YCE Severance 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

DODGE. TERRY J Lenexa 

General . Freshman 

DOE, MUNEHIRD K Derby 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

DOW, STEVEN R Olathe 

Philosophy and History , ... Junior 

DOWLING, WILLIAM N Wilson 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 




1; $%% 







/v\\* 




ft % i ij» 





4M%Jm 




ik^M *?* 




DREW. JEFF L Overland Park 

Business Administration Freshman 

DRYDEN, LESTER A Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

DYE, TIMOTHY J Kansas City 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

EDMONDS, JAMES K Topeka 

General Freshman 

EHLERS, BRUCE J Fort Atkinson, Wl 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

ELLIOTT, CAMERON M Phillipsburg 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

ELLIOTT, ROBERT L Wichita 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

ERKER, MICHAEL F Argonia 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

EVANS, LESLIE W Valley Center 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

EVANS, RANDALL K Topeka 

Humanities Senior 

FENTON, GARY K : Leawood 

General Sophomore 

FERGUSON, KENT L Phillipsburg 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

FERNANDEZ, OSCAR M Mexico City. Mexico 

Milling Science and Management Freshman 

FISCHER, GREGG K Seward 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

FOELSCH, DOUGLAS S Hilton, NY 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

FORD. MICHAEL J Ulysses 

Pre-Forestry Freshman 

FORET, GREGORY W Shawnee Mission 

Landscape Architecture Junior 

FRAZIER. JEROME B Prairie Village 

Business Freshman 

FREEMAN, BRUCE R Hutchinson 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine Junior 

FREY, EDWARD H Albion, NB 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

FUHRMAN. WILLIAM D Meade 

Accounting Junior 

FUNKHOUSER, JACK R Prairie Village 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

GALE, MARK D Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

GARDNER. L MARK Florissant, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 




haymaker hall — 353 



haymaker hall 

GEISERT. MICHAEL T Chapman | 

Pre-Medicme Freshman 'jettWttt^. 

GLATT, CHRISTOPHER G Chapman R^ 

Engineering Freshman R 

GOFORTH, GREGORY L Topeka zStm. 

Business 

GOFORTH. TODD A Topeka 

Statistics Freshman 

GOTTSCHALK, GARY M Leavenworth ^^^ " 

Accounting Senior TKd^H 

GRAHAM, LLOYD R. Casa Grande, AZ fV p 

Chemistry Senior % 

GRAHAM, STEVE H Belleville 

Architecture Junior 

GRANDY, MICHAEL L Belleville, IL 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

GRAPENGATER, DANA L Newton 

Accounting Junior t M ^_ 

GREER, WILLIAM L Elk City 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

GREGG, STEPHEN L . , Wichita 

Mathematics Freshman W vji 

GRIFFING, WILLIAM J Greenfield, IN 

Biology Senior A 1§F^ 

GROSS, WILLIAM M Hays 

Milling Science and Management Senior !4 

GWIN, EDDIE Leoti 

Music Education ' Senior 

HADEN, MARK D Hope 

Radio and Television Senior 

HAGEMAN, STEVE J Wichita 

Architecture Senior 

HARDEN, JAMES M Ashland JJT 

Agricultural Mechanization Freshman jm^ 

HART, BARRY T Kansas City 

Architecture Senior i 

HARTMAN, MATTHEWS, Topeka g^?% 

Engineering . . Sophomore 

HAUSMANN.GARYJ. Butte, NB 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

HAXTON, RICK L Topeka 

Accounting Freshman 

HAY, WESLEY R Ottawa 

General Freshman 

HAZEN, RICHARD D Gnnnell 

Radio and Television Junior 

HAZEN, ROBERT E Gnnnell tffl^^k "V^.:-' 

Agriculture Sophomore Hk ; JO^ 

HECHT, JOHN L Andale 

Agronomy Sophomore 

HEINRICH, FORREST A Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HENRY, TERRY L Ottawa 

Accounting Freshman 

HERBERS, MARTIN E Rose Hill 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

HERRING, QUENTIN J Highland 

Finance Senior -W f) 

HESS, MICHAEL H Lawrence , / 

Architecture Junior 

HILL, BRIAN K. Salma 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

HOCH, JOSEPH C Wilson 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

HODGSON. MICHAEL L Wetmore 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

HOLCOMB. MARK A Plevna 

Accounting Junior 

HORINE.TROYE Wichita 

Secondary Education Freshman 

HOOPER, THOMAS K Hiawatha 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

HOUF, WILLIAM G Larned 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

HOWELL, RONALD T. . . Sheffield, AL 

Psychology Sophomore 

HUGHES, LONNIE J Sublette 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

HUMFELD, TERRY L. . . Beloit 

Horticulture Graduate Student 

HUNT. DAVID W Arkansas City 

Agriculture Freshman 

HUTCHINSON, JAY N Great Bend 
Civil Engineering Freshman 

JACOB, STEVEN D Halstead 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

JANSSEN, DAVID M Solomon 4^k\ 

Civil Engineering Junior Jv*- 

JANTZ, MERLE F Wichita A .» f*^M 

Architecture Senior » K 1 

JAQUES.JOHNC Wichita ~~* WW 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior ■'"^AWM^ 

JENKINS, EDWARD L Cape Girardeau. MO "<^r ^H 

Architecture Senior ^ ^ ^M 

JOHNSON, DONALD R Tecumseh ^t^k M 

Accounting Senior JPi B f jj^l 





ii m 



354 — haymaker hall 



£1 ft <9 ft /I 








^!iS 5u 2. ■'?: 










JOHNSTON. RANDOLPH P Hutchinson 

Computer Science Junior 

JONES, RICK L Newton 

Physical Therapy Senior 

KAUFMAN, DEAN A Atchison 

Accounting Junior 

KAUFMAN, RUSSELL F . , Dorrance 

Business Sophomore 

KAUFMANN, RODNEY D Topeka 

Business Administration Junior 

KEARNEY, BOB C Hutchinson 

Commercial Art Senior 

KELLY, KENT C Phillipsburg 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

KELSEY, FRANCIS A Silver Lake 

Agronomy Junior 

KENDALL, JOED Topeka 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

KERLEY, DON E Peck 

Feed Technology Junior 

KIDWELL, DAVID A, Enterprise 

Agricultural Mechanization Freshman 

KING, MICHAEL E Osage City 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

KINNAMAN, MARK B Prairie Village 

Milling Science and Management Freshman 

KISER, KIMBALL P . . . Argonia 

Architecture . .. Fifth Year Student 

KLIEWER, GLEN M Hillsboro 

Dairy Production Junior 

KOPITNIK, LARRY J, Prairie Village 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

KOPSHINSKY, DANIEL W Waukesha, Wl 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

KOST, JOHN A Eagle Butte, SD 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

KRISS, J. T Prairie Village 

Agriculture Freshman 

KULICH, STEVE J Sylvan Grove 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

KUMMER, FRED S St, Louis, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

KURTZ, ALLEN D Burlingame 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

LANCE, DOUGLAS H Ulysses 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

LARKIN, STEVE P Prairie Village 

Political Science Graduate Student 

LEHMAN, ROBERT L Brewster 

General Sophomore 

LEVENSON, LEE A Manhattan 

Geology Sophomore 

LEWANDOWSKI, RICK J Salina 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

LITCH, JOHN E . Melvern 

Agriculture Freshman 

LITTLE, RICHARD L, . . . Carbondale 

Business Freshman 

LOWREY, DREW I Milton 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

LUTZ. RANDY L Topeka 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

MAGEE, MATTHEW K Shawnee Mission 

General Sophomore 

MANGAN, STEPHEN L Tribune 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MATHES, DANA L. Derby 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

MAYSE, LARRY W Mission 

Business Junior 

MCALLISTER, R. DOUGLAS Prairie Village 

Chemistry Senior 

McBRIDE, STEVEN B Atwood 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

McCLANAHAN, ALAN J Overland Park 

Landscape Architecture Junior 

McCLUGGAGE, MARK D Douglass 

Architecture Senior 

McCREARY, TERRY L 

Social Science 

McCULLOUGH. MIKEL L , , Grinnell 

Accounting , , , Junior 

McFALL, LARRY D Sabetha 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

MEISENHEIMER, FRANCIS E, Kingman 

Business Junior 

MENARD. TERRY M Kimberlmg City. MO 

Pre-Design Protessions Freshman 

MIDDLETON, JEFFERY P Overland Park 

Geology Senior 

MILLFR.NEILA ... Kansas City, MO 

Milling Sueru e ,ir nl M.n mi ji mi it-i it Freshman 

MILLER, ROBERT C Greenleaf 

Chemical Science Senior 

MILLS, EARL E Centralia 

Agricultural Economics Junior 



haymaker hall — 355 



haymaker hall 

MITCHELL. PAUL D Bonner Springs 

Accounting Junior 

MOLL, CHARLES A Wellsville 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore 

MOLZEN. MYRON A. Clements 

Horticulture . . . Sophomore 

MOORE, WILLIAM K, Wichita 

Pre-Law Freshman 

MORRAY, BRIAN S Madison 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Sophomore 

MULLEN, KEVIN M Hutchinson 

Accounting Senior 

MYERS, JOE C Meriden 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

NECH.DOUGW Salina 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

NEIBLING, DAVID L Highland 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

NEIER, WILLIAM C Mullinville 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

NELSON. LLOYD D Ottawa 

Horticulture Junior 

NEMECHEK, MICHAEL C Goodland 

Accounting Junior 

NORRIS, GALE E Edgerton 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

NOTTINGHAM, DAVID L Lawrence 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

NOVOTNY. BRUCE J Winner. SD 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

NUSS.GARYA Durham 

Horticulture Junior 

OCHS. ROGER K Leavenworth 

Business Administration Junior 

O'NEAL. RANDY L Halstead 

Agriculture Freshman 



$ £. M 














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356 — haymaker hall 







mMM 



ORTMANN. MICHAEL F Augusta 

History Junior 

OSBORNE, DAVID F Overland Park 

Building Construction Senior 

OTT, JON S Kiowa 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

PALMER, BRUCE E Wichita 

Architecture Senior 

PALMER, DWIGHT R Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

PARR. KELLEER . .. Delia 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

PENDLETON. JOHN C Lawrence 

Agriculture Sophomore 

PERRY. MICHAEL R Overland Park 

Agriculture Freshman 

PERSINGER, STEVEN W Norton 

Agriculture Sophomore 

PETERS. CLARK C Hastings, NB 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

PETERSEN. BERNARD J .Salina 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

PETERSON, SOLOMAN F Salina 

Architecture Junior 

PETRUSKY, ALBERT R Carbondale 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

POE, EDGAR A Oberlln 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

POELL, TIMOTHY M Hanover 

Accounting Junior 

POLSON, DOUGLAS R Halstead 

Business Management Senior 

POST, KRAIG M Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

PRATHER, NORMAN T Kincaid 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

PRETZ, GEORGE C Osawatomie 

Agricultural Education Junior 

PRINGLE, R KENT Yates Center 

Accounting Junior 

PRUITT, THOMAS L Barnard 

Dairy Production Freshman 

PRYOR, GARY A Hutchinson 

Economics Junior 

PRYOR. WILLIAM D Kansas City 

Engineering Technology Junior 

PUTNAM, JAMES C Newton 

Architecture Senior 

PUTNAM, JANA L Newton 

Elementary Education Senior 

RANDALL, MICHAEL D Rockport, MO 

Architecture Senior 

RAUTH, MARK K Atchison 

Business . Freshman 

REED, CARL I Pomona 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

REID. LANCE E Brewster 

Physical Education Graduate Student 

REID, NATHAN D Brewster 

Business Administration Senior 

REMINGTON, PAUL R . . . San Jose, Costa Rica 

Architecture Junior 

RICHARDS, STEVEN H Mission 

Accounting and Finance Junior 

RICHARDSON. DAVID E Kansas City 

Fine Arts Junior 

RIDER, GARY R . . . Abilene 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

RIEB, MARK L St Francis 

Biology Junior 

RIEMANN. RALPH E Clatlm 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

RIPPE. EDWIN C Linn 

Physical Education Freshman 

ROBERTS. WILLIAM D Norton 

Computer Science Sophomore 

ROBSON. KENNETH E Abilene 

Agricultural Education Junior 

ROENIGK. RICHARD A Shawnee Mission 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

ROGERS, RONALD G Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

ROSS. MICAH A Topeka 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

RYAN, JOHN R Solomon 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

RYBERG, GARY A Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

SALLADE, EDWARD M St Louis. MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

SALTER. STEVEN C Overland Park 

Business Administration i lesMm.m 

SAMBOL, F KEVIN Leawood 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

SCHAAKE, MARK D Lawrence 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 



haymaker hall — 357 



haymaker hall 



featherweight 

At the risk of pet accidents, shedding 
hair, and floating feathers, favorite ani- 
mals occupy a place in many hearts and 
living quarters. Pets often prove to be less 
messy roommates than their human 
counterparts. 




SCHIEFEN, JAMES C Goodland 

Pre Medicine Senior 

SCHMIDT, STEVE A. Stanley 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

SCHMITT, JOSEPH C Beloit 

Business and Finance Senior 

SCHOENTHALER, RANDY D. Ogallah 

Agricultural Education Freshman 

SCHOETT, DAVID E. Wankesha, Wl 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

SCHUMAN, CARY R Prairie Village 

Restaurant Management Freshman 

SELIGH, DAVID G. Wichita 

Landscape Architecture Junior 

SELM, MICHAEL E Salina 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

SEXTON, DANIEL W Chapman 

Dairy Science Junior 

SHAY, WILLIAM O ( Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SHERLOCK, PETE St. Francis 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SHIDELER. ROBERT J. Topeka 

Architecture Junior 

SHOOK, TIMOTHY R Hutchinson 

Music Junior 

SILKMAN, WILLIAM C, Hopewell Junction, NY 

Architectural Engineering ... Freshman 

SMITH. ERIC A. Macksville 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

SNYDER, RICHARD K .Topeka 

Business Administration Junior 

SPADE, STEVE L, Burlmgame 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

SPARE. BRUCE D. . . . St John 

Agronomy , Junior 




358 — haymaker hall 










^L#J| I 



&'tikmklA '" ■%$£ 




MiWW, 



SPARKS, DAVID L Minneola 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

STAFFORD, JEFFREY L Kansas City 

Architecture Senior 

STEGEMAN, JAMES F Overland Park 

Geology Junior 

STEINKIRCHNER, P. GARY Newton 

Business Administration Junior 

STEVENS, DOUG E Merriam 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

STEVENS, LARRY W Harper 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

STEWART, PAUL D Olathe 

Wildlife Biology Senior 

STICH, PAUL F Chanute 

Agronomy Junior 

STILES, DALE W Spring Hill 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

STILES. DOUG L Liberal 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

STOCK, GREG L Kansas City, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

STOCK, STEVEN J St. Joseph, MO 

Architecture Graduate Student 

STORY, CLAYTON J Udall 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

STRAWN. BARRY W Salina 

Business Administration Junior 

STRUNK, NEAL V Colwich 

Business Administration Freshman 

SUHR, FRED M Salina 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SUTTON, JEFFREY J Atchison 

Medical Technology Junior 

SWANSON, RICHARD D Yates Center 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

SZTUKOWSKI. GARY F Florissant, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

TAYLOR, BRADLEY H El Dorado 

Horticulture Senior 

TAYLOR. MARK K Topeka 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

TAYLOR, T. J Goodland 

Music Education Senior 

TAYLOR, TOM G McPherson 

Accounting Junior 

TEEL, MARK E Ballwm. MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

TILGHMAN, RICHARD K Topeka 

Architecture Senior 

TOLL, DENNIS J Mexico, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

TRYON, CHARLES P Marysville 

Architecture Junior 

TRYON, MIKE D Marysville 

Business Junior 

TURNER, RONALD E Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 

TURNER, WAYNE B Overland Park 

Accounting Freshman 

TUXHORN, DOYLE P Kingman 

Accounting . . . , Junior 

VAN PETTEN, JEFFREY F ." Eskridge 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

VAUPEL. GARY R Salina 

Engineering Freshman 

VAUPEL, WILLIAM E Salina 

Civil Engineering Senior 

WARDEN. PAUL G Salina 

Agronomy Junior 

WATKINS. BRIAN K Conway Springs 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

WEATHERBIE, WILLIAM K tola 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

WEBER, DAVID P Shawnee Mission 

Radio and Television Senior 

WEBSTER. ROBERT E Overland Park 

General Freshman 

WEIBLE.W JEFFREY Florissant, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

WEIDMAN, JOHN H. Salina 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

WENDT, RICHARD G Hermgton 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

WERNER, DONALD E Overland Park 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore 

WERNER, MARK A Dodge City 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

WETTA, EARLJ Andale 

Engineering Freshman 

WIENCK, DENNIS A Barnes 

Mechanical Engineering . Sophomore 

WIENS. JEFFREY R. Olathe 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

WILBECK, TONYA, Hutchinson 

Business Sophomore 



haymaker hall — 359 



haymaker hall 

WILDER, DENNIS L St Louis, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

WILLE, MARK H Overland Park 

Modern Language , Junior 

WILLIAMS, BILLY C Topeka 

History Sophomore 

WILLIAMS, ROBERT D Leawood 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

WILLIS, GREGORY O Overland Park 

Milling Science and Management Freshman 

WILLIS. KENT M * Topeka 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

WILSON, CHASE C Prairie Village 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

WINTER, SAMS Mt Hope 

Engineering Freshman 

WOLTERS, MARK A Atwood 

Secondary Education Junior 

WOOD, RONALD J ......... Solomon 

Agriculture Freshman 

WOODALL. DENNIS C Salma 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

WOODARD, BILL G Overland Park 

Business . Sophomore 

WORKS. FRED J Humboldt 

Business Freshman 

WORKS, RICHARD C Humboldt 

Political Science Senior 

WRIGHT, JOHN H Overland Park 

Business Administration Senior 

WRIGHT, WILLIAM M Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering ...... Freshman 

WUTHNOW, MARK L Manchester 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

YLANDER. DAVID M Omaha, NB 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

YODER, DAVID D Denton 

Education Graduate Student 

YOUNGER, LES A Lebanon 

Radio and Television Junior 

ZEORLIN, DAN H Wichita 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

ZERBE, STEVEN C Council Grove 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

ZIEGLER, MARK H Topeka 

Geology Sophomore 

ZIMMERMAN, LESLIE H Dover 

Food Science and Industry Senior 

ZUK, ERIC A Hutchinson 

Biology Senior 





360 — haymaker hall 



kappa alpha theta 



©aaaaa 




sa^aaa 




a o n are 



THOMAS, CLARA E Housemother 

BALES, REBECCA J Emporia 

Fashion Marketing Senior 

BARRETT, MICHELE Belleville 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

BAUMGART, JACQUELINE A. Overland Park 

Business Freshman 

BEEN, EMILYS Scott City 

General Freshman 

BERNASEK, JANICE M Manhattan 

Speech Pathology Junior 

BIGELOW, LANA J Ottawa 

Elementary Education Senior 

BODECKER. BARBARA J Wichita 

Education Sophomore 

CAMPBELL, KATHY Holcomb 

Speech Freshman 

CHANDLER, TERESA Almena 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

CLEMMONS, MARY J Topeka 

General Freshman 

COFFMAN.GERALDINEA Ottawa 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

COLLINS. CYNDIE A Liberal 

General Freshman 

CORKRAN, DEBBIE S Shawnee Mission 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

CORRIGAN, SUE E Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

COX, PAULA N Topeka 

Interior Design Freshman 

CURRIE, MARTY Stockton 

Textile Research Freshman 

DANIELSON, CANDY S Wichita 

Business Sophomore 

DAVIS, AMY K Fanwood, NJ 

Lite Science Senior 

DEBRICK, RITAB Garnet! 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

DENGLER, PATRICIA M Wichita 

Business Sophomore 

DENYER, DANA L Manhattan 

Pre-Physical Therapy Junior 

DENYER, MARCY L Manhattan 

Marketing Freshman 

EATON, NATALIE J Wichita 

Clothing and Retailing . . Sophomore 

ENGEL, CAROL B Liberal 

Fashion Design Junior 

FOWLES, RITA K Clay Center 

Home Economics Education Junior 

FULLERTON, JULIA A Overland Park 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

GIVEN, PATRICIA J Manhattan 

Modern Language Sophomore 

GOODING, MARTHA J Shawnee Mission 

Fashion Marketing Freshman 

HAMMERLI. BARBARA A Salina 

Early Childhood Education Freshman 

HAUSE. JANE C Manhattan 

Recreation Sophomore 

HILL, CHARLOTTE J McPherson 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

HINKEL.JILLA Hutchinson 

Learning Disabilities Junior 

HODNEFIELD, LORI L. . . , Mission 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

HOENER. CAROLYN St. Louis. MO 

Fashion Design Sophomore 

JONES. MARGOA. Wichita 

Physical Education Freshman 

JUNGMANN. JENNIFER A Prairie Village 

Accounting Senior 

KASTEN. TERESA A Atchison 

Ottice Administration Freshman 

KESL. PEGGY M Belleville 

Horticulture Junior 

KREHBIEL.PATL Pretty Prairie 

Physical Education Sophomore 

LASH, ELIZABETH L Prairie Village 

General Freshman 

LASSEN, LINDA A Mesa, AZ 

Family Economics Freshman 

LUNDHIGH, MARCI A Overland Park 

Horticulture Freshman 

LUX, LYNN M Wichita 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

McCANDLESS, DEBRA K St. John 

Family Economics Junior 

Ml Nl HAN, MELISSA A Wichita 

Recreation ; n,' > ••<■ 

MOORE, MELISSA Manhattan 

Dietetics Freshman 

MOSER. MARYE Marysville 

Home Economics Education Junior 



kappa alpha theta 161 



kappa alpha theta 



r 


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rm 


m^Hajj|^WHHHj|U| 




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best medicine 


V 


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Between the unfailing study assign- 
ments and the sometimes failing GPA, 
there's a medium of happy. Thetas relax 
in the jovial togetherness that often is the 
most infectious way to cure depression 
cases and bring down up again. 


M 









NORTH, LINDA E 


Prairie Village 


NUTTER. CONNIE D 


Wellington 
Sophomore 


Home Economics Education 

POPHAM. DEBORAHS 
Elementary Education 
POWERS. LAURA J 


Senior 

Minneapolis 
Sophomore 
Manhattan 


PUCKETT.E PAGE 
General Engineering 


Prairie Village 
Freshman 






REED. LAUREN A 

Accounting 

REEDER.KATHERINEL 


Prairie Village 

Freshman 

Troy 










REMBLESKE. MARGARET A 

Home Economics 

REYNOLDS. LAURA L 


Wichita 

Junior 

Shawnee Mission 










RUMSEY, JILL J 


Dekalb. IL 






Music Education 

SPRINGER, KIMD 

Clothing and Retailing 

STALCUP. GIAM 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts 

STALCUP. MARY ANN 


Sophomore 

Manhattan 

Sophomore 

St John 

Junior 

Lawrence 


SWALLOW JOY D 


Manhattan 


THIESSEN. EVAN 








TOMPKINS. M DIANE 


Overland Park 






■'IAD 
Psychology 
WHITE, MARY A 
Early Childhood Education 

//III IMAM JENNIFER E 

Acc ounting 

WHITT.PATTID 

Musi- 1 rluf./ition 

Mil 1 IAMS DONNA M 

ZIMMER, PAULA K 
A( i ounting 

- ai i lalphalheta 


Stockton 
Sophomore 

Shawnee 
Sophomore 

Leoli 

Freshman 

Wichita 

Sophomore 

Pratt 

Junior 

Shawnee 

Sophomore 





aafia 




kappa delta 




HEDRICH, SALLY 



ALBERS, DEBORAH A 
Psychology and Pre-Law 
ALIOTO, ALICE M 
Interioi Design 


Topeka 

Junior 

Parsons 

Freshman 




Senior 


ALLEN. JEAN E 
Pre-Nursing 


Leawood 
Freshman 














BALL. JANA L 








BAREISS, SHERI L 


Overland Park 


BATT, BEVERLY A 








BERGQUIST, DIANE K 








BERRY. RHONDA L 
















BROWN, PAMELA J 


Overland Park 


BRUNNENKANT. KARENS 








BURNETT, CHRIS 
















DAVIDSON. SALLY K 








DEAN, KIMBERLYA 


Kansas City 










DOLL.CANDICER 
Home Economics 
DREILING. ELYNNM 


Peck 

Freshman 

Topeka 










EHRET, SARAE 




General 






up for bibs 



If this group of KDs is a typical sam 
pling, one out of five K-State coeds owns 
and wears denim overalls. Big Macs are 
fashionable among all students who 
desire comfort, freedom of movement 
. . . and lots of pockets. 



k.ipp.uMU — 363 



kappa delta 



EISIMINGER, MARYS Walhena 

Music Education Freshman 

ENGELLAND. RHONDA R Sterling 

Home Economics Freshman 

ERICKSON. MARIANS Kansas City 

Elementary Education Freshman 

FORSBERG, LORI L Lindsborg 

Business Freshman 

FRIEND. LINDSAY A Augusta 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Sophomore 

GATES. SHELLY L Winona 

Accounting Sophomore 

GAYLE. SHELLY J Leawood 

Interior Design Sophomore 

GEORGE. VERONICA A St Louis, MO 

General Freshman 

GOLDSMITH. LINDA G Overland Park 

Accounting Sophomore 

GOOLEY. BARBARA E Prairie Village 

Accounting Freshman 

GRISHAM CYNTHIA S Shawnee 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

GUTKNECHT. DEBORAH L Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Senior 

HARBERT. CATHIE A Larned 

Special Education Junior 

HEDGER, MARJORIE J Overland Park 

Elementary Education Junior 

HENRY, LISA D Parsons 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

HIMEBAUGH. KARENS Wichita 

Music Education Sophomore 

HOLLAND. BARBARA J Overland Park 

General Sophomore 

HOLLOWAY. LINDAS Mission 

Food Science and Industry Sophomore 

HOLT. DENISE J Manhattan 

Pre-Design Protessions Sophomore 

HOUGHTON, JOAN Leawood 

Speech Pathology and Audiology Senior 

HOVERDER. JAMIE Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

JAYNES.LEESAA Hoismgton 

Psychology Sophomore 

KARLIN, DEANNAM Salma 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

KASTEN, VERONICAS Atchison 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

KAUP, JANETTEE Manhattan 

Music Education Junior 

KELLY, BARBARA J Leawood 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

KNOX. JACALYN E Topeka 

Sociology Junior 

MAY, ROSEMARY Crown Point, IN 

Fashion Marketing Senior 

McBEE. SHELLEY A Wichita 

Family and Child Development Senior 

MEALMAN, LINDA K Overland Park 

Elementary Education Junior 

MILLS. LAURIE L St Francis 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

MILLSAP, TERESA C Bonner Springs 

Physical Therapy Junior 

MITTS. KATHLEEN A Bonner Springs 

Horticulture Therapy Junior 

MUELLER. ANN ELLEN Hiawatha 

Elementary Education Junior 

MURPHY, KAREN I Liberty, MO 

Physical Education Freshman 

NORTH, SHEILA A Baldwin 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts Junior 

OLMSTEAD. DEBRAF Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Commumcalions Freshman 

OPPITZ, CONSTANCE C Topeka 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

PI f rCHER JANETS Manhattan 

Family Economics Junior 

PLUMMER, SARAH M Lake Ouivira 

Social Welfare Freshman 

POE.SUSANJ Dodge City 

General Freshman 

RASH. VALERIE L Wichita 

Compuler Science Sophomore 

RAWSON JANR Lindsborg 

General Freshman 

REED JOANNA Chapman 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

RIVES. ROBIN J Wichila 

Music Sophomore 

RUNNELS, REBECCA Leawood 

Recrealion Junior 

SHIDELER. DEANNR Topeka 

General Freshman 

Prairie Village 

: i atn n ' ;i iphi imore 






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SPICER, LINDA J Hutchinson 

Business Education Junior 

STAPLES, DEBBIE L Norman, OK 

Elementary Education Junior 

STEVENS, ELIZABETH C , . . Salina 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

STOVER, DEBORAH S Salina 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

SULLIVAN, CATHY Kansas City 

Social Studies Education Senior 

SWEENEY, MICHELLE L Overland Park 

Elementary Education Senior 

TESTORI. KAREN A Topeka 

Fashion Marketing Junior 

TIDEMANN, JEAN V. Valley Center 

Horticulture Junior 

VOLDER, PATRICIA A . Merrlam 

Biochemistry Sophomore 

WAHLE, SUSAN L Junction City 

Physical Education Freshman 

WEEKS, STEFNI L Hoisington 

Elementary Education Senior 

WOODS, NANCY G Overland Park 

Horticulture Senior 

WOODWORTH, NANCY J Overland Park 

Sociology Junior 

WUNDER, MARIA K Valley Falls 

Business Freshman 

YOUNGBLOOD, KATHLEEN A, . . . Kansas City, MO 

Horticulture . Sophomore 

ZIMMERMAN, SUSIE C Manhattan 

Modern Language Senior 




k.i[v.i .vn.i ; f-'> 



kappa kappa gamma 



PARKER, BONNIE Houseparent 

ALDERSON. LAURA E Kansas City 

Home Economics Senior 

ALLEN. KARINS Olathe 

Medical Technology Junior ^ 

ANDERSEN, CONNIE R Shawnee Mission 

Pre-Nursmg Freshman '•_- . 

ARNOLDI, MARY E Overland Park : "-^ & 

General Sophomore , > At. 

BARKIS. LLOYAK Paola 

Secondary Education Senior 1 

BENEDICT, TERRIS Garden City 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

BIRCH. CAROLYN A Wichita 

Business Administration Freshman 

BOPPART, MARYS Overland Park 

Fashion Marketing Freshman 

BOTKINS. JOYCE E. Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

BRINKMAN. BRENDA J Arkansas City 

Home Economics Freshman 

BRISTOW, TARA J Manhattan 

Modern Language Junior 






smackin' good 



Words don't always express a true feel- 
ing the best way. A trio of Kappas realize 
that on occasion a sincere smooch or 
the cheek succeeds as well. 



366 — kappa kappa gamma 




mJzMJJL 










QafrM 



BROWN, PAMELA J Shawnee Mission 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

BURRUS. SUSIE Wichita 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

CASE. TERESA J Marion 

Interior Design Junior 

CASTETTER, KIM E McPherson 

Accounting Sophomore 

CHISHOLM, SUE A McPherson 

Secondary Education Senior 

CONNOLLY. DEBORAH S Manhattan 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

COSTELLO, TERESA M Marion 

Special Education Freshman 

CRAMER, KARIN K Manhattan 

Business Education Senior 

DILL, JULIE A Overland Park 

Office Administration Freshman 

DILLER. HEATHER Belleville 

Family and Child Development Junior 

DINKEL, PATTY Topeka 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

DOEBELE, BARBARA J Hanover 

Consumer Interest Senior 

DOLL, DALENF M Olathe 

Learning Disabilities Freshman 

DOOLING. MELODI A Stillwell 

Business Administration Freshman 

FEILD, DIANNE Overland Park 

Social Science Junior 

FINK, SARA A Topeka 

Modern Language Sophomore 

FLYNN.LISAM Mission Hills 

Fashion Merchandising Freshman 

FOSTER, CELESTE K. , Leawood 

Fashion Marketing Sophomore 

GAAR, ANNEE Kansas City 

Art Freshman 

GIBSON, MARSHA A Wichita 

Economics Junior 

GLIDDEN. MARYE Overland Park 

Special Education Junior 

HARRISON, NANCY A Shawnee Mission 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

HELM, JANET L Independence, MO 

Home Economics and Journalism Freshman 

HOLLINGSWORTH, MICHELE V Hutchinson 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

HOPKINS, HOLLY A Prairie Village 

Fashion Design Sophomore 

HOSENEY, CHERYL L Manhattan 

Elementary Education Freshman 

HOWARD, E. BARCLAY Arkansas City 

Recreation Senior 

KENDALL, CONNIE M Wichita 

Modern Language Senior 

KINNEY, KRISTI L Garden City 

Elementary Education Senior 

KLEWENO, CHRISTINA J Shawnee Mission 

Interior Design Freshman 

LAASER, WINI L Kansas City 

Fashion Marketing Sophomore 

LACEY, MARILYN E '. Lawrence 

Home Economics Freshman 

LINVILL, L. GAY Tiburon, CA 

Radio and Television Senior 

LIVINGOOD AMY L Overland Park 

Horticulture Junior 

LUNDSTED. NANCY J. Columbia. MO 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

McCAUSTLAND. HEATHER C Bucklm 

Music Education Freshman 

McEWEN, PATRICIA A Belleville 

Accounting Senior 

McRAE, PATRICIA A Topeka 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

MILLARD. BARBARA S Overland Pork 

Fashion Merchandising Freshman 

MILLER, CAROL L Leawood 

Interior Design Senior 

MOORE. MICHELLE K Mernam 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

OSWALD, LESLIE E Hutchinson 

Accounting Junior 

PASTRICK, PATRICIA K I eawood 

Interior Design Freshman 

PI N( I MERROLE i and Park 

Otfice Administration 

QUICK TAMIK Wichita 

General 

QUINLAN. SALLY J Topeka 

Dietetics l reshman 

REILAND. CATHERINE A Mel ' 

General 

ROOK, MARY A 

i ieneral 



kappa kappa gamma 




SCHROEDER.CONNEEB Topeka 

Horticulture Sophomore 

SCHUTTE, EMILY A. Prairie Village 

Accounting Junior 

SEITZ. VICTORIA A Junction City 

Fashion Design ■ ,. I( ,h, ,m, ,., 

SHARP. JEAN C Humboldt 

Pre-Optometry Sophomore 

SHIRLEY, JULIE L Topeka 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

SHRUM, CHRISTY S Wichita 

Accounting Junior 

SMALL. TERRIR Garden City 

Business Freshman JJMWM^ « „M tt"%M^. '<Hk 

SMITH. TRACEY L Liberal *^Wm\ /PH^, & "*^Mk'' ^ft 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore tIB M Hft JT ;i#' S 

SOUTHARD, JANS Wichita JL& **ll^B ■_ .JHft 1'^, JgjH iW** *&■ 

Family and Child Development Sophomore f ,. JH1 M^ "•! 'K> 

STANFIELD, MELANlE A Oakley |^ ]■ ^ -'AlB \{^Jm M ^ fl 

Business Freshman m " *MB 1 -^ Mw^ T " tr "— $■ «. "*■**' ^* 

STEEPLES. CARLA J I W^ddUS ■ '. _*<*£■. *^ - ^™i 

Agricultural Economics Junior S|^^^^^^k JM 

TEATE. A MICHELLE Shawnee Mission ■■ " .^Mt W! WS^, *^L^-^WW 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman *;., 

THOMPSON, DAWN G Manhattan 

Chemistry Senior 

TOWERS. DONNA L Durham, NC 

Foods and Nutrition Freshman 

TRAYFORD. G MICHELLE Overland Park «■ Hj 

Business and French Sophomore 

TURNBULL. CHERYL R Stockton 

General Sophomore 

TURNBULL, CYNTHIA J Stockton 

Speech Pathology Senior 

VANIER, MARTHA A Brookville 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Sophomore 

WARD, KAREN L Overland Park 

Interior Design Senior A- > '1B»" ' 

WINSTON, SHANA K St Francis M ^Wk £■ WM 

Physical Therapy Junior f m fit *ffll 

WINTER. PAULAS Prairie Village M — *Wfi| fiPF ---■■] 

Music , Freshman V - . S fiw ■ **tMB 

ZAWAT2KI. MARY KAY Kansas City A^3jM' ■ ID ' 

Elementary Education Junior BOL J&§* 'jk fSm 







368 — kappa kappa gamma 



kappa sigma 








ASMt 1 ? 



CIONI. BECKY L Houseparenl 

CIONI. PETER J Houseparenl 

ANDERSON, DENNIS P Smith Center 

Business Administration Freshman 

BACKES. KENNETH P San Diego, CA 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

BELL, WILLIAM K Salina 

Business Administration Senior 

BOLTON, KEVIN L Burlington 

Accounting Sophomore 

BRAINERD. PAUL W Hiawatha 

Political Science Sophomore 

BROSE, MICHAEL L Valley Falls 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

CAMPBELL, HUGH J Hoxie 

Agriculture Freshman 

COMMER, ROGER D Wichita 

Architecture Senior 

COOK, GARY S Olathe 

Pre-Law Junior 

COOK, JOHN V Hardtner 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

COOL, RODERICK H Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

COOPER, JOHN M Topeka 

Pre-Denlistry Sophomore 

DILLON, KURT R . . Ozawkie 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

DONOVAN, GARY J Medicine Lodge 

Agricultural Business Senior 

ECKENBERG, GENE W Lenexa 

Agriculture Freshman 

EGGERMAN, JEFF Green 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

EHRSAM, ALEX G Bern 

Accounting . Junior 

EVANS, STEPHEN P . . . Louisburg 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

FOWLER, DOUGLAS D Centralia 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

FUSSELL. LARRY G Overland Park 

General Freshman 

GIBSON, CRAIG A Hutchinson 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

GRAVES, WILLIAM D Greensburg 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

HAZZARD, DANIEL M Ozawkie 

Business Sophomore 

HOWES. BRIAN T Overland Park 

Business Freshman 

HUNT, ALAN H Overland Park 

Engineering Freshman 

HUTTON, BRAD D Topeka 

Architecture Senior 

JAQUITH, STEVEN L Topeka 

General ... ........... Freshman 

JAUERNIG, JEFF D Burlington 

Agriculture Freshman 

JAUERNIG, WILLIAM J Burlington 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

KULL, DANIEL D . Topeka 

Business ... Sophomore 

LANGLEY, LYLE E, Ozawkie 

General Sophomore 

LEHMAN, WILLIAM W Overland Park 

Business Administration Senior 

LONG, R DALE Wintield 

Medical Technology . Sophomore 

MANSBERGER. CURTIS D Roselle 

Sociology Freshman 

McCLARY. KENT M Centralia 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

McCLARY. MICHAEL D Vermillion 

Business Administration Junior 

McGUIRK, KELLY J Louisburg 

Business Jophomore 

MILBURN, MICHAEL W Hutchinson 

Architecture Senior 

MOSS, DON V Hoxie 

Agriculture Freshman 

OLTJEN, LARRY M Robinson 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

OST, KIRK D Mankato 

Business Administration Senior 

PETERSON, BRUCE W Abilene 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

PETRY.GARYL Centralia 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

ROANE, THOMAS N Clay Center 

Economics Senior 

SCHAIBLE. JAMES M Fairview 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

SHOEMAKER, STEVE Manhattan 

Feed Science and Management Senior 



kappa sigma 



it's really loaded 



Some bartenders get carried away 
with their concoctions. With two or 
three shots to trigger it off — some 
Kappa Sig is sure to get blasted. 




SIMLER, DAN B. Kansas City, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

SPENCER, DOUGLAS M Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

STERLING, PATRICK B Hardtner 

Business Freshman 

STERLING, STEVE E Hardtner 

Agricultural Business Sophomore 

STILES, MARK Hutchinson 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

STOLTENBERG, STEPHEN Ft. . . Hiawatha 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

STOUT, TERRY S. Salina 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

THOMPSON, MICHAEL W Osborne 

Business Administration Freshman 

VOLLBRACHT, MARK L Valley Center 

Milling Science and Management Senior 

WATTS, TONY B Hardtner 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

WHISLER, SCOTT R Topeka 

Business Administration Junior 

WILLIAMS, GREGORY W . . Larned 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

WILLIAMS, JOHN K Topeka 

Agriculture Freshman 



WkQi 




370 — kappa Sigma 




lambda chi alpha 




fliili 




ftlSL 




VANOVER. IRENE J Houseparenl 

ALVIS DAVID W Cimarron 

Business Adminislralion Junior 

ANSELMI KENTE Leawood 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

BEARDMORE. DAVID H Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

BISCHOFF EDWARD L St Joseph. MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BOGGS. MARION A Prairie Village 

Marketing Sophomore 

BURNS WILLIAM H Hutchinson 

Business Management Junior 

CLIPSHAM ROBERT C Prairie Village 

Biochemistry Junior 

CLIPSHAM SEAN J Prairie Village 

Biology Freshman 

COULTER THOMAS P Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

CRAIG. DOUGLAS J Natoma 

Radio and Television Sophomore 

CROSBY MARK S Rockford, IL 

History Junior 

DAVIS, DALE B Garden City 

Architecture Senior 

DOHERTY, STEPHEN J Prairie Village 

Accounting Sophomore 

DRITLEY. PAUL M Fremont. NB 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

DUNN. CRAIG A Junction City 

Business Administration Junior 

DUNN. RONALD M Overland Park 

Business Junior 

FOSTER. ROBERT D Olathe 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

FRANK LAWRENCE V St Joseph. MO 

fii- [ ii-.ign i-'n .(." .'.lurr. Freshman 

HARRIS, W. RUSSELL Manhattan 

Political Science and Journalism Senior 

HASELHORST. RONALD J Hays 

English Junior 

HICKOK, TIMOTHY W Overland Park 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

HILGER, CHARLES J Murdock 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

I li ii .1 i H ID ' iR( i iORY S Ottawa 

I i,:;n,. .:,-.,; Freshman 

HOOVER, ALAN J Manhattan 

Computer Science and Accounting Senior 

JANKOVICH, RICHARD B Manhattan 

Marketing Sophomore 

JENKINS, PHILIP W Shawnee Mission 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

JOHNSON. KYRON D Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

KELPE. RONALD M Omaha. NB 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

KNIGHT, GARY E Topeka 

Political Science Sophomore 

LEONARD. MIKE A Grand Island. NB 

Music Sophomore 

LETCH, PETER E Kansas City. MO 

Milling Science and Management Senior 

MANN JOSEPH D Olathe 

Pre-Dentisfry Freshman 

MARQUFZ. EDWARD J Topeka 

Accounting Sophomore 

MARTENS. KENT A Prairie Village 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

McCONNELL. KEVIN P Topeka 

Sociology Sophomore 

McWHORlFR. DANIEL M Elkader. IA 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

MEANS. DANIEL E Hiawatha 

Business Junior 

NEFLY, DAVID G Topeka 

Pre I h-mcim I'm >lt",sions Sophomore 

NOLL, DAVID S Chestertield, MO 

Pre-Medicme Senior 

OLDS. GARY D Junction Cify 

Bumik'v. Aditiinr.il, ition Junior 

OLDS, GREGORY D Junction City 

English and Political Science Senior 

PI NNINGTON, MARK A Easton MO 

Pre Design Prolessions Freshman 

PI rF.RSEN, CHRIS K Overland Park 

Pre I aw ■ Freshman 

PROGAR RON A Wichita 

An hltei lure Junioi 

PURNER, ROBERT A Hockaway, NJ 

Architecture Senior 

i URTISS Peabodv 

r„ili,i,n Hf,i Miii •■ r\.-1 . i m . i . i . • r 1 1 1 ■ r 1 1 

R( IMBI R( .1 R Nl l SON A Abilene 

( ieneral Agru ullure > reshman 



lambda chi alpha 



SANDERS. GARY B Prairie Village 

Business and Political Science Junior 

SCHARIG. TERRY D Independence, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

SCHMIDT, P. MARK Hays 

English Sophomore 

SCHROEDER. FRED J Overland Park 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

STANLEY. MARK E Topeka 

Psychology Sophomore 

SVOBODA. WAYNE A Wahoo. NB 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

TEEFEY, JEFFREY L Kansas City, MO 

Business Senior 

TUCKER. ANDREW E Salma 

Engineering Sophomore 

WEGNER, STEVEN L Rockville. MD 

Business Sophomore 

WHITESIDE. TIMOTHY E Tulsa. OK 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

WINTERS, KEVIN L Mission 

Business Freshman 

ZANDERS, DAVE Prairie Village 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

ZERNICKOW, KENT L Abilene 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 




£ $ <* $ 

MM 




they went thataway 



Showering Lambda Chis rush outdoors 
to catch a glimpse ot the varmint with the 
water pistol. Not being dressed for the 



occasion, 
chase. 



they voluntarily gave up the 



:V/2 — lambda Chi alpha 



marlatt hall 




|^ f-*| (ft JS| 



i" 

wry 



ROOF, DONALD B Director 

ADAMS. PHILIP A Ft. Lauderdale, FL 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

ADRIANO, JOSEPH M Kansas City 

General Freshman 

ALLEN, F O BENJAMIN Lee's Summit, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

ALMS, THOMAS H Overland Park 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 

AMMERMAN, ALLEN M McPherson 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

ANDERSON, GARY D Oberlin 

Business Administration Freshman 

ANNIS. JOHN R Oakley 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

APPLING, SCOTT Ulysses 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

ARNETT, PHILIP R Lenexa 

Radio and Television Senior 

ASBURY, LONALD K Moberly, MO 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

AYDT, PATRICK B Nashville, IL 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

BAER, RANDALL L Overland Park 

General Freshman 

BAKER, PAUL E Scandia 

History Sophomore 

BARCLAY, LYNDSEY L Topeka 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

BATSELL, STEPHEN G Deerfield 

Physics and Mathematics ■ Junior 

BENDA, DAVID L Atwood 

Business Administration Senior 

BERRY, MICHAEL G St Ann, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BIENHOFF, JOEL F Kensington 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

BIERY, RICK F Topeka 

Civil Engineering Senior 

BLAIDA. ROBERT A Leawood 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

BOEH, WILLIAM L Troy 

Architecture Senior 

BOHNING, SCOTT A Hanover 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BOIS, PAUL K Shawnee Mission 

Business Administration Sophomore 

BONE, JEFFREY D Shawnee Mission 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

BONHAM, MICHAEL W . Anthony 

Natural Resource Management Sophomore 

BOYD, TIMOTHY M Overland Park 

Secondary Education Senior 

BRACE. MARK A . . Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BRADSHAW, KEVIN Midwest City, OK 

General Freshman 

BREST, GORDON A Topeka 

Civil Engineering Senior 

BROWN, ALAN L Towanda 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

BROWN, BRIAN T Shawnee 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BURDGE, BRENT A Goddard 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

CARRIER, DAVID W Mission 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

CARTER, RICHARD H Cape Girardeau, MO 

Architecture Senior 

CASEY, BARRY A Glen Elder 

Milling Science and Management Senior 

CASEY, TEDD A Glen Elder 

General Freshman 

CASEY, TODD A Glen Elder 

General Freshman 

CATER, JOHN M Topeka 

Engineering Freshman 

CEDERSTROM, DAYN L Blue Springs, MO 

Architecture Senior 

CHESTNUT, WILLIAM B C la\ C entei 

Natural Resource Management Freshman 

CLARK. MICHAEL C Paola 

General Sophomore 

CLARK. STEVE M Overland Park 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

CLASSEN, DALE A Hesston 

Accounting Junior 

COCKRUM, ERNEST H Tulsa. OK 

Engineering Sophomore 

COLLING, RON D Austin. MN 

Nuclear Engineering .Junior 

COLLINGE, MARK D Carbondale 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

CONES, DAVID J McPherson 

Chemical Engineering Junior 



iiMtl.ltt h.iil 



marlatt hall 





COOK, ROY N Emporia 

Agricultural Economics Freshman d£ ^^ mW _^ ^HBBk. 

CRABB, JERRY E. Williamsburg jOk VjA fPJ| BBk V # 

Pre-Medicme Senior HP" 1 jjfc BB§L Hf 

CRAIG, WILLIAM M Olathe ■^^5*B^ %"s>o«s3BP ¥..* ' AW i** 

Milling Science and Management Junior '••■^ WB \f/v~V'W w* r ^^ 

CRAWFORD, ALAN W Wakeeney « h JB» , ,,- J <.<■£>" Hk " 

Civil Engineering Sophomore ™ w'f —V jf W MB% ' 

CREEK, KENNETH D Meriden f , r~ 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore • ^ ■ A 

CUMMINGS, WILLIAM L Syracuse / Br A 

Psychology and Corrections Senior f ' m\y '&*. i F Hf BB ^ 

CURTIS, DAVID W Great Bend — , M BBP9BBB 

Chemical Engineering Freshman ^f^MAh. M ■! *$■ 

CUSHENBERY, DARYLW Hoismgton J T BBk WBtk M ~ AKlk. 

Art Freshman ! \«Ml llL Iflft F Jt&PW 

DALE.QUENTINB Manhattan Ri^fSBJ W** <***■■ .-. \ ' \ •- * P <j» - flBBB. 

Labor Relations Junior L< Y^M AT .5^ M . » ** \ W"* **"■ " F if ** JfSA 

DAVENPORT, JOEL A Concordia ^ * m - — Bf \ '-v k W * JjW I 

Chemical Engineering Freshman \-""~* P J" «aBC % '~~* ik * -~£mW "~~ »•"-*•%* V 

Sa, GREG0RYL ,/,=; { £ ! wi^^M I ISrVj * 

DAVIS.LYNNA Norton JK*> B BB^ MW^ +W^ 111 ^AW a MM 1 1/ , *V ^ 

— ^vP*fc'^iiV.jM IP k» 

DAVIS, ROGER L Hutchinson 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior A JAm. ,-■-. . 

DAY, DENNIS St Louis, MO ^ AWM WtiL. 

Construction Science Sophomore ■%''■■ *§Ma\ t<**' |S6BMBB¥ * " ATM ^W 

DIAZ, JOSEF Mexican. Mexico ,_*., l^T 'Jr^^ 

Business Administration Graduate Student ilf^l^^B 4 ■£ BF -«* *"*Bi w 'H 

DIERKS, LLOYD R Brewster I 'Jb--g 1 / -\ Wt W -^ W A «•* 

Business Senior J| ,.Jk flf i ~ - * M . W % -~3 

DOLES. DENNIS A Topeka ,••▼ | §L S ^ * » Bj 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore BANiBbBI iBHk flbw I " i '#* I 

DRUMM.DONA Hamilton, MO Bfcfc HKBb * ' BBH " ' ^J ' hv Wm AWA\ 

Civil Engineering Graduate Student mBk JH ■ *"" — JlMsk ^flk H 

DURANT, LARRY W Wellington a^fcx "•"■^ BBfei » 

Accounting . ... Freshman /BBk\ ''"* .» BBk -IMMMMk. *4P'Mk *MT*'&MAk 

DYE, ROBERT L. Shawnee Mission ii|| ^' ■ iP^Bl ilk j£i , £? 

Construction Science Senior «l \ BMr «L fcL «i B5l ''BBBl 

DYKMAN.GARYL Shawnee Mission H'jHPnfl wW -» <S W^" ** A W^Bf**" ffVWBB ^^ •«5^^B 

Horticulture Sophomore m ■ I I ;=? JR-f rfe - V.-.M» 

EDIE, ROBERT J Emporia <^> ^ % ^j* \ ■■-- f -- ? -"J- ; # ^ - J 7 

Electrical Engineering Junior jk v ■ F ' "~ •~' : 

EHRLICH, MELVINR Russell ' y*w* L >iX--. 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore JFT ^PB. ' 

EICKMEYER. DAVIDA Prairie Village ^ <V ?^T^ x *^. f *■ V * ". ' 4 i* ■ aX/W A 

Electrical Engineering Junior \/ ^ K JT^ ■ vf ^ t»k jM /I / 

EISENBARTH, STEPHEN L Hoyt ^m^ ^m^. 

Agriculture . Freshman Wtkh : WA\ m gm\\. JEENHAk 

EISENHAUER, CARL A. Moberly, MO '*^ JKf ■■A uk 't| i 

Architectural Engineering Junior |w MM* ^ ')•• .•4BA Wjk' J 

ENLOE.JACKL St Louis. MO ■r^e-Bl W-* «. V V <m> <«l M^» «i^ w - ™ 

Architecture Junior ■ J *^"| " 'T W F I W -J* 4 * 

ERICSON, KEVIN C Funk. NB % .,, W 'J&AWT % i-"2fc /-»'\r I .- — 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman ' ,: .' .V ^ *^^E ' ^ * ^. ~ 

FIELDS, GREGORY L Wichita , v; %r 1^ Jjk V ^ 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman ,* -™'' J i • r^-"^ l-i'V 

FINGER. GREG F Larned , ^A . JH fc \ ^ L j^ ^ f 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore Ht < P^^^L '"^^BSBi « ^ 

FINGLAND, ROBERT L Sedalia, MO «^ 

Architecture Senior ~^fk\ 

FIRESTONE, DONALD D Roeland Park 

Electrical Engineering Fifth Year Student Bpfc> \ 

FORD. CHARLES A Salma MM** < * ; B 

Nuclear Engineering .Sophomore X^« -; ■»■»» "--' J s- 

FORD, DONT Edgerton i J2»_/ ^ "'^ \ ^jj! 

Electrical Engineering Junior *■. . ^A\ * ■"* 

FOSTER. DAVID W Wichita ^ ' , ^■■k.^W -^ 

Pre-Design Professions r ' • ^P*JBP Bjk#BHfH| ^MMm 

FRANKEN. DAVID P. Easton M%. 7 JAW I 

Medical Technology Freshman *Mv ^uAt ' 

FRANKLIN, DOUGLAS L Wichita _^£Ls^ 

Physical Science Senior •P*™^^ 

FREACH, STEPHEN G Tampa .^MMm. 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Sophomore -^^MMu 

FRYDENDALL. DOUGLAS L Smith Center . M 

Accounting Senior 

FUNK, KEITH M Newton *" .*» UM 

Horticulture Junior ^P 

FUNK, RODNEY M. . . . Goessel JT Jt* . J^X^s^S I ^MMM± *f 

Psychology Sophomore i ^K*/ \ ^Bt A\ ^ AMW r ■ \ 

GAITO, MICHAEL E. . . . Topeka BP Ai , K^BMVIbk Z flV yBF 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore IIfW rW^BkT^BBk '"' ™^v /^^"' B> ^ » 

f /I'll , CVCUSJBI «.'- !!!'. ,Vc ."'.'■ - 

GALLEGO. JORGE I. Mexican, Mexico ^ 

Business Administration Graduate Student _^BL. 

GASTON, PAUL M Marysville 

Radio and Television Senior 

GEE, D. GLEN Oklahoma City, OK BE ( 

Business Graduate Student \ J ■Js. ^m 

GFELLER. DOUGLAS R Junction City A " J \»C^»^MMWm\ 

Agricultural Economics Junior 3" w 

GILL, JEFFREY L. . Harper BB? ^KT .. l^BP? ^, fet*' 

Accounting Freshman / ^ «,.■*? •*.'' •' •"■ 

GILLEN, RICHARD P. Ulysses >J Wr'?&~< "'■ 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore xi^,^' \£%i W&Q'ifPifi V 

374 — marlatt hall 







-•& ,' 



f k<> ri 




•x 



*JBi 



GOOD, RICKY C San Juan, PR 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

GRAFF. GARY M Manenlhal 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

GREEN, DANIEL J Emporia 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

GREEN, THOMAS H Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Graduate Student 

GRIMWOOO, TED Sedgwick 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

HAAG, JEFF E Portsmouth, NB 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

HAFLING, MICHAEL N Topeka 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

HAGER, DARYLE E King City, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HAWTHORNE, BRADLEY C Derby 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore 

HEATHMAN, JAMES B Ottawa 

Physics Senior 

HEINZ, RICHARD M Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HEMMER, MICHAEL W St. Libory, NB 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 




never the twain 

One likes books, the other prefers 
beer. Potluck with the housing computer 
can be hazardous or provide a chance 
for personal growth and tolerance. 
Roommates make excellent sociology 
projects. 



marlatt hall — 375 



marlatt hall 




HENDERSON, GRADY Kansas City ' j^AMt^ 'ML ^tSmmk. 

Recreation Freshman Jflj ^M\ yBk ^^^^B 

HENSLEY. KEVIN C Derby jgk- 1M 

Pre-Design Protessions Freshman ' iWw^^^m ■ -S. *Br^B or-ls^^^™ 

HERRMANN, CHARLES E Otterle WW | SB ^ \_/A 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore W 

HERRMANN, DARRELLE Otterle »— >»* | 

HIEBERT.' DALLAS D Rozel •JB^F^>» j 

Animal Science and Industry Junior ■'-■JlkirwWwW* ■■-.' Jkjk\\±>~"' \ ± !'■ 

HILL. DONALD A Kansas City t ttm^^K - IfljiO MHBlHi M8M& M |hh| 

Radio and Television Freshman | J^m. V ' 4 B /fl£- 

HILLMAN. REX V Wakeeney ifF^A 

Business Management Sophomore ■{ i-.'fck 

HIRT, STEVEN E Waterville i_f !■ 

Agricultural Economics Senior km ^Wm* 

HOFMANN, ROBERT J Green ■<3fc ^*^p 

Business Finance Senior ^ I 

HOKE, BRENT K Dorrance \ *%m W^ \ ^V " W. 

Biology Freshman ' w Mh l, -3f mmm 

HOLMES, RODNEY E Topeka W P.j}7^ » fJA' ^M 

Business Administration Sophomore /"% .;.'■ f ^ v 

HOOD. THOMAS P Mayetta g^ MfeM^ HNfl 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman j^r r~ >^g«!" *fj::>£ j/mmW WmU 

HURST, GARY L Johnson 

Agricultural Mechanization Freshman 

HURST, JOHN P Denison, TX 

History Senior 

HUTCHISON, JON M Great Bend 

Music Education Senior 

INGLE, PAUL B Topeka 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

IRONS, STEPHEN M Prairie Village 

Crop Protection Senior 

JAFFERIS. PETER M Overland Park 

General Freshman 

JANSEN.TERRYA Emporia 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

JENNISON,TINDELK Latham 

Computer Science - Sophomore 

JOHNSON, BRUCE A Axtell 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

JOHNSON. REX G Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

KALIVODA, SCOTT N Agenda 

Civil Engineering Junior 

KANNARD, KRAIG E Overland Park ^tttU* 

Business Administration Freshman ^|tf" 



376 — marlatt hall 





KATTERHENRY, CURT A Florissant, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

KAUB. DAVID F Ottawa 

Physical Education Junior 

KAUFFMAN, BYRON B ... Brewster 

Engineering Freshman 

KITE. RONALD A Lyons 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

KOUKOL, DARWIN L Cupa 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

KRAUSE, DARREL E Lmcolnville 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

KRIER, THOMAS J Beloit 

Business Administration Freshman 

LAYNE, DARYL E Atwood 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

LEMMONS, BLAINE E Pittsburg 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

LOBMEYER, JAMES A Garden City 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

LOLLAR, MICHAEL D Topeka 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

LONDEEN, DAVID S Arkansas City 

Music Education Junior 

LOW, M DOUGLAS Fowler 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

LUKERT, KARL F Dover 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

LUKOW, EUGENE W Holstein, NB 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

LYNCH, DENNIS R Kansas City 

Accounting Junior 

MANZO. WILFRED F Mount Vernon, NY 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

MARIHUGH, KENNETH L . . . Esbon 

Agriculture Freshman 

MARKS, JAMES M Atwood 

Accounting Sophomore 

MARTIN, BRYAN V Spring Grove. PA 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

MARTINCICH, KEITH E Fairway 

Psychology Freshman 

MASON, ERNEST L Hays 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

McCANN, WILLIAM T Paola 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

McCHESNEY, JOSEPH L Downs 

Computer Science Sophomore 

McCLANAHAN, KENNETH C LaCygne 

Physical Education Sophomore 

McCLURE, STEVEN L Philhpsburg 

Engineering Freshman 

McDANIEL. KIM W Norfork, NB 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

MCDONALD, GARY L . . . Rolla, MO 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

McFADDEN. WILLIAM C Larned 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

McGRIFF, ROBERT W Liberal 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

MclVER, BRAD J Buhler 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

McKEE, CHARLES D Derby 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

McKEE, JACK K Goff 

Agriculture Freshman 

McKENZIE, MARVIN B Overland Park 

Horticulture Junior 

MELCHER, JEFFREY L Fori Scott 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

MEYER. DARREL W Sabetha 

Engineering Freshman 

MICKELSON, ROGER C Wichita 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

MILLER, CHARLES E El Dorado 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

MOHNEY, CHARLES D Ozawkie 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

MORGAN, PHILLIP L Onaga 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

MORRICAL, GREGORY W Beverly 

Agronomy Freshman 

MOSBACHER, RICHARD D, Cincinnati, OH 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

MOSER, MONTE B. . . Oakley 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

MURPHY, NEIL E Santa Fe. NM 
Architecture Fifth Year Student 

MUSIL, PATRICK E Turner 

Pre-Design Protessions Freshman 

NELSEN, KIRK Leawood 

Business ... Sophomore 

NICHOLSON, WILLIAM D Topeka 

Engineering Freshman 

NOE, BRUCE A Tecumseh 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 



marlatt hall — 377 



marlatt hall 



NOLAN, JOHN R Bayonne, NJ 

Biology Senior 

NOLL, JEFFREY E Easton 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

O'CONNELL. TIMOTHY J El Dorado 

Pre-Design and Professions Sophomore 

OLDHAM. ANDREW L Wakeeney 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

OLSON, MARK S Arkansas City 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

OWENS. ROBERT W Wamego 

Electrical Engineering Junior 



PANKRATZ. GARY L 
Agricultural Engineering 
PHILLIPS. LARRY N 
Electrical Engineering 
PORTELL. JON E 
Biology 

PROCTER. DAVID E 
Political Science 
PYLE, RICHARD G 
Pre-Design Protessions 
RATHBURN. RANDALL L 
Mechanical Engineering 



Wakefield. MA 

Freshman 

Lyons 

Sophomore 

Mission 

Junior 

Spring Hill 

Junior 

Prairie Village 

Freshman 

Bellevue. WA 

Freshman 



RELIHAN. BRUCE A Chapman 

Horticulture Junior 

RELIHAN, MICHAEL D Chapman 

Political Science Senior 

RHODES. PAUL W Gaylord 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

RICHTER, J BLAIR San Antonio. TX 

Bakery Science and Management Freshman 

RIEBE.DELBERTG Girard 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

RIEKENBERG, DARRELL R Sylvan Grove 

Civil Engineering Senior 



RILEY, WILLIAM F 
Mechanical Engineering 
RINGEL.H GRANT 
General 

RINKE, JAMES E 
Electrical Engineering 
ROBERTS. DANIEL H 
General 

ROBIDOU. ROBERT K 
Civil Engineering 
ROESLER. DAVID E. 
Architecture 



. 1 1. 1, vi ii -c Missii hi 

Sophomore 

Alma 

Freshman 

Lenexa 

Freshman 

Newton 

Freshman 

Salina 

Freshman 

Ballwin. MO 

Fifth Year Student 



Esbon 

Freshman 

Clayton, MO 

Junior 

Assaria 

Freshman 

ROSE, GALE J. . Haviland 

Theatre Senior 

RUDER, JOHNATHAN E St Louis, MO 

Pre-Design Protessions ' " 'I ' tl( '"" '"' 

SCHAMLE, RODNEY J Wellsville 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 



ROGERS, JEFF K 
Pre-Vetermary Medicine 
ROLOFF, VERNON A 
Architectural Engineering 
ROMIG, RALPH W 
Chemical Engineering 



SCHEURLE, JAYS 

Construction Science 

SCHINZE. KEVIN M 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine 

SCHROEDER, DENNIS L 

Accounting 

SEBA. RODNEY R 

Civil Engi, leering 

SEMPLE. DON R 

Agriculture 

SHALINSKY. LEE B. 

Journalism and Mass Communications 



SHARP, ANTHONY W 
Natural Resource Management 
SHARP, JOHN F 
Engineering 
SHEPARD. LELANDM 
Chemical Engineering 
SHIMP. JOHNF 
Chemical Engineering 
SHORE. CARL L 
Electrical Engineering 
SHORT. BRIAN C. 
Business Administration 



Glenview. IL 

Freshman 

Topeka 

Junior 

Atchison 

Junior 

Larned 

Sophomore 

Overland Park 

Freshman 

Prairie Village 

Sophomore 



fumnnrl.ili' .'»"• 

Sophomore 

Great Bend 

Freshman 

Chapman 

Freshman 

Topeka 

Junior 

Leavenworth 

Sophomore 

Topeka 

Freshman 



Wichita 

Freshman 

Oakley 

Freshman 

Ottawa 

.. ,[,li< >i ni in- 

SMITH, CASEY V. Junction City 

Business Administration Senior 

SMITH, WAYNI I I'mimi' /ill. mi' 

Computer Science Sophomore 

SMITHHISI FR. MATTHEWL Lihue, HI 

Business Freshman 



SIEMENS, MICHAEL A 
Chemistry 

SIMONTON, JEFFREY A 
Electrical Engineering 
SKIDMORE.MIKEB 
Agricultural Economics 






^ ^ Ok M ^ 

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H 
fa****™ 











SNELL, RICHARD C Wmfield 

Agricultural Education Junior 

SNETHER, GARYL Goodland 

Agriculture Freshman 

SPEED, DANIEL E Shawnee 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

SPELLMAN, STANLEY D Salma 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

STALLBAUMER, JAMES F Franklort 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

STROM, STEPHEN C. White City 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

STUBER, DENNIS K Kansas City, MO 

Computer Science Senior 

STUCKY, TIMOTHY A Moundndge 

Agriculture Sophomore 

: .III If HMAM ( ,1 I MM M . . Hillsboro 

Physical Education Junior 

SWANN, RICK M Shawnee 

General Freshman 

SWART, KYLE D Seneca 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

SYNEK, TIMOTHY B Overland Park 
Business Sophomore 

TAYLOR, ROY J Waldo 

Agricultural Mechanization Freshman 

TERRY, DAVID D Russell 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

THARP, DAVID W Kansas City 

Business Freshman 

THOMPSON, ROBERT C Sedalia, MO 

Construction Science Senior 

THORNTON, LARRY L Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

TOBLER, JEFFREY E Olathe 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

TOHER, JAMES D Little Falls, NY 

Architecture Senior 

TRUPKA, DENNIS J, , , Elhsville, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

TYSON, JEFF A Olathe 

Business Administration Sophomore 

UNRUH, DOUGLAS E Halstead 

Civil Engineering Junior 

VAN NAHMEN , ALAN G Spearville 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

VOEGELI.TOMJ Peck 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

VONFELDT, BRYAN L Victoria 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

WAHL, SCOTT M Washington 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

WALDREN. DERYL E Tribune 

Radio and Television Junior 

WALKER, TERRY L Kansas City 

Music Education Senior 

WALL, ORIE E . Topeka 

Engineering Freshman 

WALLACE, RICHARD E Paptllion. NB 

Agriculture Freshman 

WALSH, HAROLD J Alexandria, VA 

Sociology Freshman 

WALTON, DAVID N Ellsworth 

Computer Science Senior 

WARREN, WYMAN M Wichita 

Pre-Forestry Freshman 

WEBB, STEPHEN D. . Glen Ellyn, IL 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

WEBER, RALPH G Bonner Springs 

Business Marketing Freshman 

WEEMS. STEVE Shawnee Mission 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

WEHLING, RANDY L Hollenberg 

Milling Science and Management Senior 

WENGER, ELDREDD Powhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

WIBLE, SCOTT R Topeka 

Speech Pathology Junior 

WILKERSON, KELLY L Jefferson City, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

WILLIAMS. HENRY A Salma 

Economics Junior 

WILLIAMSON, KEITH W Hudson 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

WITHINGTON, HARLAN E Atwood 

General Freshman 

YERBY, PHILIP S Overland Park 

Civil Engineering Senior 



marlatthall 379 



moore hall 



PETERSON. VALERIE Director 

ABED. AHMED A . Jeddah. Saudi Arabia 

Gram Science and Industry . . . . Graduate Student 

AITKEN, JOANNE E ......... Wichita 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

ALBERS. TREGAN P Davenport. NB 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

ALSTOT. CORVIN G. Deertield, IL 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

ANDERSON. ADRIENNED. Belleville 

Psychology Junior 



ANDERSON. CORT D Leawood 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

ANDERSON. DAVID A Kansas City 

Architecture Junior 

ANDERSON, MICHAEL R Jamestown 

Business Senior 

ANDERSON. REX M Wheaton, IL 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore 

APPLEGATE, TERRY L Hutchinson 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

AYLWARD. JAYNE A, Salina 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 



BABB, SAMUEL M Wakeeney 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

BACH, REX C Jetmore 

Microbiology Junior 

BAGWELL. LEANNES Salina 

Horticulture Freshman 

BARTH, JEFF S Belleville 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

BAUGHMAN, GARY L Longton 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Senior 

BAXTER, DARRELL J Clay Center 

Accounting Senior 



BEATY. JEAN Leonardville 

Agricultural Business Sophomore 

BEATY. JO A Leonardville 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 



BENNETT. CAROL J 
Pre-Vetennary Medicine 
BENNETT, SHARON B 
Pre-Vetennary Medicine 
BERRA, RONALD J 
Pre-Design Professions 
BISHOP, EVERETT D 
Business Administration 



Topeka 

Freshman 

Prairie Village 

Freshman 

Bndgeton, MO 

■ ,i-,|, hi imure 

Bonner Springs 

Junior 



Bonner Springs 

Freshman 

Belleville 

Junior 

Norton 

. . . . Freshman 



BISHOP. JIM L 

General 

BLACKWOOD, SANDRA S 

Home Economics Extension 

BLICKENSTAFF.BARTD 

Applied Music 

BOHNENKAMP, DONALD R Omaha, NB 

Microbiology Senior 

BONEBRAKE, DAVID R Shawnee Mission 

Marketing Senior 

BOREN.FREDW Parsons 

General Freshman 



BOWE, SUSAN E Pratt 

Dietetics Senior 

BRANSGROVE, GENE Liberal 

Agronomy Sophomore 

BRANTINGHAM.MICKIEG Wheaton. IL 

Speech Freshman 

BRAUN. GLENN R. Garden City 

Political Science Sophomore 

BREDTHAUER, ANNETTE K. Wood River, NB 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

BRENNAN. GEORGE L Huntington, NY 

Biology Junior 



BRINK, LINDA J Tecumseh 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

BROCKMAN, LORI L. Grandview, MO 

Accounting Freshman 

BROWN. CAROL A. . , Raytown, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BROWN, CHRIS P. Abilene 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

BROWN.GRATZA Wichita 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

BROWNING, GENE C Shawnee Mission 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 



BRUBAKER. STUART C Cortez, CO 

Agronomy . Sophomore 

BRUNGARDT, GREGORY N. Galesburg 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

BRUNK, MALEAJ Hill City 

Modern Language I I'^hmnn 

BRUNT, JANE E Wall. NJ 

Biology Junior 

BUELL, SHERYLL Junction City 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

BUNCK. DENNIS J Silver Lake 

Agriculture Freshman 





BURNICK, DALE L Mulberry 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

BUSSE, STEPHEN M Bird City 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

BUTTON, DAVID D Great Bend 

Engineering Freshman 

CAMPBELL. RONALD A Big Bow 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

CANTRELL, CANDY C. . . Kansas City 

Accounting Sophomore 

CARR, CHARLES R Prairie Village 

History Junior 

CHELLGREN, STEVEN E Kansas City, MO 

Geography Senior 

CHIPMAN, JAMES T Wichita 

Counseling Graduate Student 

CHOWDHURY, ASHESH Karachi, Pakistan 

Business Administration Freshman 

CLARK, BRADLEY E Newton 

Journalism and Mass Communications ...Junior 

CLAWSON, RODNEY R Goddard 

General Freshman 

CLEMENT, DANIEL J Birkenfeld. Germany 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology. Sophomore 

CODY. MAC A El Dorado 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

COGSWELL, DAVE A Olathe 

Computer Science Freshman 

COLSON, CONNIE J Wheaton, IL 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

CONAWAY, DENISE A Athol 

Dietetics . Junior 

CONNELL, MARK A Claflm 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

COOK, DOUGLAS M Ellinwood 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

CREVISTON, DAVID A Overland Park 

Accounting Sophomore 

CURRIER, MARK A Salina 

Psychology Senior 

CURRIER, MARTIN L Salina 

Psychology Senior 

CURRIER, ROBERTA K Salina 

Family and Child Development Senior 

CUSIC, B. KEVIN Emporia 

Biology Junior 

DAHL, ROBERT J Abilene 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 




mooieh.ll ,<SI 



moore hall 



DAKIN. ROY L Louisburg 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

DANIELS. SANDRA J Augusta 

Accounting Freshman 

DAVEY, LARRY D Osawatomie 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

DAVILA. GASPAR M Guaynabo, PR 

Veterinary Medicine . . . . Freshman 

DAWSON. MARGIE M Junction City 

Psychology Freshman 

DECKARD. KRIS T Herington 

Accounting . . Sophomore 

DeGEER, JAMES E Lake City 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

DeROUCHEY. DOUGLAS W Miller, SD 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

DETRICK, WILLIAM R Kansas City 

Applied Music Senior 

DIETRICH. GREGORY L Topeka 

Chemistry Freshman 

DIETZ, RANDY F Satanta 

Business Administration Senior 

DILLON. KATHY L. Junction City 

General Freshman 

DIXON, MICHAEL E. Junction City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

DOLL, JULIE Garden City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

DONNELL, PAMELA J. Cofteyville 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

DRUMM, ROBIN D Bushton 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

DUCH, LORINDAM. Junction City 

Art Freshman 

DUNNING. CRAIG S. . . Wichita 

Horticulture Junior 

EDMUND. KIMBERLY A Hays 

Engineering Freshman 

EDWARDS. SARAH L Reedley, CA 

Interior Design Junior 

FARR, TAMI E . , Topeka 

Elementary Education Freshman 

FENLEY, PAULF Norton 

Civil Engineering . Freshman 

FINE, CONNIE E Junction City 

Home Economics Sophomore 

FLETCHER, TERRI L . . . Kansas City 

Secondary Education Junior 

FOREMAN, MELINDAK . Goodland 

Clothing and Retailing .Freshman 

FORSTER. MELANIEP Smithfield, NB 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

FOWLER, DON K McLouth 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

FOWLER, RONALD K. McLouth 

Pre-Forestry Junior 

FOX, WILLIAM L St Louis, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

FRASER, BARRY R Belleville 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

FRIESEN, CYNTHIA L Bel Air, MD 

Biology Freshman 

FRIESEN, ROBERTS Colby 

Business Administration Junior 

GANTZ. MICHAEL W Hutchinson 

Engineering Junior 

GARTEN, GARY F Abilene 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

GASSAWAY, TERESA A Overland Park 

General Freshman 

GENTRY, ROBERT H. . . Topeka 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

GILBERT, SCOTT A Council Grove 

Business Administration Junior 

GILSLEIDER, EDWARD F. East Brunswick, NJ 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

GODSEY, BRUCE F Waterville 

Electrical Engineering Graduate Student 

GODSEY, JULIE A. . . . Waterville 

Commercial Art . . . Sophomore 

GOTTSCH, KAREN K. Hutchinson 

Business Freshman 

GOVERT, JULIE L Kingman 

English Sophomore 

GRANSTROM, DAVID E. . Roeland Park 

Veterinary Medicine . . Sophomore 

HAIFLEIGH. DEBRA Goodland 

Political Science Junior 

HAJI.ALIT Riyadh. Saudi Arabia 

Grain Science Freshman 

HALE.VELVAC Arkansas City 

Agricultural Education Freshman 

HAIL, BARBARA A Overland Park 

Fashion Marketing Sophomore 

HAMILTON, STUART A Topeka 

Interior Architecture Senior 




•?mm* 




HANSEN. NANCY J . . Augusta 

Ollice Administration Sophomore 

HAYES, MONTE L Poplar Blutl, MO 

Bakery Science and Management Senior 

HAYS, ROSS E Arkansas City 

Milling Science and Management Freshman 

HEADRICK. DANIEL E. . . Kismet 

Biology . . . . Sophomore 

HENKE, MARSHA K Shawnee 

Interior Design Sophomore 

HENN, ANTHONY W El Dorado 

Computer Science Senior 

HERZ, SALEH M Hofuf, Saudi Arabia 

Gram Science Freshman 

HILL, JEFFREY C Bushton 

General Sophomore 

HISKETT, LARRY W Ellinwood 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

HJETLAND, PEGGY L Everest 

Social Work Senior 

HOLL, DIANE K Great Bend 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

HOLMAN, STEVE C . Topeka 

Business Freshman 

HOLT, MICHAEL T Pocasset, MA 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

HOUSER, MARK C Minneola 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

HOUTZ, BECKY A Alma 

Horticulture Therapy Freshman 

HUAMAN, ROSA I . . Topeka 

Business Sophomore 

HUDSON, KRISTIE L Topeka 

Elementary Education Freshman 

HUFFMAN. KATHY L Beloit 

Pre-Law Freshman 

HUSTEAD, DAVID R Leawood 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

INMAN, TAMMY J Kansas City 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

JANISCH, NANCY A Lawrence 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

JOHNSEN, DAVID W Bird City 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

JOHNSON. BRIAN W Leavenworth 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

JOHNSON. DEBRA L Wichita 

Fashion Marketing Freshman 

JOHNSON, GAIL A Salina 

Business Finance Junior 

JOHNSON, RICHARD L Waterville 

Business Senior 

JOHNSTON, MALA D Olathe 

General Freshman 

JOINER, DAVID L Overland Park 

Architecture Junior 

JONES, COLLEEN K . ... Sterling 

General Sophomore 

JORDAN. ROBERTO J La Paz, Bolivia 

Economics . Freshman 

JUDGE, PATRICIA L Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 

KAUTZ, MICHAEL G Atchison 

Architecture Junior 

KEALING, JAMES H Leawood 

Economics . . . Junior 

KELLEY, DAVID W Rapid City, SD 

Architecture Senior 

KEMRITE. HAROLD D Middletown, NJ 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

KENDRICK. DAVID A Olathe 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

KILPATRICK.SEAND. Pella. IA 

Interior Architecture Junior 

KING, PHILIP N Kinsley 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

KLASSEN, DELTON C Hillsboro 

Accounting Sophomore 

KLOCKE. ARLAN D Clay Center 

Horticulture Freshman 

KOEHLER, EDWARD C Wichita 

Pre-Design Protessions I r^shnun 

KOLICH. MARGIE J. Kansas City 

Interior Design Sophomore 

KRUG, KAREN E Phillipsburg 

Home Economics Freshman 

LaFORGE, ROBERT R. , Matawan. NJ 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

LANE, MARY J Belleville 

History Junior 

LEA, LESLIE C Kansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

LEAVITT, WALLACE C Mound City 

Agronomy Senior 

LFHMANN, DIXIE S Gaylord 

Medical Technology Freshman 



moore hall 

LENTELL. BRIAN A Wichita 

Business Administration Freshman 

LEON. REBECCA M. . . . Wichita 

Social Work Freshman 

LEONARD, LARRY D Sublette 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

LILLARD, DIANE L Prairie Village 

Music Education Sophomore 

LLAMAS, PAT A Newton 

Business Administration Sophomore 

LOO. JANISK G Lihue. HI 

Home Economics Sophomore 

LUDWIG, SYLVIA R Beloit 

Physical Education . Freshman 

LUKINAC, CINDY D. Kansas City 

Pre-Nursing . . . . Freshman 

MACNISH, THOMAS A Cranford, NJ 

Biochemistry Junior 

MACON, GWENDOLYNS Junction City 

General Freshman 

MANCE, THOMAS E. Prairie Village 

Horticulture Junior 

MARKEN. HARVEY E. Salma 

Biology Freshman 




basket case 

If Mom didn't quite come through on 
washing instructions, a little direction 
from neighboring co-eds might deter 
gents from overflowing soapsuds, 
shrunken T-shirts, or the ultimate — pink 
BVDs. 



384 — moore hall 




Mil 




MARSHALL, LEIGH A Leavenworth 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

MARTIN, DEBORAH L Garden City 

Psychology Senior 



MARTIN, KATHRYN J 

Horticulture Therapy 

MASSOTH, JOSEPH J 

Geology 

MATHISON, DEBORAH H 

Pre-Nursing 

MATLACK, REXW 
Business Administration 



Glen Ellyn. IL 

Junior 

Yates Center 

Sophomore 

Clay Center 

Junior 

Clearwater 

Freshman 



MATSON.DEANL Smith Center 

Business Administration Junior 

MATTHEW, RANDALL K Prairie Village 

General Sophomore 

McCLINTOCK, GARYW Louisburg 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

McCLINTOCK, WILLIAM G Louisburg 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

McCOSH, CATHERINE J Chapman 

Social Work Sophomore 

MclNTYRE, ROBERT R . . . Meadville, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 



Mcleod, teresa m 

General 

McWILLIAMS, GORDON C 

Electrical Engineering 

MIKA, JOESPHD. 

Engineering 



Junction City 

Freshman 

Olathe 

Freshman 

Kansas City 

Freshman 



MILLER, KIRK W Ness City 

Freshman 



Agriculture 

MILLER, MELANIE A, Dodge City 

Home Economics Sophomore 

MILLER, STEVE J Frankfort 

Horticulture Sophomore 



MINNEAR, DONALD G McPherson 

History Junior 

MIROCKE, ANNETTE C Shawnee 

Sociology Senior 

MONTELEON, ROSALIE M Kansas City 

Elementary Education Freshman 

MOORE, GREGORY A Topeka 

Recreation Graduate Student 

MORGAN. DAVID J Wichita 

General Freshman 

MORSE, ROBERT E Joplm, MO 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

MUEHLBACH, MARY L . . . . Shawnee Mission 

Consumer Interest freshman 

MUETING, DALE F Axtell 

Dairy Science Senior 

MUETING. DUANE H Axtell 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

MULHEM, ABDULRAHMANA Riyadh, Saudi Arabia 

Gram Science Freshman 

MURRAY, ROBERT G. ...... Moscow 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

NAVINSKY, MARCIA L Leavenworth 

General Freshman 



NELSEN, BRAD J Omaha, NB 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

NEYER. PATRICIA L Junction City 

Consumer Interest Sophomore 

OGDEN, DEBRA L Overland Park 

Physical Education Sophomore 

OSTFELD, ADRIENNE L Chicago, IL 

Accounting Junior 

OTT, CYNTHIA E Olathe 

Recreation Freshman 

OWEN, DAVID R Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 



Shawnee 

Freshman 

Garfield Heights. OH 

Sophomore 

Succasunna. NJ 

Freshman 



PALMER, KIRK W 

General 

PARHAMOVICH, JEFFREY L 
Bakery Science and Management 
PARKINS, KATHLEEN J 
Pre-Vetennary Medicine 

PASCHAL, MARK J Luray 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

PATCHEN, TERRY L Jetmore 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

PATTERSON, TERRI K Kansas City 

Pre-Design Protessions Freshman 

PATTON. RICK R Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

PEDROSA, SYLVIA A, Newton 

Psychology Sophomore 

PENG, VICTOR I Emporia 

Architecture Senior 

PENNY. BEVERLY 

Home Economics Sophomore 

PETERSON. BRADLEY D Topeka 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

PETERSON. JEAN M Overland Park 

Applied Music Junior 



moore hall 



PFEIFER, RHONDA L Hays 

Fashion Marketing Sophomore 

PHERIGO, NANCY J Waverly 

General Sophomore 

PICKFORD, PEGGY A Topeka 

Pre-Velennary Medicine Sophomore 

PINICK, STEVEN J Wichita 

Engineering Freshman 

POLSON, CRAIG M Vermillion 

Agronomy Sophomore 

PRATT, DOUGLAS C Goddard 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

PRICE, DAN R Overland Park 

Pre-Design Protessions Freshman 

PRICE, SUSAN B- Shaker Heights, OH 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

PRINGLE, BARBARA A Topeka 

General Sophomore 

PUGLIESE, JOSEPH Locust Valley, NY 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Sophomore 

PULLIAM, GARY D Freeport 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

RATH, CURTIS M Dodge City 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

RECTOR, STEVEN P Leavenworth 

Music Education Sophomore 

RIEPL, GREG A Cimarron 

Geology Sophomore 

RINNER, GEORGE A Topeka 

General Freshman 

RIOS, RITA E Kansas City 

Physical Education Sophomore 

ROBB, LORINDA Shawnee Mission 

Special Education Junior 

ROHNER, KEVIN A Wichita 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

ROESLER, KAREN E Junction City 

Elementary Education Freshman 

ROGERS. JOHN Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

ROLLINS, RAY E Overland Park 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

ROMEIEH, CHARLOTTE A Morehead, KY 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

ROMIG. RONALD L Leavenworth 

Accounting Junior 

RUES, ROSEMARY Lewis 

General Freshman 

RUSSELL, STEVEN F Eureka 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

SAGER, KIM S Mission 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

SANDOVAL, JEANNIE I Tuba City, AZ 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

SCHAFF, JASON A Lunenburg, MA 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

SCHUL, JILL D Topeka 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

SEARS, BROC Jackson, TN 

Commercial Art Senior 

SECK, MARK W Gardner 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

SHELLEY, RITA L Leroy 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

SHOEMAKER. ROBERT M, Winner, SD 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

SHUMAN, DEBBIE Salina 

Elementary Education Senior 

SILKMAN, CHERYL J Hopewell Junction, NY 

Engineering Sophomore 

SLOAN, HERBERT W Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

SMALL. SUSAN K Conway Springs 

Family Economics Graduate Student 

SMART, ROBERT L, , Kansas City 

Restaurant Management Freshman 

SNORTLAND, KRISTI J. . . . Bismarck. ND 

Early Childhood Education Graduate Student 

SOUTHERLAND, STEVE R Overland Park 

Pre-Design Protessions Freshman 

STILL, RICHARD E Topeka 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

STUCKY. DENNIS J Pretty Prairie 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

SVOBODA, ALAN C Chapman 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

SWANSON. JIM R, Kansas City 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

SWANSON. JOHN E. Kansas City 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

TAYLOR. JOHN E. El Dorado 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

THOMSEN. DAVID J. . . . Council Bluffs, IA 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

THOMPSON, PATRICIA L. . . Clay Center 

Secondary Education Junior 






THORSELL, GEORGE R Chanute 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

TOBALD, JOHN A Glasco 

Agronomy Senior 

TORRES, ABDON M Junction City 

Psychology Senior 

TRAMPOSH, GERALD P Overland Park 

Biology Senior 

UNGLES, RALPH L Satanta 

Agronomy Junior 

VACZI.JAMESA Overland Park 

Physical Education Sophomore 

VASEY, VELDAJ Winfield 

General Sophomore 

VEITH, ANTHONY J Viola 

Pre-Design Protessions Freshman 

VILLA, RANDY J Waukesha, Wl 

Business Administration Freshman 

VOEGELI, JOHN J Peck 

Microbiology Senior 

VORAN. KENTS McPherson 

Agricultural Mechanization Freshman 

WABUDA, GARY J Shelton, CT 

Microbiology Junior 

WALRAFEN, GREGG L Topeka 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

WARD, KENNETH A Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

WEIDE, MALIA J Topeka 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

WESTHUES, JAMES M . Overland Park 

General Freshman 

WIEDENMANN, KURT R Overland Park 

Pre-Forestry Freshman 

WILDER, GREGG A Prairie Village 

Physical Education Junior 

WILSON, PAUL R Burr Oak 

Accounting Junior 

WINTER, CHARLES L, . . Garden City 

Accounting Sophomore 

WISWELL, CHESTER L Sublette 

Agronomy Freshman 

WOELK, LINLEY E, Topeka 

Pre-Design Protessions Sophomore 

WOODERSON. RICKY A Newton 

Business Management Freshman 

WOOLERY, SUSIE K Wichita 

Fashion Marketing Sophomore 

WORKMAN, WESLEY E . . .Topeka 

Biochemistry Sophomore 

WRIGHT. DOUGLAS E Sublette 

Pre-Design Protessions Sophomore 

ZIMMERMAN, STEVEN W Olathe 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

ZORN, MICHAEL A Claflin 

Engineering Freshman 



moorehall — 387 



phi delta theta 







i i 



Houseparent / BBt B^BBy *<BRlBi ^i™BB >"9k 

ANDERSON, JOHN M Garden City J**Q|BB Br^M ^PJjjjB Bk 

ASHBURN.' RICHIE F\" ' Garden City |H W #1B| V^'j^^B ^T * 4BB BF^*P|B |nB 

Natural Resource Management Freshman IflLrflMlBp * ^.. IBa ■ X jBT H ' tW Bl OB 

BAY RANDALLS Topeka jPf ■ >. 3fejBr 1 dkaB 7 Bl *£jB *, -"** BY ' 

Business Administration Sophomore A &JKM JB^iffliv W' ^3B] a "^ImBtF ^m w \ ~~~A^m 

BEERS. GREG S Topeka ' ~W ^JWW'i') J JKf & ■ ' ■» ^ «JBV ^. «BB 

Chemistry Freshman X 5=' ; ( ,.Jk "WT \ *1»BBta>. i A Vk ML ^rBrw 

BEERS, RAY Topeka Wku. SPl^ JB> J BB A j^ III IfPB Bfe jU^f^ BBB B\BB( 

Business Administration | Bb \ 1 »* --• > BtSBfl 

b\ a I P^J^E ■ nm SHE 

BEINS. MAX A Overland Park 

Building Construction Junior 

BENSON, JAY B Garden City W^mm 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore W Bk %* * -KB, :-y 

BLOCH. BILLC . . Overland Park 

General , Freshman 

BOL, DAVID G I 'M'.vn.»l 

Accounting , Junior 

BROADFOOT, JEFFREY A Olathe ■■*£ I | 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Senior /A 

BRUCE ROBERT P Shawnee Mission *!« M^^, $B* ' BWIBl. I BkGI 

Pre-Medicme Junior . MiJS™ vBBJ"' **< \ jflnBBB SSBiJiW 

CALLAWAY. HAROLD C Ottawa 

Agriculture Freshman 

DAVIDSON. GARY M Manhattan J| 

Business Freshman 1 _ 

DAVIS. GREG D Manhattan MP 

Business Freshman I • 

DAWES, MICHAEL A Topeka ^, - 

Pre-Dentistry Junior BB| 

DORAN. PATRICK J Overland I W k?^m 

Business Administration I* Jk B^ 

DOUGLASS. JASON J Ottawa If ;J fl|9Bk " >A 

Business Sophomore f T. HM iBi /fB^ ^ 

ENGELS. GLENN M Rose Hill ,^^k m£-m jf/Kf^ 

Feed Science Sophomore ^B. £B^Bk, ttSx Bk 

ERWINE, STANFORD W Garden City Wk WU BB jBPJ*fBB 

Business Management Sophomore BWBIBH B' ^tf^^H fSMBM^^B 

FAIRBAIRN, SCOTT W Garden City ■! |B B"* ^BB jjf V ■ BB 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman • I V B .A |Bb B <Jf 

FLAIR, ROBERT F Bucklin 1 ' .'JkW \ ^|B B *-•*& 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman ~ ^B*" & jBM ^»\ *^BF 

FOSTER. MARK E Topeka V ^Bl l^WW N '*B? 

Business Administration Junior A <9Bw. C^W JP 

GALLUP. DONALD R Blue Rapids IT 2T^ *k\ 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore &B. i^HB ^. , iffiS'' 

GALLUP, GEORGE A Blue Rapids 

Business Administration Junior 

GRAT. DAVID C Overland Park 

Veterinary Medicine . , Freshman 

GREELEY. PAUL K West LaFayette, IN 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HEIDEBRECHT, BRENTON L McPherson 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman X M 

HORST. GUYR Stanley A ^J Z '^B^ ^^Bwik A vBTw ''"^^Bw 

Social Science Senior B »k sjK ^Rk ^Jp ! Bj^vBJBfc^ M^ AV 

HOUGLAND. STEVEN C B\ 'wBjW. /!a ■ .V"' JH j Z'" F"'' ;; " B\ W*BBi ^BVB 

Business Junior Bkl*l BBS IjF M A Bl ^' Bf BBn r 

HHHI SB HB B 

HOWARD, GREG W Kansas City J^ m "^. l Uf t fc *' BBk ^BBk. .BBk. 

Psychology Junior ^BM\ wfl A flF '^BjJJjW .BHfiBk ^Aw 

HUEBEN, BRIAN C Overland Park (Bj JH\ MftttlBB ■P'BBB BpVBB 

Pre-Medicme flK BpP^^Bi ^ 4BM ^^^9K\ 2 9 ^WJ 

JACOBS, THEODORE R ' St Louis. MO « ' ««M| ''' Jl ^t Bl 'f -»Bj *' *'** *^BJ #i"^TBB PdH 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman Bf C ^^ A «» BT C ' " B J X 

JOHNSON. DAN Salina ' A ^. Bl ^ '_^B * iBW ---^ "^B 1 '^BF 

General Freshman "^^HL \ "^fc. "W^ • #v ^F ^BV 

JOHNSON. STEVEN D Salina t^JT ! ^P-:\ # k "^P^ ^. A ^B '"^B^^ 

Mechanical Engineering Senior ^L HB ^E fct. ^B' .* , < tV ,,rf ■>-- ,^^^^ ^Bk f^k. /#L ^^^. 

KAUP, STEVEN C Manhattan A> X ■ B^lp - MBB| Bff A k Bl B\ JkB^ ^^H 

Biochemistry Junior If / v ^%^^ ^K% bWIbVb! Bffk HbTb .Cl^ 

KEARNY. MICHAEL A Leawood B^Bw ^V<Bk B^Bk ^BBM. ^BBw 

otiawa ■^^^B» ^j^^IbV BvbVb jir^^Bi Bb ^A. -«■» Ibi 

Architectural Engineering ^JB] ■^^^BBl ^T ^^1 B^^Bl ^B Aff* jM\ 

K0EHN. MATTHEW A, 1^ I^B 'jf* ffBj M-9 #BB ■ ^ dBj 9 <4»^BBJ B f*BB 

Pre-Design Professions ^ -A B ■ , IV V B « ^^B IB " ^^ W Bf 

LAMGENWALTER, PETERA Wichita ^ iMLBI m --~^rBl "B % 

Business Finance Sophomore V "*BBP?^ * ^^. ^BlBjf ^^B^ ~~^^^r .^B 

IEGLER, DONALDA Overland Park A -^BT ^w£ BF Br 

Political Science Senior iF'w^ BB ? '^T Bw ^T^ 

MARK h Overland Park ^ ^ B^ ^ A« - A AI flB BBk 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman ll _, ^BBB IB ^BjfH ff^^B 

MOEHLENBRINK. LARRY D Blue Rapids H ^^^ 4f-^ 

Radio and Television Junior j^^B^ BFjdBk 

MOORE, JEFFREY W Overland Park ^3 Bk ktf BJ 

Sophomore ^^^^^Bb /t 

MOORI MICHAEL E While Cily Jr^tfBB * **** • 1 

I lw tnr ,ii I ngmeering Freshman 1 *""^ \ jBB 

MOM Hollon .1 '%A1 l-.il 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore i ~^B % tBP 

MOSER IEFFREYC Marysville % 'tF ~^^T 

MUSH JAMI Sf M.in'lMl!'.'in "'ii. 



388 — phi delta theta 







NELSON, D. CRAIG Rose Hill 

Construction Science Senior 

NELSON, TODD A Rose Hill 

Business Freshman 

NEWSOME, WILLIAM R Manhattan 

General Freshman 

NICHOLSON, WILLIAM G. McPherson 

Business Administration Junior 

PATTON, LEWIS A Overland Park 

Pre-Medicme Junior 

RAMSDALE, MARC R McPherson 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

RICHARDS, DOUGLAS D Topeka 

Computer Science Freshman 

SCHREIBER, JEFFREY A Wichita 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

SCHULER, STEVEN J Chapman 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SEATON, ALAN J Wichita 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

SMITH, MARK E, Ottawa 

Business Sophomore 

STAUFFER, WILLIAM H Topeka 

Business ' Sophomore 

THOMPSON, MARC A Manhattan 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

TURNER. RODNEY L Manhattan 

Business Freshman 

WATSON, DAVID E Manhattan 

Accounting Junior 




Sometimes a view of the next door resi- 
dence affords diversion from the routine. 
These Phi Delts may be on the brink of a 



discovery as they look out on the neigh- 
borhood from a precarious vantage point. 



outside interests 



phi delta theta — 389 



phi gamma delta 



DUNCAN. HELEN M Houseparenl 

ALLISON, DOUGLAS A Riverside, CA 

Building Construction Senior 

ANTHONY. H SEAVEY Manhattan 

Pre H sign Professions Freshman 

BARTLEY. KEITH D Manhattan 

Pre-Pharmacy Freshman 

CAMPBELL. MICHAEL W Westmoreland A. . 

Electrical Engineering '£&H^^? ^^. 

CHAMBERLAIN. RONALD L Smith Center B&J^fe 

General Freshman ^^R. 

CLANCY. DON D Liberal 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

DAWDY. DAVE A Salma 

Economics Sophomore 

DORSEY, THOMAS H Salma 

General Freshman 

FARR. STONEY Abilene 

Physical Education Freshman 

FENLON. C PAUL St Louis, MO 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

FRISQUE. JOHNT. Salma 

Criminology Freshman 

GEBHART. MARK D Salma 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

HARRISON, PAUL D Fairway 

Accounting Senior 

HAUG. EDWARD W Abilene 

Business Freshman 

HAUG. TOM Abilene 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

HELLMAN. JOHN E Manhattan 

Construction Science Junior 

HERMAN. JOHN D Abilene 

Business Administration Junior 

HITCH, DANIEL L Westmoreland 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

JANSSEN, ROYCE C Little River 

Accounting Senior 

JOHNSON, KENDAL D . Little River 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

KELLOGG. RICHARD J Prairie Village 

Psychology .Freshman 

LAWRENCE. RICHARD W Manhattan 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

LUSTGARTEN. EDH Overland Park 

Chemistry Junior 





MM 



an earful 



One surefire method of drowning out 
crowd noise is by using a more distract- 
ing noise — like music. When tired 
enough, listeners can be lulled into slum- 
ber even by Led Zeppelin. 



)90 - phi gamma delta 



MILLIGAN, RANDY J Clay Center 

icultural Economics Freshman 

MORRIS, MICHAEL E. Westmoreland 

Food Science . Junior 

PAUSTIAN, DONALD L Manhattan 

Family and Child Development Junior 

ROBSON, MIKE Abilene 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 

ROME, DONALD L Holcomb 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

SEARS, LARRY L Smith Center 

Finance Senior 

SHAW. WILLIAM D Prairie Village 

History Junior 

SMITH, RICHARD J Elliott, IA 

Physical Education Senior 

SMITH, ROD A Manhattan 

Horticulture Therapy Junior 

STRAUB, ERNIE J Kansas City, MO 

Construction Science , Sophomore 

THOMAS, MICHAEL D Atwood 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

VANIER,JAYD Salina 

&\ jrSSfcN Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

WANG, ROGER W Clay Center 

Milling Science and Management Freshman 

WHITMER, MONTE W Zenda 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

WIETHARN, GARY E Clay Center 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

WILSON, GREG H. Abilene 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

WILSON, MARK T Abilene 

Bakery Science and Management Junior 




P iii .i.Hiiiiui delta — 391 



phi kappa tau 



ANDERSON, DOUGLAS S Wisconsin Dells. Wl 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

ARNOLD, RICHARD L Overland Park 

Social Work Senior 

ARPIN. SIDNEY L Stockton 

Civil Engineering Junior 

BECKERLE. HARRY S Shawnee Mission 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

BHANGANANDA. NITINAI Thailand 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman i 

BRYAN. KIM F Independence t^m. 

Accounting Freshman H^K 

CARPENTER, WILLIAM R Kansas City 

Business Administration Graduate Student 

CARR, STEPHEN T Pittsburg 

Restaurant Management Freshman 

CASE, TIMOTHY G Manhattan 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

CHAFFEE, PAUL D Overland Park 

Regional and Community Planning Graduate Student 

DAUBERT, KENT J Scott City 

Agronomy Junior 

DAVIS. DANIEL M Merriam 

Pre-Forestry Freshman 

DILLMAN, DENNIS B Wichita 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore £ S^ ^fe 

DISSEL.STEPHANC Manhattan JMI^k M --»P» 

Business F reshman Wr ]^B ■ USS^^^R 

DUENSING. DAVID T Liberal 9« *«f^B W*^H^M ' 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

ELLIS, WALTER C Garden City \, -Aj 1 .JMF 

Agricultural Economics Senior X s ^Bjf 

FORREST. ROBERTS Kansas City i JjjJM . „ >. JM 

Political Science Junior hss^F ' Bi ^ FK 

GORDON. DANIEL B Overland Park i w BEL ▼ B|^^ 

General Sophomore I W ■ J \ #jfc SB I 





t n t 





392 — phi kappa tau 




GUSTAFSON. MARK M Hastings, NB 

Theatre Junior 

GUTIERREZ, RALPH Topeka 

Architecture Senior 

JONES, RICHARD P Overland Park 

Business Sophomore 

JONES, ROBERT T Overland Park 

Architecture Senior 

JONES, TOM M Garden City 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

KENNEDY, CHARLES D Luray 

Physical Education Freshman 

KRAMER. JOHN C Ottawa 

Pre-Forestry Sophomore 

LA WSON, FORREST C Wichita 

Music Education Sophomore 

LINDER.JAYE Clay Center 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

LUCK, RICHARD D Lyons 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

MARTIN, RICHARD A Assaria 

Architecture Senior 

McKENZIE, JEFF D Independence 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

PALMBLADE, FREDDIE E Leoti 

Horticulture Senior 

PASSEN, PHILIP C Leawood 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

RODDY, WALTER C Overland Park 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

SHOEMAKER, ROBERTS . Kansas City. MO 

Architecture . Filth Year Student 

SNYDER, MARK G Overland Park 

Civil Engineering Senior 

STEIN, GREGORY I Gypsum 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

THIERER, LARRY Ogden 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

TRACY, WILLIAM O Syracuse 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

VENKER, J, STEPHEN St. Louis, MO 

Architecture .............. Fifth Year Student 

WALLACE, JAMES R Ottawa 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

WHEELER, LARRY R. . Shawnee 

Horticulture Therapy Graduate Student 



the better the sooner 

A lot of time and papier-mache reaped 
first place for the Phi Kappa Tau home- 
coming display. Counterpart of the 
Conestoga wagon, a ferocious Willie 
Wildcat perched atop the Phi Tau house 
during homecoming week, but didn't 
scare off any Sooners — or Wildcats. 



phi kappa tau — 393 



phi kappa theta 



BRUNK GLESNOR L Houseparent >j£'Mfc& 9fek ^*A 

ATWOOD. ALANR Oswego JmMHBk WV 

Agricultural Economics ^BC2SMBi jlyHP^^^^^B K^ 

BERG. WILLIAM M Prairie Village AU* 9 ■» "* Wk ' \it* ffF*tm 

Business Administration Freshman fmg _» Jm ym ' J*^ 

BIRCH. JOHN W Shawnee Mission Egf ^ J1 » jjttm \ *«* lIV 

Accounting Sophomore ^^ WJm * — "** 1^^ 

BORGERDING. DAVID G Marysville V ML'NmL* Jr H^' 

Accounting Sophomore i irf^. JBfeA ~*f^&. 

ERICKSON. MICHAEL V Council Grove ^g, /^Hfck I ^^ Jh 

Pre-Law HW Jflb T^B HHfl V '■ W ^ 

FRIEDEL, MICHAEL D Wichita ittM- ^ Zjl^ *^9^k 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore J^^EH^B i *§t/m BBfe /^ '^^^B 

GOTTSCHALK. GENE Hays M^MH &MHE S& » ^WBl 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore pfc wK/ZS Wmm 

HASTERT. ARTHUR A ; - ^' \*^|^k W^^MH ' J» O 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore a -~ -»> ~-JM S7"3K 

HELLMER, JOHN F Shawnee Mission ^ ^M^B^ «-*-fcW^ W Jf 

Electrical Engineering Junior ^^^^M ' ^* ^dBw 

HENRY. STEPHEN L Gypsum A "iH^t '<4flP^. ^ ^^8^*1 

Agricultural Economics H -^^B^^^ .-. 3^.^^^^ g0HP 

HOLLANDER. STEVE J. . St. Charles, MO Hk <■ ■ v!" ' . sjk fk M 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman ^& *J^| H«*'" jff\jH Hb / 1 KM 

IVES. RON M Salma 'iJBt '"' 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman JW"*\ \ 

JILKA, JOHN P Assaria 

Anthropology Senior „ 

KELLNER, TIMOTHY L Littleton, CO « 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

LINENBERGER. STEVEN P. Hays CI ^Z^T 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore ^t "'jBfflF 

LLAMAS. STEVE A Newton ^R TgjiPi ^«B -^'""M 

Accounting Junior H& ™ ^^^^ ^^^^^ flH 

LOW, KENDALL C Fowler ^B ^V ^^^ ^ JRl Hfe* / 4 .* 

Architecture Junior i^B^I 'JJJJJJJJJJJJJJ t ' w! / * ' 

MAHONEY, THOMAS H Dorrance ifl 1^^ <^B|^. 

MARTINEZ. JESUS R Wichita ¥*&" mm^B JHflV^B 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman J f ^B^^^JIb 

MILLER, STEVE L Prairie Village « J jflF ^V =*» V^ft 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore — »_ -J 

MORGAN, TIMOTHY J Greeley , ^ "W 

Physical Education Senior ,4 ^E ' ""^W 

MUDD, FLAVIAN G Gorham £V£ jr*. sjr ^ 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 5MS, J& SW jHW 

MUDD. PATRICK P Gorham &"?* JBI Hal & / i^^ft 

Agricultural Engineering Senior g *: ik / ^H 





holed up 



V 



Members of "the Hell Hole" look a bit 
devilish as they repose in the rustic set- 
ting of their clubroom. Primarily used for 
study, the pit lends itself to . . . er , . . 
entertainment. 



394 — phi kappa theta 












PREISSER. DON G Haven 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

REDD, LAWRENCE R St. John 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

ROSEWICZ. GARY P Kansas City 

Civil Engineering Junior 

SCHAFER, GREG A Pretty Prairie 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

SCHLETZBAUM, JAMES V Atchison 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

SCHMIDT, FREDERICK J St Louis 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

SCHMIDT, PAUL C Hays 

Dairy Production Senior 

SCHMIDT, STEVEN P Caldwell 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

SCHROEDER, RICHARD V Hays 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

SIGLER, HAROLD W Prairie Village 

Business Management Junior 

SMULLING. TIMOTHY W Princeton. IL 

Pre-Design Professions . Freshman 

STEWART, ROBERTA Hutchinson 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

WARNICA. CHARLES A Seneca 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

WATKINS, JAMES P I'rairir- 7ill,:ifi> 

Natural Science Freshman 

WAWRZYNIAK, JUDE J St Louis. MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

WHITESELL, WAYNE D Blue Rapids 

General Freshman 

WIESNER, THEODORE F Ellis 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

ZIEGLER, LOREN A Grainfield 

Business Education Sophomore 

ZIEGLER, RALPH P Grainfield 

Physical Education Senior 




pi beta phi 



GOHEEN. DELTA G Houseparent 

ALLEN. SUE L Inman 

Speech Pathology Freshman 

BARBER, MARJORIE Anthony 

Speech Pathology and Audiology Senior 

BARNES, DEBBIE J Wichita 

Elementary Education Junior 

BEARDMORE, LUANNE Topeka 

Interior Design Senior 

BENIGNUS, SARA S Hoismgton 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

BINFORD. KERRY K Liberal H 

Child Psychology Sophomore 

BISAGNO. KAY Augusta 

Accounting Sophomore 

BOLAN.JONNAL Manhattan 

Vocal Music Sophomore 

BOLES. CATHERINES Manhattan 

General Freshman 

BRADBURY. DANA A Topeka 

General Sophomore 

BRAUNAGEL.CARENA Wichita 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 




ample ammunition 



v 



Straight shooting Pi Phis? Couldn't be 
any other way with the arrow as their 



symbol. No marauding enemy greeks 
better try to make off with this prize. 



396 — pi beta phi 



omm& 





ao^ 



ijk 



# 


s 


*^ 


1* 


ft 


^<^^ 




'• •> 1 dp^ 



BROWN, CATHARINE A Manhattan 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

BURNETTE, GARAL. . Overland Park 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

BUSTER. SALLY L McCracken 

Business Administration Freshman 

BUTTON, AMY L Newton 

Political Science Senior 

CALL. JULIE A Manhattan 

General Freshman 

CAMPBELL, BARBARA L Fairway 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

CARDINAL. GAIL A Peoria, IL 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

COOK. CAROLS Wichita 

Business Junior 

COULTER, SUSAN E Topeka 

General Freshman 

CRUTCHFIELD. PATRICIA E Coffeyville 

Pre-Elementary Education Freshman 

DANNER, D'EARL H Manhattan 

Sociology Sophomore 

DEPEW, JULIE A Manhattan 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

DRAKE, DEBRAL Winfield 

Business Sophomore 

EATHERLY. LINDA L Garden City 

Elementary Education Junior 

EDDY. JAN Hays 

Recreation Therapy Sophomore 

ENGEL, KARLA K Solomon 

Home Economics Freshman 

ESAU, VICKIE L Hutchinson 

General ... Freshman 

EVANS, KAREN G Eureka 

Speech Pathology Junior 

EVANS, LESLIE E Eureka 

Early Childhood Education Freshman 

FREY, RUTH A. Manhattan 

Accounting Sophomore 

FROMME, DEBRAJ Topeka 

Music Education Junior 

GRAFF, ELAINE L Manenthal 

Secondary Education Freshman 

GREEN, POLLY A Manhattan 

Business Freshman 

GUTZMAN, MELISSA A Leawood 

Interior Design Sophomore 

HAWKINS, LAURA J Wichita 

Fashion Design Freshman 

HEPPERLY, MARY L Concordia 

General ...... Freshman 

HUTCHISON, MARLAS Hays 

Pre-Nursing . Sophomore 

IRELAND, DEBORAH A Holton 

Outdoor Recreation Senior 

JOHNSON, JOLENE K Colorado Springs, CO 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

KING, JOAN A Bartlesville, OK 

Fashion Marketing Senior 

KINGSTON. ARLETTA M Hoisington 

Fashion Marketing . Sophomore 

KNIERIM, DEBBIE R Rock Port, MO 

Business Education Junior 

KRIWIEL, MARGARET J Wichita 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

LINDGREN, DEBIE J Prairie Village 

Architecture Senior 

LIVINGSTON. SUE A. . El Dorado 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

LUTHI, ALLISON J Madison 

Physical Science Sophomore 

LUTHI, JONI R Madison 

Recreation Junior 

MAIN, JENNIFER L El Dorado 

Commercial Art Senior 

MANN, DONNA L Salma 

Elementary Education Freshman 

McENDREE.VICKIG Wichita 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

MclNTYRE.PEGGEA Coldwater 

Business Education Sophomore 

MEADE, SANDRA A Wichita 

General Freshman 

MITCHELL, SHELLEY D Cassville. MO 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

MORGAN. KIMBERLY A . Salma 

Social Work Junior 

PALMER. KIM K Shawnee 

General Sophomore 

PHELAN. JANE M Hutchinson 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

PIERCE. JEANNE L Salina 

Pre-Denlistry Junior 

PROPHET. DEBBIE J ..Springfield MO 

Speech Pathology and Audiology Sophomore 



pi beta phi 




RIEDEL. BARBARA C Topeka /^SBm* BBv. -J^BBk. -^■B^Bk. 

General Sophomore LJUPlBBm Jfl BB BV'^bBBV JkMm *BK 

ROACH, NANCY C Wichita BuT 

Home Economics and Journalism Sophomore Brat ^Hr -■-# I^^Bb ■ -^ ,*JbBB a B «^Bb 

ROE. BARBARA I Superior, NB v 11 fm *▼ ■ 

Textile Research Junior j9 / JkB| V i ■ JLjB? 

SALMON, DENISE A Manhattan VL^XPBr ^B> Mr* iBSST ' Bk ~'19aBf 

Elementary Education Junior ?W ~^JrW ^f -< IbBv 

SCHMIDT, CINDY A Kansas City ^ '^^J^/^ I 

Fashion Marketing Senior Jr ™ 

SCHROCK.JOA . . Kiowa -— ^ ^/ — *#^ 

Agriculture Sophomore 

SCHULTE, KIM A Garnett /f^BBVB .4b1BbBW JbT'mW C«BbV ill 

General Freshman ■■ "-A .BbF ^bVBV / asm ,/* "^Bm *-' 

SCHUMACHER, KARLA J Salina StM M-V # ^M _f BBL |/ -B\ 

Home Economics Education Freshman LMr» <^^H 9 BbBb ™i .-» ^™JBB m*S- ^"IBB : w— 

SEELEY.MARYANN El Dorado H^ 5 * f^Bl af '"'Ml I 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore fft y-^^H B -' BB 4 "^ ^fcv \# 1»«B ^ < 

SHEIK, JULIE B Bern tB^BBW M'^lB ^BT^J^B I V ^M%\ lV 

Math Education Sophomore '■ J% JBv <4B1 W J^H. ■■ i,.\ V^Fl ■ kB 

SPARKS, KATHY L Shawnee Mission "J/ --"40 fldF ^^Bl 

Physical Therapy Junior P ' ! ™B ' * aBB 

SURBER, HEIDI M Eureka -M*** ,' Br "*^Bl BY 

Applied Voice Sophomore ^■r ' *B ^ ^» 

TAYLOR, ELISABETH A Kinsley jfe .JBlflB- j«*"V aBlf(lW 

General Freshman 4*4 A V'lP^Bk aB( % mSP^bB 

TIPPIN.KIMBERLYA Wichita »" ^J| ^1/ 'Bb- ™"t ^B 

Landscape Architecture Junior |B_ ^-^ ^■■B ikil - .^B ttHF ^_Wk 

TOLLEFSON. ANN C ■"*' <^*fl J^'f/H Mm 'i flfl BT ^^H 

Special Education Junior '$$• B >^ "JEB bB '"4BBBT 

TOWNSEND, NANCY A. Concordia i - I HM ■ ^"^B B / Bi B -■■*"* 

Recreational Therapy Senior V ^T^^ EBl ' < 

VAN CLEAVE, JANET H. Kansas City ▼ ^ * , B^^^BBW I JBb»4b1 ^"^ 

Modern Language Senior 

Business Administration , , Freshman ■. ■) 

WHITEHEAD, LESLEY Y Lincoln, NB A _V M ^ 

Business Junior M\ • Vk ^fJ ^tJK r ' 

WILKINSON, SHERYLK Wichita MF" « «W^ T>BI 

ftecreation Sophomore ^ |j^ _V jABjm j 

WILLIAMS, SHARI L Dodge City __f ^Bl _V - f4BB§ B "* 

Pre-Nursmg Freshman mBB 4~Bb1 Br> N 

WITTMEYER.GAYLEJ. Ottawa Hjk, '^BB i. " BbBI M<~ 





398 — pi beta phi 





pi kappa alpha 



BBjk k w ADAMS. GARY L. Concordia 

Mtfk -J*" ^fc K Civil Engineering Senior 

m , *2&m ADAMS, RICHARD R Concordia 

mmf^W $ ^ (H ADAMS. W. CLAY Overbrook 

■ / ~4BM W - ~* M* Clvl1 Engineering Senior 

*ML " "~ A\ ^T JiBT ARC HI R l>< HH.LASSK Garnelt 

^m^^^MtL, % i ^W. «^Bw. BODELSON, MICHAEL A Santa Fe. NM 

*;■ Jft, J JzF^ m^m\ Architecture Junior 

l| / AT Bk r^BJ jf% BM BURNETT. DAVID G Overland Park 

| H^ MB ™B Natural Resource Management Junior 

fPUk ^SHak. jlH BBW BYBk 4t Jfew BURRIS. JEFF K Garnet! 
BM HH HA «fe *?""•** * Bk J iBBi Business Sophomore 
IT BWWJ P J. BMr m H| CARR. CHARLESR Wichita 
IB ItJI fHp ■¥ IP 1**J |I, t4» 1 k CARTER, KENT L ^Russell 
r -Sj "*%JmW^ 41 Br ^^ * 1 4h S '^kJmw 1 *4mBT Accounting Freshman 
^^* -<MJaP r jk ^ »— g W ' " CLESS. GARYC Prairie Village 
BM\ j ^aV *Sa. JV kHfli x ~jrMm*' Agricultural Economics Sophomore 
BjM WW PBW ^tf T#Bv OkHM "W)F CLESS. STEPHEN E Prairie Village 
BM BMk ifrBr flK Sr^ Ba I^hBT / Radio and Television Senior 
, BJBM /ABB fey II M BBBr B.^Bf > jST ' CORMAN.RICHARDvV Wichita 
BM /BBS BT ^ BM IP BBBJ . lOBTl lift. Accounting Sophomore 

CORY, SCOTT E Wichita 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

COYLE, MICHAEL D Overland Park 

jf *W m Horticulture Senior 

CROFOOT, JAMES W Cedar Point 

Business Administration Junior 

DAVISSON, STANLEY P Mission 

Accounting Senior 

DELL, BRUCE D St Louis. MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

DENNING. DALE P Russell 

Pre-Medicme Sophomore 

Jm\ Mf\. " - A .'JBjSBl ^H HBk ^C'.jMk DREHER, STEVEN P 

i J^^ 1 S BP^BIBM ^B BMk f^ BBB Animal Science and Industry Senior 

m\j 1 BT 111 If *"Bl BM Bwl BM J iBM ELMER.DANAG. Manhattan 

B^bwJ I hiBl f'« I* 8 *** •/"*i"<Bl S^mBbI I'" ^*b1 B,o,o9v Semo ' 

# " ' &^BM a I Bf V B? B] ^^BW I -4 JBf FUESSLE. RICHARDS Overland Park 

BW JmW '■ 4kiBM ^ "'""it BT » _SBp ^\ " -Br 1 -*"* JB^ Agricultural Economics Freshman 

™ -» i \nBf **- *" ir "* ^ """SlBPP* A ~*Jy GRIFFITH, EDWARD L Marion 

ME •^mJmW ■** *■ Jr _2F^ k BBl '^P 7 *^ Business Junior 

^^fc. > Wk ~ "" ^ ~\ ^WHBk jk\BBMh HEIM DANNY W Marion 

iBT' - i^T ^ Y* «K '•J 4B BMMWM Agriculture Junior 

?0#>.BM ILlF / ".» - # BBI tl Bfi BM^lB JOHNSON, ROBERT P Kansas City 

.V\^BT if"' / Wr _BS iTr / IBM \BM BMl£B Business Administration Graduate Student 

I**V '^ I ffk /•^BB ^PjBjk J^ ^ JONES, JAMES C Stanley 

*^M appppwH t jppi m ^ MBB\ Secondary Education Sophomore 

W~3 jOBk ^JBjB flK Mk ^Bi "^BjM KIMBLE. DAVID E Chanute 

"* wH 3P^ CB B^ BBi IjMt jrfBBl Electrical Engineering Senior 

. JIB « -*« Jm .1 -* 1 m -*. P i BM lair. Gregory d Pigua 

~Jm\ ^» <-»»'W S -^HrBBk ^ ,_-3nf Agronomy Sophomore 

"^F * JP{ A ' -^^Bb i\ \ -^iPB LOOMIS, JACK L Marion 

-^gj[ "SrtB^k ^ " " ;i " 1 Nagjr ; m Business Administration Junior 

api "I* >•.." ^jBI W^ LYLE, DWIGHTR Overland Park 

'/'„»-■■ , 1/r J £j JBBW >aki f«k Construction Science Senior 

; |^m t', / + , BT "^ ilw " MALONE, MARK S Ulysses 

MSB ^~-^HB BTJBBBJ Bft / l^[ Architecture 

K BBk ^tJBk ^E ^ ™Bk -' ^^ WWlk MARKEE.JIMM Franklin. MA 

Jf*»StfBM. B& ' JEJQBBk B> * ^Bk &MfcV\ llPk Restaurant Management Senior 

V™9B\ J^^^H ST* B\ rr Bl ^B^^^-M .JP**?^I McARTHUR.WESTK Salina 

If^iBjl Br» «^BB) W ^ Bl W ^" Bl - -« 4V mZtfmmR Accounting Sophomore 

|*r 1* ^^B *t flP B -A^m 'm S-*frF TA^^bY McCARTER.STEVENW Overland Park 

^ "^38 N#"lBl "" """* - » "*""*" ^*«^IBW^ McGREW. ROBERT L 

XTj ^tf ■^■^ \ ^^B AJk^^BBfe Business Administralion 

9BW ->/ BjH X BW mJ9W ^BBaBBB McNITT.JAYD Ulysses 

fW / \1pB ~ BM ^\BBk # V ' ^ \,( m Engineering Science Sophomore 

ira If \ ' ■ BM #*A.Bl ! m BT ■ Kt-BI METZLER. BRADD Dover 

ffl i ▼ \* I BH/^tJlABl V ¥ BBhVBBBI Junior 

f,--4BBBW ^-^Blk. *BjW "Bl iaaaak mills, brianj Russen 

/jfBI PBk ■BBBBBi ^Hk. A* ^1 BB ^,'B BB Poll,lcal Science Sophomore 

i^T^ BBk BT" ^ -SMH Br^^^BB BBB BS NEIGHBORS, DAVIDC Olathe 
W^^k W^M ***W I s '^ f^rB 

B ■ B J szAm 'Br m "• Ml \ Business Administration Senior 

^-*BBjT ^BM ~~Bf %"~BB/ ' -^^BBJ I NELSON, JEFFREY A 

* ^B^V .^Bk ^ ^^B ^V—^W'^ Milling Science and Management Freshman 

-imr k ^bBRP- •, n IfL yfm ''' -taWBfetr NICHOLS, LAURENCEE Leawood 

XT |B\ A ^ Bw. - \. ^r JBl V* Business 

J^ 1 / .^ , , « j* BM rpBBBl nV - ■' • -F^V PEPPERDINE.ROND Kansas Cit) 

fNjj / '^P y \mm ^BBXvfilBB B\ if- Bakery Science and Management 

^B BB. rfflBBk w\ 1mm. iaBBBk ^-T^Bfek #^Bi 

^B I rvA i V^Bl ^ BBk "fc* ^^B BT BBBk Agronomy 

mr^ BJ 4hmBp b B ■--^3Bjk r^ i ' -^Bl i ^BBB riley, greggt 

■■'•• #VBT Bh^9 flBl Kf * tr^BM J «i *^BBi -(^'■BBV ■ - ^SBB Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

|B\ ^B mm ~W ™ -a. BW ■ ^^B] V 5 "' B^ifBM* SANDERS. DOUGLAS K Concordia 

^ ^ 4a ■ /^Bf xk^BBT ^kBB) "=»B1 ^ -^ BBa i-- ..i.'i.i.n, M-jicme 

^Bk B? ' ^ 'Mf V&mW JnB ^*A^ri. SCHNEIDER. MARTIN E 

V^ftfk, ^ .^k ^^PV V_^Brji \ -m\w -^mr M\ Vcl.Min.ny Medicine 

^^ F 1 3BjBw ^^S^ tBt ^yP* ' X ^T ^^ ^P SEITZ. RICHARD M 

: ^|Ba ^ , A.' k\ * A "^ J ^T > SHORT. FREDRICK w Kansas City 

flBf BBhR ^'BBTjr^fj ^ m m ^ '* p,r M, ' iiir ""' 




pikappaalpha 199 



pi kappa alpha 



SIPES. MARTIN J Russell 

Accounting Junior 

SMART, GREG L Kansas City 

Engineering Freshman 

STANIFORTH. CHRISTOPHER J, . Leawood 

Business Administration Sophomore 

TOWELL, MICHAEL S Kansas City 

Marketing Senior 

VALLERO, KEVIN M Galesburg. IL 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

WATKINS. JEFFREY P Newton 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Sophomore 

WHITE, TRACY M Concordia 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

WILLIAMS, LARRY A Garnett 

Art Freshman 

WINDHORST. DANA J Wells 

Pre-Medicine Junior 




where's the fire (truck) 



Should a riot or flames break out in this 
group, the fire hose might cool it down 
... if the Pikes can find it in the crowd. 
The 1 928 La France was purchased from 
the Garnett Fire Department in 1 968. 




400 — pi kappa alpha 




putnam hall 



BURK, DANIEL J McDonald 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

DUPY, DWIGHT D Salina 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

ALBRIGHT. KATHI M Hutchinson 

Food Science and Industry Sophomore 

ALLISON. PAMELA D Basehor 

Home Economics Extension Junior 

APLEY. SUSAN D Larned 

Home Economics . Freshman 

ATTERBURY, RUTH A Kansas City 

Accounting Junior 

AUST, ELIZABETH D Wichita 

Agricultural Journalism Sophomore 

AYRES. JACQUELYN R Smith Center 

General Freshman 

BAKER, JUDY E Humboldt 

Business Finance Senior 

BLUNK.KATIEA Hardtner 

Pre-Velennary Medicine Sophomore 

BOGGS, PAMELA J Arkansas City 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

BRACKETT. BARBARA L LakeQuivira 

General Freshman 

BREWER. TINA A Pittsburg 

Early Childhood Education Freshman 

BROWN, NANCY J Garden City 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

BURGDORFER, JANET L Gardner 

General Sophomore 

CALLAHAN. ANGELA M St. Marys 

Dietetics Sophomore 

CARLSON, MIRIAM G Lindsborg 

Physical Education Senior 

CASSELMAN, MARSHA A Conway Springs 

Fashion Design Freshman 

COFFMAN, BARBARA A DeSoto 

Physical Education Freshman 

CREWS, CAROL G Kansas City 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

DALTON, CYNTHIA D Kansas City 

Journalism and Psychology Senior 

DETWILER, JAN E Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

DIVELEY, C JOYCE Highland 

Home Economics Education Junior 

DOCKER. CONNIE D Topeka 

Fashion Marketing Freshman 

DUSIN, ANN M Phillipsburg 

Accounting Senior 

EGAN, DIANE Wichita 

Speech Pathology Junior 

FARRELL, MAUREEN E Leawood 

Elementary Education Senior 

FUNK.BRENDAJ Garden City 

Home Economics Education . Junior 

GERAGHTY. SUSAN E Lenexa 

General Sophomore 

GERMANN. DEBORAH K Garden City 

Business ... Junior 

GOFF. JANET A Olathe 

History Junior 

GOODRICH. TRACY J Olathe 

Medical Technology Junior 

GOWEN, ALICIA K Wichita 

General Freshman 

GRAVES, SHARON K Greensburg 

Elei lentary Education Senior 

GRIFFITH, SUSAN L Walton 

Radio and Television Senior 

GRIPP, LISA A Smith Center 

Home Economics Sophomore 

HAMMEKE, MARY E New Providence. NJ 

Accounting Sophomore 

HANSON, CAROLYNS Olathe 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

HANSON, MARGARET A Leavenworth 

Accounting Junior 

HAYS, LINDA S Natoma 

Special Education Sophomore 

HEIKES, JANICE K . Riley 

Sociology and Social Work Junior 

HEITSCHMIDT, DIANE K Scott City 

Home Economics Senior 

HESS. JAN L ScottCitj 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

HIGGS. DEBRAS . Topeka 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

HILTZ, SUSAN M. Waukesha. Wl 

Computer Science Junior 

HOECKLE, CHERYL L Montpelier, ND 

Dietetics Senior 

HOFFMAN, PAMELA E Challm 

Interioi Design Junior 

HUMBARGER. JOYCE E. Hennglon 

Pre-Nursing . Freshman 



putnam hall 



HUSTON. DONNA K. . . Wichita 

Social Work Freshman 

ISAACSON, JANNA J McPherson 

Dietetics Junior 

ISENHOWER, DANA J Harper 

Interior Design Senior 

JAHNKE.DEBRAA Topeka 

Business Education Sophomore 

JILKA. ROSEM Assana 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

JOHNSON. DONNA J Bridgeport 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

JOHNSON, LINDA K Assaria 

Horticulture Industries Senior 

JOHNSON, SHARON D Assaria 

Elementary Education Senior 

JULIAN. GLENDA E Johnson 

Pre-Physical Therapy Junior 

KALLENBACH, SUSAN L Valley Center 

Fashion Design Sophomore 

KECK.DEBRAA Wakarusa 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

KENNEDY, CONNIE A Prairie Village 

Fashion Design Senior 

KLASINSKI. DANETTE E Kansas City 

Interior Design Junior 

KNACKSTEDT. NANCY J . . Russell 

Accounting Freshman 

KRAUSE. ROBIN S Modoc 

Foods and Nutrition Sophomore 

KRAUSE, STARLA J Modoc 

Consumer Interest Junior 

KREMPA. ELLEN M. . . . Eden, NY 

Home Economics Extension Sophomore 

KREUT2ER. PAMELA D Scott City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 







Mention munchies in a dorm and the 
rush is on. Snartin' and chompin' accom- 
panied with good friends equals an 

eat your heart out impromptu party 



V 




402 — putnam hall 



: 




















LILLARD. REBECCA L 


Kansas City 






Art Education 


Freshman 






















McMAHON, RENEE 
Psychology 


Overland Park 
Sophomore 










Office Administration 


Sophomore 


Elementary Education 
METSCH, DIANE M 
Pre-Vetermary Medicine 


Freshman 
Newton 
Junior 














MILLS, LORRAINE A. 
Pre-Forestry 


. Russell 
Freshman 


Interior Design 


Freshman 










Elementary Education 


Sophomore 






















MURPHY, NANCY J 
Elementary Education 


Overland Park 
Sophomore 


Music Education 


Sophomore 


Interior Design 

NOLL, JANET L 

Journalism and Mass Communications 


Junior 

Winchester 
Sophomore 


Agriculture ...... 


Freshman 
Oberlm 


Home Economics and Journalism 
PARCEL, PENNIE E 
Music Education 


Sophomore 
Coldwater 
Sophomore 


Family and Child Development 


Junior 








Ulysses 

Senior 

. Cimarron 
Sophomore 
McPherson 


Journalism and Mass Communications 

PIXLEY. CYNTHIA L 
Pre-Vefennary Medicine 
RAMSDALE, JANELLES 


















RICHTER, LINDA K 


Assana 




lola 


Journalism and Mass Communications 


Freshman 














SABATKA, JANIECE M 


Atwood 






Journalism and Mass Communications 

SCHWANKE. LESAS 
Pre-Vetermary Medicine 


Senior 

Scott City 
Sophomore 

•:■<■ 






















SPARE, DONNA J 


St John 








Junior 












putnamhall 403 




STEGEMAN, MARGARET C. Overland Park 

General . . . Freshman 

STRAND, CONSTANCE Leavenworth 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

SUELLENTROP. MARY T Colwich 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

TANNER. REBECCA J St John 

Radio and Television Sophomore 

TENNAL, APRILS Sabetha 

General . Sophomore 

TETLOW, SUSAN E. Troy 

Microbiology Junior 

TEWELL.JANEE Bonner Springs 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

TIBBITS. DARLENE Minneapolis 

Pre-Nursing . . Sophomore 

TRAMMELL. JANICE L Wichita 

General Freshman 

TRAYER, DEAUN K Garden City 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

TRAYER. MARTHA A Garden City 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

TURNER. KIMBERLY J Topeka 

Pre-Nursing '-.nphomcire 

VANTASELL.BRENDAK DeSoto 

Physical Education Freshman 

VAN TASELL, DEBRA S ... DeSoto 

Family Economics Junior 

VOGTS, JOAN D Girard 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

VOILES. DENISE A Shawnee 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

WALTERS. SANDRA A Olathe 

Radio and Television Freshman 

WANN, MARJORIE M Hays 

Home Economics Extension Junior 

WEST, KAREN A Kansas City 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

WILLIAMS, SHERRY L Kansas City 

Biology Senior 

WOMACK, NANCY D lola 

Interior Architecture Senior 

WOOD. MARY E Cedar Point 

Horticulture Freshman 

ZWEYGARDT. BARBARA K St. Francis 

Home Economics Sophomore 




404 — putnam hall 



sigma alpha epsilon 




HLftrlw 




*& %lLUL WfL 








Try & i>wk *Td)M ™. 






FOSBERG. KATHRYN Houseparenl 

ALBRIGHT. JEFF P . Winfield 

Engineering Freshman 

ARMBRUST, JAMES R Buhler 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

ASBURY, DANIEL B Leavenworth 

Business Sophomore 

ATKINSON, STEPHEN C Winfield 

Pre-Law Freshman 

BAHNER.KEVINA Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

BANTA, THOMAS 8 Wichita 

Business Freshman 

BARNES, JOHN F Newton 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

BASHAM, CHUCK E Manhattan 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BERKE, JEFFREY H Leavenworth 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

BERNICA, R GREG Topeka 

Accounting Freshman 

BEYMER, ROBERT K Lakin 

Business Administration Sophomore 

BISHOP, BARRY W Independence 

Accounting Senior 

BOWLES, THOMAS B Hutchinson 

Accounting Junior 

BREWER, STEVEN R. Manhattan 

Business Sophomore 

CHANDLER, C JEROME Sterling 

Business Sophomore 

CHRISTIE, KENNETH A Beloit 

Engineering Freshman 

DAYVAULT. MARK S Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

DECK, STEVE B Wichita 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

DeVORE, PAUL C Independence 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

DYKSTRA, MICHAEL A Atchison 

Business Administration Sophomore 

ELDER, KENT E Mulvane 

Pre-Medicme Sophomore 

ERNST, JACK R Manhattan 

Building Construction Senior 

ESTILL, BRADFORD W Arkansas City 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

ETLING, JAMES B Garden City 

Microbiology Junior 

EUBANK, JAMES W Coats 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Senior 

GARVERT, TERRY J Plainville 

Food Science and Management Senior 

GIESCH.JOHNA Leawood 

Business Freshman 

GILLETTE, CURT J Pillon, CO 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

GLOTZBACH, JOSEPH C Leavenworth 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

GUNTHER, GREG J Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

HALE, STEVEN C Lawrence 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

HATFIELD, JOHN R., II El Dorado 

Animal Science Senior 

HATTAN, MICHAEL A Concordia 

Pre-Optometry Sophomore 

HEALY, MARK J Manhattan 

Business Junior 

HENDRY, DAVID W San Francisco. CA 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

HEROLD, DON Parsons 

Architecture Senior 

HOPPAS, DOUGLAS W Lakin 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HUGHES, JEFF D Manhattan 

Business Administration Senior 

INGRAM, STEVE W Overland Park 

Physical Education Senior 

JONES. DAVID E Arkansas City 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

JONES, JEFFERY W Topeka 

Engineering Freshman 

JONES. RONALD P Mulvane 

Business Junior 

KITE, EDWARD K St Francis 

Marketing Senior 

KUNZ, MICHAEL Prairie Village 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

LACY, STEPHEN M Shawnee Mission 

Accounting Senior 

LADNER. ROBIN A Topeka 

I ishenes and Wildlitr lii.'lmn sv'vm^' 

MARIETTA. JAMES R Salina 

Agronomy Sophomore 



sigma alpha epsilon — 405 



sigma alpha epsilon 



MARTIN. R CRAIG Overland Park "m%L. y '**"SBk 4^BBfcfc ^ "X <^jfcfc. 

Pre-Law Sophomore w ^^ l^&A <rrvj| BBk rfljBBJBk. ftir^lBBBk 

McCUNE.GREG A Plamville JhP^BI J-* 'Wl^Bk hNhIIH St ^Bk "91 

Agricultural Journalism Senior HP «k '^^Bl ffi'^F'i^Bl £jr IB i 

McPHETER. GEORGE R Hutchinson I F-' *' iBBl V "*BjBB §M PBB JB at JMH B "** f*BBl 

Business ■ !» > y Hf V -,» |*fl I £]M 

MEITNER. JOHNT Lenexa & ^-HBBr % "^WT ™ "~^T \ Ai »l ' . . | 

Agricultural Economics Senior • / ^#*aB SP^ 

MILLER. MARK W Topeka / * ^» £& ^B*l » ^f Jf 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore *^ • ^^^ / .* B^. "B^V ^^ 

MILLER. THOMAS E Atchison | .<• f BBBBW. / /& ftj)K ^H 

sophomore W , ^flRlBiflB S ■ 'MBIbbbI 

NASS. MICHAEL G Atchison 4SBt£^, .- . iBBk Aft "BS3k. 

Pre-Law „■ ™ BBk £^BBBBBk S A B« 

NEUMANN. THOMAS A Atchison BBpBBJBBB. F M ? BB J^ jB 

Business Freshman ^^^B B- -^BBT M^F BM JP**^^H 

NITZSCHKE KEVIN J Atchison ■ "*** sSH |^#»»>1BJ BJT, f« Pf -» gjjBf 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore " _ w ■ JHb a I 

OTT. KENT A Perk W ^ 'Hllr ' " ~~ JF. W ~Wr 1 ' "jUt 

Agricultural Economics Junior ^ JB/ '■*! " "^HT 1 *~3B/ 

PARKER. LANDON K Atchison ■ "JF 

Pre-Design Protessions Sophomore Bk .jPkv IB nirtifffff .ci ^Ba |r 

PIKE.BYRONL Miun.-..l,i BB "^H»fc. ^'-' "*¥<** ' 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine Freshman jBL< L^JtflBBk ^%- .. J&BStZ'' A 

Bflr~MBBBK ...BflkvyBBBBr .. '• !»>.. * <\A 

RANKIN, MILTON R Ashland 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Sophomore 

REESE, JAMES E White Cloud I flPBBl 

General Freshman 

REESE, RUSTY A Leavenworth 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

ROBERTS, ROY C Ashland 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore 

RODDY, JACK W Overland Park 

Gram Science and Industry Junior 

SANTEE, RAY L Parsons W »^ ^§B / ^ ■■■ Mpjlff A 

Building Construction Junior fB\ Bh A BfilBl lfRtli&» W, 

SCHUST. JAY E Leawood 

Electrical Engineering Junior ^ ~9llk ^P" BBk *w<3lBW Jt * 

SMITH. DONALD R Walnut M ^-A w «i*Bl ' JBk •*' 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman B» 4BB ± """BBS " ^BB W 

SMYTH. D CRAIG Beloit W~ /C&BBi JB "^ P"J 1 JBj- W' 

Agriculture Freshman I J KB W - FBBfc m 

StEPHENS, DONALD D Ashland 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

STEPHENSON, JAMES D St Louis, MO 

Pre-Design Protessions Freshman 

TAYLOR. MATTHEW M Atchison 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

> A.-Msammm 

THOMPSON. KRIS P Topeka -~^^. 

Accounting Freshman i ■ 'S Mm *BB *lBBH^ ^IK\ 

WEIR, RICK R. Geuda Springs 'X ftf M > -fBJ Bfek . ^ B& 

Industrial Engineering Senior rBhfclinfll M. Si 9H iM ^1 

WEST, STEPHEN G Shawnee Mission #^ MBit I ^?B F*"^^^ (*^#'*JB 

Freshman ^B/ ri§ ^SBf 1'* r "*"•■■ W" ' *-^B 

WORNOM.JOHNL Chandlet '*&i^W W "^^BT " -A JBBP \ /..^B 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore - -=»• 9 " ~ : 3^r ~~"** BBr^ \ *JWwr 







hellenic upkeep 

Brushing up on his greek alphabet, a 
Sig Alph gives his house's cement insig- 
nia a fresh coat ot paint. The letters stand 
on the front lawn and were donated by 
the 1975 pledge class. 



V. 



i ! »' ■ igma alpha eps 




a 9 
if* fk 

P? Ik ffy V* AftJ 




sigma chi 



KELLER, OLETTA Houseparenl 

ALLDRITT, LESLIE D Wichita 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

ATLAKESON, KEVIN K Atchison 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 

BARBER. CHESTER I Anthony 

Aeronautical Engineering Sophomore 

BAUER, GARY B Wichita 

Business Junior 

BECKENHAUER, DWANE M Manhattan 

, ^ l&//[ ] $\ Pre-Medicme Sophomore 




*imt 




91 






' <^#F^Hl^H tB^W. ^^iB^fe-! j2r ' ' ~^t wKL HEUERMANN, PAUL A Prairie Village 

L iS" ^BL. — ■ 1M ^K IF IfcL. Geophysics Sophomore 

HOFFMAN, STEVEN J Kansas City 

Business Management Senior 




BLEAKLEY, DAVID P Overland Park 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

BOOTH, JOHN E, Overland Park 

Pre-Law Freshman 

BOWMAN, JOHN D Prairie Village 

General Freshman 

BURKE. PATRICK T ...... Mulvane 

Construction Science Freshman 

BURKHART.W MARK Kansas City 

Business . , Sophomore 

CARR, JAMES E Mulvane 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 



COTT, JEFF J Belle Plaine 

Radio and Television Sophomore 

DOVE, DeVERE Great Bend 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

EASTER. RICHARD C Raytown, MO 

Pie- 1 it ".n)n Pintessinns .Sophomore 

EICHMAN, JAMES J Wamego 

Fashion Marketing Sophomore 

FLICK, JOHN W Wintield 

Pre-Forestry Sophomore 

FOLKERTS, DON A Great Bend 

Accounting Senior 



FOX, LARRY D Larned 

Business Senior 

GANTZ.GARYR Ness City 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

HARMON, DAVID P Wichita 

Business Administration Junior 

HAVENS, JOHN H Olathe 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine 



1 SML 9 



HONER, STEVEN L Atchison 

Radio and Television Sophomore 

HOWARD, ROBERT L Overland Park 

General Freshman 

JACOBSON, STEPHEN B Wamego 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

JONES, REX A Wichita 

Business Sophomore 

KNOPICK. THOMAS J Wichita 

Pre-Forestry . . . . Sophomore 

LYNTON. PETER D Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 



MACH, SCOTT W Peoria, IL 

Radio and Television Sophomore 

MARKEY, DOUG B. Lake Quivira 

Business Sophomore 

MATLACK, TERRY C . . Clearwater 

General Sophomore 

McCOY, MICHAEL D Manhattan 

Mecianical Engineering Sophomore 

MORRISON, KILE R Wichita 

£j | 7" Architecture Senior 

NELSON, JAMES C Overland Park 

Business Freshman 



\ 




II J 1?J i M * 



NORTON. DANIEL J Shell Knob. MO 

Business Freshman 

OSTERMANN, SCOTT L Sylvan Grove 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

PALMA. PHILIP F Topeka 

journalism and Pol it n .il 'm mn r Sophomore 

PARKER, ROBERT W Glen Elder 

Accounting Junior 

PARSONS. DAVID C Wintield 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

PATRICK. J BRIAN Pittsburg 

' 1 / Accounting Junior 



* 



<IQ 



4^ k - Sm t 



PERKY. DAVID W Leawood 

Accounting Senior 

PETERS, MATTHEW W Wichita 

Economics Senior 

PISHNY, NORMAN C Waterville 

Computer Science and Accounting Senior 

PRATT, TYLER P Goddard 

Business Junior 

RAY, CARLO Jetterson City. MO 

Pit' I it'siqii I'lolosshiiis Freshman 

REED, LAWRENCE D Prairie Village 

fit Mr.) Special Student 



sigma chi — 407 



sigma chi 



brewing over books 

Midnight oil isn't the only late night 
study tuel. True crammers employ any- 
thing trom the usual coftee and No-Doz 
to individualized methods of continuous 
eating, chain smoking, or vigorous exer- 
cising at regular intervals. For some, 
however, the almighty GPA is ample 
incentive. 




Rf ISTI R BRIAN P 

I'r.' /.-t'Tirur/ Medn me 


Prairie Village 
Freshman 






V.HNf llJf H [JWIGHTT 

General 

SKOOG PI rERR 

It.' Veterinary Medicine 

STUCKEY, D. SCOTT 


Stocklon 
Freshman 






Will If III ADMARKA 
IT" Design Professions 

il<A HNGTON 
Conslru( lion ' ,< ien< e 


Lincoln, NB 
1 reshman 

Mindenmtnes, M( l 
i reshman 



*MM 



®L 





sigma nu 

BALDWIN, THOMAS F Salina 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

BAY, MICHAEL W Topeka 

Business Administration Senior 

BENNETT. DANIEL M Newton 

Business Freshman 

BERNING, GARY L Manenthal 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

BERNING, LARRY A Marienthal 

jf ^B^fefe Sfck Business Senior 

Mi [ja, ■■ I ^\ T MM BERNING, MARKS ..Leoti 

P| mk B RK K i*i ■ General 

BROTTON, LESLIE E Sahna 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

COPE, JOHN M • Leawood 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

CRAWFORD, JEFF A, Shawnee Mission 

Business Administration Junior 

DAHLSTROM, H. GEORGE Topeka 

Business Administration Senior 

DOLLIVER, MARK T Leawood 

Business Administration Junior 

! ! DOLLIVER, MATTHEW P Leawood 

4iM-: if* G — 

EAGLETON, MARK S Salina 

Business Administration Junior 

FAIRCHILD, KIPP C Leawood 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

GNAEGY, DAVID L Glendale, MO 

Landscape Architecture Junior 

GRIEVES, BRAD A Topeka 

General Sophomore 

GRIEVES, KEVIN D Topeka 

Architecture Senior 

HARP, RICHARD D Leoti 

General Freshman 

^| HAX, CHRIS M Prairie Village 

I'Sk l jflna '^Hok, Business Administration Junior 

f V| '•-,- jj, *■ -ii HILLS, SCOTT W Sedan 

WMi tdmmWmm* it ■' Jm General Sophomore 

Jjfat *Jmmm\ Ktilp mm W-^fSB IVES, RANDY G Sahna 

Business Administration Sophomore 

I .KM \7b m 423m LAW.ROBERTS Kansas City, MO 

\-^m *m. Mi ^Bfc. Architecture Firth Year Student 

am mmmm^m «Jpi«. ^B khkjharv mfvin., .: ■ t 

Mm ^mwrnX ™A? ^SF Mm Commercial Art Sophomore 

i BJ& X. ■ ' T^ $j*p MARIETTA, JOHN C Salina 

' ^■^^■{fl i( | AK W! Pre-Dentistry Junior 

t^mmte^ MURRY, JOHN P Manhattan 
|m Pre-Law Freshman 
i 1 H r ' ; ' NORTON, WILLIAM B Haven 

*U Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 
JPotJBBB''' ORTH, DOUGLAS G Andale 
General Freshman 
*f f ~ZM¥ PATTON, WILLIAM R Troy 

Business Finance Senior 
Ml ^m^T ■ PUKACH, WALTER S Topeka 
BBk ^BJk^ Civil Engineering Junior 
; 1m # iBBBj RIDDER, J JEFFERY Leoti 

n / 'Mf j Agriculture Freshman 





sigma nu — 409 



sigma nu 



RINNER.JOHNA Topeka 

Building Construction ' ■■;■'!■ r r i< .'. ■ 

SANDBERG, CRAIG L Prairie Village 

Business Management Senior 

SCHRAG. LOREN R Moundndge 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

SNELL. ROBERT R Manhattan 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Sophomore 

STILLIONS. KEITH M Topeka 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Junior 

SUTLICK, ALBERT F Kansas City 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

THIES CHARLES W Salma 

Construction Engineering Freshman 

TRAPP, TIMOTHY M Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

TWIETMEYER. STEVEN F Goddard 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 
VAN WORMER. GREGORY W Berkeley Heights, NJ 

Business Administration Junior 

WEBSTER. RANDALL B Osawatomie 

WILSON, BRIAN C Coral Gables, FL jdmt 

Bakery Science and Management Senior W 

WOLFENBARGER, KURT A Raytown, MO A 

Pre-Design Protessions Freshman JK : 

WOOLDRIDGE. BAIRD J Prairie Village 

Pre-Design Protessions Sophomore 




a bad batch 



V 



Cooks not only handle pots and pans 
with skill but also the pranks and com- 
plaints ot those they teed. A good sense 
ot humor is one ingredient the Sigma 
Nu's top chef isn't without. 




sigma phi epsilon 




^ \ 




1&MM 




SHUPE. CORAL 

AICHER, ERICL 

Feed Science and Management 

AMES. RODNEY W 

Agriculture 

APPLEBY. JON L 

Business 

AVERILL, SCOTT G 

Business 

BELL. KEVIN P 

Business 



Houseparent 

Eureka 

Sophomore 

Leoti 

Sophomore 

McPherson 

Freshman 

Kansas City 

Junior 

Salma 

Sophomore 



. Wichita 

Freshman 

Lawrence 

Sophomore 

. Alta Vista 

Junior 



BIRD. RONALD D. 

History 

BLEWITT, TIMOTHYS 

Business 

BOHN. MICHAEL D 
Veterinary Medicine 
BOHN, RODNEY P . . . Alta Vista 

Dairy Science Freshman 

BOURK. GILBERT P Leawood 

Business Sophomore 

BUTTON, DANIEL J Newton 

Pre-Forestry Sophomore 



CARLSON. RANDALL A Valley Center 

Business Junior 

CHALTAS, J STEVE Salma 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

CODY, MARK W ' Coffeyville 

Accounting Junior 

COE, ROBERT W McPherson 

Pre-Law Freshman 

DIERKS, CHUCK C Leoti 

Business Management Junior 

DYER, DAVID K Overland Park 

Business Sophomore 



EVERETT, JOHN W Scott City 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

FREES, JERRY L Great Bend 

Agronomy Senior 

GEHRING GEORGE M Atchison 

Radio and Television Freshman 

GERSTBERGER, JEFF F Leoti 

Agricultural Business Senior 

GLASCO. CALVIN J Goodland 

Agrii ultural Economics Sophomore 

GRAFF, JOHN F Marienthal 

Agricultural Education Senior 



GREENLEE, JOHN W Denver. CO 

Architecture Junior 

HATCHER, BRYAN C Goodland 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

HECHT, ROBERT D Seneca 

Agronomy Freshman 

HECKMAN. CHADC. Wakeeney 

Computer Science Fifth Year Student 

HERZOG, GREGORYS Topeka 

Architecture . Junior 

HODGES, TERRY L Leawood 

Accounting . Sophomore 

HUEY, KIRK E Russell 

Education Senior 

JOHNSON, ROBERT R Garden City 

Architecture Senior 



JOY. DANNY W 
General 
JOYCE. REX M 
Pre-Medicine 
KIRK, CHUCK 
Agricultural Economics 
KNOX. KENNETH W 
Agricultural Economics 



Durham 
Sophomore 
Garden City 
Sophomore 
Scott City 
Sophomore 
Wellington 
Sophomore 



LARSON, G. KENT Scandia 

Agronomy Senior 

LAUE, HAROLD L Topeka 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

LEVY, DAVID S Coffeyville 

Architecture Senior 



LEWIS, R PERRY 
Pre-Design Professions 
LIEBL, STEPHEN A 
Pre-Vetennary Medicine 
LUEBBERS. DENNIS J 
Mechanical Engineering 



Topeka 
Sophomore 
Dodge City 
Sophomore 
Marienthal 
Freshman 



ViACALUSO, NICK J 
3usiness 
ViARKER. JEFF A 



Shawnee 

I reshman 

Garden City 

Physical Education Freshman 

Mcdonald, james p Scandia 

Business Senior 

MEARS, TIM P Topeka 

General Sophomore 

METHENY. LARRY A. Garden City 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

MOOTS, CRAIG K Eureka 

Plant Pathology Sophomore 



sigma pin epsilon - 



sigma phi epsilon 



contestant 
number one 



Daytime tv viewers have a wide selec- 
tion ot programming to choose trom — 
game shows, game shows, or game 
shows. Which did these Sig Eps choose 9 



A right guess could mean three sets of 
luggage, a trip to Hawaii, and tive cases 
ot dog tood. 




MYER. MARK L Atchison ' ^jBBBk' *>*0BBk "^Bfefck JT ^JHIUK 

Business Freshman jt 1 ^^k ^BBBi 4£)BBBk 1 I^Bi ^BJ ' £k 

NEDERMAN.JEFFA Overland Park 1 J^B JoBBBV ^M W*^S^A # Jl jP^TB) 

EH™™ : p^ ;p» iff* vjm (-ink F^» 

NIEDEREE.MIKEC Great Bend I -JLjBM % ~„ J % """"^l \ BBk -* £ 

rawHl • & ■ m 4 tW bw^ I Will #\ II 

PHELPS. ROGER A Shawnee ^f^^. -'SBW. 3 0^-\. ^^^. 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman /wr^VBlW IBflk ^A ^BBjBl 

REID, WILLIAM M Topeka A,* ^BBk Bj^"BBBi JbV A lP ™JBi 

Corrections Sophomore jB BF BBj <*» <aft ^BBjB ^^^^^^B\ 

ROHRER. JOHN W Kansas City. MO ^ -* ^"■Bl ■/ ^» #4PBl <2 "t^BB*. ■~f 3 TBB 

Construction Science Senior Q " -4TB1 

RUFFIN TIMR Lenexa ^C&BV ^, AbBF -^3bTW ~^*<BB7 

Freshman v ■ Bj \ ~ ^JH? "^y mrt~^~ i «*BB7 

RYNARD. JOHNE Shawnee «*jB^^. ^wh~ \ J ^Ba 

Accounting Junior "*^ BjW "* , ^rJ^'^ ' ' * / ^^B. ^B^L. 

SCHROEGER. MICHAEL S Shawnee ^ BBBj S JT 1 W BBB, BW 

STANSBERRY, GARY Salma A -BB^Bfc. ' 15^ 4<BBbX 

Sophomore ^iBBlBk '' v^BBi BBjBBBBBBI £? *kt '" A 

SWARNERJOEM Shawnee f* £ 9k V A^BBl J^^^BM 

Sophomore l^^ P ^BB -T '#£■ A * rfM. W IBM Bfl JSriBB. 

UNRUH. GALEN K McPherson |T 7 ^BJ > " r^vBjB Pi V^B f . ^fl Bjj VBj 

Agricultural Economics Senior J iT^B] ^ /~^^F ^P -jfl 

UNRUH. MILOM Wichita ^ ' '^^BjV * C3mBB7 ^ ' Jf 1 -4tBW W ""^H 

History and Pre-Law Senior BB "~ : ^BBF ^ -3#T \ -^BBK ™ 

WEEMS ROBERT E Harveyville <BF BBi^^^W^ / ^BB>^ Vk j ^JjBj—w , 

^bjL.1b\ abbI AbI f^ ■ A^J 










M$i 



AM! 






smith 



SLOAN, GERALD E Houseparent 

SLOAN, JAN L Houseparent 

ATWILL, DONALD E Smith Center 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

BAHR, BILL G Claflm 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

BELL, THOMAS L Holton 

Psychology Sophomore 

BRACK, MICHAEL J Ness City 

Accounting Sophomore 

CHARTRAND, EDWARD E Leawood 

Business , . Sophomore 

CORN, DAVID A Bushton 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

FORD, CARL D Salma 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

FUNK, GLENN E Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

GONZOLAS, ED Hermgton 

Accounting Junior 

HUDSON, DONALD L Olathe 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine Senior 

KAUP, DAVID R Smith Center 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

KELTZ, JACK D Mound Valley 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

KENWORTHY, JAMES R Ransom 

Biology Freshman 

LATTA, RONALD D Wichita 

Chemistry Freshman 

McCOSKEY, STEVEN L Wichita 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

MOORE, KENNETH D Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

MORIN, TERRY J Manhattan 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

NASON, RANDALL R Wakarusa 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

PARKER, JEFFREY J Kansas City 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

RAYS, ARTHUR B Salina 

Pre-Law and Physical Science Senior 

RHODES, RANDY Clifton 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

RODENBAUGH, STEPHAN M St. Marys 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

ROGERS, DANNY H Topeka 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

RUARK, ROGER L Cofteyville 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

SIDEBOTTOM, BILL J Topeka 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

SIMPSON, SCOTT A Clay Center 

Biochemistry Senior 

SIMPSON, STEVEN R Dodge City 

Business Management Senior 

STAHL, MIKE El Dorado 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

STUEVE, GERALD J Hiawatha 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

WURTZ, GREGORY J Topeka 

Chemical Engineering Junior 




smurthwaite 



HUESNER, NEVA Houseparent 

ALEXANDER. MILA A Overland Park 

Elementary Education Junior 

BARB. CHERYL L AltaVista J^ 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman ■ ""*▼ 

BENIGNUS. NANCY V Hoismgton .- ..,,. :.* 

Recreation Junior 

BRUEY, LOU ANN Blulf City 

Elementary Education Senior |P* 

BRUEY. PATRICIA J Blutt City 

Recreation Sophomore 

BYRNES. CAROLYN A Overland Park 

Physical Education . Freshman 

BYRNES. JEANNE M. Overland Park 

Animal Science and Industry . . . Junior 

CHANNEL, MARY Soldier ^-j 

Home Economics Education Senior 

CRAIG. RHONDA L Kansas City 

Horticulture Freshman 

DAVISON, JANET E Topeka 

General Freshman 

DEAN, HOLLY M Wichita 

Home Economics Freshman 

ENGELHARDT, VICKI J Chase mWKK^. '#VS^. 

Dietetics Sophomore W&A mW^RBMx 

FELDKAMP TERRY L Axtell WMk, gf ^W^M 

Dietetics Junior m . Jj§ M^ssll™ 

GARDNER, MARY Hartford -jpr ■"**\'t B**'' ' *W 

Clothing and Retailing Senior M ID M "" M 

GARRETT, ROANN K Woodbine M •>' ~ - fi k " ' A 

Elementary Education Sophomore Wkk. ^ *S> j| 

GARRETT, ROSANN G Woodbine &£% - 9 

Elementary Education Sophomore WJjL 

HARRIS, S KAY Hays ^P ' VI WM' ^^H 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore v "^BP? HF hH 

HAVEL, EILEEN Belleville dlfc^. 

Food Science and Industry Junioi ; ^Bli?V J^mM^Hix. 

HECHT. THERESER Andale ^^*m M^WMM 

Physical Therapy . . Freshman Sdar m m *. *2 

HILDEBRAND.SHARI Stafford j^»* pJI W ■ 

Home Economics Freshman M im m v <* I 

HOLMAN. BEVERLY E Winfield gB £j/UM A " /i 

Home Economics Education Senior ?^k._ji^M 

HONIG. CATHERINE A Onaga Ht ^^3B ^P '*'**?Im 

Foods and Nutrition Sophomore -. A <S1 y\ i 

HOUK. JANET M "V/&< *B^^ I "' ' flV 

Home Economics Education Junior ," ISft • fl» 

KASL, CECILIA M Cuba JBNHk.' - < * ^- 

Home Economics and Journalism Freshman 'Wr^^A, ^tk 

KOLMAN.VENETTER Greensburg Of 

Sociology Freshman mm. -~. *eJUm X i^, 

KOUKOL. NANCY J Cuba 

Special Education I <■■ ■ J uti.h 

MARTIN, NANCY J .... Hays 

Music Sophomore 

McCLURE, CYNTHIA Stafford 

History Senior 

McKAIN. SHEILA D Miltonvale 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

MINTURN, MARTY Abilene 

Special Education Junior 

NAEGELE, ELAINE C Arkansas City 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

NEAL.JERIL. Williamsburg 

Agriculture Sophomore ^L\ 

OESTERREICH.TERRIA Woodbine 

Music Education Senior 

POLSTON. DIANA M Hope 

Home Economics Freshman 4 

RADER. PAM Olsburg ■ 

Agricultural Journalism Junior I 

REESE, MARJORIE L Plamville 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

REXWINKLE, ANGELA C Great Bend 

Accounting Sophomore 

RICHARDSON, DENISE L Wilsey 

Medical Technology Freshman 

ROMBERGER, DEBRAJ Abilene 

Medical Technology Junior 

SMITH, BECKY A Wichita 

Interior Design Sophomore Wm\. T Art- ' 

SMITH. MARY J Onaga ] mAA MAM 

General Freshman f fnVA^rm 

SOLTIS. MARY E Wichita 

'.' ■;'■"' .)• : '.'.<■ ,r; tiI ' ,i iphi Tin in.' 

STOFFER. JANET M Abilene 

Home Economics Education Sophomore MMM 

TAYLOR. KAREN S Waldo ^W 

Biology Senior 

TREI8ER. SUSAN A Atchison W 

Music Education Freshman 

TRUMBLE.CARLAE Oakhill HI <fe 

General Freshman 

VINING. MARGARET A Horton JB 

Life Science nm, « I 



smurthwaite 




WARY, JOLEEN M oommous 

Music Education Sophomore 

WAYBRIGHT. GLENDA S Liberal 

Psychology and Education Senior 

WETTA, PATRICIA J Wichita 

Home Economics Sophomore 

WHITEHOUSE, KEVAR Stafford 

Business Freshman 




"Watch those hands and how those 
cards are landing" comes the warning 
from one player who doesn't care to be 



dealt a bad deal. Nothing like a friendly 
game of chance to bring out the true grit 
in a Smurthwaite woman. 



shuffle scuffle 



straube 



MAY. DAVID C Houseparenl 

MAY, DEBORAH J H,>us,.|>,ii."nt 

ANDERSON. JOHN G Reading 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

ANDREW. DEAN R Des Moines. IA 

Geography Freshman 

ARPIN. RICHARD W Salma 

Agronomy Freshman 

ARPIN. RONALD D Salma 

Horticulture Sophomore 

BAKER. JERRY L Scandia 

Civil Engineering Junior 

BIRD. JACK E Great Bend 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

COOPER. JAMES L St John 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

DODD, TIMOTHY J Mankato 

Milling Science and Management , ... Junior 

DOUGLAS. STEPHEN L Leavenworth 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

DRUMHILLER, STEPHEN A Milan 

Economics Senior 

ELSASSER. SCOTT E Clifton 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

ENGELHARDT, DARRYL L Chase 

Feed Technology Junior 

GORDON. JAMES L. Fort Scott 

Accounting Junior 

HICKEL. GREGORY A, Ellinwood 

Business Freshman 

HOFFMAN. MARK A. Clatlin 

Engineering Freshman 

HOLLINBERGER. THOMAS S. Belleville. IL 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 




pouring it on 



Everyone knows Tom Collins is one of 
the most sociable partiers around — 
even if the party is private. A Straube resi- 
dent introduces a couple of acquain- 
tances. 




M&M I 



HOLT. MARK I Newton 

Music Junior 

HURTIG. FRANKS Silver Lake 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

IVES. BRADLEY D El Dorado 

Accounting Freshman 

KATHKA. DAVID K Oberlin 

Pre-Law Freshman 

MALTBY. DAN Wetmore 

Bakery Science and Management Sophomore 

O'TOOLE. FRANK K Marysville 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

OYER, DOUG L Gardner 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

PETERSON. GARRY E. Basehor 

Microbiology ............ Freshman 

SNYDER. MICHAEL D. Mankato 

Engineering Freshman 

STITT, TERRY L. Clay Center 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

SWIFT, BILL Wichita 

Education Sophomore 

VANDYKE, JOHN R Tonganoxie 

Civil Engineering Junior 

WULLSCHLEGER, RICHARD D Wichita 

Milling Science and Management . .Freshman 






tau kappa epsilon 

AMSLER, KENNETH J St Louis. MO .aBBSSW "aW """Bk ( ^?«Bk ff Pth 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore fjt juk sflj k tPk M*r ' BBk M ^Bk 

AUXIER. BRYAN E SI Joseph. MO /BlLv *» ^m 4Mk ^» f^ BB jf 

Pre-Design Professions Junior diLj'^BBBBB, * v*"^^^BB Hf^ *Mk ~»- ^MMMM §_» .^^BBl 

BAKER. ROGER D Topeka B^iPIBbT ^JK '^ flBBr B* ' tPP ■ F^BB 1^ f^BBk 

Industrial Engineering Graduate Student BJ 1BF B, 7 -Mar H .-AjH 1 Jk^BB 

BARRON. DAYNEC Topeka .--St If' W SLyjHW J ""SP ' fgk ' ~'2B tf^BBBBl 

Pre-Forestry Sophomore / "j^P^ ^ ^^mr ZI BV J Btt BjVB 

BAUER, GREGG Wichita ^^^A -^T JF W "^^W^ ^^kr '' 

BLICKENSTAFF. ROBERT D Scott City W^. „ -BBkk. 'i ■'>■*■ X|^^ ■,^Hp*'" ; |A / , 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore / ' ! BE\ _ . ijjg BljHfr JBH jF/SyB f^B 1 "^' B' / 

BRALEYBILLR Wichita JP" j^ ^BB^k 4fP% 

Accounting Sophomore * J^k * % JB*^ 1| 

BROTHERS. MIKE J Lyons 4BBB ^flb^SBB) ' Jl BflBBi 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore ^ ffpfr. «gBBB> Bm., 

BRUEGGEMAN.DALEH Scott City I PW BBr^'PP# 1 l^BBl «]P*^«B1 £ "* .*»*■ ■ «B> 

Accounting Junior f ,Jg JBf Ml , StfP ™ <& JBB7 JB M W 

BRUMBAUGH. SCOTT A Hutchinson i> "*~WmW ^H *«»mW ■ S^BbBBT 1 -~3BB B. nWC % 

Chemical Engineering Freshman V ®BT B) . *^k ' ", **bB» *•" , aBr r\[ *"Bf^ 

CLINE. GREGORYS Kansas City ~V*UfiV> j 'WF&G^ ^CBBBtl '* > BBmT ^BbI 

DARRAH. MARK W Lyons ,afBBfcflk i B BI* 1 4f^*' k ■ '■ 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman SM "Ifl iyjk JjBk »f|j 

DOLLMANN, STEVEN C McPherson Cr^BBY . Jfci***«||| ^ BBk. 

Civil Engineering Senior /Jf IBBj «-» ISbBB Mr .. J9BB 

FERGUSON, TERRY L Dighton M ,. _JM w""V'T!BB iP^ WWBk 

Recreation Senior *' ^ ; "CjBW ^ -' ^4, BBB B ~* BL 

FRfctD. STEPHEN W Lansing - 7-JfaB» ' ' JBr ^ >"~^MIB» " -^Bl % *^BI 

Horticulture Junior — tP»^ J fJSEK^ \ BJL --^^jBMk. ^ ~^ m mj ^Bf "" P 

FRITSON. RODNEY D Shawnee Mission "_» gfl *«BfL M -vggF ^^ ^flBBBBh ^^BrW -WWEr 

Chemical Engineering Freshman JH B ^P^B^. £1 i /^^B ^ wP^BHW ' ' A^ 

GALLAWAY.DALEW Topeka *"** ^^8^-. HB JkllBW Stk '**% JrAwBgH Mi BIBB -*■ IB 

Computer Science Junior ;*r ^Btf «#\ , JE / I |# ^H HH / > flVArJI Mr 

GRAVES. MARC L Greensburg ^W^ J^B«Bk. flfl^BV ^lYflBk. / tt^Bk 

GRIFFITH, T SCOTT g ^|MH Jf^' *JB_ if^^lB J^ ^^B #^^^HbB Mm* iB 

HAAS Un jOSEPH G St Lou?s JT^IIIm I ^ f^^B Si ^ iMi f^ f^BB ■ ^H BT^ »M 

Agriculture Sophomore % , -• J I -« OP 1 -1 IBff/ B -JL JmW TA 1W 

cSr ry GARYW s XJr V^l^~m '^T \^Br ^ ^m 

HANSLEY. STEPHEN M. Wichita & ' f -^T Mh ^r«W ! '^■■■9 •^(■■J ^fV 

Accoun,,n9 Semor a^ : J^iBTaB^ ^T flfflV v Jf^Bfc^ WBW. ^ ~-kw 

HELTON. TIMOTHY M Pensacola, FL i .■ftW * A «HB k I i?'""B BB BV fll JVJ 

Business Marketing Sophomore BBBf \ : _ jBfM BMHrB i^BH ■ /■■d 4^ .■ / -— - . | | |f ^"1 

HENDRICKS. CHARLES R Overland Park :? aBBw *"tHBv 

Business and Finance Junior M. ^mmmmk ^BBV 

HENRY. FRANK J Enterprise J^' 

Pre-Velennary Medicine Junioi sB^^a2Bl » **• #*»B 

HESLOP, STEPHEN J Independence B^JR-BB € /if V 

Mechanical Engineering Senior BJ "^".^BBW ■ T-i'liBWr ^» 

HUFFMAN, TERRY E Wichita 1 '--W—f '^W *Ji 

Agricultural Economics Junior 1 " mmw ^MTjkk. 

IRELAND, RANDY W Madison Bk ^B ^J « IWaajW .-,';: ^^ 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore tBwjBb^^ Bb 1 '^ J'flBrBB iC flBk^^ 

KIMMEL.HALSEY W Topeka ^^% Bjk Blifl 

Landscape Architecture Semor f419 BM Si 7 f OfflffS !■ 

KLEIN, SCOTT S Topeka ^BTj», ^Bk. ' ^^BBk. '' ^B^lk 'BP^BBk 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman jjfc J^B\ -BBk ■ i f Jl BBk ^^IBBBk ,4 

KURZ, KENNETH W Leawood T^ 'BBV t ^ 1 W^^^m mM ^BB 

Business Administration ^_ «JH| VjT^i^B ^ I"- ^nBH IMWa^BBr Br ^3b ^SB 

LAST, GREGORY D Leavenworth ^^ ! ■* -V "BB h' * |WB) "*^FlBl Wi PVBI Of H 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman ("Sb^mT "^ mS 4 JyB S ' - JL JBr UB -Jkjfll Jf /-Jmrnr 

MADDUX. MICHEL A Scott City "™^ATm f '^aP/ TflV "^BBlr f 9 "^mY 

Electrical Engineering Freshman ..JmW ML \ Jmm «B BB 

McGINNESS, CLARE A Marion "••■r ^ Wk "^W^" ^ ^^MT \ BtL 

Business Administration Senior /^ ■■fcw A jP^k. jpr JPfe v i ■£ BkW 

McGONAGLE.TIMOTHrj Scott City i#'i / / , t , fB JM Ifekw EB BBW 

Horticulture j|| ^ ^ 1 ^ | f^ W^ ■■ ^ 4V C^ IIIvBpbM 

j, ^ a#BBbV i^HpBHk ,4jflPjBBk VaMBk 

General Freshman BI'A. £* RBV 4, EB\ '' ,V BBk *JTl BB 

MINNIX. JAMES M. Scott City kA ...»k flflj ' ^" «B B"^^^Bv ■ "^^B» 

Agricultural Economics Senior -BBk i»3»^\2 BB BB \ ** t9m\ 

NELSON. DAVID J Ml ^ ff^BB I ffl ^ f^ffll B t^mW BY W^F^BB 

Pre-Design Professions B ^ L.JBB B 1. BW B -<4'Bl Jff '«BT l# * / JBBBJ 

PARIS. ALLAN J . BB] A ^%MM7 B '""^DBP 9/ 'TlW *^bBT •JTK 

Agricultural Mechanization Freshman % **BB'^ -*. ^ PBk. flV ^^r ' -^5BBjk -^mr 

PARKER. MARK M Kansas City IfejBjV N -4mW W. "^rMT 1 * BV ~fP»JW ..^ -^r^MMh 

Business Administration Senior x \^B '^^ BB^fc. BB .^LjBBW ^mm\ *^PBI A J 

RASSETTE. BRIAN L Salma y, \ Tf . ' ^gl BBI I,' 1 '' BBhBB BBi BB4kBBI 'C' f 

-i.AA ,fl JHI I'll / HbpbB ■ r iyBI /fi / 

REED. DOUGLAS W Lyons I^BW aBBVBk. Bt flk ^T «vBBBk BBjJMk 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman SBk A 9Bk SB aB^BBw sB / ' flB 

SANDMEYER, CARYB Topeka AW BBI BT BBJ | «/ fl £T JBJ 

in Professions Sophomore |~, jSHJ B5? 4»BB1 V " BB "3 *^B ^Bl BTa — ""^B 

WERK. ROGER L Wichita 1 I flM 47 "^BJ B ^»^aBM mJB ^ flfl IF^mBBi T r^BI 

I anrlv.ape Architecture Filth Year Student I ^ JBI Bji 1 V BEflT BB ■ r I 

SMITH, RON D Salma \' := BBBr B I JA 7JH _£* ^SBF 1 -' B J - B 

Education Senior -^BBBk A "^BBB v ^MT 7 B — 2B BB aflBl 

THOMPSON, Pill tin Topeka ^BJIP^I ^mmWW ^. -^B\ B\ -^Li - -** " Ol 

Sophomore I BP^BL BBk aP^ik. Bk. BBB. ""Br Bw. VBw 

ciearwat-r ^\ n BBk k BBw BBk x i BB. ■ ^-T^ BBBfcw BB i& BBBB 

jumor ^ fmlm bbV BBTflBrnJIflMl/^ AHIbI ^r ■ 





lau kappa epsilon 




WALSH. GERALD J Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

WEARING, MICHAEL A Salina 

Psychology Freshman 

WOODS. WILLIAM D Clearwater 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 




summit meeting 

To sum it up, TKEs perched on a porch 
means something. Possibly that either 
the sun — or the passing scenery — is 
being soaked up. 



i. ui kappa I'psiion — 419 



theta xi 




ADAMS, DAVID E El Dorado ^Mfc^ >^0lBk. 

General Sophomore ,^HH?^ ^HHR^feV 

ALLEN. RANDALL G Jefferson City. MO 12Hm|\ " ^^^^B^BBL 

Architecture Fifth Year Student » «B 

BARUTH. KENNETH F Marysville 4 /> #€*^Bj BV* W""Bj 

Psychology Junior V Ik^^m S X .«■ 

BODEN. RICHARD Bloomingdale. NJ ^ -m, MM ^k "*%BW 

Veterinary Medicine Senior ^ "^aHBT 

BOGART. LEEL Wichita JJr Jk^ ; TBFJh 

Mechanical Engineering Junior ^f ^PP* '"^tr Km 

BREIPOHL.GARYW Lawrence ■ JL ^^ ■ 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore X / tB\ , 

BRENNAN.TERRENCEL Manhattan «^ ^g^ ^fcv 4#H^. ~4HR^ ^SMW 

Architecture Fifth Year Student -# j.«mW ^ *lBBk ^^iUH\ J£ JAk 

CHAMBERS. CURTIS N Norton .jtflHft ''"'' A IMBhBL 

Agricultural Economics Junioi ,!»! ji^ flflB ^k~- 'S™|| A T]^B I .. ..^JIBBl H^^^M I 

COLLIER. JOHNN ,JB V^lSBl I ^ H| S^CPBB ■ •*• rf^BI 

Agriculture Sophomore Y rAW 4 f^M X • iLi&7 B -<•» - V f "W 

COLLIER. STUART R. Alta Vista \ Jk^flP &. 1 --~9UP A ' r ^wM. 1 -"•*£■ * "** 11 

Agricultural Economics Senior ~4HV f* ^^~ -^B W V ■'^■■V » ~2KB^ 

DAVIS. ROBERT D Greensburg " *^^ JbL ill JJW ■ -<Br BBBB ^ '"^T BB * "^■P^ ** 

Business Management Sophomore ^y^ ; J^^ fSjlB I ^BB BH "^ ~^r fc^^^ 

DIETZ. STEVEN D Ottawa »/a ' H / »V' lalBB^B A.B /^ BBBB 

H,S,0rV Sophomore «f ^ t i ^ BBBBV i ul M BBTWBbI • " « ilJB 

ENDECOTT. MARK A. Trenton. MO .,v] ^A #^^^JL\ ■r^^^^B k ' C 1 bW B ^jM^BBBl 

FELTON. RICHARD E. Junction City 1 ?» MB B ^kYB\ 1'»^™J Wf ( ' ^W ^** ,t ^B W "** gH 

Psychology and Political Science Senior BbT ■r** P^§8 jlF ^w ~^£B \ ^r V ly 

HUEBERT. MICHAEL A Henderson, NB ■ _/ '-|jj\' .'" JH '' /Ok^^^ i^/ - I ' AA\ 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman ''B ^'^BHIafl : nf ^ : ; .v. ^plng] BT MB 




420 — theta xi 



dm &- i»JI 

ma* 





LUNDSTROM, RICHARD A 
Pre-Design Protessions 
McDIFFETT, TIMOTHY L 


Topeka 
Freshman 






McVEY, BART L. 








MITCHELL, LOWELL R 




Chemical Engineering 
OLSON. DANAG 


Junior 






OWENS, CHARLES H 








PAYNE.MIKELA 








PULLIAM, KENDAL K 
















ROTTMANN, RUSSELL W 








SESSIONS. CHARLES E 








SHEHI. DENNIS W 


Westmoreland 


SOUTHWICK, CHRISTOPHER L 




Pre-Medicine 
STEJSKAL, RICK L 


Sophomore 
Timken 


STIGGE, DOUGLAS K. 
Pre-Medicine 


Manhattan 


WATT, STANLEY F 








WHITE, SPENCER T 




Engineering 
WINGER, JOHN 
Business Administration 


Freshman 

Wellington 
Junior 



rerun review 

Hogan's Heroes, Beverly Hillbillies, and 
Andy Griffith. Appearing faithfully every 
night, tv reruns are bountiful. Who do the 
Theta Xis let choose the programs? They 
leave it to Beaver. 



triangle 



ANDERSON. CARL R Muscotah 
Electrical Engineering Sophomore 


*•» 




^t 

* / 




P 






3 t 




Mechanical Engineering Junioi 


Architecture and Construction Science Senior 

CHRISTENSEN, KEVIN D. Holton 

Nuclear Engineering . . . . .Freshman 

FESSENDEN, CHARLES B Clitton 

Math Education Senior 


FRANKEN. JOHN W Sedalia, MO 
Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

GARTNER. CHRISTOPHER L Topeka 

Civil Engineering Senior 








1 


uL 


§ 






Architecture and Construction Science Junior 
HAFFENER. JOE A AltaVista 


HAKE. NOLAN F Lenora 
Civil Engineering Sophomore 


HARDEN, PHILIP A Ashland 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

HARDMAN. BARRY S Hill City 

Medical Technology Senior 

HART. LAWRENCE R Holland, Ml 
Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 


, 








% 










HOWELL. RICKS. Independence, MO 


mT<j 


KOELSCH, RICHARD K Great Bend 


.mH m 


& 


i 




it 


t 


KUNIHOLM, ALAN G Pierceville 

Architecture Senior 

LITTLE, DOUGLAS J Wichita 

Chemical Engineering , . . . Sophomore 














all washed up 

College is great for learning — but it's 
not all in the books. Knowledge also waits 
in the laundry hamper or behind a broom 
and dustpan. Armed with trusty dishtowel 
and dishwater hands, this Triangle man 
V learns a tew tacts of life — in the kitchen. 


422— triangle 
















McCONAUGHEY. KENT E Ulysses 

Building Construction Freshman 

McNAUGHTON, GARY A Laurel Springs, NJ 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

NEIBLING, WILLIAM H. Highland 

Acjrii ultur.-il f nqin^ermq Graduate Student 

O'BRIEN, CHARLES E . St. Joseph, MO 

Pre-Design Professions . , Freshman 

PETERSON, WILLIAM C . . . Greeley 

Engineering . Freshman 

POLLI, STEVE Mahopac, NY 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

ROBSON, JOHN E Abilene 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

SAGE, JOSEPH W Augusta 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

SMITH, DAVID R . Osawatomie 

Interior Architecture Fifth Year Student 

SPENCER, STEVEN H. . . ... Leavenworth 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

STONECIPHER, GREG D Overland Park 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

TOLIN, BRYCE A Holton 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

VAN PELT, REGINALD A Pierce City, MO 

Pre-Design Protessions Sophomore 

WISE, STEVEN C Clearwater 

Architecture , Junior 



triangle — 423 



van zile 



WEDDLE. MARK E Director 

ANDERSON. WILLIAM L Oberlin 

Dairy Science Graduate Student 

ANNIS, JENNIFER L Lawrence 

Home Economics Education Senior 

ARNOLDY. DIANE K Tipton 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

ARNOLDY. LANETTE M Tipton 

Horticulture Junior 

ARTH. KAREN A Overland Park 

General . . . Freshman 

BEOUGHER. DUANEV Ellsworth 

General Sophomore 

CLELAND, SARAA Baldwin 

Home Economics Extension Junior 

COATS. ROBERT L Wichita 

Accounting Junior 

COLONEY. PATRICIA L Wichita 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

COOPER, NANCY J Saflordvtlle 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

COX, CRAIG J Atwood 

Agricultural Education Graduate Student 

CURTIS. MARSHA L Dodge City 

Music Sophomore 

DAVIS. JUDITH A Overland Park 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

DREESE. PATRICK C Wichita 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

EULERT.CAROLJ Topeka 

Engineering Sophomore 

FOERSTER. STEPHEN L Lmdsborg 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

FOWLER, DANIEL L Salina 

Labor Relations Senior 

GIBSON , DANIEL W Wichita 

Architecture Fitth Year Student 

GIBSON, ROGER E Wichita 

Horticulture Senior 

GOCHENOUR, KIMG . Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

GREEN. NATALIE K Atwood 

Speech Graduate Student 

GROENEWOLD, JOAN K Wichita 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

GUTZMAN. LINDA K Almena 

English Junior 

GUTZMAN. RICCI L Almena 

General Freshman 

HANKINS, KEVIN G Wichita 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

HAVERFIELD.CATHYJ Russell Springs 

Political Science Freshman 

HEIN, MARGARET M Andale 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

HENDRICKSON.JANAD Garden City 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

HENSLEY, KENNETHS Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering : .ophomore 

HINTZ, JAMES R Salina 

Accounting Junior 

HODGSON. KIM A Little River 

Geophysics Sophomore 

HYSON. JOYCEA Klue M..und 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

JOHNSON, LONE Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

KLOCK, EDWARD L Wichita 

Architecture Junior 

LEWIS, CLIFFORD S Wichita 

Accounting Senior 

LIGNITZ. LARRY G Marysville 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

LLOYD, STEVE W Clay Center 

Milling Science and Management Senior 

LONG. STEVE P . Shawnee Mission 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

LUNDBERG. CHERYL A . . Mission 

Special Education Sophomore 

MARTENEY, JOHN D , Wichita 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

MARTIN, PATRICIA R Kansas City 

Psychology Senior 

McNEIL.DEBL Hutchinson 

Business and Psychology Junior 

MIKOLS.WAYNEJ Hinsdale. IL 
Nuclear Engineering Graduate Student 

MILLER, MICHELLE Downs 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

MOORE. LYNN A Arvada, CO 

Architecture Junior 

MURPHY, MICHAEL W Wichita 

Biology i i.-.hnun 

OLSON. JACOUELYNJ Osage City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 




A J 1 




ftflW 



4,M /.m /iki h.ill 




Though finals be painful, it helps to than one — not to mention two sets of 
share the hurt with a fellow sufferer. lecture notes. 
pdSSJng nOtGS Everyone knows two heads are better 





ORME, KATHIE J Overland Park 

Recreation Senior 

ORNDORFF.DANETTEL Topeka 

Recreation Sophomore 

PLOOSTER, LARRY G McPherson 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

RENCHER. DAVID M ' Overland Park 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

SANNEMAN. GEORGE W Idana 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

SCHANKER, NEIL. Prairie Village 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore 

SCHOOF, VAL E Council Grove 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

SCHROEDER, MARY L Tipton 

Retail Floriculture Freshman 

SCHWAB, PATRICK R Prairie Village 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

SEDLACEK, WANDA J Marysville 

Geology Junior 

SMITH. KENNETH C Shawnee Mission 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

SOOY, MICHAEL G Prairie Village 

Geography Senior 

SPICER. RONALD W Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

SPICHER. RANDALL- D Overland Park 

Business Si iphomore 

STUTZMAN, EMELISE D Prairie Village 

Geography Senior 

SUTTON. CRYSTAL R Blue Rapids 

Physical Education Freshman 

TUCKER, GREG A Wichita 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

VORAN. ROXIE L Kingman 

Geology Graduate Student 

WATERS. MONTE G liberal 

Mathematics Junior 
WHEELER, JANE C 

General Sophomore 

WHITE. EARL R Moscow 

Engineering Freshman 

WINTER, MARY A Garden City 

Business Administration Senior 

WOOD. PHU ic A Liberal 

/Mo In i in-- Sophomore 

YARROW. F REDERICK L Morganville 
Agricultural Engineering 



van ,-ile ha -l :> 



west hall 




ADAMS. DENISE M Overland Park 

Home Economics Freshman 

ADAMS. LUCY A Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

ADAMS, NANCY L Prairie Village 

Elementary Education Senior 

AHRENS. DORISJ Powhattan 

Home Economics Extension Junior 

ALEXANDER, JUANITA Gardner 

Office Administration Sophomore 

ANTWEILER. MARILYN B. Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore -* 

VI 

ARNOLD, JO ELLEN Burlingame „^ 

Dairy Production Senior « &, W jjjjk ^4JM lm\ 

ARNOLD. LINDSAY B ...Burlingame 4 >J m, *%. i dk '■ * W HW WMX fSBF iBV. "^ 

Horticulture Freshman H^H < JMWk^M\ I % M -». AM I ■ ■* * TB M ^H 

BACKHUS. JANET L Leavenworth BJ^ |B W-^Wi ' ' M^ Il». 

BAILEY, CYNTHIA J Sabetha Br^ A >«Bl " S^«V £.?»< *^ Bm^Bj*. 

Horticulture Freshman t \ Sgjs » *. * , V f| 1 *ji fl >»"' 

BAKER. BARBARA '" » 'I- •fT'^' fRfj» jjBl 111 ^UC JBBBWjBjl 

Elementary Education Sophomore ^»^ y 4 * /*-. _ O jfl fj ITnl f|/> ! ft M 

BALDWIN. BARBARA J Salina 

Fashion Merchandising Junior 

BALDWIN, ROMA L Salina 

Dietetics Freshman 

BARNES, ROXIE A Smith Center 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

BARSTOW TAMARA K Macksville 

General Freshman 

BARTAK.KATHRYNJ Cuba 

Family and Child Development Junior 

BARTH. ANNEM Belleville 

Interior Design . Sophomore |^k . vf ■ " > i 

BEARD, SHEILA A Centralia Hfi^ 

Home Economics Education . Freshman m ^"MMV 

BEHM, KAREN A Paola M ^m\ j^, MA 

Dietetics Freshman JL~~ **Mm , mT^_ ^B 

BELL. SHERYL A . ... El Dorado f ~* **"*« ^*H«*» i: 

Electrical Engineering Junior ■ . JH -Jl V H 

BERGES. CINDY K. Onaga r X« r JA | *|* fcsy »^ 

Home Economics Freshman ifl| _^H "Bjk *Bll 

BERNHARDT, LAUREL L Tampa » ^Jj 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore ^P ^"""SaSM Bb ♦ 'B ./ 

BIERY.TERESAE Topeka ^f ^ 

Biology Education Senior ^U9Pt_B ' 1 ^ 

BINGHAM, KIM R Salina JWMjk, % 

Sociology Freshman ▼ , A |H A - fA 

BLOOM. RONI J Topeka ^J** M wL^s vtt 7 1 

Elementary Education Junior »»r^ ^JMm f*JfT <«JBl 

BLUME.DEBRAD Scott City ^ "% J ^TB J-- « 

Accounting Senior 4c-„ | * , . §? "M^-^V 

BOTTOM KAY A Topeka Jfc "OVAMk Ik J^ &, jBjV i 

Physical Therapy Freshman -jm _JI*^B' -% „■* jB"' 1BV_J 

BOURN, LESLIE J Overland Park ^1 > <*W "WL^mT WT* 

Business Administration Freshman ^ wyi :'H1l 

BOWERS. MARY L Marion * >$W^BlB?- ^ » • k 

General Freshman *"j j ■>* 

BRADLEY, GILL L. Leavenworth 

Horticulture Sophomore 

BROKESH.VENITAJ. . Narka 

Foods and Nutrition Sophomore 

BROOKS, BECKY J Salina 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

BROSE, LISA A Marion 

Anthropology Freshman 

BROWN, SUSAN M Salina 

Business Freshman 

BROWNING, CYNTHIA D Lawrence 

Agriculture Freshman 

CAMPBELL, JOYCE L. Cheshire, CT loR ,'lk 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore M3T 

CARNES, LAURAS Weir 

Home Economics Education Junior jlv *^M\ 

CARSON, KENNAS Clearwater 

Home Economics Extension Junior V C! .- M 

CASE. LEILA L Beloit ^ jm- 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore MjT ^M\ 

CASWELL, SANDEE L Salina W tBj»; : - ( 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman » »« 

CHAPUT. SUSIE A Salina . \ - A 

General Sophomore 

COCHRAN, MICHELE R. Topeka ,^BBjjK /l^Ml. aMM^a. JT~ **\ 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore a iM ■%. If m jM ■% | jf* JM\ 

COLLINS, DEB Topeka Mf^Wl fl^^^B PtTw 

COLLINS, MONICA m"" Kansas City / " ' li I W ** 1^1 ^f -^B Ik ^B 

Educat.on Sophomore IvwnJB , ^ i M - '- fcS. I -'# 1. «L 

CONARD, SUSAN E. . . Overland Park V^ ^ i ■ <jM fj^W ^k^*M ■ " m. " '^H 

V 7 1 .^FjL ^k^^BK ^ ^^ -^ ]k . V 

Menden Bl ■^T ^^H v^Pv'^Bk. R^> «*■".* ' ^"\ ^^ 

Freshman IV ii\jtt^BV 9k. 

COOK. KAREN S. . . . Kansas City. MO MM jUI WML BMr^ J Ha. 

Freshman H^ ' >^ f^^ MM MMT \f ■' I 





426 — west hall 




Aa§§&3 



CORN, SUSAN L Bushton 

Dietetics . Junior 

CURRY, KIM J Madison 

Dietetics Junior 

DICKSON, DEBRA D Hiawatha 

Computer Science Sophomore 

DIXON, KRISTI L Parsons 

Fashion Design Freshman 

DONAHUE, DEBBIE J Durham 

Accounting Sophomore 

DREILING, DEBBIE A Chapman 

General . . Freshman 

DUSCH. KIM C Marysville 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

DUWE, MARGARET A . . . Lucas 

Home Economics Education Freshman 

EFFLAND, CLAUDIA L Lincoln 

Speech Pathology Freshman 

EPPERSON, CAROL L Prairie Village 

Fashion Merchandising Junior 

ERDWIEN, MARY C El Dorado 

Modern Language Junior 

ESCHMANN. CYNDEE D Topeka 

Fashion Marketing Junior 

EVANS, LISA M El Dorado 

Finance Junior 

EVERETT, EVELYN A Kansas City 

Interior Architecture Senior 

FENTON, DONNA M Sabetha 

Elementary Education Freshman 

FISCHER, KATHRYN J Ottawa 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

FLOYD, BARBARA St. Francis 

Music Education Senior 

FOX, DEBBIE K Cambridge 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

FRICK, CHRISTINE E Arwood 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

FULTON, JOY L Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications . . Sophomore 

GALLION. RANDA K Mullinville 

Accounting Freshman 

GAY, VICKEY L Chapman 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

GENCHAN, JONETTER Kansas City 

Social Work Sophomore 

GILMORE, LYNN A Topeka 

Consumer Interest . . Junior 




west hall 



GODDARD. JONAJ Radium 

General Freshman 

GOERL. VALERIE A Little River 

Elementary Education Junior 

GRIFFIN, BETTY L Alton 

Political Science Freshman 

HAHN, CAROL L. . .. Gypsum 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

HAMILTON, NANCY A Dodge City 

Clothing and Textiles Senior 

HAND. JENNIFER J Newton 

Biology . Freshman 

HEIMER, BARBARA J. Merriam 

Elementary Education Junior 

HENKE, MAURENE L Leawood 

Elementary Education Junior 

HOBSON. PATTIS Wichita 

Pre-Pharmacy Sophomore 

HOFMEISTER, PHYLLIS E Clallin 

Elementary Education Senior 

HOISINGTON.LAURAI Salina 

Business Administration Sophomore 

HOLMQUIST. KRISTIN D Smolan 

Physical Education Sophomore 

HOLTHAUS. DEBRA K Seneca 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

HOLZRICHTER. SHIRLEY A Halstead 

Elementary Education . Junior 

HOUCK, SHERYL L Augusta 

Home Economics . . . . Freshman 

HUERTER, SUSAN M Overland Park 

Recreation Junior 

JACOB, CINDY K Amencus 

Home Economics Freshman 

JOHNSON. SANDRA K Wichita 

Political Science Junior 

JONES. BONNIE L McPherson 

Home Economics - - Freshman 

KANAGA, L ROSE SHARON . Ness City 

Office Administration Freshman 

KANAGA, MARY E Ness City 

Horticulture Junior 

KELLENBERGER, VICKIE L Sabetha 

Music Education Freshman 

KELLY. NANCY L Shawnee Mission 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

KIMPLE, KANDACE A Little River 

Fashion Marketing Junior 

KINAST, PAMELAS Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Junior 

KING. ANNE Marysville 

Natural Resource Management Sophomore 

KLAUMANN, TERESA K Belleville 

Psychology Sophomore 

KOGER, BARBARA A. Holton 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

KOHMAN, JULIE E Solomon 

General Freshman 

KOLLING, JANAM. Chapman 

Business Education Freshman 

KORTE, ROSE M Concordia 

Computer Science Freshman 

KOSKO, JOY E. Overland Park 

General ... Freshman 

KREIDLER, MARGARET L Udall 

General . . . Freshman 

KRENGER. TERESA A ...Abilene 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

KROUPA, JOAN C Marion 

Special Education . . . Sophomore 

KRUSE. TERESA M . Wichita 

Interior Design Junior 

LANG, KATHLEEN I Claflm 

Retail Floriculture Freshman 

LESHOVSKY. DEANN M Prairie Village 

General Freshman 

LOCKHART, VALARIE A Salina 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

I u ii if ji JIM [j( BRA A Overland Park 

Fashion Marketing Junior 

LUNDY, JOAN M Salina 

General Freshman 

MABEN, PAMELA S Overland Park 

Biology Senior 

MAJORS, NANCY J Dodge City 

Home Economics Junior 

MARTIN, DEBRA J . Madison 

Physical Education Junior 

MASKUS, SHIRLEY E. . . . . . Jetmore 

Accounting Sophomore 

MATHEWS, PAMELA J Topeka 

Interior Design Senior 

MATZ.EYDIER Hillsboro 

General Freshman 

McDANIEL. CINDY C. Winchester 

General Freshman 



428 — west hall 





MELTON. CORAL E Stockton 

General Freshman 

MERCER, SUSAN J Salina 

Business Freshman 

MILLEN, MARY L Overland Park 

Home Economics Freshman 

MILLER, VICKIE K Lawrence 

Microbiology Senior 

MITCHELL, D'ANNE M Kansas City, MO 

Speech Pathology and Audiology Sophomore 

MITCHELL, PHYLLIS Mission Hills 

Special Education Junior 

MOODY, JO E St John 

Home Economics and Journalism Freshman 

MOORE, KIM L luka 

Home Economics and Journalism Freshman 

MORRIS, JULIA A Wichita 

Social Work Junior 

MUELLER, JO M Marion 

Accounting Freshman 

MUELLER, LINDA L . . Overland Park 

Business Junior 

MURPHY, CLAIRE E Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

MYERS, RAMONA L Kansas City 

Health Education Sophomore 

NATIONS, KAREN Z Overland Park 

Math Education Freshman 

NEALY, CARLA K Bonner Springs 

Business Freshman 

NEALY, KATHY R Bonner Springs 

Physical Education Freshman 

NELSON, MARSHA K Chanute 

Dietetics Freshman 

NEUMANN, JEANETTE L Troy 

Elementary Education Junior 



Letters trom relatives, friends, or even 
"special, once-in-a-life-time otters" take 
top priority around noon. Anything that 
fills the mailbox is acceptable because 



stuffed cubical is synonymous to popu- 
larity. But, to reach the pinnacle, one 
must receive the postal ultimate — a 
"care package" from home. 



west hall — 429 



west hall 




NIGHTINGALE. DEBBIE K Salina 

Business Freshman 

NORDBOE, CONNIE J Salina 

Biology Junior 

NUTTER, JUDITH A. . . . Los Alamos, NM 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

OCHS, TERRI L. . . Leavenworth 

Business Administration Freshman 

OLTJEN, RITA A Robinson 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

PANNBACKER, MARY K Washington 

Food Science and Industry ...... Freshman 

PARKER, KATHLEEN J Lewis 

Retail Floriculture Freshman 

PARRY, BECKY J, Washington 

Home Economics Education Freshman 

PASLAY, LESA G Topeka 

Family and Child Development Senior 

PHILLIPS, ALICE J Valley Falls 

Home Economics Extension Freshman 

PHILLIPS, JO ANN Leavenworth 

Speech Pathology Junior 

PRATHER, DEBORAH L. Lake Quivira 

Pre-Design Professions . . . Freshman 

PRICE, BRENDA . . Kansas City 

Clothing and Retailing ............ Junior 

OUIGLEY, THERESA M St Francis 

Engineering Freshman 

REED, NANCY D Clay Center 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

REIMAN, MARGO A Byers 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

REINHARDT, TERRI S, Erie 

Music Education Freshman 

ROBBINS. CHERYL L Belleville 

Medical Technology Junior 



4 (f.J Aff.'.l h.ill 




a iY"> 




ROBERTS. SANDY K. . Topeka 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

ROBERTS, VICKI L Pomona 

Accounting Sophomore 

RONEY, CYNTHIA D Waverly 

Consumer Interest Senior 

ROOS, RITA JO Shawnee 

Math Education Senior 

ROTH, JOANNJ Green 

Dietetics Sophomore 

ROTH. KAREN L Shawnee 

Applied Music Freshman 

ROYSE, DEBRAA Langdon 

Engineering Freshman 

SAATHOFF, SANDRA F Marysville 

Pre-Physical Therapy Sophomore 

SADOWSKI, BARBARA A Chapman 

General Freshman 

SAMS, JUDY C Overland Park 

Home Economics Freshman 

SCHULTZ, MARGARET A Macksville 

Art Freshman 

SELF, MARIE E Salina 

Psychology ■ Freshman 

SEXTRO, WANDA M Netawaka 

Home Economics Education Senior 

SHAFFER, NANCY E Valley Falls 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

SHARP, SALLY L ...... .St Marys 

Music Education Freshman 

SHRIMPLIN.TINAM, Valley Falls 

Medical Technology Freshman 

SIDIC, DINKA D - Canberra, Australia 

History Junior 

SIEMSEN, DEBRA K Little River 

Family and Child Development Senior 

SKIDMORE, BETH A Ottawa 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

SMITH, DIANE M Enterprise 

Home Economics Freshman 

SMITH. JOANNA I Shiprock, NM 

Secondary Education Freshman 

STINSON, SHARON L Admire 

Early Childhood Education Freshman 

STOSKOPF, DEBRA L. Valley Falls 

Education Junior 

STOSKOPF, JAYNE L . - . Valley Falls 

Finance ..Freshman 

STUM. MARLENES Ness City 

Consumer Interest Junior 

TEETER. VICKY L Lyons 

Community Services Sophomore 

THOMPSON, DIANE K. South Euclid, OH 

Art Sophomore 

TOMPKINS, JACQUE A Ford 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

TRUEBLOOD, MARSHA L Norton 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

TURK, BECKY S Independence. MO 

Speech Pathology and Audiology Senior 

TYLER. CINDY L Sabetha 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

URISH. RENEES Burling, ■ 

Recreation . . Sophomore 

UTZ, CASSANDRA D Kansas City. MO 

Agricultural Journalism Sophomore 

VENTRESS. VICKIE E. Olathe 

Business Administration Junior 

VOIGTS. MARTHA L Lenexa 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

VOSS, SHERRI D St Louis, MO 

Foods and Nutrition Sophomore 

WARNER, BETH Belleville 

Home Economics Education Junior 

WEYAND, CAROL A. McPherson 

Accounting Junior 

WILLIAMS. GAYLET Oklahoma City, OK 

Corrections and Sociology Junior 

WILLIAMS. REBECCA A Overland Park 

Dietetics Junior 

WILTZ, JANICE C Sabetha 

Biology Freshman 

WINTEROTH. SUZANNE E. Norton 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

WOHLER, LORENE K St. Marys 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

YENZER, SYLVIA L Dodget it) 

General sophomore 

YOUK, TERESA A Durham 

Horticulture Sophomore 

YOUNG, MARLENA G . Topeka 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 



west hall — 431 



off-campus 

ABDULLAHI, JEMIMAHP Nigeria -— ^ jgfl^flW jflflTW ^MBk f> ifc 

Home Economics Graduate Student & , «^ ^± |PV A' J flflflL ,'T jr ^fl^ ^^ ^flk 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior W "^Wm " ■* -^ ■* K •*■«#■ ' JflT / '•&&& fllflB^PUJ P Jl <- J 

ADKlIoN, MARLENE S Topeka p ^--» I JU BnwJfl > V*" ' ' ^^Hl 

Radio and Television Senior «^*^ ^ mr" 3 iP Hf Af / ..Jf/ 

AESCHLIMAN, SUSAN D Centralis 4flP£*Bt ^BjjE^. ^r <^^^Bk v .v^fefci 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore jSOB. Bm /flF 4 , ■ jm W mW\ B 

AHERN. JOHN H Howard : '^ %mM ^#&wl MW^WX 

Civil Engineering & flflflk ^aflBflfl ^BI fgjtf « B**TiHB tf 

AHLQUIST.LILAE Clay Center flT ^| K flf ^rsMM * Jf« 0mMk & -*«PP BpflflB 

General Sophomore M~ f^M \ % C TPJP « B B '' " fj^B ¥!^^ 

AISTRUP.EMMETTD Hanston B ' ImBI T \ - « B J&Jflfl "'" ■NSW tftJK 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior ■■ '- -tTMT ' ^fc_ *"^ """"^iB^B. .^\~-JBw % -1^ ^Slk 

AJAKAIYE, MICHAEL B Ogidi-ljumu, Nigeria ^*^^ , N^A^flBi t,, B "BSV ^ **! Bflte Tfll' * "i^ 

Horticulture Graduate Student W" k WWM PJ| f^P / M ■< , ^T^ Jfc. ^^ I j 

AJEANI. MILDRED R Arua. Uganda -§ Mm ... I AB if' Mfflff ft' ffk - ' •J^- J / 

Business Administration Freshman j .""l Jr.^ i'€ '~ *lLj**£i Y» Hlf I *~ ^^ \ 

AJEANI, YORAMU J Arua, Uganda _~^|^ ' ' n^'iTIi .dBBflk. .^flflBk. ^O^^h. 

Animal Science and Industry Graduate Student jflTfl BBk jSiP^Bk. flPP*(flB. flfl EflB ^BHlflflk 

AKIN, LYNNEC BP^<B ^ST VP P^ IB flPPB. MM Bv Bi ^^ 

Elementary Education Sophomore B~ ^1B , ^MWM WW flB BP^BflB MW^^MM\ 

AL-AMOUDI.ABDULLATIFA Jeddah, Saudi Arabia ™j*mMT BP^HBI m&04MM\ W^ WWWM\ C«V 

Business Administration Senior 1 -><B Ti « 1 B B^' ^Tl V^T^B 

ALAMOUDI, HUSSEINS Jeddah. Saudi Arabia WmSMm ^» 4-»B - *>, PB fljjl ^ «■/ li*3flflW 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore ^M^Mf BflV MMm -^MF * ' -SmmT V^SiflW W^^Mw 

AL-AMOUDI.KHALIDA Jeddah, Saudi Arabia -flHflP I *3P^^ Vt^T ^ 

Interior Architecture Junior §? ^Ba ^^BP^ ' 1 '\ '^MmJ . **^ ^^ >#*■•>• 

ALBERT, HARRY Baton Rouge. LA . ^Hk ■■>*. -*^" *5^ W l^B^H rirlr. " / ^* 

Education Graduate Student £\ , W/ -■ r * \f ■ lf%'F " ., #',X. / / 

ALBRACHT, STEPHEN J. Manhattan '4BW Bk .r#^^. #*"iSk. '^^^Bk ^T^^ 

Agricultural Education Senior JM |Bk Qji .B^^BM / VBk ^lt ^T BBk 

ALLDRITT, CELESTE L Halstead HJP 1 IB JB*B B- << / ^Bft oVB ^B> 

alUooUasb s x= pr^| MmWm |<*H| **«% r^* 

Agricultural Economics Senior ■ - il I -4JB: % -3LMW ' ■ '^™ X -Jv I / 4V 

ss G1 T ?s -A Iw vjl iflB ^ JL * jT 

ALLEN, KEITH R Sublette 7w J BW ■B^^jB' V^Bl^W WBr^* ^ ^ "~ ^B 

KnTeSUE, S0P To°p m e . r a J^^JI ^^ T^ A NJEk 

Clothing and Retailing Senior « 1 j ■- ' «• , V^j" 

ALLEN. RONALD K Elkhart ^c *w ^ ^~ -M. ^ -s-'JJP H^ ^*~jw ^|^. ^*i^ 

General Freshman BB #/"*•! /B MM # ,«m 

ALTIZER, PAGE L Overland Park ?'. B ST «■ W <B J*'J&MMk. MW^MM klWMMk 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore • ■ ^H /IS . «jJH jV Ak # :« '• M ^H^B 

ALTLAND, SUSAN M Manhattan M.^^MMM\ wA "* ^1 ? <* *%^B I 1 ^B^B W ^m*aM\ "% 

Early Childhood Education . Sophomore »" 1 ^1 ' JUBfl MyJk JBf 1<*I— I * Uff 

AMEND. MICHAELS El Dorado •■ -«,<«■ ^"IBf M V»M ^ JlJMM -^1 » '-3»'B 

History Graduate Student JB'^'yBBJ k^^Bk^ WM^ 1MMMM --' f ™B^ k IB 

AMOAKO-ATTA, BOAKYE Legon, Ghana M' ,..^— I ? ^B^BBk ■flBpBI '■: < W m. -W ^ -mT* i 

Entomology ....... Graduate Student ^ Jr/ '^MW'H^- 

ANDERSON, CAROL J . .... Oberlin . , f J9B f /% ' " ; ., 

Home Economics Extension Junior Jf ^ j>« ' y^ - 1^^^ wf 

ANDERSON, HAROLD E. Chanute jMM^. A. ^k. "^^ >oril ^ s *M* V 

Animal Science and Industry Senior Bt 4'- flBk ff ; A ' Wr IMk 

ANDERSON. JACQUELINE S. Manhattan * 24 Mg B| «> BV #--* B 

Fashion Marketing Senior ^P^"^ '' * ^-^BV H -^^ V ^B. * ^JBl 

ANDERSON, MARGARET E Garnett W *» ^m ■ J ■ v9m li '* ^Bfc fl~'-f-^B* S W^^" 1 ^ 

Home Economics Education Graduate Student ' . WW W< 

ANDERSON, SONIAS McPherson ^ / - ;: B ' '% ^'^Mw ™ ' W A -'-X fl JOwMF 

Social Work Senior * "#W "^L^ 3^" Bv 3 "^r^* 

ANDRES. JOHN L AltaVista 'IF Bjh Wl "^BP" KkBB ^"'' 

Veterinary Medicine ,-A B ^Bk t^B^^I 

ANDREWS. BOB L Pierceville , W » ' - * !BV '^BP ^B*Vl 

Animal Science and Industry Junior ,J|k WB^ j i *^" / Bd& H^ -. ■BPPv* 1 

ANDREWS, DEBRA L Concordia ^r rr^fBk ^T"jfc, -, . ^ ^ B'^. 

ANNETt' CLARENCE 1 1" " , AmarH^TX V» ^B ' f ** ^^^ '^B B ^XjB 

ANSON. ELIZABETH D Truma^sburg, NY B ' \fll ^M \ '- *"v B ^-^^B 1 \ '" ^ 

Elementary Education Senior ^ 'MB "^^B^P B>v V <B1 \ ^ A 

ANTHONY, RUSSELL V Lexington. NB ^' _^ T! T ^^ ~MWA. B -^BIBB P^ "iBw IBV^BI 

Animal Science and Industry Junior <\ \ i_* ^ ^^^BK P « "Bj ^Bw IB I iPBBk 

ARCHER, PATRICIA A Lyons Tj ^B ^B ' ^ <I RbW ^fB 

Family and Child Development Junior \y WW \ \ W - ^— \| M£% * B 

ARMOUR, CHARLES W Junction City fy ■» . .^fc-BW ^Tk 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore fr* r *mwt .^iBk. / -Jl ' Bk ~ %. 

ARMOUR, JAMES L Viola 4B| HW t, . *Bj tflk 

Civil Engineering Senior ■ ^ ^J PB JB B B> BB 

ARMSTRONG, MARK J Muscotah Or-^TPB tB"iB W^"*PBL W'* ' '•^Bj 

Agricultural Economics Senior f i JOF I B^^PB ^ A 

ARNOLDY, JEANNE Tipton '• -« » ^^ C j"jaHB] I /jsBl 

Fashion Marketing Senior \ JBB k~ Bblb Mk. ' =3Sfl 

ARNOLDY. NANCY S Tipton WW 'WM \i »1 W . k-^MW'Z I ' ^ ..tMW WW m 

Corrections Administration Sophomore P^ ^MB . ^B 7 fl II (*7/r BBBl P Bl 

ARPIN.ALCIDT Stockton (fl I ^fl\ ^ MM '* OWE , ♦P-lf ' J 

Architecture Fifth Year Student A R|^ ^■j^Sl ^E£IH" ' »l 





432 — ott-campus 




«l n $ 1&& 




ARPIN.LANAG ... El Dorado 

Interior Design Junior 

ARTZ, DONNA K El Dorado 

Health Sophomore 

ASHCRAFT, BRENDA L Wakefield 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

ASHER, LAWRENCE J Shawnee 

Radio and Television Senior 

ATKINSON, DWIGHTC Abilene 

History Senior 

ATKINSON, GLORIA A. Austin, TX 
Geology Junior 

ATTEBERRY, DONALD G Tecumseh 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

ATTEBERY, J, DENISE Paola 

Special Education Junior 

ATZENHOFFER, MARK D . Great Bend 

Radio and Television Freshman 

ALIEN, CYNTHIA A Manhattan 

General Freshman 

AVEY, KIMBERLY J Liberal 

Interior Design Sophomore 

AYLWARD, KATHY M Solomon 

Finance Senior 

AYLWARD, THOMAS M Solomon 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

BAALMAN, RHONDA G Menlo 

Speech Pathology Junior 

BADER, TERRY F St. Louis, MO 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

BADGER, CATHRYN S Carbondale 

Horticulture Junior 

BAEHLER, GARY L Sharon Springs 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

BAHR, KAREN L Olmitz 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts Junior 

BAHR, PAULA S Gndley 

Foods and Nutrition Junior 

BAILEY, KATHRYN A Newton 

Home Economics and Radio-Television Senior 

BAILEY, MARILYN A Emporia 

Civil Engineering Junior 

BAILEY, THOMAS F Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering Graduate Student 

BAILEY, TIMOTHY K Oskaloosa 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

BAIRD, DARREL K Benedict 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

BAKER, ANN F Kansas City, MO 

Elementary Education Senior 

BAKER, CINDY S Syracuse 

Fashion Marketing Sophomore 

BAKER, JILL C Overland Park 

Home Economics Education Junior 

BAKER, MARGARET D Leavenworth 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

BAKER, SUSAN L Buhler 

Medical Technology Junior 

BALCOM, RAMONAJ Mernam 

Office Administration Junior 

BALDWIN, LYNN W Galva 

Recreation Senior 

BANKS, NANCY A . ..Wamego 

Fashion Marketing Senior 

BARBER, REX A Ellmwood 

Architecture Junior 

BARGER, ROBERT E Madison 

Music Sophomore 

BARKER, GARY D Pratt 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

BARKER, MARTIN D Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

BARKER, RICKY J Muscatine, IA 

Mathematics Graduate Student 

BARKER, RUTH A Pratt 

Elementary Education Senior 

BARKYOUMB, SUSAN . Manhattan 

General Freshman 

BARNES, GREGGORYT ...Newton 

Education Junior 

BARNETT, CAROL J Wichita 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

BARNETT, CYNTHIA A Wichita 

Retail Floriculture Senior 

BARNETT, DAVID M Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

BARR, KATHY J. ....... . Burdick 

Art Sophomore 

BARRETT, SHERYL A Colby 

Fashion Retailing Senior 

BARTA, RANDALL L Ellinwood 

Interior Architecture Junior 

BATCHELDER, PAUL H Highland 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

BATTEN. MARK B Toledo. OH 

Architectural Engineering .Junior 



off-campus — 433 



off -campus 



BAUER. MICHAEL E. Florissant, MO 

Architecture Junior 

BAUGHER, MARSHA K Manhattan 

Horticulture Senior 

BAUMGARTNER, PEGGY L Bern 

Elementary Education Senior 

BAXTER, RICHARD R Kirwin 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

BEADLES, SHERRI L Fall River 

Business Administration Senior 

BEALS, CONSTANCE L Runnells, IA 

Home Economics and Journalism Senior 



Cleveland, OH 

Junior 

Luray 

Graduate Student 

Marion 

Sophomore 
Prairie Village 

Junior 

Manhattan 
Sophomore 



BEAMISH, CYNTHIA L 

Special Education 

BEAN, THEODORE A 

Civil Engineering 

BEASTON, MARTY K 

General 

BEATSON. JACKIE R 

Speech Pathology 

BEAUDET, CAROLYN M 

Business 

BECHTEL, ROGER A Conway Springs 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 



BECHTEL, TERRI L Manhattan 

Education Sophomore 

BECK, DAVID W Wichita 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

BECKER, CHERYLL A, Monroe, LA 

Business Administration Junior 

BECKERDITE, CLAUDIA E Kingsdown 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

BEINEKE, KAY Nickerson 

Recreation Senior 

BELL, DAVID G El Dorado 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 



BELL, DEBORAH J Beloit 

Horticulture Senior 

BELL. JOSEPHINE C. . . . Pine Bluff, AR 

Curriculum and Instruction Graduate Student 

BENDA, BEVERLY J Ludell 

Accounting Senior 

BENIGNUS, ELSBETH J Hoisington 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

BENSON, ANN Garden City 

Architecture Senior 

BENSON, KIRK T Coffeyville 

Pre-Medicine Senior 



BENTZ, ARLAN E Abilene 

Computer Science Graduate Student 

BERGLUND,TIM A Stanley 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

BERGMEIER, WILLIAM R Wakefield 

Physical Education Sophomore 

BERNEY, RANDY C Phillipsburg 

Accounting Junior 

BERRY, PATTY D Wichita 

Physical Education . Junior 

BEST, PETER H Manhattan 

Civil Engineering Junior 



SEVENS, CHARLOTTE L Topeka 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

BICKLE, LYNETTE R Hays 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

BIEBERLY, GREGORY E Salina 

Civil Engineering Senior 

BIEBERLY, JULIE A Manhattan 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

BIENHOFF, MARK W Kensington 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

BIESENTHAL, JANE M Westmoreland 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 



BINDER. STEPHEN F Hays 

Gram Science Graduate Student 

BINFORD, MARY E. . . . Liberal 

Art Education . Fifth Year Student 

BIRD, ALICIA A Liberal 

Elementary Education Freshman 

BIRD, GREGORY J Liberal 

Accounting * Junior 

BIRZER, DEBEJ Bonner Springs 

Family and Child Development Junior 

BIRZER, MATTHEW L Ellinwood 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 



BISWELL. JULIE A. . . Manhattan 

Horticulture Therapy Junior 

BLACKER. TIMOTHY L Manhattan 

Theatre Freshman 

BLACKMAN, ROBIN G Olathe 

Geography Senior 

BLACKMON, SANDRA G Topeka 

Home Economics and Journalism Senior 

BLOCKSOME, RICHARD C Ransom 

Agronomy Senior 

BLASCHKE, WILLIAM A Palm Beach, FL 

Bakery Science and Management Sophomore 









km 



ft All A 

Mm. 





$.$&&&$ 




fBLASKE, KATHY J . . . Marysville 
Elementary Education Sophomore 
BLASS, MIKE L Beloit 
Building Construction Sophomore 
BUCK, JOANNE E Wichita 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

BLINZLER, CAROL A Kansas City 
Special Education Senior 
BLOOM.ADALEEA Clay Center 
Home Economics Junior 
BLOUNT, JOHN M Joliel, IL 
Elementary Education Junior 

— ^a^ BLUME, HAROLD R Westmoreland 

9k f JBk ^mwm^ .rJML:. Agricultural Engineering Senior 

m -!^k #NHPm jAf ^ML : BOCK. DONALD R Manhattan 

» ff ^i^B Am |& Jr ^Ife. 4 Engineering Freshman 

■r*H" l #l «~ -^ fT'i» MflV m** #SSM BOGINA, MICHAEL E Lenexa 

fc^fSM f ^m Civil Engineering Sophomore 

\ "* j \ -AjP a C3&JH BOISCLAIR, PAULA A Huntsville, AL 

Tm*""3§l il M m HStsF <m * "" Business Administration Sophomore 

'4'^igH M. J ,^B ^k . . ^ BOLD! LARRY V Pratt 

A 33 ▼k Jmw\ Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

■ ^%,' ; "" ; BOLIN, DEBORAH J Wichita 

W W<8BP^W ii JH I - '^£f Family and Child Development Junior 

t -»- Hfltfc rU ffc BOLTON. CHARLES L St. George 

^fllR^. «vl Sk .^B^B^ Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

«KF^Bk V^^Qflk ''*B\. BOMAN, SHIRLEY M Holcomb 

JBfc. JV Hk fi 9k Special Education Freshman 

VrW '#■■ M'«« *«■■£ ImmB BONDANK, DIANNE J Leawood 

m > 1 ■ P"*am. ^ 17 |nler, ° r Des| 9 n 

^A mV » / A.J^^I ' -« V BONNER, TIMOTHY J. Fredoma 

ll^i . ^!""WMM r3K. Sociology Senior 

V 7^ H^k JH Jfk BORHANI, KATHYJ Pittsburg 

MB" 1 '!Ba i "*^ Amk Chemistry Graduate Student 

i^3L '■ I wLmm:\ MM BORHANI, MOSTAFA Shiraz Iran 

I* A tT ? # J ^Hl^9 H'*i^> Electrical Engineering Graduate Studenl 




ofl-campus — 435 



off -cam pus 

BORTZ, KATHRYN L Manhattan 

Medical Technology Senior 

BOSCH, CATHERINE E Manhattan 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

BOSTER. SCOTT A Bennington 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

BOUCHARD, RHEAL J Newington, CT 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

BOURAY, MICHAEL D Chanute 

Pre-Forestry Freshman 

BOWERS. DOUGLAS D Wichita 

Accounting Sophomore 

BOWMAN, JACOLYN E . . . . Ellmwood 

Physical Education Sophomore 

BOWMAN. MARY M Kansas City 

Business Education Junior 

BOYD, BECKY L Topeka 

Interior Design Junior 

BOZARTH, JACK M Minneapolis, MN 

Radio and Television Freshman 

BOZEMAN, RICHARD T Hays 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

BOZEMAN, SUSAN K Hays 

Mathematics Graduate Student 

BRACK, KIM E Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Senior 

BRACK, LES L Hutchinson 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

BRADEN, MICHAEL J Wakefield 

Marketing Junior 

BRADFORD, SHERI L Lyons 

Recreation Senior 

BRADFORD, THELMAH Baton Rouge, LA 

English Education Graduate Student 

BRADLEY, DENNIS M Atchison 

Architecture Senior 

BRADLEY, NORMAN E Peculiar, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BRADLEY, REBECCA L Goff 

Physical Education Sophomore 

BRAND. JEAN M Welda 

Art Sophomore 

BRANDEBERRY, JACKIE L Russell 

Modern Language Senior 

BRANNAN, MICHAEL S Meade 

Civil Engineering Senior 

BRAUN, MARY J Edgerton 

Social Work Senior 

BRAXMEYER, PATRICIA J Atwood 

Business Junior 

BREEDEN, BRADLEY A Great Bend 

Biology Senior 

BREEN GAIL L Augusta 

Art Junior 

BREESE, LYNNC Hillsboro 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

BRENNAN, LISA A Rossville 

Accounting Sophomore 

BRENNEIS, DENNIS R Hollenberg 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

BRENNER, DEBORRAHS Junction City 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

BRETTELL, JOHN E Manhattan 

Political Science Sophomore 

BREWER, MIA Ouenemo 

Pre-Law Junior 

BRIGHT, SHEILA M , Meriden 

Finance Sophomore 

BRINKER, KAREN K Glen Elder 

Family and Child Development Junior 

BRINKLEY. JAMES H Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BRISON, LEAH J El Dorado 

Fashion Merchandising Senior 

BRITO, GUSTAVO P San Juan, PR 

Biology Senior 

BRITTON, ROGER G Hutchinson 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

BROKES, CRAIG D Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

BROUGHER, TONI K Great Bend 

Elementary Education Junior 

BROWN, BARBARA J Manhattan 

Foods and Nutrition Graduate Student 

BROWN, BRYAN C Manhattan 

Music Education Senior 

BROWN, DALLAS S, Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

BROWN, DANIEL K Wichita 

General Sophomore 

BROWN, MICHAEL S Liberal 

Business Administration Senior 

BROWN, PATRICIA J El Dorado 

Interior Design Senior 

BROWN, PHIL W Wakelield 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 









f^fcjv jB99k "^ "^IBBk BROWN, RONALD L. Erie, IL 

Hk »"fl| Bm Architectural Engineering Senior 

jfc 99\ gSj J^'^BBk BROWNBACK. ALAN L Parker 

99^ § '» Veterinary Medicine Junior 

*«* flfll B^fiS I SM it?** 99B BROWNBACK, NANCY E. Parker 
W* F*M999l Family and Child Development Senior 

■V^w fir iI O!^ w<=m sr^.™ LE8 . R v.v .-■£» 

«*W T "^■T lm « J1 W ""f* BROWNE, CYNTHIA J Salina 

Hf SWmri Architecture Fifth Year Student 

f >h " . Jtt99M «9W BROZANIC, LINDA M. Kansas City 

, I 1 -""V. V \ jBI MBkV. Bk Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

_JjB9*k. «ri99J9W 4^^. '««tt. BRUHL. BERTHA K New Cambria 

JKBr Wk. £M f^k* All Pre-Nursing Freshman 

V mV JP Wli ''BB. #B *• ^99k BRUNA, ALAN W. Hanover 

M. i_JW WL [ Mathematics Senior 

" ''"% WKWSK 1 *— W ^ |9BI BRUNGARDT, RICHARD Victoria 

NT"* ■ JOI 1 -4t W IB „ I / Veterinary Medicine Senior 

* JMw \^-^m'§m 9f <JBm¥ 2t /-^Bl BRYAN,DAVIDH Highland 

J^fkb iff \ ~ "* Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

■ ^jvlnlH I^hL *'* W tMbI ' ^^ „. .^ BRYON, DIANA M Kansas City 

^Bl ' JB1 Iflk "^ Bfck *Bl-' |& Home Economics Education Senior 

^■t/H 99k i /H : '%, BUCHANAN, LINA J Spring Hill 

99 laB H^ ' BBK — ■ ~^ 99 fc.HL II Family and Child Development Junior 

f ,.„a^ BUCHANAN, LOIS A Lewis 

Recreation Junior 

BUCHER, DENISE M Overland Park 
Home Economics Education Senior 
**"*HB1 1 * ""*"1 lL-«» ""V BUCHMAN, KAREN A Manhattan 
19 Home Economics Sophomore 

\ < lu • j BUCHMAN, REX B Manhattan 

k %, *af Animal Science and Industry Senior 

f JW\vt • % / BUCHMAN, SUSAN K Burdict' 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

A Mr J^ Hk fiBk BUCL, LOARNL Timken 

• . ' M | iB*3 M H\ jPll W Crop-Protection Senior 

a tf ^ -. ^ j99kV ,«99^ BUDD, DAVID R Fallston, MD 

,JWBk ■ ^yy 9j)Jjk !■& 99k JP^ Architecture Senior 

J^ ^k ^"^ *^9 BKl BULK, MARTINA M. Topeka 

I M |B .i^tta.^L. ' I Horticulture Senior 

Biff ■■■ Jf ~ # Si99l u^BWPVJHI BULKLEY, SHELLEY S Prairie Village 

"W 1 «j ■ Horticultural Therapy Freshman 

•,4m I ^mm vi -^ F V* i BULLER, REBECCA J Tqpeka 

:ji '-jflJH Si jj B ■*■¥ **. *"Ba « , Early Childhood Education Junior 

BW ^ B^tfB I "*~m jfc *^B BUNDY, ALAN L Goddard 

HP*lflJ 39' -ifS ' 49? Agricultural Mechanization sophomore 

MF ™1"P^^ i m/W^V-;. t.wM BURGER, SHEILA M Clay Center 

:.' i W' : ' " Family and Child Development Sophomore 

BURKE, MARY L Overland Park 

Fashion Marketing Junior 

r BURKE, PATRICIA L Overland Park 
/yj Elementary Education Senior 

BURKHOLDER, DAVID E McPherson 

Interior Architecture Senior 

BURNS, PAUL W Topeka 

Horticulture Sophomore 

BURNS, S DIAN Chattanooga. TN 

Commercial Art Freshman 

BURR, MARLENE K . .St. Francis 

Home Economics Extension Junior 

a^99Bv BURTON, CHARLENE J Greensburg 

m ^*M ' 4 9BJBW Speech and Drama Education Senior 

/ . - «*p|99 g£fc% T9i Mi JIBjR { _ jjlk Agronomy Senior 

*► «m « '''■' B^-*tBBf §BH- jflBM A ■"*' 'IB burton, kennethr .Wichita 

1, / •*%, mm M r ir ¥ Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

^JmK. I I -V fl BURTON, RICHARD A El Dorado 

Bhk! . Pre-Dentistry Senior 

gB\ 9L ^W • ~A Bk 4 9P s ^9999l BUSBY, MARGARET D Hutchinson 

■■K m\ ^^^^ / HHV ^^T ^^^. Family and Child Development Senior 

{■ i vjBjk iBff / 9M99k F*""™ '™^ 9K 1^1 99P". jiii Architecture Senior 

BUSSE, KENNETH R Goodland 

English Literature Sophomore 

BUTIN, SANDRA L Halstead 

Home Economics Junior 

/ ^ a9J "M I jHf "' "^99 BUTLER, HUGH Manhattan 

[ / J^^r Pre-Medicme Sophomore 

■ C^BBmI BUTLER, JOANNE G. Topeka 

■9k Clothing and Retailing Senior 

B^^9?B CAFLISCH. LEONHARDR. Independence 

Architecture Senior 

CALHOUN. KAREN R Wichita 

Dietetics Sophomore 

CALKINS, STEVEN H Olathe 

Geology Senior 

CALL, JERILYN J , ,, Wamego 

Social Work , Junior 

#CALL, MARY P Prairie Village 
Elementary Education Senior 

CAMPBELL, CAROL J Beloit 

Music Senior 

CAMPBELL. CLYDE A Russell 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

CAMPBELL. MARC A Wichita 

Industrial Engineering Graduate Student 






oft-campus — 437 



off -campus 

CAMPBELL, MARILYN K Manhattan 

Home Economics Sophomore 

CAMPBELL, ROBERTA Wichita 

Special Education Junior 

CAMPBELL. STEVEN G Ulysses 

Business Sophomore 

CAMPBELL, WILLIAM R Topeka 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

CANFIELD, CONNIE S El Dorado 

Social Work Senior 

CANNAN, S. GAIL Pratt 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

CAPPS, JAMES R St Louis, MO 

Architecture Junior 

CARBAUGH, DONNA J Lawrence 

Physical Education Sophomore 

CARLETON, CARLA L. Burtonsville. MD 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

CARLIN, ROGER E Bucklin 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

CARLSON. MARK D Overland Park 

Biology Junior 

CARNEY, KARLA J Edna . 

Home Economics and Journalism Senior 




1 1 r * I 







MMM 




CARR, KATHERINE L Kansas City 

Education Senior 

CARREL, DEBRAS Shawnee 

Foods and Nutrition Graduate Student 

CARSON, COLETTE A . , Wetmore 

Journalism and Mass Communications ' ■■ ■ f j r i • r> . n 

CARTER, BILL C Merriam 

Civil Engineering Senior 

CARTER, CAMMIE C Paola 

Secondary Education Senior 

CARVER, DAVID L Manhattan 

Chemical Engineering Senior 



CARVER, JENNA S Manhattan 

English Senior 

CARY, JAMES H Downs 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

CARY, LES Downs 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

CASTANEDA. CHRIS T Junction City 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

CATES, L KIRK Belleville 

Medical Technology Junior 

CATLIN, DANIEL L Miltonvale 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 



CATLIN, MAURICE A Concordia 

Agricultural Education Senior 

CATLIN, MICHAEL W Concordia 

Agricultural Education Senior 

CEDERBERG, JOEL E Manhattan 

General Freshman 

CELLMER, TERRY L Plainville 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

CHAFFIN, VERONA J K Leavenworth 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

CHAMBERS, BARBARA L Overland Park 
Dietetics Junior 



CHAPMAN, MARY J . .. Glasco 

Liberal Arts . Sophomore 

CHAPMAN, SCOTT L Beloit 

Business Administration Graduate Student 

CHATHAM, MICHAEL D Topeka 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

CHEATUM, JODY A Syracuse 

Family and Child Development Junior 

CHEEK, LINDAS St Louis. MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

CHILDS, BARRY K Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics Senior 



CHILDS, SUSAN E Manhattan 

Family and Child Development Senior 

CHISM, SABRINA A Clathn 

Nuclear Physics Junior 

CHRISMAN, DIANE Wichita 

Family and Child Development Senior 

CHRISTENSEN. JOND. Manhattan 

Geology Junior 

CHRISTNER, REX A Hutchinson 

Physical Education Senior 

CHRISTNER, TERRY A Hutchinson 

Family and Child Development Senior 



CLARK, ELAINE J Junction City 

Fashion Marketing . . . . Freshman 

CLARK, GAY A Netawaka 

Elementary Education Senior 

CLARK, GREGORY C Manhattan 

Crop Protection Junior 

CLARK, JENNIFER C Topeka 

Foods and Nutrition Freshman 

CLARK, RANDLE L McPherson 

Architecture Senior 

CLARK, ROBERTA M Manhattan 

Art Education . . Graduate Student 



CLARKE, THOMAS W Yates Center 

Finance and Accounting Senior 

CLEMENTS, LAWANA G Oxford 

Horticultural Industries Sophomore 

CLEVENGER, MINDY L Mission 

Sociology Senior 



CLINE,REMYD, 
Business 
CLINE. ROGER H 
Electrical Engineering 
CLINTON, DARRYL L 
Chemical Engineering 



M.i"' itl II 

i reshman 
Honolulu. HI 
Sophomore 

Scott City 
Junior 



COATS, LINDA J Hutchinson 

Physical Therapy Junior 

COATS, VICKI R Wichita 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

COLBY, PATRICAA Concordia 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

COLE, CYNTHIA A Wamego 

Secondary Education Senior 

COLEMAN, KATHERINE L Manhattan 

Modern Language Freshman 

COLLE. LANCED Nickerson 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 






off -cam pus 



COLLINS, ANNETTE K Concordia 

Family and Child Development Senior 

COLLINS, CHERYL L Overland Park 

Social Work Sophomore 

COLLINS. GARY W. St. Louis. MO 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

COLYN. LESLIE D McPherson 

Secondary Education Junior 

COMPAAN, MELODY-LEIGH Norton 

Elementary Education Senior 

CONDRAY, SCOTT R Clifton 

Agricultural Economics Senior 



Overland Park 

Junior 

Independence, MO 

Sophomore 

Manhattan 

Junior 

CONNER. JERRY E Maple Hill 

Graphic Art Freshman 

CONNER. MARTHA J Maple Hill 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

CONVERSE, CINDY S Eskridge 

Physical Education 



CONDRY, ELLEN M 
Elementary Education 
CONGER. C BRENT 
Pre-Design Professions 
CONKWRIGHT, KAYS. 
Graphic Art 



CONVERSE, MARK A 
E ngineering 
COOK.GIOVANNAT 
Modern Language 
COOK, JUDITH A. 



Manhattan 

Freshman 

Manhattan 

Sophomore 

Manhattan 

English . Senior 

COOK. MARIKA F Manhattan 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

COOK. ROBERT R Jewell 

Agriculture Sophomore 

COOPER. ALICE E Topeka 

Horticulture Senior 



COOPER, DAVID L Leavenworth 

Political Science Junior 

COOPER, DEAN L St. John 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

COOPER, JAMES L Overland Park 

Business Management Junior 

CORBIN, MARK R St. Louis, MO 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

CORCORAN. JEFFREY B Junction City 

Art Education Junior 

CORCORAN, THERESA G Hutchinson 

Special Education Senior 



Manhattan 

Junior 

Overland Park 

Sophomore 

Overland Park 

Junior 

Belleville 

Junior 



CORFMAN, TERESA J 
Elementary Education 

CORNELIUS, GREGORY T 

Accounting 
CORNELIUS, MARY D 

Pre-Medicme 

CORNETT, JACK L 

Agricultural Economics 

CORNWELL, MARTHA J St. John 

Dietetics Senior 

CORY. LINDA M Wichita 

Elementary Education Junior 



COTTEN, JENNIFER J Hoisington 

Dietetics Senior 

COTTINGHAM, LEANN Concordia 

English Education Senior 

COURI, ROBERT M East Peoria, IL 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

COWEN, MELVIN D. . . Manhattan 

Architecture Junior 

COX.CHERID Topeka 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

CRAFT, GLENN S Lebo 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 



CRAIG, DENISE L Overland Park 

Radio and Television Senior 

CRAMER. CONNIES Manhattan 

General . Freshman 

CRAMER, STACIA J Manhattan 

General Freshman 

CRANDALL, ROBERT J Overland Park 

Business Administration Senior 

CRANDALL, SUSAN J Overland Park 

Home Economics Education Senior 

CRANE. E. DAVID . Larned 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 



CRANSTON, BRADD Montrose, CO 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

CRAWFORD, WARREN L Longton 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

CREASON, MARK D Kansas City 

Construction Science Senior 

CRISLER, MICHELLE E Wamego 

Horticulture Senior 

CRIST. CYNTHIA D Little River 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

CROWL, GARY M Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 








f fctflfr 




440 — oft-campus 




&1,I$ 




1 1 9 Aft? 



CUDNEY, NANCY L Trousdale 

Psychology Junior 

DAHL, MICHAEL E Abilene 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

DANLER, PATRICK J. . Kingman 

Biology Junior 

DARNELL, GWEN S Salina 

Education Senior 

DAROSETT, GARY W . . . Newton 

Pre-Law Freshman 

DAVIDSON, DOUGLAS A Wellington 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

DAVIDSON, STEPHEN R Wichita 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

DAVIGNON, ROGER E Hill City 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

DAVIS, CAROL S Scandia 

Political Science Senior 

DAVIS, CHRIS N Mission 

Geology Senior 

DAVIS, DEBRAJ Highland 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

DAVIS, GEORGE A Junction City 

Business Administration Senior 

DAVIS, LYNDA S Fort Scott 

Dairy Science Junior 

DAVIS, MARY J Overland Park 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

DAVIS, MARY S Manhattan 

Business Education Senior 

DAVIS, RETTA A Shawnee 

Marketing Research Senior 

DAVIS, VICKI L Leawood 

Microbiology Graduate Student 

DAWKINS, JOHN L Shawnee Mission 

Biochemistry Senior 

DAWSON, HERBERT E Medicine Lodge 

Architecture Senior 

DAY, CINDY L Henrietta, NY 

Home Economics Freshman 

DAY, TRACY Overland Park 

Business Finance Senior 

DAYLOR, PAULA K Wamego 

Social Work and Corrections Junior 

DEAN, KENT A Wamego 

Corrections Administration Junior 

DEAN, WILLIAM H Cheney, WA 

Accounting Senior 

DEBOLD, TERENCE E Salina 

Business Administration Senior 

DEBRICK, CONNIE M Paola 

Social Sciences Senior 

DEBRICK, KATHY L Paola 

Medical Technology Senior 

DECKER, PATRICIA K Burr Oak 

Computer Science Junior 

DEFFENBAUGH, ERIC P Manhattan 

Radio and Television .Junior 

DeFRIES. RICHARD B Manhattan 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

DeHART, STEVE D Topeka 

Microbiology Senior 

DEINES, GEORGE F Ness City 

Restaurant Management Senior 

DEINES. PEGGY J Solomon 

Elementary Education Senior 

DEMO, DANIEL D El Dorado 

Business Sophomore 

DEMUTH, DOROTHY L Wright 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

DEMUTH, YVONNE M Hanover 

Elementary Education Senior 

DEMPSTER, JAMES L Atchison 

Business Management Freshman 

DEMPSTER, RICHARD E Atchison 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

DENNING, DOUGLAS G Russell 

Accounting Senior 

DENNIS, E ANN Leavenworth 

General Freshman 

DENNIS, SCOTT M Olathe 

Microbiology Senior 

DEPENBUSCH.LARRYJ . . Zenda 

Architecture Junior 

DESCH. JOSEPH P Topeka 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

DEUTSCH, BRADLEY L, . . Hoismgton 

Accounting Junior 

DIAZ, CARLOS A Cayey, PR 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

DIBBEN. ELAINE M Junction City 

Home Economics Education Senior 

DIBBEN. N. CRAIG Junction City 

Business Administration Senior 

DICK, DAVID A Buhler 

Agricultural Mechanization Junioi 



olt-campus — 441 



off -campus 



DICKASON. CYNTHIA A Fort Scott 

Recreation Senior 

DICKENS, LOREN E Neodesha 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

DICKERSON, BILL J Topeka 

Health Sophomore 

DICKEY. HALLEY K Lake Lolawaha. MO 

Architecture Junior 

DICKS. CHRISTOPHER L . . Bardstown, KY 

Criminology Sophomore 

DICKS. VIRGINIA G Bardstown, KY 

Psychology Senior 

DICRISTINA, NADINE M Jackson, NJ 

Family and Child Development Senior 

DIECKHOFF, SUE E Salina 

Interior Design Senior 

DIETRICH. MARYS Hiawatha 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

DIETZ, CARMA J Hoismgton 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

DIETZ, CHARLES H Manhattan 

Park and Recreation Management Senior 

DIKEMAN, STEVE Syracuse 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

DIRKS, RANDALL K Dodge City 

Physical Education Senior 

DIRKS, SUSAN K Dodge City 

General Junior 

DIVER, MARCIA L El Dorado 

Dietetics Junior 

DLABAL, DEBORAH K Ellsworth 

Physical Therapy Junior 

DOAN, RICHARD L Mound City, MO 

Architecture Senior 

DOBBIE, JOANN M Kansas City 

Physical Education 





_■ ___H__H_i __■_ ___. ________ 

?_M 







PARKING ^^ 




442 — otf-carnpus 





a.®iM 




DOBY, CINDE D Leavenworth 

Marketing Sophomore 

DODGE, JAMES W Manhattan 

Education Senior 

DOEBELE, CONNIE J Hanover 

Radio and Television Junior 

DOKKEN, DANIEL P Derby 

Architecture Senior 

DOKKEN, PEGGY L Derby 

Music Education Senior 

DONLEY, KEITH B Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

DONMYER, JOHN E Casper, WY 

Statistics Junior 

DOOLEY, MIKE E Atchison 

Milling Science and Management Freshman 

DORSEY, RENEA C Haysville 

Interior Design Junior 

DOTSON, DEBORAH Wichita 

Theatre Sophomore 

DOYLE, GREG Denver, CO 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

DREES, CHARLES M Hays 

Guidance and Counseling Graduate Student 

DREES. DUANE W Garden City 

Agronomy Junior 

DROGE, BEVERLY F Seneca 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts Senior 

DRUMHILLER, LINDA K Hutchinson 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts Senior 

DUDLEY, DEBRA J Cawker City 

Recreation Junior 

DUDTE, TIMOTHY J Hesston 

Architecture Senior 

DUFFENDACK, SCOTT A Kansas City 

Business Administration Junior 

DUKICH, MARSHA L Leawood 

Sociology Senior 

DUMLER, SYLVIA J Russell 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

DUNCAN, JON B Kensington 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

DUNCAN, LYNN M Kansas City 

Accounting Senior 

DUNCAN, VICKI L Trenton, MO 

Fashion Marketing Senior 

DUNIVENT. GAYLE K Manhattan 

Interior Design Sophomore 

DUNN, JOSEPH J Holhs. NY 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

DUNN, WAYNE E Meriden 

Agricultural Education Graduate Student 

DUNTON, MARION D Topeka 

Adult Education Graduate Student 

DURANT, JACKIE E Jewell 

Fashion Marketing Sophomore 

DURBIN, RANDAL L Moline 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

DURLER, MAURICE G Dodge City 

Accounting Junior 

DYE, REBECCAA Goodland 

Business Sophomore 

EAVERSON, DEBORAH J Overland Park 

Speech Education Senior 

EAVERSON, ROBERT G Overland Park 

Music Education Junior 

EBERTH, TOM E Basehor 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

EBY, CARL W Howard 

Accounting Junior 

EDDY, ADELL L Syracuse 

Accounting Senior 

EDDY, SUSAN M Marysville 

General Sophomore 

EDELMAN, MARK A Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

EDIGER, CHARLOTTE A Buhler 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts Senior 

EDMONDS, VICKI S McLouth 

Physical Education Junior 

EDWARDS, SUSAN F Emporia 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

EGAN, FRANCES L Salina 

Political Science Senior 

EGGERS, DOUGLAS W Ellmwood 

Business Administration Sophomore 

EICHHORN, CONNIE M .Salina 

Physical Education Junior 

EICKHOLT, MARIE-ANNE T Junction City 

Modern Language Junior 

EILERT, BECKY L. . Beloit 

Pre-Nursing . Junior 

ELDER, RODERIC L Arkansas City 

Architecture Senior 

ELLIFF, CONNIE J Port Isabel. TX 

Foods and Nutrition Graduate Student 



off-campus — 443 



i 





off-campus 

ELLIFF, DONALD A Port Isabel. TX 

Administration Graduate Student A. SBR 4Hl\ £ JflBk A. JP™P» V .^^BR«&. 

ELLING.JOANE Marion §■ "^m. "^P^'% ILJIMHB flk W Wk i«P^« 

Physical Therapy Senior f^ ^A ,V % fT^M i ~ ,-M I * **■ E^ A 

X;r RAK sxrre , -y ^A [-*■ f;.r» k u t^ V*^ 

"e-al ^^ ^mot "jC M^ ' ' >Jf A^^V^l ^SbL 
ELLIS. RANDALL W '^■F frm # i \ <tf| I |W SB V ^Jm ^ "-S^BBW 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior JR \i9BWk R flf* \*"Wm I i&4fll 

ELSAHOOKIE.MEDHATM Baghdad, Iraq JB ,/ / / 1 ' /IHTTiMi HI ^ I ^k9 

A9r0n ° my Graduate Student rf f| / / ^ J| , ^«| » J| fj ^J ^Q| 

ELSEN, CAROLYN M Pratt — 5^ df^ 

Elementary Education Senior HB& ^£9Bk 

ELSEY BRUCE D Garden City ^^"HY 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 1 : ■T^^^R* B ^TB» 

EMERY, BARBARA A McPherson EK-vlS 1 ~ 

Home Economics Senior ^1 , t&M 

EMERY. TERRIK. McPherson ^ - ? ;f 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore W Bw 

ENGELLANO, GLENN A Sterling T jBF" im WT'' 

Poultry Science Senior s ^flMf4 ^^ f 

ENGLISH. C.STEVEN Sedan NBhL 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Senior h. ^BMBII ? I 

ENYART, JENISE G Abilene gf ^ 

Social Work . Junior Bk 

EPLER, DEBORAH K. Valley Falls M RBY 

Social Work Junior If ^M 

ERICKSON, JULIE A Courtland I "* "•■j 

Management Junior \ / 

ERICKSON. SHELLEY A Wichita I- ¥ 

Elementary Education Junior \ V tR 

ERICKSON, TIM J Wichita | 

Architecture Senior j 

ERKELENS, ALLISON C Heidelberg, Germany t 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman jjfe 

ERTL. GARY R Manhattan 

Business Administration Freshman ndBRv -^ ^&Bl / Tft\ /^wMNk. /^ 

ESCH, ROBERT J. Spalding, NB ^BBk JBM Mm£ m A 

Construction Science Senior <W**"^ . Ig Tl» JJItejilBR / 

f rt sER ' MARYE - ^ ?-*• rnl fla Jr*™ r 

EUDALEY, DEBBIE L Manhattan • ••* . ■ ~*mJ^V BR r^HM R ^ iBw l 

Elementary Education Freshman \ ~~~" M ' " M ap BV TBR* : R "" £ I 1 

EUKER, VALERIE D Hutchinson ^ ■LjMBvI BNmH 

Physical Education Senior -jr "^B^h- H 'AJ 1 

EVANS, BRYAN D . Arlington -V ^ ■Bl JH "■ !■▼ "F^ 

Agronomy Junior ^ J* ■ } Jk ■ HF V ^BT |^^ 

EVANS, JERRY R Manhattan 

Elementary Education Senior 

EVANS, MARY M Manhattan 

Fine Arts Senior 

EVANS, SHERRY Chetopa |i 

Fashion Merchandising Senior R 

EYLER. JERRY M Abilene 

Accounting Graduate Student 

EYLER, PAMELA B Abilene 

General Freshman 

FAGERAH. ADNAN H Meccah, Saudi Arabia 
Accounting Junior 

FAIR, DORIS M Raymond 

Family and Child Development Senior 

FALLON, LORETTA A Topeka 

Business Senior 

FANKHAUSER, TONY H Madison 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

FANNING, GARY L Meriden 

Horticulture Senior 

FASNACHT, GLEN F Galva 

Physical Education Senior J W y\ 

FAWCETT, KIM M Ree Heights, SD I f V 

Animal Science and Industry Senior \ ^m*~m 

FAY, CAROLYN A Manhattan 

Home Economics Extension Senior 

FEE.FORRESTM White Cloud 

Wildlife Management Junior 

FEHR, LESLIE B Herington 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

FEHRENBACH, ELDON D Ness City 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

FEIGHTNER, SHARON A Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

FELDER, PAULA Wakeeney 

Foods and Nutrition in Business Senior 

FELDMAN, ROBERTA L Kinsley 

Psychology Senior 

FENNEMA, DIANE R. . Kansas City 

Special Education Junior 

FENTON, TOM A Sabetha 

Physical Education Senior 

FERGUSON, RUTH A Abilene 

Special Education Junior 

FERRO, FRANKS. Ottawa 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

FEYERHERM, JOAN L Manhattan 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

444 — oft-campus 





f 9 A3 




Mm, 



FILBY, JEFF B Junction City 

Recreation Freshman 

FILIATREAULT, GREGG L. . . .Topeka 

Sociology Junior 

FINNIGAN.KATHRYNJ Junction City 

Elementary Education Junior 

FIORAMONTI, E. JOHN Silver Spring, MD 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

FISHER, DEANNAL .......... . . Norton 

Elementary Education Junior 

FISHER, DEBBIE L Stilwell 

Special Education Senior 

FISHER, TERRY L Liberal 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

FITCH. GREGORY K Caldwell 

Biology and Psychology Junior 

FLACK, THOMAS D Lincoln, NB 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

FLETCHER, DONNA L Leoti 

Home Economics Education Senior 

FLETCHER, MICHAEL T Leoti 

Social Work Senior 

FLINN, JERYL A Glen Elder 

English Education Senior 

FLUDERER. JO ANN Shawnee Mission 

Physical Therapy Junior 

FLUDERER, WILLIAM H Shawnee Mission 

Fisheries and Wildlile Biology Senior 

FOHEY, MICHELLE L Overland Park 

Elementary Education Junior 

FOLEY, DONNA F . . . Atchison 

Psychology Junior 

FOLEY, SUSAN J Joplin, MO 

Elementary Education Senior 

FOLGER.LIZA Wichita 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

FOLK, SHERRY L Holyrood 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

FORBES, LAURIE A Lawrence 

Business Education Sophomore 

FORE, JANE A Mission 

Biology and Pre-Medicine Senior 

FORREST, KEITH P. Manhattan 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

FOSTER, ANNE K Topeka 

Business Administration Sophomore 

FOSTER, GARY L Eureka 

Physical Education Senior 

FOSTER, KELLI I Manhattan 

Interior Design Junior 

FOSTER, KENT R Manhattan 

Architecture Senior 

FOUNTAIN, DEBBY M Sterling 

Family and Child Development Junior 

FOUNTAINE, CHARLES W Randolph 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

FOWLES, JANET K Wakefield 

Medical Technology Junior 

FRANKENFIELD, PEGGY A Spring Hill 

Architecture Senior 

FRANKLIN, MARK A Edson 

Business Administration Graduate Student 

FREDERICK, PHIL B Hutchinson 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

FREELAND, GAILA M Burns 

Elementary Education Junior 

FREEMAN, PATRICIA A Topeka 

Dietetics Senior 

FRENCH, DEBORAH K Carbondale 

Sociology Graduate Student 

FRENCH, JEANENE G Kansas City, MO 

Horticulture Senior 

FRICK, NANCY L Durham 

Family and Child Development Senior 

FRIEDRICH, RAYMOND L Leonardville 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

FRIEND, SUSAN C Wichita 

Special Education Senior 

FRIESEN, BRADLEY W Inman 

Physical Education Senior 

FRINT, GARY D Belleville 

Wildlile Conservation Senior 

FROEBE, DONALD D Independence 

English Senior 

FROHNE, RICHARD F Palatine. IL 

Architecture Junior 

FRY, ROSELYNG Sedgwick 

Physical Education Sophomoie 

FRYE. LINDAS Topeka 

Home Economics Education Freshman 

FRYE, RAYMOND E. , .. Topeka 

Agriculture Freshman 

FUHRMAN, WILLIAM A '^•u-i.in, , 

Agronomy Junior 

FULTON. RICK A Ottawa 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 



off-campus — 445 




off -campus 

FUNDERBURG, LOIS J Manhattan ^m. 

FUNK. BONNIE R. Abilene / 1 *^k MM Wk^ >" ,j§^ 

Interior Design Senior W" ^^^^ HI fjrj fift 

FUNK, MARILYN K Russell JW . ^^B [^B % ' ^|H 

i i.'- FREDf .'.'.'.'.'. Kansas City, MO 1 -4fl ^B f i" ^<M 

Regional and Community Planning Graduate Student fL "" " j Tl . * 1 ^ M,.,.jmr 

FURNISH. SUSAN J Shawnee Mission ^\3i Wtew ^^Jd \ < " M 

Fashion Marketing Junior H , . iBfeto* ' ^-^BR 

FYFE, GREGORYS Manhattan ^^ 

Construction Science Senior ^*^A I Bm^ 

GABEL, CRYSTAL L Kansas City 

Elementary Education Senior 

GABLE, DEBORA K Manhattan 

Social Work Senior 

GABLE, C. MICHAEL Wichita 

Building Construction Senior 

GABEL. SUSAN R Manhattan 

Social Work . Sophomore 

GALLE, KAY A Moundndge 

Interior Design Senior 

GALLON, MARY E Fredonia 

Family and Child Development Senior 

GALVIN, RICHARD R Overland Park ^ttdlk 

Political Science Senior JKA ^Lm. 

GAMBLE, DIANA L Plainville 

Home Economics Junior 8P^^3i Hr 

GARBER, SUSAN D Manson, IA Mjm p9|^V 

Social Work Senior f • |H J -* 

GARDNER. CHARLES R Overland Park \ A .%| I^B 

Theatre Junior V 

GARDNER, NANCY C Overland Park V 

Business Administration Junior 

GARNSON, VICKI L Salina gk 

Special Education Junior i|v y* 

GARST, BARI A Pratt 

Interior Design Junior 

GARTEN, CARL H Abilene 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

GARTEN. MARK L Abilene 

Horticulture Junior 

GARY, RANDY L Abilene 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

GATES, JONI L Manhattan 

Business Administration Junior 

GATZ, JANET K Pratt 

English Junior 

GATZ, JOHN E Preston 

Radio and Television Senior 

GEBHARDS, JAMES R Weskan 

Crop Protection Junior 

GEHRT, TERESA A Manhattan 

Dietetics Senior 

GEIST, GARY Hays 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

GEITZ, GREGORY A Horton 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

GERARD. ROY W Syracuse 

-„, ^ 

GERLACH, DEBRA N Manhattan <^^^ Jf^^ 

Bakery Science and Management Senior ^Ifl^Hlk. ffiSk ^^^ 

GERLACH. PAUL M Manhattan J^k 

Geology Graduate Student YUm JHpr ^^H 

GHOLSON. JENNY Dodge City ^F^9 fp E ■■ JH 

Radio and Television Junior 4^Q I W& ■^9'ml^L 

GIANFORTE, THOMAS J Racine, Wl B Czt^K V j-jf 

Veterinary Medicine Senior ^Hk. I iL-~mK 

GILMORE, DEBORAH D. Manhattan W x^^E ~ 4& 

Business Management Senior >2LJ ^Bfe L^^L 

GILMORE, JAMES W Manhattan ^^■H Aj Bfe 

Architecture Junior I ^^H 

GLADDEN. LINDA C Wathena 

Computer Science Sophomore jft*\ «^tflM&^, 

GLASKER, PATRICIA A Culpeper, VA i^>jM 

Physical Education Freshman 

GLAZE. DEBBIE L. Augusta W . ^^^ HB 

Business Administration Sophomore ■•** r™ W 

GLAZE, JAMES B Augusta J ^ JM 

Chemical Engineering Senior >; WL~ZFjA ^Hi ^1 • - OF 

GLEASON. MARTIN J. Kinsley '^k^fr ^P ' 3r 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior mJ^B 

GLOVER. DIANE K Manhattan ^m ^Hg » vHl • 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine iHW y',/^ 1 : ^^■f 

GOBEL, MARYE Manhattan 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

GOETZ, RONALD E Wichita 

Accounting Senior 

GONZALES, LUCINDAM Garden City 

Psychology Junior 

GOOD, LISA Benton 

Music ... Junior 

GOODWIN, BRUCE W Prairie City, SD 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

GORMAN, L. KEVIN Fort Scott 

Food Science and Management Senior 



446 — off-campus 





GOSNELL, JONI Shawnee Mission 

Interior Architecture Junior 

GOUGH, CINDY L Wichita 

Interior Design Junior 

GOULDING, THERESA D Shawnee 

Recreation Senior 

GRADY, MARGARET A Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

GRAFF, VICKI S Marienthal 

Elementary Education Senior 

GRAHAM, GAY E Manhattan 

Accounting Freshman 

GRANT. JOHN J Manhattan 

Accounting Sophomore 

GRAVES. CAROLYN L Salina 

Interior Design Senior 

GREEN, DEE A Kansas City 

Business Sophomore 

GREENBERG, BARRY S Chesterfield, MO 

Architecture Senior 

GREGORY, JULIANA Ulysses 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

GREGWIRE, ROBERTA L Salina 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

GRESS, JUDITH K Summerfield 

Agricultural Education Senior 

GRIDER, NANCY E, . . . Shawnee Mission 

Fashion Retailing Junior 

GRIER, CAROL J Billings, MT 

Music Education Senior 

GRIER, CHRISTOPHER A Wichita 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

GRIFFIN, SUSAN K Alton 

Speech and Theatre Junior 

GROSS, TIMOTHY L Larned 

Pre-Dentistry Senior 

GROSSARDT, PHILIP F Claflin 

Radio and Television Junior 

GROTHUSEN, JANET S Ellsworth 

Family and Child Development Junior 

GROVER, JOYCE K Palmer 

Social Work Senior 

GRUBER, RANDALL R Bennington 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

GRUBER, TERRY M, Hope 

Adult and Occupational Education Graduate Student 

GRUENTHAL, LINDA A Salina 

English Senior 



off -campus 



GUIPRE, KEVEN A Minneapolis 

Business Administration Senior 

HACHINSKY, DAVID M Kansas City 

Interior Design Junior 

HADDOCK. MICHAEL J . ..Beloit 

Modern Language Junior 

HAFFENER. CONNIE A Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

HAFFENER, TERESA S Manhattan 

Theatre . Junior 

HAGANS. ROBIN A, Overland Park 

Accounting ... Junior 



HAGEDORN, STEPHEN W Overland Park 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

HAGERMAN, DENNIS R Lamed 

Business Administration Senior 

HAGERMAN, JOYCE D Larned 

Elementary Education Senior 

HAGGARD. MARKHAM R Vienna, VA 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

HAHN, CAROLE A Leavenworth 

Senior 



Art 



Elkhart 
Sophomore 



HAKE, LYNN D Tipton 

Architecture Senior 

HALAWANI. ABDUL-AZIZO Medina. Saudi Arabia 

Bakery Science and Management Graduate Student 

HALEY, PAUL J Paola 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HALL, KATHRYN L Ames, IA 

Interior Design Senior 

HALL. MARY A Ames, IA 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

HALL, S. GAY Kansas City 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts Senior 



HAMBRIGHT, MARJORIE B Wichita 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Junior 

HAMM. DANA L Topeka 

Horticulture Junior 

HAMMEKE, KEVIN F Ellinwood 

Secondary Education Senior 

HAMMOND. SUSAN L Easton, CT 

Housing and Equipment Junior 

HANEY, KARLAJ Claflin 

Art Education Junior 

HANSEN. CAROL J Fort Collins, CO 
Special Education Junior 



HANSEN, TERRY J Cylinder, IA 

Geophysics Senior 

HARDER, JAN A Mernam 

Business Administration Junior 

HARDER, RON J Whitewater 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

HARKEY, JERRY P Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

HARLAN, NANCY L Madison 

Retail Floriculture Senior 

HARMS, WAYNE A Newton 

Chemical Engineering Senior 



HARPER, MARK W 
Building Construction 
HARRIS. JEAN A, 
Elementary Education 
HARRIS. NANCYS. 
Home Economics 



Springfield, MO 

Junior 

Manhattan 

Sophomore 

Wichita 

Sophomore 

HARRISON, BRENT A Kansas City 

Business Senior 

HARRISON, DEBRAL. , ... Pratt 

Sociology Junior 

HARRISON, JANE A Beloit 

Pre-Nursing ...... Junior 

HARRYMAN, JOAN D Kansas City 

Family and Child Development Senior 

HART, MARY A Jamestown 

Psychology Junior 

HARTFIELD, FREDDIE D Pine Bluff, AR 

Education . . Graduate Student 

HARTIG.MARYM Anchorage, AK 

Accounting Sophomore 

HARTNETT. KIM L Stafford 

Family and Child Development Junior 

HASKINS, JUDY K Meade 

Marketing Senior 



HASLETT. LISAS. 
Pre-Nursing 



Junction City 
Sophomore 

HATCHER, CINDA A Goodland 

Home Economics Extension Senior 

HAVERFIELD, NANCY L Russell Springs 

Psychology Senior 

HAWKINS, TERI J. . Dodge City 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 

HAWORTH, DANIEL R . . Melvern 

Construction Science Junior 

HAWTHORNE. SUSAN E <,.,H, V 

Food Science and Management Sophomore 



448 — off-cijrnpus 




. 








«|M 






,.«,!. ^^. HAYNES, BRADLEY R Lamed 

ifl ^Fi3fck Pre-Design Professions Junior 

.gT ^Bk HAYNES, JEANINE E Pawnee Rock 

Family and Child Development Senior 

*3 jm 'mmt B 1 BBJ HAYNES. ROBERT G Wamego 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

Ml <JWf % ■ HEACOCK, ANITA L Topeka 

■L T^M Horticulture Senior 

&-*flBt HEALY, FRANK G. Spring Hill 

AmmtL m^^ Cro P Protection Senior 
WgL ' '|^^ ,- HECHT. JANET M Seneca 

HA' /■ Family Economics Graduate Student 

jmlm± Jtm±. mT'-m HECKMAN, JOHN E Independence 

dBk /•'''**^k. • #■ Architecture Junior 

MF ^■fc I *Bk f JHBk HEDKE, DENNISE. Manhattan 

/ BJ^ W „^9Hb J *BB Geophysics Senior 

• -S- -^*am V "^ mm **W¥ ; '"^"BBv HEDRICK, NANCY K Hutchinson 

BjjjjV m A jBW ■/ BBt. Elementary Education Junior 

jtt/ <«• , \JShBJL m lT> HEIDRICK, RUTH A Beloit 

ML 9 BjUkw m " Dietetics Junior 

m. ...-J Bit BjW.^BHBb HELD, JON J Jamesburg. NJ 

#7BJ Bfl Physics Senior 

mA/ m mmW BB HELFERSTAY.CYNTHIAIvI. Mulvane 

WmFfj B Speech and Theatre Senior 

HELINE, LINDA F Salina 

Home Economics Education Senior 

HELMER. DENNIS W . . . Marlon 

Building Construction Junior 

W-> HELMER, KENDALL J Marion 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

HELVEY, RICHARD L Abilene 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

HEMPHILL, SUSAN J, . . . Clay Center 

C i! tIf^K Ik Community Service Junior 

HENN, CARLA J El Dorado 

Dietetics Sophomore 

JBmW UBk. HENRICKS, VERNON J Hope 

PBfo. BlBk Physical Education Junior 

• BB HENRY, CINDY K Topeka 

JBft M BBft Interior Design Junior 

i«r^ aSB> a BB henry, Florence Enterprise 

:^f .„ B « A'<.il' .Freshman 

BF HENRY, FRANK J Enterprise 

Jmm Sociology Junior 

WL^ HEPTIG, LORAA St.George 

i 4"*^Bjj Medical Technology Sophomore 

/ ' HERL, JACQUELINE Monument 

^^ <?»*^-» | mmg J Fashion Marketing Senior 

fxAttBA ■ f H h HERMAN, KATHRYN A. Concordia 

J^P^^BJk mrmmm. Business Administration Senior 

!■ JBjk HERMAN, SANDRA J Concordia 

W — ■jB ' Jp *BH^B. Home Economics Education .Junior 

X 'MB If •* ' 9 HERONEMUS, DARYL L Ness City 

I . Jll I I B Agricultural Engineering . Junior 

!> #*mm \ --— HERRON, LYNDELL D Manter 

* *%£^B/ ^f ' Agronomy Junior 

g*V ~im HERRON, MAYNARDM Manter 

Bntw h . Agricultural Engineering Graduate Student 

B_ HERRS, STEVEN A Linn 

Radio and Television Junior 

n -MM, HETTENBACH, BRUCE E Abilene 

I --<£ Accounting Junior 

HEWSON, ROBERTA D Larned 

Family and Child Development Graduate Student 

HIBBARD, GORDON V Toronto 

Secondary Education Senior 

HICKERT, DANE Bird City 

Business Junior 

HICKS, LINDA S Shawnee Mission 

Health Education Junior 

HICKS, MARICA E Garnett 

Household Equipment Sophomore 

HIGGINS, JONIK Elkhart 

Bik { «t£Bk Home Economics Junior 

' Jit Bft HILDEBRAND, JOHN W. Stafford 

BK JBk tM\ ' m^A Agricultural Economics Junior 

~ ** m^^ trlM <3m? HILL, CHERYL A. Kansas City 

, Bk W**P>mm\ fUv ■* ''BJ Medical Technology Senior 

HILL, CHERYL J Hutchinson 

^ J4w Bj* OS Physical Education Senior 

^mr Jk HILL, CLARENCE A Bloom 

"Bfl Mechanical Engineering Senior 

HILL, JEANIE E Manhattan 

/^BBl Family and Child Development Senior 

a B^Bk. HILL ' ROGER R Bucklin 

#BJ V Electrical Engineering Senior 
^jB^BBBk HINKSON. CRAIG Q Wichita 
■■ Philosophy Senior 
,-^BBj HINSON.LOISA, Arkansib i'it\ 
■ /Yj BV Sophomore 
■L MINI FN, STEVEN H Mexico. MO 
% ^T - A Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 
~ <JJ»* HINTZ, DAVID J S.ilin.i 

Business Administration Senior 

HITT, STEPHEN H Omaha. NB 

N 4 y Music Senior 








off -cam pus 



HOBSON. JUDY A. 
Elementary Education 
HODGE, SHARON D 
Home Economics 
HODGES. MARILYN A, 
Veterinary Medicine 
HOERMAN, CONNIE M 
Family Economics 
HOFFINE, SUEL 
Early Childhood Education 



Scandia 

Junior 

Reno. NV 

Junior 

Lawrence 

Sophomore 

Manhattan 

Graduate Student 

Prairie Village 

Junior 



Abilene 

Junior 

Salina 

Junior 

Overland Park 

Junior 

Junction City 

Freshman 



HOFFMAN. CALVING 
Psychology 
HOFFMAN. LINDA K 
Interior Design 
HOGLUND, BRUCE A 
Physical Education 
HOLBORN. JEANNE A 
Elementary Education 

HOLCOM, SANDRA K Gypsum 

Horticulture Therapy Senior 

HOLDER, BLAINE K Leona 

Milling Science and Management Senior 



HOLDER, MARY C Manhattan 

Home Economics Freshman 

HOLLAND, CONNIE L Shawnee Mission 

Family and Child Development Senior 

HOLLIS. BRIAN W Wichita 

Landscape Architecture Fifth Year Student 

HOLLIS, RALPH Erie 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

HOLLOWAY, RANDALL L Narka 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

HOLLOWAY, RICK D Narka 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Junior 



HOLMES, CAROL E Eudora 

Elementary Education Senior 

HOLMES, JOE D Eudora 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HOLMES. LUANN Manhattan 

Interior Design Sophomore 

HOLSTE, CURTIS A Ludell 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

HOLSTE, SYLVIA N Ludell 

Art Education Senior 

HOLT. SUSAN E Topeka 

Elementary Education Junior 



HOLTON, GEORGE M Kansas City, MO 

Architecture Senior 

HOLUB, GARY S Marion 

Business Administration Senior 

HOLUB. RODNEY J Marion 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

HOLYFIELD. ROGER L Kansas City 

Business Administration Sophomore 

HOOVER, STEPHEN J Clay Center 

Construction Science Senior 

HOPKINS, DAVID W Olathe 

Biology Senior 



HOPKINS, THOMAS L Washington 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

HORAN, KATHLEEN D Abilene 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

HORAN. TIM D. Abilene 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

HOSSAIN, MD MOSHARRAF Jessore, Bangladesh 

Architecture Graduate Student 

HOSTIN.LONNIED Olathe 

Accounting . . Sophomore 

HOSTINSKY, DALE D Cuba 

Agricultural Education Senior 



HOUSH, RICHARD D Hiawatha 

Mathematics Senior 

HOWARD, RUTH E Topeka 

Elementary Education Senior 

HOWE, MARCIA L. Overland Park 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

HUBALEK.VERNEA Wakeeney 

Agricultural Mechanization . . . Junior 

HUDSON, JUDY M Falun 

Elementary Education Senior 

HUEY, DANIEL E Manhattan 

Political Science Junior 



HUGGINS, HOWARD M Parsons 

Marketing Senior 

HUGHES, DENNIS L Anthony 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

HUGHES, JERALDYN L Eureka 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

HULLMAN.KATHRYNL St John 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

HULLMAN.KIMH St John 

Accounting Junior 

HUMBARGER, GLENN E Henngton 

Microbiology Senior 






*M1 







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HUNT, BRENDA S Lyons 

Home Economics Education Senior 

HUNT, DEBORAH L Attica 

Family Economics Graduate Student 

HUNT, JEFF B Prairie Village 

Business Senior 

HUNTER, STEVEN R Topeka 

Geography Junior 

HUNTSMAN, JENNIFER C, Belvue 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

HUPPE, GARY S Roeland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

HURLEY, ALLEN L Republic 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

HURLEY, BARBARA E Republic 

Family and Child Development Junior 

k ,*J3 HURLEY, MARTHA L Glasco 

Pre-Medicine Senior 

HURST-WALKER, DEBORAH K Johnson 

Art Education Junior 

^L W HUSEMAN, BOB E . . Ellsworth 

,. 4 ^B^k S90 Veterinary Medicine Junior 

/'*A ^HATW HUSEMAN, WILLIAM A Scott City 

/%y> BB. &■■ Veterinary Medicine Junior 

tjBjfy ,-^tfr M^lBv „^M «t. HUSER. BERNARD P Hays 

f? . k ^SBk gJT ^^m. JBk Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

mm |1 w. . jj0 m Mk m ^Rk Jbf^Mb -■ huseth, Gregory c Topeka 

B^" _V 1B& m - J9BBV ^M Bt M !■ Accounting Senior 

S -*r mm Wmmwmmm m ** F^bBY. WSt^> f*^mm\ BY ~» **M huston, randall w Amencus 

H ,-kJmm\ Wm WM I fP Biology Special Student 

P mmMf ~ _t_ JT IB. -^*" J '»'-'"*■■'■ * "V HUSTON, TERRY A Overland Park 

V T "^ :JfV Wk. Jmm wL. ' rM "*77 Home Economics with Liberal Arts Sophomore 

vjJB^. ^fk ^\®mm~ « HUXMAN, MARILOU Morland 

J 3^ Mmm ^H WL Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

/* | • jai r LI ST |~^ HYDE, DOUGLAS W Newton 

, / ' ,:•, > !, §B\ ^^^ I c ' vil Engineering Senior 

., -^ jm7m*> *^. ^a^B^ IRELAND, JAMES R Benderville 

. ^^k SBw ><?iBB*. JHB. Chemistry Junior 

l inL ■& Hk f^ JmV% ISERN.JOHNM Elhnwood 

(T . BB n PtIt^ jJI Sociology Senior 

ISiyM /m^mm ■ ' isern.myronj Eiiinwood 

«B I ^WW 1 > JL 1 T ^ B General Sophomore 

M — |B ^ #J» 1 CaMr V -^UjF H 1 JB . - (WERT, WILLIAM H Mahaska 

B^fFBT ^ - -V M. ~ \ m "%«*;'-» Education Senior 

■^•*fcBB| A mmm^ ^<T*™JbW -^B IWINSKI, DAVID M Caracas, Venezuela 

~Z-fM -Jf iW**! W&m. S^mM Milling Science and Management Senior 

/■ \ ^W ;/ V-- '■.■'.- "■■"?■ ir? > IZADI, REZA Hamadan. Iran 

7 ▼ ■■ i ^L .".'-W.-.*. ^ y*BP I ■ r 1 ' Education Graduate Student 

a. % .jBBk. ! f^tflBk JACKA, CARL G Fort Riley 

/ V^k i rT^'^Bk Pre-Medicine Freshman 

J 4 m JACKSON, DENISE M Arkansas City 

J ._ ^JkM ■P""^5 l* nH\ Elementary Education Senior 

%M \SL\ v T I lull sr ENH sopnrs 

%"^H IF • "l •*^BM \ jtxdm A Mm. JACKSON,SHARYLL Merriam 

%^L k **arm MS BmB, Corrections Junior 

9n. m\"^m^mi '%M MB JACOBS, CHARLESC Peabody 

^■B'^TH I yB ^BjJF Freshman 

SWB I W v >' |H JACOBS, JOAN M Solomon 

W ar iM H / TTi Fashion Marketing Senior 

aj^^fck. i^ - -^- ^•i'V JACOBS, ROXANNE M Plains 

^^^^ MmT'Jm. !lBk t* JjSlk % Pre-Vetermary Medicine 

f fmmV ly^'IH JACOBS, WILLIAM R Peabody 

■ ^fSm illH ff^f^H 3^l3R ill JACOBSON, CAROLS...: Hor^ 

TV y^£ ■f-^'k 1 HI ^ ' "• Medical Technology Senior 

ALMS ■ M _L^L H mmk ^m\ JACQUES, ROBERT M Hutchinson 

■ rlsAT ■k" r ^B ' lP» ■ ^J Agronomy Graduate Student 

WJ I fl| " rr Wm ^k ~dmWmWL^ HB^fl JAMES, JOHN D Dighton 

V ' .^^^B 1 ^^MWi m HPS Special Education Graduate Student 

A*A ^9H JH£. AbI J! / ifMP F^BjM MnP JAMES, SUSANM Jewell 

■ /^ *^^-f^: k ' >: 'JLsw • ^^ ; -j General sophomore 

P^m>,< Ajk ^™^ A«^ JAMES, VICKIE L Dighton 

■M ^JBM Wm\ /k ^^ ■•—^ JAMISON Fontana 

Li m ^ ^1 k^SVI > WW Wm ' nmr ' Agricultural Education Sophomore 

Mi' M^^mwm 1M -^wk mW<mmm l~.mwm janke.edwardl chapman 

■f -» ^BV " i ^ ^ , W " Agricultural Engineering Senior 

■4 V ■ > \ 11 V <^BT S./^H l/'4fl JANSSEN.GERALDW Geneseo 

M /-3mm \ JWV ^ '"'""t A. 1 iSL^^iBl Architecture Senior 

X ^JL ^^Jmm ▼■■I » ji BB^IHl 

^am^. - ^ / t^^. .^ ^9>SBk. *lA+*. JARVIS, DAVID A Salma 

JT^. «Bk M^^mmm. m ^ A /" ^b^ Hm sociology 

f *"^Bm ^ ^Hk ^ Hk Hk M JASTER. NANCY L Leavenworth 

Vm 1 Wm\ . Computer Science Junior 

M *» m\m mm^M WmMk j 49 " m 9mm • ' hQ 1 ' *'?» W -™ jensen,howarda Hoiton 

•j" ■■ f^rV Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

* ^mmW m\ a m 'MmmW rn-i^mm P ^SM^^i \ - f 

^L mWmm,^ BF jL_A ^1 E% ^1 jensen.rital Hoiton 

XBw I ^ ■L'^VJ ^Bk. Pre-Nursmg . ... Sophomore 

*B| BB ^^1 V S?i BB Bw JILKA, CATHERINE M . .. Shawnee Mission 

Jl BJ ^^^^^Bf^fc Vi I Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 




oil i ampus 451 



off -cam pus 

JOERG. CINDY A Manhattan 

Sociology Senior 

JOHANNSEN. NANCY J Lawrence 

Biology Junior 

JOHNS, GERAL YNN L Richfield 

Agricultural Journalism Senior 

JOHNS, NORMAN D Richfield 

Agronomy Junior 

JOHNSON, BRENDA G Hollon 

Psychology Senior 

JOHNSON. C DAVID Stafford 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore 

JOHNSON, DIANE K Eskridge 

Social Science Senior 

JOHNSON. EDWARD A Wichita 

History Sophomore 

JOHNSON, HEATHER K Dwighl 

Horticulture Senior 

JOHNSON. JANEL L Wichita 

Pre-Forestry Freshman 

JOHNSON. JANET E Olathe 

Medical Technology Sophomore ^| 

JOHNSON. JEANNE M Topeka | 

Physical Education Sophomore , 

JOHNSON, KAY L Wichita 

Microbiology Junior 

JOHNSON, KENTR Manhattan 

Pre-Forestry . . . Freshman 

JOHNSON, MARY J Sterling 

Music Education Junior 

JOHNSON, MICHAEL G. Wichita 

Architecture Junior 

JOHNSON, MURIEL J Belleville 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

JOHNSON, NANCY J Salina 

Civil Engineering . . . . Junior 

















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JOHNSTON, CYNTHIA J Overland Park 

Marketing Junior 

JOHNSTON, DENISE R Glen Elder 

Medical Technology Junior 

JOHNSTON, JERRY D Concordia 

Construction Science Junior 

JOHNSTON, JODY S Wichita 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

JOKERST, KATHLEEN M Salina 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

JONES, ALBERT R Stanley 

Commercial Art Senior 

JONES, CHARLOTTE A Independence 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

JONES, DAVID A Baldwin City 

Physical Science Senior 

JONES, GARY L Meade 

Civil Engineering Senior 

JONES, JAMY A Kansas City, MO 

Architecture Senior 

JONES, JANISA Hiawatha 

Social Science Sophomore 

JONES, MARK A Topeka 

Finance Senior 

JONES, MARLA S . . Hiawatha 

Physical Education Sophomore 

JONES, MAX A Pretty Prairie 

Biochemistry Senior 

JONES, NADINE N Memphis, TN 

Modern Language Senior 

JONES, PAMELA L Topeka 

History Senior 

JONES, PATSY Y Pretty Prairie 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine .Junior 

JONES, REGINALD D Great Bend 

Engineering Technology Junior 

JONES, ROD L Hiawatha 

Accounting Senior 

JONES, TERESA M Chanute 

Elementary Education Junior 

JONES, TIMOTHY J. Baldwin 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

JORDAN, MICHAEL D Beloit 

Agronomy Senior 

JOSLYN, RANDY L Wichita 

Architecture Senior 

JOY, ADEN E Narka 

Agronomy Sophomore 

JOYCE, JODEEL Wichita 

Pre-Physical Therapy Sophomore 

JOYCE, PATRIC L Garden City 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

JUAREZ. JOYCE A. Junction City 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

JUNGE, RICHARD C . Coffeyville 

Bakery Science and Management Junior 

KADAVY, DAVID J Belleville 

Science Education Senior 

KAISER, ROBERT H Phillipsburg 

Medical Technology Senior 

KARR, STEVEN D Emporia 

Architecture Junior 

KASTER. LARRY V ....... Kansas City 

Entomology Junior 

KAUFFMANN, TOM V Tulsa, OK 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

KEATING, ELIZABETH A Fort Scott 

Radio and Television Junior 

KEATING, MARY C Fort Scott 

Pre-Physical Therapy Senior 

KEATING, RICK A Liberal 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

KEEHN.ANNEM Towanda 

Business Administration Sophomore 

KEETEN, JAN S Phillipsburg 

Home Economics Extension Senior 

KEIM, JERRY L Wakefield 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

KELLAMS. R KENT Manhattan 

Business Junior 

KELLEY, RAYNAS Manhattan 

General Freshman 

KELLOGG, ROBERT R. Phillipsburg 

Accounting Junior 

KELLY, STEPHEN R Effingham 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

KELSEY, RICHARD M Rossville 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

KEMNITZ. DENNIS R .Wamego 

Foe id Si n-Miro Junior 

KEMP, KEVIN C Oxford 

Pre-Medicine Senior 

KENNEDY, KAY E Waldo 

Physical Education Junior 

KENNEY, CALVIN R. . . . Overland Park 

I ir'iix-nt.ir v i 'Iih ,i(u ui Sophomi ire 



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KERKULIET. MICHAEL F Larchwood, IA MB ■» \ ^ j| V ^ JP I CIS JL HK I "%fl 

be =^p |a R!^ ^ M mR- 

Mechan.calEng.neer.ng Senior ^^ JBk ^A ,^V J * R 

KETTER. DOROTHY W JV HkJM B MWmWW if 

Fashion Marketing J unior 

KILGORE, PATRICIA A Roeland Park 

R,adio and Television fe n.or 

KILLION. CINDY L Cofteyville 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

KILLION, JANETTE S Prairie Village 

Physical Education • ^"l ' smA - * 

KIMBALL, HARRY E Medicine Lodge 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

KIMSEY, GWEN L Manhattan 

Early Childhood Education £ e ?!°,\ 

KING, EDWARD A Oakh.ll - ) f^^Mj **^ ^k\ fr*"V »\% ->^ 

Bus.nessAdm.n.strat.on Sen.or a $*,*_ J-SUVj--^ ^Tt >^ ^■kCAIIB V^ J 

E£i ::. : ---v. : . : . ; . ; :. ; . : - : :^S (r| j'. ■ (P 3 kP^ ^j» 

Psycholo^yand^ondaryEducat-on ^Senior { ~ <** fUS ^T RS (<,•&- 

Animal Science and Industry Senior / v ^_ HK.^ 9 fl| /l ^ari -A ^1 

Independence f r f . 9| K Jfef » ; i JUtt ^H fl| 

Business Education . Junior J» / - MBW^BI '. LB '/. . II MH IJM^H 

KLAHR?MICHAEL. D DeSoto 1 * 1QR J "^jF ML^J^KL * ^diX. 

Agricultural Education Senior * -«M^HL „ \ N^f JBroBBJAB ^^■tehi 

KLEIN. KATHLEEN A. Fairv.ew M 1 |Jk ^ \ T»k J A H 

Animal Science and Industry M .^"nD BR**" '' V '^** I MF^P^BF l» : - ~V «A " 

KLEPPER RICHARD G Ellinwood # 'illL / *^ 

Agronomy Junior §|/^4^BB A 

KLEUSCH, THOMAS E Mll,ord J iBft ft J 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman ■ ^ s*K « M <* f^BJ 

KLIEWER. PATRICE M Dodge City | V^. VJB \ # Mw 

Mathematics \«i4flB i^MWW 

KLIPOWICZ, PAUL V Niles, IL \^BF^ ■* » 

Physical Education Senior ^(T : ^^pf VI. 

KLOEFKORN, RANDY L. Caldwell - ||Bk ~ ■_. 

Electrical Engineering Senior ( + A' f ■ M ^ft .££* .- . '-^r ,* P 4 

KNAUSS. DOUGLAS E Halstead H ■■*< ^| 

Business Administration Sophomore .' < a KLBatN^^BM 

KNIGHT, VIRGINIA Beattie 

Fashion Marketing Senior 

KNILANS, MATTHEW J Manhattan 

Horticulture Sophomore 

KNIPP, SAM H Scott City 

Agricultural Journalism Senior 

KNOEPFLE, MARK G Manhattan 

Business Sophomore 

KNOPP. CLAYTON R. Chapman .^^U| ^_>. iT^H \ "1 ^P^\ MT^W' IBV 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore ,T *~ Jmr ^ MM ^^ & *■'* I W/ ' T 'Vr 

KNOWLES, KENTON V Salma /T . I W ___j .* MM If *V /^^SP'"! ' 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman | .'/ £, ! W WmI M > ■>>. A.y^fflV 1 i 1 j \ // J I 

KOCH, DEBORAHS Manhattan % *^^ A. ^^ J^^. '^k ^^Btkk 

Pre-Physical Therapy Freshman Jlr ^^ M m\ M ^k / CM * J| 

KOHAKE. MARCIAR G°» / ^HV. „S ^ ^A £_ tfll^E : , *l M^OTM* 

Special Education Junior tMm>*'9rJMm W " ' " M\ ■-■«-- lA i K -J^-P ^» 

KOHL. VICKI M. EI "S '<J : J- J I ^J ■ , kj L I .4LJ B IB AMv 

BV~ J^Bk iBM ^^M ^^- mV^ 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore ■■■■■■ ■■ ^kTHB !■ ■ •*■ -JR« ^ -^^L. 

KOHMAN.RAYJ Solomon MF/ ^f M i| ^ P *f' •— *5 

Animal Science and Industry Senior H ^ , SWwJB '"'Jk'T' MM 

KOLARIK rHOMASJ Prairie Village ■UiWJHv I '" I ■ ' \MW!P 

Landscape Architecture Fifth Year Student ■IUmIWHHI I * A ■ HiV JKm 

KOLMAN, JOSEPH J. Washington 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 

KONGS, BEVJ Wetmore 

Elementary Education Junior 

KONICEK.JEANETTEM McPherson 

Accounting Sophomore 

KORVER.KIMD Overland Park 

Computer Science Sophomore •^■f fc . 

KOSTER.DERALDR Cawker City "^^ ■ 

Horticulture Freshman J\ —^ ■ 

KOUKOL.MARKA Cuba ■FA.^^flBkl 

Architecture Junior V^KnH I 








454 — ott-campus 




KRAFT, RANDY E Gndley 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

KRAMER, JOYCE M.. . Basehor 

Accounting Junior 

KRAMER, MARY A Ogden 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

KREHBIEL, BRAD J Newton 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

KREHBIEL, DEBBIE K Pretty Prairie 

Music Education Junior 

KRIER, KIRBY W Claflin 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

KUCHEM, CHRIS L Leawood 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

KURFISS, DEBRA J Hutchinson 

Secondary Education Senior 

KURTZ, QUENTINE Manhattan 

General Freshman 

KUSSMAN, JANICE M Seneca 

Accounting ... Sophomore 

KUSSMAN, RICHARD L Seneca 

Civil Engineering Graduate Student 

KUTNINK, DEBORAH A Manhattan 

Business Administration Freshman 

KUTNINK, KATHY J Manhattan 

Business Administration . . . . Junior 

LAASER, GREGORY N Kansas City 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

LADD.ALANJ . ,. Humboldt 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

LAGERGREN, RALPH E Lincoln 

Business Marketing Senior 

LaHUE, BRICE W Manhattan 

General , Freshman 

LAMBIE, JAMES R. Overland Park 

Building Construction Junior 

LAMBIE. SUSAN A Overland Park 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

LANG, JANE A Shawnee 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

LANGE, JEFF M Conway Springs 

Agronomy Senior 

LANGE, PATTI A Conway Springs 

Interior Design Junior 

LANGENKAMP, ROBERTA , Manhattan 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

LANGLEY, MARILYN K Ozawkie 

Sociology Senior 

LARSON, BRENT G Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

LARSON, JANETTE E Manhattan 

Physical Education Senior 

LARSON, MARK W Overland Park 

Psychology Sophomore 

LASSEN, DENNIS L Atchison 

Finance Senior 

LAUBER, PAMELA S Tribune 

Community Health Senior 

LAUBER, ROBERT D Tribune 

Agricultural Education Senior 

LAUDEL. SHARON A Leawood 

Accounting Junior 

LAUGHERY.SONDRAF Kansas City 

Computer Science . . . Junior 

LAURITZEN, CINDY L. Arkansas City 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

LAWRENCE, CAROL S Shawnee 

Restaurant Management Senior 

LEACH, ANN J Chesapeake. VA 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

LEBOEUF, LEE C Vergennes, VT 

Architecture Senior 

LEDELL, BERT A McPherson 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

LEE, SANDRA C Shawnee Mission 

Civil Engineering Senior 

LEHRMAN. VERNEYD Newton 

Construction Science Junior 

LELAND. STANLEY B Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

LEMBRIGHT, JIM A Dodge City 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

LEONARD. EVANL White! it} 

Accounting Junior 

LESSLIE, TEDDI A Independence 

Social Work Sophomore 

LESTER, TERRY L Minneapolis 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

LETT, KIRK R ■ -as Oh \1i 

Architecture Filth Year Student 

LEWALLEN, STEPHEN L Winfield 

Architecture i ilth Yeai Student 

LEWIS. ALLEN L Manhattan 

Business Administrate mi i roshman 

LEWIS, GREGORY K St. John 

Landscape Architecture Senior 



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off-campus 

LEWIS. JANE A Sylvan Grove 

Clothing and Textiles Graduate Student 

LEWIS. KAYLEEN C Concordia 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

LEWIS, KIRK J Manhattan 

Bakery Science and Management Senior 

LICKTEIG, DOTTIE J Greeley 

Elementary Education Senior 

LIEBL. BARBARA E Dodge City 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

LIES, STEPHEN J Colwich 

Radio and Television Senior 

LILLARD. DAVIDS. - Prairie Village 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

LINDEMUTH, J TIM Lancaster, NY 

Journalism and Mass Communications Graduate Student 

LINDER, LEE J Pleasanton 

Political Science Senior 

LINDGREN, FRED Leawood 

Radio and Television Senior 

LINDHOLM, KATHY K Cheney 

Home Economics Education Senior 

LINDSTROM, MARY A Clay Center 

Family and Child Development Senior 

LINENBROKER, MELANIE A Greensburg 

Fashion Marketing Senior 

LINK, MALCOLM K Chase 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

LINN. BRIAN G Wichita 

Business Administration Sophomore 

LINN. GARY D Wichita 

Landscape Architecture Junior 

LIPOVITZ. FRANCIS A Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

LITTLE, RITA A Kansas City 

Modern Language Graduate Student 






JSU 



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456 — off-campus 




LIVINGSTON, MARSHA R 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

LIVINGSTON, MICHAEL J Manhattan 

Agronomy Sophomore 

LJUNGDAHL, MARILYN Dodge City 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

LOCKARD, NANCY E Altamont 

Oftice Administration Senior 

LOCKE, MARK A Arlington 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

LOCKYEAR, WILLIAM L Lawrence 

Accounting Senior 

LOCKYER, ANN L Junction City 

Accounting Senior 

LODER, BRYCE J Marquette 

Biochemistry Senior 

LOEB, LINDY R Junction City 

Elementary Education Freshman 

LOGAN, BRIAN C Clay Center 

Geography Senior 

LOHREY, CYNTHIA J . . La Crosse 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

LONG, KENNETH D Manhattan 

General Freshman 

LONG, PATRICK O Clifton 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

LOVE, LINDA J Overland Park 

Business Education Junior 

LOVE, MARY L Partridge 

Computer Science Graduate Student 

LOVE, MELANIE A Overland Park 

Fashion Marketing Sophomore 

LOVING, PATTI G Pawnee Rock 

Agricultural Journalism Senior 

LOW, KELLEY S Atchison 

General Sophomore 

LOWDON, JANE D Downs 

Fashion Design Senior 

LOWDON, JANET R Cawker City 

Special Education Junior 

LUCAS, ANN M Lakin 

Special Education Junior 

LUCAS, STEVEN E Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

LUCE, ROGER C Derby 

Business Junior 

LUDWIG, SUSAN M Leavenworth 

Fashion Marketing Senior 

LUKE, CHARLES W Lebanon 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

LUNDBERG, DAVID W Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

LUNDBERG. DONNA L Manhattan 

Political Science Sophomore 

LUNDGREN, GAIL A Osage City 

Fine Arts Senior 

LUNDIN, MARSHA L Manhattan 

Family and Child Development Senior 

LUNGREN.JEFF Hays 

Business Administration Junior 

LUNGREN, KATHY M Hays 

Political Science Senior 

MAGANA, AUDIE B , Kanopolis 

Business Sophomore 

MAHANEY, JAY W Merriam 

Architecture Senior 

MALINOWSKI. PATTI Shawnee 

Business Junior 

MALLARD, HARRY C, Ottawa 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

MALLORY, PATRICIA L Ellis 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

MALM, DAVID L Lindsborg 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

MALONE, BRADP Manhattan 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

MALONE, SUE A Manhattan 

Physical Education Junior 

MANESS, MARK M St Louis, MO 

Building Construction Junior 

MANRY. JOHN . . . . Lamed 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

MARCELLE, YVONNE M Baton Rouge. LA 

Education . . Graduate Student 

MARCOTTE, RENEE S Hoisington 

Music Education Senior 

MARCUSON, BRADLEY A Dresden 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore 

MARIETTA, KALA J Great Bend 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

MARKHAM, MARCIE L Osborne 

Business Administration Senior 

MARLOW, DENVER D Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

MARMET, TERRY W Sabetha 

Architecture Senior 



off -cam pus 



MARMOR. FREDERICK W Wichita 

Crop Protection Junior 

MARR. STEVEN K Manhattan 

Accounting Junior 

MARRS. DON D Clifton 

Architecture Junior 

MARRS, RAMON A A Great Bend 

Physical Education Senior 

MARRS, VALERIA C Bennington 

Family Economics Graduate Student 

MARSH, MARY A Leavenworth 

Pre-Forestry , , Sophomore 

MARSH, SUSIE M Overland Park 

Secondary Education Junior 

MARSHALL, GLENN D San Antonio, TX 

Architecture Senior 

MARTEN, PAULAS . .. Onaga 

Business Administration Junior 

MARTI, HUMBERTO A Mayaguez, PR 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine . . - Freshman 

MARTIN, PEGGY J Silver Lake 

Math and Computer Science Senior 

MARTIN, RICHARD E, Salina 

Natural Resource Management Freshman 

MASON, LUCY N Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Senior 

MASSA, JOSEPH L Shawnee Mission 

Accounting Senior 

MASSOTH, GLENROY F Piqua 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

MASTER. AMRAPALI Manhattan 

Family and Child Development Graduate Student 

MATHEWSON, JUDITH J Kansas City 

Secondary Education Senior 

MATOUSEK, CARL W Cuba 

Agronomy Senior 

MATSON, KAREN S Onaga 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

MATTHEWS, DOUGLAS A, Junction City 

Pre-Law Junior 

MATYAK, JUDY M Rossville 

Interior Design Senior 

MAURER, SAM G, Overland Park 

Grain Science and Industry Graduate Student 

MAWHINEY, LISA K Hoisington 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

MAYDEW, JANETTE L Lebanon 

Accounting Senior 

MAYO, MICHAEL G Manhattan 

Architecture Senior 

MCALLISTER, CINDY S Bndgeton, NJ 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

McAMIS, VICKIE Hugoton 

Home Economics Senior 

McBRIDE, RONALD H Granite City, IL 

Accounting Senior 

McCABE, FRANCIS D Pleasonton, CA 

Architecture Junior 

MCCARTHY, CAREN J. . . . . . Medicine Lodge 

Horticulture Sophomore 

McCONAUGHEY. PATRICK J Kansas City 

Accounting Graduate Student 

McCORMICK, ALLEN C- Atlanta, GA 

Counseling Graduate Student 

McCOY, MARTHA A. Independence 

Geography . . . . Junior 

McCRANER, CAROL Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Junior 

McCRANN, LISA P Manhattan 

Radio and Television . Junior 

McCRAY, CHRISTI A. . . Salina 

Pre-Forestry Sophomore 

McCULLEY, SCOTT M Manhattan 

Engineering ... Freshman 

McCULLOUGH, JOSEPH B Girard 

Business Administration Senior 

McCUNDY, MARK F Hutchinson 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

McDOWELL, RAVAE J Manhattan 

Family Child and Development Sophomore 

McELROY, NORVAL R Belleville 

Finance . . . . ' Senior 

McELWAIN, RHONDA S Lyons 

Recreation Senior 

McFADDEN, EDWARD H. Kansas City 

Business Administration Junior 

McFADDEN, PATRICK M Natoma 

Philosophy Junior 

McFARLAND, CONNIE S Belle Plaine 

Accounting Senior 

McGEE, KAREN E, Mer'riam 

Special Education Junior 

McGEENEY. SUZANNE M Summertield 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

McGHEE, DAVID Ellsworth 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 



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McGRATH, TIMOTHY H 
Pre-Vetennary Medicine 
McGRAW, MARCIAG 
Radio and Television 



McGRATH, BARBARA A Greenleaf 

Accounting Senior 

McGRATH, STEPHANIE A Wichita 

Sophomore 

Wichita 

Freshman 

Hutchinson 

Junior 

McGUIRE, D. DUANE Ulysses 

Social Work Senior 

McGUIRE, TERESA A Manhattan 

Computer Science Senior 



McHUGH, MIKE Valley Center 

Mathematics Graduate Student 

McKAIG, SUSAN Gardner 

Music Education Senior 

McKAY, KEVIN W La Crosse 

Physical Education Junior 

Mclaughlin, kathleen m . Danvers, ma 

Business Management Junior 

McMURRAY, DEE A Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Senior 

McNERNEY, COLEEN Lenexa 

Elementary Education Senior 



McVEY, CRAIG L, Manhattan 

Accounting and Physical Education Junior 

McVICKER, MARILYN M Abilene 

Fashion Marketing Senior 

MEENGS, MARY L Ft Bliss, TX 

Biochemistry Junior 

MEHARG, RANDALL L Hoisington 

Computer Science . . . Junior 

MEITL, SUSAN M Oberlin 

Home Economics Education Junior 

MELLIES. DAVE Ness City 

Business Junior 



MELLOR. KAREN A Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

MENAUGH, STEVE A Kansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

MENDENHALL, JANA B Hiawatha 

Home Economics Education Senior 

MERCER, BRAD F . Carbondale 

Agricultural Economics . Junior 

MERCHANT, HASHIMALI Karachi, Pakistan 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

MERTZ.WENDIJ . .. , .... Wichita 

Interior Architecture Junior 



MESSENGER, E. SHANE Dighton 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

MESSENGER, TANYA L Dighton 

Agriculture Freshman 

MEYER, BRENDAS Overland Park 

Physical Education Junior 

MEYER, CONNIE S Belleville 

Family and Child Development Senior 

MEYER, CRAIG A Smith Center 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

MEYER, DAVID J Wichita 

Interior Architecture Fifth Year Student 



MEYER, DEBRAL Leavenworth 

Business Sophomore 

MEYER. DWIGHTC. Hiawatha 

Accounting . .. . ... Graduate Student 

MEYER. GARY W St Louis. MO 

Architecture Junior 

MEYER, VICKY L Emporia 

Retail Floriculture Junior 

MEYERS, CAROL A Olathe 

Dietetics Senior 

MEYERS, PAULA K Olathe 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 



MICHEELS, MARLENE M Overland Park 

Secondary Education Junior 

MICHEL, MIKE Coffeyville 

Pre-Dentistry Senior 

MICHEL, VICKIE L Manhattan 

Interior Design Junior 

MICHELS, KAY L Independence 

Elementary Education Senior 

MILLER, ALAN G Alma 

Microbiology Senior 

MILLER, CYNTHIA L Enterprise 

Fashion Marketing Senior 



Mil I I R, l>l I'iKAh 



Russell 
Electrical Engineering Junior 

MILLER, GREGORY B Minneapolis 

Health Education Senior 

MILLER. KATHYP Rossville 

Accounting Sophomore 

MILLER, MARCIA A, Claflin 

Elementary Edu< ation Junior 

MILLER, MARILYN S Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

MILLER. MARVIN 1 
Lie IVsuin Professions 



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off -campus 




MILLER, RUTH A, Winchester 

General . Sophomore 

MILLER, STACEY J Eureka 

Home Economics Education Senior 

MILLS, DAVID W Enterprise 

Accounting Senior 

MILNER, SUSAN E Ellinwood 

Art Senior 

MINIMIS. PATC Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

MINOR, KATHLEEN A Mission 

Physical Therapy Junior 

MISKIMINS, JOEL A Overland Park jUttttk 

Animal Science and Industry Junior £' a ■ HK 

MITCHELL, DEBORAH A. Overland Park MF^^Kk 

Home Economics Education Senior ^E ^^K 

MITCHELL, GREG P McLouth B ~1^R 

Architecture Junior ^B W 

MOATS. BILLIE M Kansas City <p - -jHf 

Biology Graduate Student ** 

MOCKRY, ELDON F Manhattan 1 

Civil Engineering Senior "J- 

MOECKEL.MERLEJ Hutchinson , 1| 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

MOEDER, LEON La Crosse 

Construction Science Senior 

MOEDER, SUSAN J La Crosse 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

MOELLER, CHRIS R. . ... Bonner Springs 

Nuclear Engineering Junior ^L 3 

MOELLER, DIANE K Hardy, NB 

Physical Education Freshman Jm''">tm 

MOHLER, MICHAEL H Shawnee Mission ^BL ^ 

Marketing Senior wttL 

MOHLER. PAULA J Atchison HL i 

Pre-Physical Therapy Junior HmJ 

MOHR, JULIE K Topeka 

Computer Science Senior 

MOHR, WILMA L Hutchinson 

Pre-Nursmg Freshman 

MONCADA, LUIS F Bogota, Colombia 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

MONFORT, DARRELL R lola 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

MOORE, ALISA K Wichita 

Architecture Senior 

MOORE, CAROL A. Kansas City 

Physical Therapy Junior 





460 — off-campus 




MOORE, JAMES P Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

MOORE, LUCIAN . . Hiawatha 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

MOORE, WILLIAM D Scott City 

Agronomy Senior 

MORAIN, MICHELLE A Liberal 

Fashion Merchandising . Sophomore 

MORANO, MIKE A Fontana 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

MORFORD, QUENTIN A Greensburg 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

MORGAN, JOYCE L Shawnee Mission 

Family Economics Sophomore 

MORGAN, KATHY A . . . Wichita 

Social Work Sophomore 

MORGAN, PAMELA Lenexa 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

MORGENSTERN, ROXANNE Hoisington 

Radio and Television Senior 

MORIN, DALE E Manhattan 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

MORRIS, BRADFORD H Dodge City 

Journalism and Mass Communications . .. Junior 

MORRIS, DANNY W Chanute 

Elementary Education Junior 

MORRIS, DERRICK E Cotteyville 

Business Administration Senior 

MORRIS, TRESIA E Wichita 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts Senior 

MORSE, STEVEN K Galva 

Political Science Junior 

MOSHARRAF, ZUBAIDA Decca, Bangladesh 

Architecture Junior 

MOSSMAN, DONNA M El Dorado 

Office Administration Senior 

MOSSMAN, RICK I ....... Topeka 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

MUCKENTHALER, MICHAEL J Overland Park 

Accounting Senior 

MUDD, ANTHONY D Ness City 

Pre-Dentistry Senior 

MUELLER, JAMES C Hot Springs, SD 

Architecture Senior 

MUELLER, TOME Waukesha, Wl 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

MULLEN, BRUCE A Erie 

Business Finance Senior 

MULLEN. RICHARD G Leoti 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

MULLIN, MARY J Shawnee Mission 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

MULVIHILL, JOANNE L Kansas City 

Social Work Senior 

MUNKRES, TERRILL J . Haysville 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

MUNOZ, ARTHUR C Topeka 

Civil Engineering Senior 

MUNZ, OLENM Great Bend 

Agronomy Junior 

MURPHY, TED Topeka 

Interior Architecture Fifth Year Student 

MURRAY. DAVID A Clay Center 

Engineering ' Freshman 

MURTHY, ALAMPALLI V . .. Bangalore. India 

Grain Science . . Graduate Student 

MUSSEMANN, SHARLA K . . . Wakeeney 

Home Economics Education Junior 

MYERS, JANET L Little River 

Art Education Senior 

MYRICK, TIMOTHY E Hugoton 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

NACE, JOHN R. . . Delphos 

Social Science Junior 

NASH, MARGARET M Lakin 

Psychology Senior 

NAVINSKEY, CYNTHIA L. Cummings 

Computer Science Sophomore 

NAVINSKi II Hie. I Leavenworth 

Fine Arts .... . . Graduate Student 

NAY, CYNTHIA A. . . El Dorado 

Special Education Junior 

NEADERHISER. STEPHEN R Bennington 

Biology Senior 

NEASE, DENNIS A Olathe 

Architecture Senior 

NEIBLING, WALTER H Highland 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

NEILL, GEORGE T Emporia 

Chemistry Senior 

NELKIN, KEN S Overland Park 

Pre-Dentistry Senior 

NELLANS, JAMES C El Dorado 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

NELSON, BRUCE A , , . Holton 

Engineering Technology . Sophomore 



olt-campus — 461 



off -campus 



NELSON. DENNIS F 
Agricultural Mechanization 

NELSON. ERIC L 

Business Administration 
NELSON, RONALD W 



Manhattan 

Junior 

Formoso 

Junior 

Salina 

Pre-Vetennary Median " 'P hl " Tl( '"' 

NEMECHEK, EUGENE C Goodland 

Veterinary Medicine • „ ^. en '°l 

NESBIT, MARY J Kansas City, MO 

Nuclear Engineering ■ ■ • s ® ni< " 

NETHERTON,TAMMYA Great Bend 

Special Education Graduate Student 



NEUMANN. YVETTEX Merriam 

Electrical Engineering ^'°,' 

NEVINS.MARLYSE Overland Park 

Fashion Design c? e S"°L 

NEWELL, KAREN K Stafford 

Art Education ,. Sen,or 

NEWINGTON, DIRK B Merriam 

Pre-Dentistry .j 86 " 10 ' 

NEY, JOHN T Hanston 

Animal Science and Industry _ Semor 

NICHOLS. NANCY A Sterling 

Social Sciences Senior 



Overland Park 
Si iphi imore 

Colby 
Architectural Engineering Freshman 

NIETFELD. KATHERINEA Dodge City 

General 



NICHOLS. POLLY A 
Interior Design 
NICHOLSON, LARRY A 



Junior 
NIGHSWONGER.TEDJ. Hill City 

Senior 

Burlesom, TX 

Graduate Student 

Liberal 

Freshman 



Agricultural Economics 

NIXON, CHARLES C 
Agricultural Engineering 
NOFSINGER, RONALD L 
Business Administration 



NOLLER, PAMELA J Hebron, NB 

Art Education Junior 

NONAMAKER. THANE N Cedar 

Secondary Education Senior 

NORDLING, MELANIE E Hugoton 
Recreation Sophomore 
NOREN, ALICE V Oberlin 

Elementary Education Junior 

NORRIS. MARY K Edgerton 
Family and Child Development Junior 

NOSSAMAN, MELANIE S ■ • P"* n 



Anthropology 



Senior 



NOTEIS, VICKI L 
Architecture 
NOTTINGHAM. LYLED 
Veterinary Medicine 
NOW, CINDI L 
Medical Technology 
NUESSEN, MICHAEL J 
Business Administration 
NYQUIST, JAMES A, 
Mechanical Engineering 
OBERG. BRADLEY G 
Architecture 



Kansas City, MO 

Fifth Year Student 

Lawrence 

Junior 

Maize 

Sophomore 

Eureka 

Sophomore 

Phillipsburg 

Junior 

Cheyenne, WY 

Junior 



OBERHELMAN.KATHYJ Clay Center 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

OBERMUELLER. BRICE B Lody, WY 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

O CONNOR MARGARET M Prairie Village 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

OGAN, THOMAS W Topeka 

Biology Senior 

OGLE, BILL A Topeka 

Business Administration Junior 

OHLEY, KENNETH D PraM 

Secondary Education Senior 



OHNO, TSUTOMU Manhattan 

Chemistry Junior 

OLBERDING, WILLIAM L Olathe 

Biochemistry Senior 

OLSON.RENETA Marquette 

Accounting Junior 

OMAN.RUTHIEJ Leonardville 

Music Education Junior 

OMENSKI, PHILIP P Kansas City 

Radio and Television Senior 

ONELLO. ANN L Leavenworth 

Business Junior 



OPAT, THOMAS D St. George 

Horticulture Junior 

OROFINO, GLORIA L Landing, NJ 

■ , .„,■ M,.,ii' in-.- Sophomore 

OROSCO. SANDRA K. '•■"'''"' "V 

Elementary Education Junior 

ORR, D. KEVIN Wichita 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

ORR, MARCIA K St. John 

Accounting Senior 

ORVIS, TERRY L Wichita 

Engineering Sophomore 





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OSTERMAN, ERIC D Manhattan 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine Senior 

OTOOLE, KATHLEEN A Lawrence 

Physical Education Junior 

OTTAWAY, DOUGLAS A Overland Park 

Psychology Senior 

OTTAWAY, KATHLEEN M . McLouth 

Medical Technology . Junior 

OUELLETTE, DULCE M Manhattan 

Adult Education Graduate Student 

OUSDAHL, LISA P Shawnee 

Business Administration Junior 

OUTTEN, BEVERLY V Ellinwood 

Horticulture Sophomore 

PAGE, BEVERLY A Topeka 

Fashion Marketing , . , , Sophomore 

PAGE, CYNTHIA M ... .Abilene 

Music Education Sophomore 

PAINTER, DOLORES W Tulsa, OK 

Agronomy Senior 

PALENSKE, JUDITH A Alma 

Interior Design Senior 

PANKRATZ, BARBARA A Hillsboro 

Interior Design Senior 

PARAMORE, CYNTHIA J Delphos 

Corrections Senior 

PARKER, CAROLYN S Kansas City 

Speech Pathology Junior 

PARKS, MARK K Johnson 

Agronomy Senior 

PARMELY, JANICE K LeRoy 

Special Education Senior 

PARR, PATRICIA A Rossville 

Elementary Education , , Junior 

PARRISH, GLENDA W lola 

Fashion Merchandising Senior 

PARSONS, IRENE K. Manhattan 

Fashion Marketing ... Freshman 

PATE, WILLIAM G Overland Park 

Business Management Senior 

PATRY, MARIAN S Hillsboro 

Home Economics Education Senior 

PATTON, JOYCE L Abilene 

Elementary Education Senior 

PATTON, RONDAL Hutchinson 

Fashion Retailing Junior 

PATZELL, CHRIS D Manhattan 

Engineering Freshman 

PAUL, MARGARET L Ingalls 

Psychology Junior 

PAUZAUSKIE, TONY V Cotteyville 

Business Administration Senior 

PAYNE, LISA A Manhattan 

Horticulture Sophomore 

PEARSON, BRAD B Beloit 

Business Administration Junior 

PEARSON, PATRICIA Prairie Village 

Political Service Senior 

PEDERSEN, JONI E Manhattan 

Theatre Junior 

PEEL, JOHN E Prairie Village 

Business Administration Senior 

PEIL, SUSAN M Manhattan 

Horticulture Therapy Freshman 

PEMBER, MARIANNE A Ness City 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

PENDLETON, DAVID E Union, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

PENG, CHRISTINE L Emporia 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

PENNINGTON. NANCY J Meade 

Physical Education Junior 

PENNY, NANCY L Richmond. VA 

Accounting Junior 

PENNY, SUSAN M Emporia 

Food Science Sophomore 

PERRY, DONNA G Chapman 

Physical Education Junior 

PERRY, EDWARD H Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

PERTSCH, KATHERINE A Leesburg, VA 

Pre-Dentistry Senior 

PETERKORD, JOHN W Overland Park 

Architecture Sixth Year Student 

PETERS, STEPHEN C. Manhattan 

Political Science Freshman 

PETERS. WALTER P. Burlington. NJ 

Marketing Freshman 

PETERSON, GARY C Manhattan 

Agronomy Senior 

PETERSON, JANE M Greeley 

Lite Science Senior 

PETERSON, JANET L Delavan 

Physical Education Sophomore 

PETERSON, MICHAEL J Clyde 

Civil Engineering Senior 



,41 , .intpus - 463 



off -cam pus 



PETITJEAN, JOYCE D St Francis .^^ 'fllL 

Foods and Nutrition Junior >4HKm. A WL. ' 

PETTET, GARY A Wakefield l^fc A 

Radio and Television Sophomore MA i JS» *SSm^ 

PHARR, SUSAN K Chase WrVl 

Business Education Senior f I Jj ■ 

PHILLIPS, REGINALDS. Syracuse 1 CjW % ««BL 

Animal Science and Industry Senior wfitk Mk ntliilMr^ 

PHILLIPS. ROBIN E Prairie Village J/Q* M ^Hffl 

Special Education Senior ^ _ SBTIrJH 

PHILLIPS, STEVEN L Carlton 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

PHILLIPS. TERESA A Olathe 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

PICKETT. DELMAR V Olsburg 

Anthropology Graduate Student 

PICKUP, CHERYL L- Kansas City 

Home Economics Sophomore 

PIEPER, LESTER N Overland Park 

Engineering Freshman 

PIERCE, JERRY E Wichita 

Architecture Senior 

PIERCE, LINDA J Manhattan 

Family and Child Development Senior Kft^H ''dfr 

PIERCE, MARK A Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

PIERCE, MICHAEL E Tribune 

Business Graduate Student Wp 

PIGG, SHERRY K Topeka W m 

Home Economics and Journalism Senior 

PILAND, ANNA G Abilene 

Home Economics . Junior 

PISTORA. CYNTHIA D Abilene 

Fashion Design Junior 

PLEGGE.JEANM Marysville 

Speech Pathology Junior 

PLEGGE, KAREN J Marysville 

Recreation Junior 

POLAND, CONNIE J Junction City 

English Education Senior 

POLAND, JOHN A Chapman 

Landscape Architecture . Fifth Year Student 

POLITO, GREGORY S Morion Grove, IL 

Horticulture Sophomore 

POLLEY, ROGERT D Easton 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

POOL, TIMOTHY K Lyons 

Building Construction Senior 

POORE, LARRY D Woodston 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

POOVEY, BILLY M Westphalia 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

POPE, DONALD E Manhattan 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

POPE, GINNYA Kansas City, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

PORUBSKY. RICHARD A Topeka 

Accounting Sophomore A,* 

POTTER, KATHLEEN A Omaha, NB J? 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

POTTS, DIANE M Leonardville 

Social Science Senior fc J9l^Kk 

POWER, TED H Abilene jP^^Bk 

Physical Education Junior i Wft. ' 

PRATT, HARRY J Hoxie f - >*^^k \ jL 

Agricultural Economics Freshman ... j ii, J WM • 

PRETTYMAN, MARTIN H Omaha, NB ' ■BH 1** ^M 

Restaurant Management Senior . ~ A 

PROCHASKA, BRETT A Ada ^^^fli *dH 

Animal Science and Industry Senior HK^i^H I >«. 

PROCTOR, ROBERT D Denver, CO < '% 

Architecture Senior ^^- ' -J<Bfc __ 

■^^^^^■■■H <s*Bwat> . m/smi 

PROTHE, SUSAN E Medicine Lodge 

Home Economics Extension Junior 

PRUITT, COLLEEN M Overland Park j0 

Family and Child Development Junior 

PRUS, WANDA R Manhattan 

Fine Arts Senior Wk -* 

PUCKETT, JUDY L Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

OUALIZZA, AMY Bucyrus 

Parks and Recreation Sophomore 

QUINLAN, MARCIA K Leavenworth A; 1 MK% 

Political Science Sophomore , M M 

QUINN, TOM Wichita 

Business Administration Senior 

RAAB, DEANNA L, , Topeka 

Agricultural Education Freshman M 

RAAB, LINDA L .Topeka ,,<■- 

Physical Education Junior M 

RADATZ, EDWIN W Galva 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

RADER, TREVA J Wichita 

Physical Therapy Senior 

RAGEL, JURETA L Garden City 

Special Education Junior 



464 — off-campus 






RAGOLE. JOE A Marion 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

RAHBERG, RICKD. Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

RAILE, RICHARD W Edson 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

RAILSBACK, CYNTHIA J Langdon 

Radio and Television Senior 

RALEIGH, NANCY J Windom 

Marketing Senior 

RAMSEY, CRAIG J Scott City 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

RAMSEY, GINA C Scott City 

Elementary Education Senior 

RANDOLPH, RITA J Pratt 

Accounting Senior 

RASHID, HAROON U Pakistan 

Computer Science Graduate Student 

RATCLIFFE, FREDERICK W . M.i • 

Electrical Engineering Filth Year Student 

RATHER, RONALDS Independence 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

RATHERT, MARK F Marion 

Landscape Architecture Senior 



olt-campus — 465 




off -campus 

RATHERT, SUSAN L Junction City __ . / ^fcfjk ^yBV. 

Elementary Education Junior pi 1^^ sj BBBrB ' 'B ilF *^B\ ,1k, S\ 

RATHERT, VICKY L. Lancaster # «Bk B / iflk m 

Home Economics Education Senior iBBk *"jHrjT*>^M J ~ ^"IB if V i/ B 

RATZLAFF. DEBBIE L Fredonia ■„ -"VBA ■ W "9 f*^BJ J| f ~ ■■•^^B |«^ ,,JB 

Business Education Sophomore ■ . j JJJB| I -JL jBBH ■ C'^yH ' H| Hf B 

REDEKER.JANAJ Olpe 1 . __, OM <4 ■ W« J|b.^^BBB BHt-'^BB 

REDENBAUGH, ELAINE M Gardner J\ tf^BB It ^^^^ ft vJB <J« Ml ^bW^^BfL* 

Home Economics Education Junior jBhBF^B| EJBK IBBM ,.*BB¥ 5qrM C, K ,fl 

REDER. CAROLE Effingham ■F^iw^BBB WF BwBPw I Bk I HI " ' IP- 

Dietetics Senior ^#fp»jii|H B'< /aH jHH _ _ 

% ■'■■' IB 

REED. LINDA A. Lyons g^ -48*1^ ,*BV ....fiSfflBBk. «*«BBw AV 

Home Economics and Journalism Senior s .JJjBFa 4BBlBk ^W :SB *' SBk ' ;1F m 

REED, RICHARD L. Topeka fl M £*•■ A T BB^^"* >M B 

Political Science Senior BfF^BB * 9A Bft HP W § -» 4WVB. M_ >"B\ 

REES, DOUGLAS M St John f« JIB JHHHH jM* Wm WT * dP J' * ■) .#^ ^"V 

Physical Therapy Junior f P^BH «¥ !RBB *jfl " W -JUP T "*" JBP «J 2 

REES, JANE H Great Bend 1 fAdBB B - JBBBJjl B l^BBF W ^tP^ %. """" ' !► B ' itt 

Business Administration Junior ^ - W \. ~~ jS * "3SF J ^ if'ir > » .^BT 

REESE, RICKI St. Marys ' ^ \nJbWi 'sj|, BF IT tF^^BT. Tk ^B 

Accounting Senior jr TBBw^ H 3 BB vV' *F*\ PV 

REGAN, CAROLYN L Shawnee ^k.. : t^Bfe 't&jftBT*? _jtf*' l1F^B» HI J|B9Ih\ .Jail ' i JW» 

Elementary Education Junior BBflP^^IMSF ^a^MM ~\ ^ ' I^W' 

REGAN, TIMOTHY J Atchison 4^Bk jflPk. »-■<*&»■. —^ JBK jCV 

Business Administration Sophomore . I jBB * * 4fliBk #' ^BB IV^. ^k^BRBV /M 

REICHLE, ANNALENE R Manhattan ^JM MB f ¥B J ^JB A, • ' ' *f jB J ' Si 

Elementary Education isFjMH I J I 1 dW#BB ^^ ** 

yp 1pbb> A^B^BBBBM^- ^ 

REYHLE, LINDA L. Prairie Village % '■■■<':' A iWifH ViK^S |HL r ^| » 

Fashion Marketing Senior J.^ ^ J^^j 

REYNOLDS, JANETS Manhattan 

Foods and Nutrition Freshman 

REYNOLDS, JOHN M Paradise 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

REZNICEK, JUDITH A. Ottawa 

Pre-Nursmg Junior 

REZNICEK, SUSAN E Ottawa 

English Freshman 

RHODES, DAVID I Salina 

Electrical Engineering Senior ^gRj ;*3L* ^SBF^? J >\ ^BP'SE^ 

RICE, JENNIFER L Overland Park Al W^S^i. ^*^' ^Jl y 'A f^v- 

Animal Science and Industry Senior !■% IHi ''■■■&. JMjBBm i -fie ' *1\3I>^» ""A ^ '^* 

BBBBBB^BBB . \JHMfBW -A i}\'PMB? *St / : W? "*^ \V • 

RICE. NANCY L Shawnee Mission ^%t, •» 

Fashion Marketing Junioi BOB % 

RICE, SHARON E Manhattan Wl^ 

Finance Senior IB ^f KM i S iflk 

RICHARDS, ASHANNA M Greensburg BB^ MBB W> **JBRI 

Elementary Education Junior BV ' J, ■ T \ 

RICHARDS, DENNIS S Greensburg M ."^» I BBS, V r^ 

Speech Education Senior :•% Mt k -. -I % Jf 

RICHARDS, PATRICIA K Topeka Bfc^naM ^ ! ''^ "*" 

Counseling Graduate Student v"M 

RICHARDSON, C MICHAEL Overland Park BJIbI Bl >~^ 1b1 ^k -' ' T ^lf*> ^« A 

Business Administration Senior ^% . j } Jem \ JHttttBBBM *'" 1* 

RIEPL.GARYM. Cimarron ^P^W ^f^. ^BkV 

Business Finance Senior ,^^ .^ JK ^k 49SbV **#» 

RIETZKE. JAYNEA Kensington F~ jBB JMB JW : BBBB 

Recreation Junior _ JBk » BM ^-^Bb» 

RILE/, MONICA J Lincoln, NB B "' " IB ^jSaBB B "* r **TBL "^* ftt 

Sociology Sophomore I ^^^ JP |<*fB ,fl J B i A M 

RILEY, TERRY Z. Carbondale "» ^-^JB\ B JL^VB Bl »-#B 1 — JBr 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior Jr^Bw JIB -^PEbT ^Bk ' iJBBV 

RINIKER, CORRINEK Manhattan "^ ^BBB BV^^^BBb ^BB""** BB) "^B 

Freshman ^— - ^B| TbBBVjBIf^ ~^BB ^iB"*^- - 1 -^ 

RINKENBAUGH, JOHN D Cofteyville ,, <, : -JJB RZ^~ ^^ ^^ BBf fc. BBWBBf ^B 

Mechanical Engineering Senior ^M' UJ '^\J k \ ^^J^\ ,S I " i 

RIPHAHN, BILL D Copeland 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

RlVAS, MARIA A Ulysses 

General Freshman 

ROACH RICHARD R Manhattan 

Business /■-:-„„,., ,,!„■„, Junior 

ROBBINS, FRANCIS V Yates Center 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

ROBERTS, CHARLES B Kansas City 

Marketing Senior 

ROBERTS, RICKEY J Kansas City 

Dairy Production Senior 

ROBERTS. STEPHEN P Manhattan ,^^~ ^m , AJ^ — _ 1 _—« fc . a.'.- 

Accounting Sophomore BBk B& ■•*"* L B\ MfBMJjjB BTjBB Ml^BBk ' 

ROBINSON, FRED L Garden City ^Bl BB -^^B)B '; 'C lA VBB 

ROBINSON. G CRAIG Ellinwood wi m W ff^> f4BB M *^BB 1* -^^BV JJJJJF - "jUbB 

Senior BJB ..jfjBjf| B '* f^ T C ■ « J ^ U~ ^M 

ROBINSON. LINDA A Perry 2 / ^ JT "\ .JL* 4 ^3bbI Bk. ^^B» ' \ T^P BB Tt ^ ^^BF 

ROBINSON, TOM \ "^B ^Bl "^BBfc^ -^F / _^K. 

Accounting and Psychology TBfc* '^BF ^^ \ W* B i»- ■^'^BFW 

ROBINSON. ZENDA J. Wellington iBH *# *Fv ^^\ F ' U .^ ^H ' B*HP1 

Elementary Education Senior I ^ >'* /'bMbB ' ^* RBkA BB^W JBbV^BB ^ (Mt BBJbI 












'.. . .11 .:• ; 



mm 




& * %M.1 



ROBL. JAMES M Ellinwood 

Pre-Velerinary Medicine Junior 

ROE, RICHARD N Olathe 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

ROENBAUGH, JACOB W Trousdale 

Agronomy Senior 

ROENBAUGH, SHIRLEY A Trousdale 

Elementary Education Senior 

ROESNER. JAMES R Salma 

General Freshman 

ROESSLEIN, MARK A St. Louis, MO 

Architecture Senior 

ROGERS, MARK A Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

ROLAND, RONALD L Falls City, NB 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

ROLES, GARY D DeSoto 

Architecture Junior 

ROMIG, MARGARET A Manhattan 

Lite Science Senior 

ROSETTA, VICTOR F Topeka 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

ROSS, TERENCE L. . Ellinwood 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

ROSSELOT, ANGELA M Topeka 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

ROTHLISBERGER, ROYCE R Green 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

ROWE, TIM N Hill City 

Physical Therapy Junior 

ROWLAND, BARRY D Elkhart 

Agronomy Senior 

RUDD, DEBBIE Kansas City 

Pre-Nursing Senior 

RUDEEN, MARILYN I Harveyville 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

RUDER, HARVEY Hays 

Construction Science Sophomore 

RUEBKE, JUDITH A Pretty Prairie 

Accounting Junior 

RUES, ALICIA A Lewis 

Elementary Education Senior 

RULE, KIMBERLE J Herington 

Physical Education Senior 

RUNDLE, KATHLEEN E Logan 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

RUNFT, SHARON K Scandia 

Dietetics Senior 

RUPE, DOUGLAS G Wichita 

Radio and Television Junior 

RUSH, JEANETTE Troy 

Lite Science Senior 

RUSH, MARKI Arkansas City 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

RUSSELL, DENISE S Kansas City, MO 

Home Economics Education Senior 

RUTSCHMANN, JANISE Maple Hill 

General Junior 

RUTT, PATRICIA L Junction City 

General Freshman 

RUTTGEN, GREGORY L Oswego 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

RYAN, GEORGE F Salina 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

RYAN, MICHELLE Kansas City 

Family and Child Development Senior 

RYSER. DICK L Concordia 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

SALLMAN, VICKIE J. Junction City 

English Sophomore 

SALMANS, STAN R Scott City 

Architecture Senior 

SANDERS, CYNTHIA K Overland Park 

Civil Engineering Senior 

SANDERS. RICHARD M Concordia 

Business Management Senior 

SAPP, DEBBIE A. Esbon 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

SARENSEN, GREGORY A Netawaka 

Agronomy Senior 

SARGENT, SHARLIN J Latham 

Elementary Education Senior 

SATTERLEE, JANE E Assaria 

Math Education Senior 

SAUBER, MICHAEL J. ..... , . . . Ellinwood 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

SAUERWEIN, TOM D Newton 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine .ophiiinor,-. 

SAULS, TIME Topeka 

Building Construction Sophomore 

SAWIN, RUTH M Lyons 

Fashion Marketing Senior 

SAWYER, DOUGLAS W McPherson 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SAYLER, EDWIN W Paxico 

Speech Junior 



oft-campus — 467 




off-campus 

SCHAFER. ANNETTE M Topeka ^^ ~ ^ ^ a 

Social Work Junior <* \ ^k jBBBW - JBfik. -» BjBk ^ABBk i 

SCHAFER. CALVIN E. Perry J |A &■ W^B^ Mkr BB ^^^BV 

Veterinary Medicine Senior Jtf JP** P B\ B\>^B IB f Bl 

SCHAFFER. DENNIS J Manhattan 4» .%1B M^c^Wm K^ttZSB MWl^fiMm K« M^& *& JCiBl 

Accounting f~ 1 ^f "~>t*f Ir^W ■ T I JT C B, I'M 

SCHAFFER. JILL R Garden City lc«Lrfl n JjLM ¥> ' '*# A £lBB 4.AB A 

Sophomore V' -/L ' / % ^Jt A " '' Am \^M I JBV^bWB 

SCHEID.MARKW Whiting BY«u2BV. «Jr~^ ~'M ^' - j B»' m j B /PBk-^M 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior B^l "* r ^fejv j* mB I ^ J ^^i IB '- 3H B3a 

SCHENBERGER. NANCY L Overland Park ■ BB '-''A Thm^ B\ ^ffS. ■ .JUKI 

Early Childhood Education Senior J|^f ^ ]||| „ | || „ j||| | f^M\Wi 

SCHIERLING, DUANE A Quinter ^^mMM. 

Animal Science and Industry Senior >flH 

SCHILLING, LAURENCE E Abilene MM j*B 

Crop Protection Senior aBBBBB 

SCHINSTOCK, GERALD L Kinsley r "^*^&m 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore Bf " tTB> IP "^Br flr I CtB £: 'T 

SCHLATTER. CHARLES W . ... Overland Park ^B ' ~*EMT ' _T*|. }P * 2 , -B&* 

Business Management Junior ML " i^ ■••' M I -' jjm^ X -~ 3RB^ 

SCHLICHT, MARKR. Prairie Village ~^ .^§BW. -■»' '<mBV J JF 

Economics Senior ^B l^QBB *^B8v'" tt /^MJ ^ "*W±^ 

SCHMEIDLER. EDWIN F Wakeeney I /!■ ^m " 'Vil ^ \i' 'Jf BB T Bl 

Agricultural Economics Junior l/* ^ ^^SBI^^it ^SL~ ^ T Br """' BBB fMV BB 

SCHMID, ANTHONY C Atwood ^a^^. ^T«s 

Crop Protection Junior ^BSbV 4r >^3BW *Bk ^BW SBBv 

SCHMIDT. RANDY G Norwich S BB ' w J|i ^P^Bm ■"** Bk JF^ ^B 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior BMB "^t(B « tB\ HP~ ;, "^^I _*^4 : |jiB w *J^ 

SCHMITT, BEVERLY J W^ Bl ' > ' v B ■ Bl kj| M m$JT^^Mm\. W ^-jA 

s&eg soph = w^y ! J r *» W*n w^r ^U 

Animal Science and Industry Junior ', " IKV AV-"-3^JBB -\ -Jy| -~Br ' "dB 

SCHMITT. MICHAEL L Lakin ^MrJmSm AMm^~ZjMM\ - J - w "W X_^HB| 

Pre-Design Professions Junior Jr f M^IW B» - iV""^^^ < SHBr "^T "'" 

SCHMITZ, DAVID G Selkirk JF > * J ^BV\B^| * N ^(B« ^M 

Veterinary Medicine Senior ■? -f / IK ^ " 1 B^ B 

SCHNACKE. JERRY D. Overland Park ^^ itMMk. ™^m> 

Radio and Television Senior MMUmk. /« B "'"\ 

SCHNECK.GARYA Larned ^BF^B fct,l Bl ^^^|B 

Mechanical Engineering Graduate Student Mmr J 9* J ^~*MW\ T^^^^^K. 

SCHNEIDER. ALICE F. Russell BT -* fB * ' ' B tM m. t&k 

Music Education Senior H |1 1 fjR ^| 

SCHNEIDER. TOM A. Neodesha ^B ~%M \ <-«■ 'W LJNT 

Accounting Senior Bl ~ JH # S- ^ik * r:r W 

SCHOEN. STEVEN J Cawker City Bf \. .a P^ JF St »J^. 

Business Administration Junior ^ y t : "*^ "—"" J "BW 

SCHOOLEY. KAROLYN K Clay Center M\ ^ Bk ifl ^Bf . 

Pre-Nursing . . . ...... Sophomore \ f* ^J ^ ^ , ■''Mm ^Bk 

SCHRADER. DANIEL J. Oskaloosa ^Bw y«^MK%- '4'*^. 

Business Junior _ ^^\^. ilpHI^B^ vk. 

SCHRADER. DEBORAH K. Oskaloosa Br B ^7~ Bl / Wa 

Business Administration Senior yHr s . .JmA d& MM\ ; /-»»^_»B 

SCHRAEDER.JULIEA. Rush Center 4*" 'TpB M-**,-#*^P A13mP"M U-»T 

Speech Pathology Senior B/"^B B Ml * i ^V» J 

SCHRANDT. STEVE F Glasco S ' -WM B - > : »W |KA ^—^BM \ •* 

Agricultural Economics Junior W Jp JB /^»B HsV. JMU\ V " 

SCHREIBVOGEL, BECKY A . . . Holcomb ^X r ^P WBV BIBmBI 

Physical Therapy . Junior ^P^ 

SCHREUDER, MARILYN A Cawker City ;-' T^t 

Social Work Junior |. ?,S Bk I 

SCHREURS. KATHY M Hays « v y^BW 'flBk. 

Physical Education Junior BJW /* WMm. ^Bi # <fck. M JBk. 

SCHROEDER. LINDA M Kansas City »,. P^JB #^ ^BB ^^BB A "^B ST - 1^ 

Office Administration c.1* ■ W MWk HfeBI A/ 'Bl L' fl 

SCHROTT, BRUCE D Rush Center F^ ^BBl B^ir^B ■ ^ £*Mm\ j I -^ ^H 

Chemical Enaineenng Junior *§■ ^^ Pk f Bl W ^ff ■'* F^Bl ' F 

SCHROTT. PEGGY L La Crosse ■ / J^M 1^%#^B U ~<aY « / ^B O^rM 

Business . ..Junior ^B '"^BF m. v Ji * *^B BL*^^H Bk. 

SCHUETTE. MARK L . Manhattan TB^n^B* W^Bfl -M* - ^ MM^±. 

Geology Freshman dBNBk M^ Bft i ^BB B ii ^ 

SCHULER.GARY A. Ness City B>k BV \ ^B7 I I ^A AV 

Natural Resource Management Senior ^^^5™BWft I J x I Tf ^B IB TW^ i 

SCHULTZ.DONG Topeka ... ^ 

Architecture Fifth Year Student /BBBk 

SCHULZE. RONALD E. Manhattan ^P^ B^ 

Agriculture . . Freshman I 

SCHWARM, MARK A Haviland WM39 <BB 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

SCHWARZENBERGER. MARY B Collyer m\ _^MMMf 

Psychology . Junior B^f^-^BT 

SCHWERTFEGER. ELAINE Satanta ^BmBB 

Family and Child Development Senior ^BH 

SCOTT, CHARMAINEB Overland Park JffB»^ W '^ W * 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman MW MS H iAk A^^. » r 

Mr /Ji 

SCOTT, DICK D Fredoma ^^^ 

Animal Science and Industry Senior ^BBk 4 MMk .^HBhW ^'flBk W^ ^B 

SCOTT, KAREN Wichita 'j^tt^BV IB\ ' 4 B\ JV^nB BV "B 

Family and Child Development Senior <liF""^^B. BB^Bm B^^Bl /aBF 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior ■ \ -^■^H < ~~^K Uu\ "'^■^r I 

SCOTT NANCY Hays J ^ £ 1 ^BW .-/V ^W ^B^^^ ^fl 

Elementary Education Senior . ^^ |F. »\ ^ BW , ^^ WWr- ~ B>s. ^^B1 ■t^ *' / k. 

SCOTT. SHARON S Wichita J .%, ' J I iBBft A, , JlBBlBs BBk « vBfl 

Family and Child Development Senior ^V^B^i.^B "'W^O Uff ^ -^ V ill I ^rf"%SBWB 






466 — off-campus 




SCOVILLE, NANCY J. Lyons 

Radio and Television Junior 

SCRIBNER, CRAIG W Caldwell 

English Junior 

SCRIMSHER, BRENDA J Topeka 

Sociology Senior 

SCROGGIN, WILLIAM W Mission Hills 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Junior 

SEARS, STEVEN R Hiawatha 

Agricultural Education Junior 

SEATON, JULIE A Olathe 

Art Sophomore 



SEE, JOHN Kansas City 

Business Senior 

SEEHAFER, MARILYN S Hunter 

Accounting Senior 

SEIBERT, PAMELA J Macksville 

Retail Floriculture Senior 

SEIRER, PEGGY A Manhattan 

Medical Technology Freshman 

SELIG, RICK H Topeka 

Psychology Senior 

SEMRAU, LOREN A. Sioux Falls, SD 
Architecture Junior 



fQifcfi 




SEPTS, ERNEST 

Education 

SEXTRO, DON L 
Mechanical Engineering 
SHADDAY, JANICE C 
Music Education 



Baker, LA 

Graduate Student 

Seneca 

Freshman 

Manhattan 

Sophomore 



SHALALA, SHANN A Manhattan Beach, CA 

Physical Education Senior 

SHANKS, DENNIS N Columbus 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SHARP. GORDON A Benedict 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 




olt-campus — 469 



off -cam pus 

SHARP, MARY C Ft. Worth, TX 

Home Economics Education Senior 

SHARPE, ANGELA K Clyde 

Recreation Sophomore 

SHAW, DIANA J Menden 

Psychology Sophomore 

SHEAHAN. CATHERINE L Randall 

General Freshman 

SHEARER. JOHN E Frankfort 

Horticulture Junior 

SHEEHAN, JOAN M Kansas City 

Business Administration Senior 

SHEHI, RONDA G Westmoreland 

Elementary Education Senior 

SHELDON, L. JAY Leawood 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SHELLENBERGER, JOHN W. Topeka 

Computer Science . Graduate Student 

SHERMAN, DEBORAH K Overland Park 

Psychology Junior 

SHERRARD, DIANA L Winfield 

Physical Education Senior 

SHIELDS, JANETT L Cherryvale 

Secondary Education Junior 

SHILL, TERRY L Manhattan 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

SHINEMAN, KIRBY A Manhattan 

General Freshman 

SHIVERS, MARY B. Holton 

Business Administration Junior 

SHORT, ANITA K Goodland 

English and Sociology Senior 

SHUTE. STEVEN E Esbon 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

SIEFKIN, BARBARA C Manhattan 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

SIEGLE, RICK Manhattan 

Business Administration ...... Freshman 

SIEMER, ALAN J Bushton 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

SIGEL, GRETA Cottonwood Falls 

Mathematics Senior 

SILADY, MICHAEL F Shawnee Mission 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

SILVA, CATHERINE Manhattan 

Pre-Medicine and Chemical Science Senior 

SILVA. MARC Manhattan 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

SILVERTOOTH. JEFF C Wichita 

Agronomy Junior 

SIMS, MIKELYN A Shawnee Mission 

Elementary Education Junior 

SINCLAIR, BONNIE S Manhattan 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

SINGER, SANDRA J Topeka 

Physical Education Senior 

SINGLETON, S. JEANIE Independence 

Elementary Education Senior 

SKINNER, DAVID A Garden City 

Agricultural Engineering ... Junior 

SLAGLE, CHARLES E Overland Park 

Political Science Junior 

SLAGLE, PENNY J Manhattan 

Elementary Education Senior 

SLATER, VICKI L Morrowville 

Elementary Education Senior 

SLATER, WILLIAM H Mahaska 

Agronomy Senior 

SLAVIK, DOYLE R Smith Center 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SLIFE, CURTIS L Princeton, MO 
Interior Architecture Junior 

SLOCOMBE. BONITAA Ransom 

Medical Technology Junior 

SLOCOMBE, JOHN W Peabody 

Agricultural Education Junior 

SMADES, RITA M Marienthal 

Business Administration Senior 

SMAIL. DEBORAH A lola 

Elementary Education Junior 

SMAIL, RONALD D. lola 

General Freshman 

SMITH, BENJAMIN J Topeka 

Dairy Production Senior 

SMITH, BRENDA H Formoso 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

SMITH, BRYAN T Manhattan 

Business Administration Junior 

SMITH, CINDY L Colby 

Business Education Junior 

SMITH, DONALD J Topeka 

Marketing Senior 

SMITH, FREDERICK E Wichita 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

SMITH, GAIL A Garden City 

Elementary Education Senior 




&mmm 



170 — off-campus 








SMITH, GALE L St. Paul 

Recreation Senior 

SMITH, JANICE A Topeka 

Business Sophomore 

SMITH, JENNIFER J. Goodland 

Dietetics Sophomore 

SMITH, JON M Greensburg 

Accounting Junior 

SMITH, KATHE J Macksville 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

SMITH, KERN W St, Paul 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

SMITH, KEVIN D Hutchinson 

Horticulture Sophomore 

SMITH, KEVIN W Manhattan 

Business Administration Junior 

SMITH, LAMAR Columbus, GA 

Education Graduate Student 

SMITH, LAYTON A Eskndge 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

SMITH, MARK A Salina 

Pre-Medlcine Senior 

SMITH, M. EMME ... Junction City 

Radio and Television Junior 

SMITH, PAUL R Shawnee 

Business Administration Sophomore 

SMITH, REBECCA J Mankato 

Family and Child Development Junior 

SMITH, REBECCA J Anthony 

Accounting Senior 

SMITH, ROBERT A Pittsburg 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

SMITH, ROBERTA M Mankato 

Family and Child Development Senior 

SNIDER, RAY S Abilene 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

SNYDER, BERRY L Atchison 

Marketing Senior 

SNYDER. DONNA L Horton 

Special Education Junior 

SNYDER, DOUGLAS R. Salina 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

SNYDER, JACQUELINE S Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

SNYDER, MARTHA M Salina 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

SNYDER, PEGGY J . . . Hiawatha 
Political Science Sophomore 

SOLOMON, DEBORAH D Whitewater 

Elementary Education Senior 

SOROKA, MITCHELL S North Caldwell, NJ 

Medical Technology Senior 

SOUKUP, NANCY A Haven 

Elementary Education Junior 

SOWERS, PAUL R Spring Hill 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SPAETH, ELAINE E Hutchinson 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

SPANGLER, PHYLLIS J. Cedar Vale 

History and Education Junior 

SPANGLER. RONALD K Newton 

Psychology Graduate Student 

SPANNUTH, AUDREY K Prairie Village 

Family and Child Development Junior 

SPARE, DANIEL P St. John 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

SPEAR, DAVID S Norton 

Civil Engineering Senior 

SPEAR, DIANE M Newton 

Institutional Management Graduate Student 

SPECHT, SUSAN L Overland Park 

Home Economics Senior 

SPEER, JOYCE K Chapman 

Chemistry and Education Senior 

SPENCER, LAUREN E Overland Park 

Political Science Junior 

SPENCER, TERRY L Dodge City 

Landscape Architecture Junior 

SPICHER, ELLSWORTH D Overland Park 

Civil Engineering Senior 

SPURLOCK, BETH A E Manhattan 

Speech Junior 

SPURLOCK, CINDY Manhattan 

General Freshman 

SQUIRES, BOBBY D Arkansas City 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

SQUIRES, JOELYN K Arkansas City 

Horticulture Senior 

STALCUP, NANCY K. . Stafford 

General Sophomore 

STALCUP, ROGER A Haven 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

STANDLEY, DONNA E Great Bend 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

STANLEY, JOHN T Dodge City 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 



off-campus — 471 



off -cam pus 

STANLEY, NEAL M. . . . Dighlon 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

STAPP. RANDY W Norcotur 

Food Science and Management Sophomore 

STAUFFER. JOHN R Emporia 

Radio and Television Senior 

St CLAIR, CHRISTINE A Salma 

Biology Freshman 

STEELE, GARY J Garnett 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

STEELE, NANCY L Wichita 

Interior Architecture Fifth Year Student 

STEELE, PATRICK E Scott City 

Microbiology Junior 

STEINER, JO A Hutchinson 

Business Administration Senior 

STEITZ, JOE A Syracuse 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

STENZEL, PATRICIA A Ness City 

Recreation Junior 

STEPHNEY, JAMES D Oklahoma City, OK 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

STEPHNEY, KEVIN E Oklahoma City, OK 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 




472 — oft-campus 





f M 9 % l ' 




STEPONICK, MARILYN R Russell 

Computer Science Senior 

STERLING, JILL A Humboldt 

Home Economics Extension Senior 

STERRETT, TIM J Norton 

Physical Education Junior 

STEVENS. ROBERT P Manhattan 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

STEWART, JANINE L Frankfort 

Floriculture Sophomore 

STICKNEY, LARRY D Ellinwood 

Architecture Junior 

STIEBE, DAVID A Kinsley 

Agricultural Economics . . . . Sophomore 

STOCKWELL, GREGG M Dodge City 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

STOFFEL, DONALD W Miltonvale 

Finance and Accounting Senior 

STOLLER, BRENTTON G Sabetha 

Graphic Design Senior 

STOSS, KENNETH J Otis 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

STOTTS, LESLIE R Byers 

English Junior 

STOTTS, ROGER L Byers 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

STOVER. KEVIN V Glen Elder 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

STRAFUSS. BEN J Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

STRAIT, CHRIS A Kingman 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

STRAMEL, TERRY L. Hays 

Family and Child Development Junior 

STRAMEL, THERESA J Pretty Prairie 
Business Education Sophomore 

STRASSER, MARK F Garden City 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

STREETER, MARCIA J Overland Park 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

STROUPE, PHILLIP J Fort Atkinson, Wl 

Dairy Production Senior 

STROUSE, DWIGHT L Merriam 

Radio and Television Senior 

STRUNK, MARVEL J Abilene 

Elementary Education Senior 

STUART, LEE C Blue Rapids 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

STUCKER, DAVID L Leavenworth 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

STUDER, BILLY D Preston 

Political Science Senior 

STUEVE, BETTY L Abilene 

Sociology Senior 

STUEVE, BONNIE L . Abilene 

Interior Design Junior 

STUM, WILLIAM L Ness City 

Radio and Television Junior 

STUMP, SALLY L Blue Rapids 

Office Administration Senior 

STUMP, WILLIAM L Wichita 

Business Administration Senior 

STUTEVILLE, SUSAN A Manhattan 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

SUBERA, STUART A Caldwell 

Business Management Senior 

SUDERMAN, ELAINE R Windom, MN 

Consumer Interest Senior 

SUITER, KERRY R St. John 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SUITER, RITA J St John 

Modern Language Junior 

SULLIVAN, JANET C Holton 

Home Economics Education Senior 

SUTHER, STEPHEN E Blame 

Agricultural Journalism Junior 

SUTTON, MARCIA L Prairie Village 

Fashion Merchandising Senior 

SWAIN. LEILA G El Dorado 

Business Administration Sophomore 

SWAN, STEVEN L Wichita 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

SWANSON, JENITA L . . . Salina 

Marketing Junior 

SWARTZ, MICHELE L Overland Park 

Physical Education Junior 

SWEAZY, SHAREE K Bird City 

Home Economics Extension ... Junior 

SWEENEY, FELICIA C . Mission 

Special Education . Junior 

SWENSON, GALEN G Salina 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

SWIFT, VICTORIA M Chanute 

Fashion Marketing Senior 

SWIST, RONALD A Shelton. CT 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 



off-campus 





SYLVESTER, RANDALL B Salina ^^^ 

Civil Engineering Junior BBW BbRKv jjWP*Si /'JBTBv 

TADE. JEFFREY A Medicine Lodge 4#*aBk. ^ JB. B^^^Bw 'pPMBB 

Art Junior . JT BBW ^W ■■■■A /XL> 1 ^^ £ ^J 

TAMSON.TONYW Independence ^B A m A M~3ki3BB JBf L ."JBf* Bgf J^B 

Business Senior B ^B. *f ** JM I '' bI NT" "BBV F* f^"flB 

TANDY. CECELIA A Rosewell, NM ■ *** "J r *Tw « . ^ BF JO .«< affl ' fr] 

Animal Science and Industry Junior I j • j ■ jl^^HBY fll < ~3» BBki JL Jr-i 

TANNER. KIM A. Wichita \ * J§ iI8J W *i BB* JJBBk BBBi V 

Civil Engineering Senior yi ^* ^JT '*4H^r iBBWMBBl BB *M i<dlP^flBp> 

TAPSAK.PAM Shawnee Mission ' jf- '*■# *'' Bw &' : BT BB *^'' BBRfc 

Community Services Juruur — j A „"5# AJK ^^ , IT ""^ 

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TAYLOR. CATHERINE M Bartlesville, OK ^^^~ -^ 

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TAYLOR. KARIS J Goddard HflBBBBjlBi ^P vk, BB, 

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TAYLOR, THOMAS E Prairie Village 1 '- -■* B Wm, /:JBBt V »"- ■ i ! ' iiB *« 

Civil Engineering Senior ¥ IS jfi < -^l|H BB'SBB 4 

TEASLEY, KAREN L JBI ^ (B : |BBW i *JB|Bk % 

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TEDROW, JANM Overland Park ""•* , 4 Wy. . JBV PJv ' 1 

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TEICHGRAEBER. PAM A Emporia *<*». 

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TERRILL. RICHARD D Shawnee ( , B\ Bk >**|8BBw 

Business Administration Senior .« JB& 

THIEROLF.CRAIGA Manhattan B B?"_ ja! B^ JBB 

Business Freshman £■ f^BBI BJ^P^B ^*» 

THIEROLFGALED. Manhattan Jji ~# JBt B „- B 'J 

Business Finance Senior B& ~ - A • - » fj 

THIEROLF, LINDA L. Overland Park BjBJBm3Bb1 * 

Recreation Senior B\ ^ 

THOMAS, CYNTHIA J Alw IS IB /i " V * A \ :3k. 

Secondary Education Junior BB1 q JB) ifi)\ ^ 'iy <mi£* S^B' 

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THOMPSON, CAROLYN F. Harveyville "3mU- k -,i "^-^BB^ -UTT Blhlt 

Home Economics and Liberal Arts Senior ar^ "W^ BB * B"**_ BT 

THOMPSON, DOUGLAS C Wichita i j»i ^H 

Architecture Senior ,^ '.•"'*' { . Hf^* 1 Jw H ' BB j ^aaSjJS Pp«^^ BB>> 

THOMPSON, PAULA J .".'M int., Jl^^fc. BB*W ^^-^^ 

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THULL, VIRGINIA K Cawker City 4, ' "BB\ BBB L ^Bk A-" A ^ ^Bk 

Physical Education Senior W Bl BflP^H| ^/ Bi ,/ , Ml ft — «JB 

THURLOW. DEANNAM Wakefield mj» #^BB | Jg-* |B . B. j* ■•* *»I |j» ^PNB j 

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THURLOW, LADONNA L Wakefield B\ ^MBBL B* '?%( *1 , • I B . - BV ' 

Fashion Merchandising Junior BW "'BB , "--^ i ' ' Bf ' ^ "'B *B Bj 

THWEATT. ANGELA P Carlisle, AR J|. -^R ^ B^^^. Bk _i m i^BBk. MJl^^HBW 

Animal Science and Industry Senior HBA r , J py BBw * < BB 

TIEKING, CHRISTINE C Concordia jHl ' BW fll ( V /■ 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 1< *gi- >r Vp>^ ' tBBJ 

TILTON, CHARLA J Quinter ^A^^k^ te. 

Elementary Education Junior i-aBrBW ^BBBBw R 

TILTON, DON E Quinter 'VMBk BBlBBB. 'B\ 

Political Science Freshman W aBk Sfir'^^^m '"B» 

TOFA. ABDU D . . . Kano, Nigeria 9B| Bn <wBB ■ BT 

Agricultural Education Freshman Bjf'*" *^ j \90 ^^B .f j^ «B 

TOMS, LORETTA S Overland Park H~ / JW ^B 4 -JmF *i WW 

Elementary Education Senior ^Bk^ 'B B " * „>B» 

TOWSE, MARLON D Ulysses AftViBWy i "JB^ ^Sr 

Junior ^CBB S^ -**&M fl «Uk ""^ 

TREMBLEY. SARAH J. Arlington llSSBBBHBk ^ Jfll •^BB 

Sociology Junior m^BB BPi HBIB^ ^BBBS 

TRIMBLE, FRANK H Weatherby Lake, MO ■-», , ri fc| 

Architecture Senior BhBBB. »Skw W -^ ^^^fcv >" iBk. "P%. 

TRIMMER, DIANE L. Manhattan |Bk , B^BBW *<*Bk ^^^BB\ ^"^BJ 

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TUCKER, BRENDAK Kiowa B ^Byl* -" jiM -^BB M '^ -Bf f 4 '-4Br B\ t-^BBI 

Accounting Sophomore JF *^BB» BB 1 ~" BBfli i ^ "^JBT '^-^wW ' "Br Bk BH 

TUCKER, JULIEK Manhattan ^ W MBw ^ V^B* Jf ^ B^^BBT 

Business Junior S4 J|fB^^ -* ' BBa BBB 

TUCKER, TERESA D Carbondale KB /T BBhv B BBt '. T^W 

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TWADDELL, JANET L Mission ^^ ^^ A^^ 

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ULLOM.STFVENJ Wichita a B>B B^^BB A^^lBjV tLT Bk BBSP^B 

UMPHENOUR, JUDITH A. Overland Park lOB» ,^BB W * r^BB ■ -BBB «jf JMlBBi I _ «BB\ B 

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UHKf l n-i. UAYNAD Leawood r A /. \ ^B BB] i j^ vi.5 ^ 

Fashion Marketing Sophomore |BT i AB 








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d /.. 







UNREIN, CAROL E Great Bend 

General Junior 

UNRUH, VIRGINIA A Greensburg 

Psychology Senior 

UNRUH, VIRLON N Lamed 

Elementary Education Senior 

UPHAM, WARD S Junction City 

Education 

UPHOFF, BETH A Manhattan 

Anthropology Sophomore 

URE, BARBARA E Kansas City 

Elementary Education Senior 

USELDINGER, LINDAS Kansas City 

Home Economics Education Junior 

VALE, BARBARA YENZER , Dodge City 

Foods and Nutrition Graduate Student 

VALE, KIM J Larned 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

VANCIL, ROGER D Manhattan 

Fisheries and Wildlite Biology Senior 

VANDEVENTER, WILLIAM H Wichita 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

VANDEWIEK. SCOTT J . . . New Providence, NJ 

Food Science Junior 

VAN LERBERG, DIANE M . . . Shawnee 

Medical Technology Junior 

VAN LERBERG, ROBERT J 

Animal Science and Industry 

VAN LOENEN, RODGER L Prairie View 

Business Administration Sophomore 

VAN METER, RUSSELL M Ada 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

VAN WINKLE, CLINTON A Silver CreeK, NB 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

VAN WINKLE, DAPHNE L. Junction City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 



off -cam pus 

VELASQUEZ, TERRY J Topeka 

Secondary Education Senior 

VELEZ, JAMES Junction City 

Radio and Television Senior 

VERVYNCK, JAN L Gardner 

Speech Pathology Senior 

VICK. STEVEN A. . Basehor 

Business Junior 

VICKERS, MAX E. Kansas City 

Marketing Junior 

VICKERS, NANCY L Gardner 

Special Education Junior 



VIENTOS. JOSE A. Mayaguez. PR 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

VIGNERON, RUSSELL D Hesston 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

VOPATA, BARBRA M Marysville 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

VOTH, DARRELL R Inman 

Crop Protection Senior 

VOTH, DONALD J Walton 

Accounting Senior 

VOUGA, VICTOR J. . . . St Louis, MO 

Architecture Fifth Year Senior 



WAGNER, DANA M Wichita 

Family and Child Development Senior 

WAGNER, JACQUELYN L Great Bend 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

WAKEFIELD. RON W Marysville 

Hortn ulture .Junior 

WALDREN, VERNON L Tribune 

Agricultural Economics Graduate Student 

WALKER. DENISE K Kansas City 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

WALKER, DIANNA L Shawnee Mission 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts Senior 



Sharon Springs 

Freshman 

Kansas City 

Junior 

Johnson 



WALKER. INGAZ. 
Finance 

WALKER, LESLIE A, 
Secondary Education 

WALKER, LONNIE J 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

WALL. DAVID L Hays 

Geography Junior 

WALTER. DOUGLAS P ■ Downs 

Architecture Junior 

WALTER. ROXANNE G Hoismgton 

Business Sophomore 



WALTERS. CATHY J. Abilene 

Social Work Junior 

WALTERS, CHARLES I Hays 

Accounting Senior 

WARD, DEBORAH D Newton 

Social Work Junior 

WARD, SANDRA J Topeka 

Family and Child Development Senior 

WARKENTINE. BOBW Wellington 

Physical Education Junior 

WARKENTINE. JANET R Wellington 

Physical Education Sophomore 



WARMUND, PAMELA J Prairie 1 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

WARNER, RANDALL L Lebanon 

Agricultural Education Senior 

WARREN, BRYAN J Galva 

Milling Science and Technology Senior 

WARREN, HEATHER M Bonner Springs 

Recreation Junior 

WARREN, VIRGINIA L Eskridge 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

WASHBURN, ROBERT L . . . Hutchinson 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 



WASINGER. RICK L Hays 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

WASSER, SCOTT A Overland Park 

Speech Senior 

WATKINS, GARY L. . St Francis 

Business Junior 

WATSON, ROBIE R Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

WATTS, REBECCA A Cawker City 

Family Economics Senior 

WEAST, DAVID H Moran 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 



WEBBER, MARY E . ... Borger, TX 

Accounting Sophomore 

WEBER, SUSAN I. . . Junction City 

Sociology Junior 

WEBER, WILLIAM P. Oakley 

Computer Science Graduate Student 

WEDDLE.SARAK Wichita 

Elementary Education Junior 

WEHRLY, MANFRED R Lenexa 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

WEIDNER. STEVE L Colorado City, CO 

Architecture Junior 



ms&m 









WEISS, RUSS W. Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 

WEISSER, BARBARA A Leawood 

Family and Child Development Senior 

WELLS, CAROLYN L Nickerson 

Corrections Senior 

WELLS, RAYMOND L Wallace 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

.JTW WELTER, JOHN F Colby 

. j|r Ahk, '\ ^Wj ' 'W History Junior 

I -<9SM^ WELTSCH. SUSAN G Leawood 

flRHL fi\ flHJ ~«^M Accounting Graduate Student 

WENGER, JOAN S Newton 

Accounting Senior 

WENGER, RONALD E Powhattan 

Agricultural Education Senior 

WEST, JIM E Neodesha 

IK, %\ / -4* Jf^S Animal Science and Industry Junior 

W a." ^SP WESTBROOK, RENA L. Pine Bluff, AR 

». Mr^L. |^k™^^F3m Architecture Junior 

WETMORE, DAVID B Fowler 

j Jf5S Computer Science Senior 

WETMORE. LU A. . . . . Fowler 

Accountir 

^^j^. WEYER, JAMES P Barneston, NB 

,.JMh0^. Agricultural Economics Senior 

| ■ WEYER, MARILYN B Abilene 

*Sk Biology Education Senior 

jM <** H ffi^F «\ WHATLEY, LIDA A. Mission, TX 

« .w"»f J i sW l 43» "*" *"* ■ Anthropology Senior 

■M "'aHJ , * fl | Vl >4F WHISMAN, NANCY S Palco 

WJ^ J ■ ^ /ji ^1| * "^ Music . . . , ...... Senior 

^» >&sj' WHISTON, KAREN A Kansas City, MO 

BY ^ v'wH - Vi Fashion Design Senior 

IBhH !■ Ifll Bfc - %h^ WHITE. BEVERLY Norton 

Mf ^16 l^%" ' fw^ BmIwJBv Clothing and Retailing Junior 

WHITE, JENIFER L Kansas City 

Horticulture Freshman 

WHITE, JOAN E Viola 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

WHITEHAIR, STEPHEN C Abilene 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

WHITNEY, CARL J Manhattan 

Computer Science Senior 

WHITNEY, CAROL A Phillipsburg 

Home Economics Education Senior 

WHITNEY, DONITA L Manhattan 

Retail Floriculture Senior 

WHITNEY, HARRY E Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

WICHMAN, BOYD F Seneca 

Accounting Junior 

WIENS, GREGG E Meade 

Accounting Senior 

WIENS, JANICE K Meade 

Fashion Marketing Senior 

WIESNER, ROBERT J Concordia 

A 3| XP&j i " Engineering Technology Senior 

J H srVB|M an wikoff, debra k. 

^M QW SB Elementary Education Senior 

aj«*w WIKOFF, DOUGLAS P Independence, MO 
/ aK^ Architecture Fifth Year Student 
' mtmim. WILCOX, EDWIN L Minneapolis 
Business Administration . Junior 
■p# M WILHITE, PATRICIA K Yates Center 
Microbiology and Medical Technology Senior 
■l <-^H WILKE, MARGIE L Troy 
Bj jHI Physical Education Senior 
WILKINSON, ARTHUR S Philadelphia, PA 
■■J Political Science Senior 
^M '"'1 WILL, SARAH J. Chapman 
Interior Design Senior 

WILLHITE, CURTIS R Leon 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore 

WILLIAMS, DEWEY D Osage City 

Medical Technology Junior 

WILLIAMS, KAREN K. . . . . . Fort Scott 

Theatre Junior 

WILLIAMS, KENT S Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Senior 

WILLIAMS, MARTHA A Holton 

Elementary Education Senior 

WILLIAMS, STAN L Newton 

5^ ^fcr Mechanical Engineering ...Senior 

a^^««te^ ^^ ^^^. ^t^ WILLIAMS, TRENTON L ..... . Greensburg 

#Mfe. |k jflHBBk >^KBW. Mechanical Engineering 

*• Bflk P ^k BAk WILLIS, ANNE L Kingman 

■n^Bi W T^L. M VM jHf^BjB Elementary Education Senior 

Ha ~ HP m " f^^Hl m -*dflB W ll w " ' ' INDI n " 

I . .^M m . \.M ItH ■ PB Civil Engineering Sophomore 

■ '^1 m.^^mW\ '"MM HI />^^H WILLS. MELINDAL. El Dorado 

■B. tBT flk. " M. ** '"'•r IHk ^ Elementary Education Senior 

^f -•■^ iflk-^r HM*^ V ,, WILLIS. RODNEY D. Sterling 

^^fl ^^HHfe I ^* HH '■H Agricultural Education Senior 

I I /* Ml , J I ■■ WILSON. CAROLYN A Asherville 

i/W \J« \vJ Business Administration Freshman 








off-campus 

WILSON, CRAIG N Wellington ^9Bw '^ ^"aSFBW ^Bk. JT Bk. 

Agricultural Mechanization . Junior 4F *BW "Wk * V™ft JL'llBBjjV. v 1BV 

WILSON, DALYN B Lawrence I Mir m ' ■ | ■ ■ W VfJ 

Animal Science and Industry Senior Wk JB BF 1 '.# fl Jf - ..JBl 

WILSON. JANET L. Council Grove V -"*f™§, ' >* JtH ~ ""* *""" m Y^T^Bf Br* PMB 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior liM ft "" - JL JV 

WILSON, JAREDL. Hanston % 3* .J_A» ™ ^» B 

Animal Science and Industry Senior /^kw ^"38™. i V JBB ' .ailr B»_ Bftv 

WILSON LYNDAS Council Grove j <0T M 3BV. 4KBMftWft 1< *» r /■kB^^I 

Theatre Junior ^A fZ BB K^B^BW 

WILSON, MARILYN D. Atchison 3B| ^fcJB Bft BMf v i 

Interior Design Senior Wk^Smtwk / l "^ 

WILSON, TERRI L Shawnee Mission 

Speech Pathology and Audiology Graduate Student <*' ""■4*. 

WILTFANG, WENDY S Topeka 

Consumer Interest Senior i-jft*' 

WILTZ, PATRICIA A. St. Marys ". J **"3B * 

Biology Senior -d*» JM I—BllI fy| 

WIMER. JOELW Manhattan «! ^ jL<|B*'' * ^L >'~- :3 H# ' *' "*/ R ^ 

Animal Science and Industry Junior ■' '£ ^^ 

WINDHORST, DAVE A Manhattan 1A r 

Computer Science Senior I fy 

WINDHORST. LISSAF Manhattan :■";■ c < . V- v. u| 

Physical Therapy Junior ^ ■ - Vft 

WINEINGER, ALANW Tribune .ah. ^■fcfc, .^HW ^ «tsv B£ 4M. 

Animal Science and Industry Senior ** Hft\ .'JH^k V -igik -dr^'^Bk 

WINGERSON.JOLEE . Topeka \ jflj. «fc <•" IBv / -<■& IT 

Economics Sophomore * fft ffiFL ,aJP 1 ff'^^NB 

WINGFIELD. GREG A McDonald i *** #» * *>i 9fc J^ *""BB 1 S 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 1 . ff TB f if | 91 Jf . 'l^Mt. , •* ftf 

WINKLER. MELISSA A Paola J^=P*B «SB.~ ""Jftft l . ' , * f B *j L!>»B l^^B 

Horticultural Therapy Sophomore Jf ^JHBJ «§<■ -^JftljB H ft ^BrB* 

WINTER. DANIEL R iBftT S ^^ : 

Architecture Fifth Year Student H. ^BfT -|V ' «> ^^^ /i 

WINTER, EDWARD D Hiawatha BM JkjBw ""^ ^PH lift ^ 

Animal Science and Industry Junior MM ■BBfcfc : lBl J 

WINTER, ORANK. Andale j^BBfOk 'Hfci '-'BKk. JWvV 

Agricultural Economics Senior SBsPft, .Jf^HBm ^m a|BA i *T \ 

WINTER, RANDALL A Marienthal H • Bk ft\jf A 

Animal Science and Industry Senior '-». *<*™B : '* WF -■ « Br BY 

WINTER, VICTOR J Columbus ! J^ j ■ * ~B ' ~ i '» - &** W^ *»»B 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior *J3fc,lBB 1ft V I I B > JkJB S9 - Ik, 1 %• ^." 

-■■ MHDI.FLOISEM ...Clearwater ^B m -^QF 4 >2 L. JTO, M < 3M1 1& V^4B» ^k*"" 

Political Science Junior ^H§ ' J '-*'• * "*J| ^L ' 'jBP^ ~ - 

WITHEE, JANE S Manhattan SBPIh \ «L 4l H ^■MT '/^ 

Humanities Junior f ^k\ ^^H IH. / J 

WITHERSPOON.KATHYM Manhattan tdw J ^ «V ?" ^12 JMVI HW % JL 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman W r > ? ; ' ; BL faiggk 

WITT. JAMES G Garden City ^■■■k. "9 «k #C ^^{W 

Regional and Community Planning Graduate Student al R^^ JP"^^^ M <«■» 

WITT. KIM L Garden City P|FM ^ ,«jr ^Hj 1%, « _ 

Elementary Education Senior ■ J«h dttl^Bk M If * - VI F m m 

WITTHUHN.RAYL Bazine 'l S ■ I H ■ WM W* 

Agricultural Economics Junior t Ih^ MF 1 6 w\ M 3^m m j _Jjl v\ 

WITTSTOCK, JANEA Wichita 4 ' ^ " , W \ ~*^k ^ "~^B MBa jBl » 

Medical Technology Junior s ' Jl^Mk. m ^fuL J' t - flt ^^ 

WIXSON.MICHEALG Overland Park W •»»r Jfc^ WW "^T -% 

WOHLETZ, DALE R Ettingham 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

WOLD-ECHERT, PAULINE M Seattle, WA n Jf ^S t- 

Elementary Education Senior ■a'^PnWMW J^BH^. ^iBVtk 

WOLF. CAROL J Kensington JPw" iI «VA jf^W^m. JJMB ft 

Pre-School Education Sophomore JSkK IMBi ' / «R Jf SB • - »Oil 

WOLF. GREG A Wichita jK1«9Hb Ji - ^» If ** fifB 1 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman V.« fjH w i^^r ^ 

WOMACK, ROGER D Wichita V -*-. «■( fjW . vM N jflB''i \ - 

Fine Arts Senior %_ " M ▼■ c3K| \ JT 

WOODSON. DORE'D Topeka JI^HK^ tiHMBKkJS ^^ 

Home Economics Junior ^■JK' '{, A1|flJ HlB9r ^" J 

WOOLERY, LANA J Topeka _fl , a 

Fashion Marketing Senior /J 

WORRELL, DAVID L. Leon ^t |k ^R*%, 

Animal Science and Industry Senior wKs B *%V 

WUNDER, BEVERLY F. Topeka J *B| Br ; 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior m _, 3 ^J- ttL^w #MI flr " 

WUNDERLE, MARTIN Clifton " V JM fl 

Elementary Education Junior * "* J »Jjk<^ JSH » t 

WURDEMAN, DAVID A. Meade ~" M i W^ ' 

Business Administration Junior A -jB#w jPjjV _^(A 

WURST.WENW Sterling ^Hl W«w ! B" _ w^ 

Political Science Junior B\ £ ffl BB / »4W *3^ 

YARSULIK, STEPHANIE E Shawnee Mission Hk ?T\ Ml HI W > f /M 

Pre-Nursing ■MObffl ■VvAt k'tT'' 1 iW 

r-AUSSI, DEBBIE Wichita .^B%W 9 AVW ^B^^. .^^ 

Medical Technology Junior JjB ^HL , WJPJjk 4^ ' l^K w ^AV ^VBV ^klfl 

YEAGLEY. ROBERT D IT^bB i 'jM * ^""k if ^B BB JM-Jk 

Biology Sophomore ,wlir^B\ BB H^^al ' F- =-~^B Bk / *!■■ 

SmithCenter ■T^kBV «F*'MH H^^^BbI V ^^B -3B jf 

Natural Resource Management Junior BB /-AB <i _J / ^4L.^B1 k ~^K W 

YERKES.JANM Independence JB C: BF 1 ^WB V '4^ B '^M ' F\4jl J ""5|B 

Elementary Education Senior fBJ £ 1^ W £V ^.^B A»"^^^V ^ ,^B 

r"IM, KWOK F North Point, Hong Kong ~ f^T 7 _^» -"^P^T ^f BBBB I W V BB> Bk^ 

ChemiMry Graduate Student / ... fe*h ?L ^ I IB BB 

YOAKUM. JOHNH ScoH City > 'W»W |A ^BJ Blkw ^B J^. * T^MwB I Bk k I 

Electrical Engineering Senior ■ /I VmBI 'I BB 'B 










i /''■ — off-campus 




H^?;JL® 



YORK. EDWARD E Chapman 

Business Finance Sophomore 

YOST, JOHN M Moundridge 

Crop Protection Senior 

YOUNG, GREGORY A Prairie Village 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

YOUNG. GREGORY B Salina 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

YOUNG, LESTER F Erie 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

YOUNG. RHONDA G Shawnee Mission 

Physii al Education Junior 

YOUNG, ROBERT K Pretty Prairie 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

YOUNG, TERRELL A Natoma 

Elementary Education Senior 

YOUNG, WENDY J Overland Park 

Elementary and Special Education Senior 

YOUNGLAND, DEBBIE J Salina 

Dietetics Junior 

YOUNKIN, ROBERT A Kincaid 

Civil Engineering Senior 

ZEMAN, GEORGE Ellsworth 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

ZERCHER, THOMAS L Russell 

Music Education Senior 

ZIEGLER, THOMAS C St. Louis, MO 

Horticulture Senior 

ZILLINGER, DOUGLAS G Phillipsburg 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

ZIMMERMAN. DEBORA A Wellington 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

ZIMMERMAN, HOWARD A Wellington 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

ZIMMERMAN, JACK B Prairie Village 

Building Construction Sophomore 

ZIRNSTEIN, WANDA M Emporia 

Dietetics Junior 

ZOELLER, BECKY L Manhattan 

Elementary Education Senior 

ZWAHL, TODD Augusta 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

ZWEGO, MARILYN S Overland Park 

Physical Education Senior 




aaa 



Aalbreglse, Christine R 313 

Aalbregtse, Suzanne H . 152.313 
Aaron. BillieM .151,313 

Abdullahi, JemimahP .432 

Abdullahi.Zaiyanu 186 

Abed, Ahmed A. .161.380 

Aberle, Jeanette S 343 

Abrams. Steve E. 432 

Acacia 288 

Academics 1 20 

A Christmas Carol 91 

Achten, Philip B 300 

Ackerman, Sherry J. 157 

Acker's Inauguration 65 

Activities Carnival 45 

Adam. Robert S. 160,296 

Adams. Charles V 179.351 

Adams, Cynthia J 343 

Adams, David E 185,420 

Adams, Debbie L 174,302 

Adams. Denise M 426 

Adams, Gary L 173.399 

Adams, Helen K .307 

Adams, Janeen A .332 

Adams. Jean M 432 

Adams. Jody E 332 

Adams. Kent L 189 

Adams, Lucy A 426 

Adams, Malmda M 332 

Adams, Michael J 161 

Adams, Nancy L .157.170,426 

Adams. Philip A 373 

Adams. Rebecca S 432 

Adams. Richard R 399 

Adams. Robert D 305 

Adams, Shane L 432 

Adams, Steve O 180,351 

Adams, William C 145,399 

Adamson, Terry J 1 77 

Adkins, Freddie E 155 

Adkison, MarleneS 143,165,432 
Adrian, Robert M. ...195,324 

Adnano, Joseph M 373 

Aelmore, John D 307 

Aeschliman, Susan D 432 

Affolter, JaclynD 332 

African Student Association 186 
Agriculture Education Club 1 59 

Ahern.JohnH 145,432 

Ahlquist, LilaE. 181,432 

Ahlstrom. Laura J 146 

Ahrens, DonsJ 426 

Ahrens, William W 193 

Aicher, Eric L 411 

Aistrup, Emmett D. 432 

Aitken, Joanne E . 380 

A|akalye, Babatunne .186 

Aiakalye, Michael B 432 

Ajeani, Mildred R J 432 

A|eani, Yoramu 186,195,432 

Akerly, Jeffreys 300 

Akin, Donald L. 189 

Akin. LynneC 432 

Akright, Brent F 175,300 

Al-Amoudi. Abdullati 432 

Al-Amoudi, Hussein 432 

Al-Amoudi, KhalidA 432 

Al-Madani, Abdallah 322 

Albers, Deborah A .151,201,363 

Albers, Pamela D 302 

Albers, Tregan P 380 

Albert, Harry 432 

Albrecht, James J 144,194 

Albracht, Stephen J 144,432 

Albright, Janice 178,181 

Albright, Jeff P 405 

Albright, Julia C 293 

Albright, Julie 143, 153 

Albright, Kathleen M 187, 401 

Alderson, Laura E. 366 

Aldnch.Lisa 343 

Alexander. Arthur L 187 

Alexander, Gil ,183 

Alexander. Juanita 192, 426 

Alexander, MilaA 414 

Alioto, Alice M. . 363 

Alison, Dale L. 322 

Alldrirt, Celeste L 432 

Alldritl. Leslie D 407 

Allen, Cathy 150,363 

Allen, Christine A 319 

Allen, Douglas B 432 

Allen, Forrest O 373 

Allen, Gregory L 432 

Allen. Jean E 363 

Allen, Karm S 366 

Allen, Keith R. . .432 

Allen, Kenneth E. . . . 194 

Allen, Leslie J 156.432 

Allen, Lisa A 290 

Allen, Mary L 309 

Allen, PattiL 178, 181 

Allen, Randall G 149,420 

Allen, Ronald K, 432 

Allen, Sue L. . . 396 

Aller, Jerry C 351 

Allison, Douglas A. 390 

Allison, Pamela D 401 

Almond. Debra A 332 

Alms, Thomas H 373 

Alpha Delta Pi 293 

Alpha Epsilon Rho 143 



Alpha Gammo Rho 296 

Alpha Kappa Lambda 298 

Alpha Kappa Psi 143 

Alpha Lambda Delta 143 

Alpha Phi Omega 1 85 

Alpha Pi Mu 1 44 

Alpha Tau Alpha 144 

Alpha Tau Omega 300 

Alpha Xi Delta 302 

Alspach.AlanD 176,351 

Alstot, Corvin G 380 

Altenbernd, David L 180 

Altizer, Page L 432 

Altland, Susan M 432 

Alumbaugh, Janet 343 

Alvis. David W 176,371 

Amend, Michael S. . .432 

American Choral Director 

Association 1 82 

American Nuclear Society 1 7 1 
American Society of Agricultural 

Engineers 171 

American Society of Interior 

Designers 1 74 

American Society of Mechanical 

Engineers 1 72 

Ames, Rodney W 410 

Ammerman, Allen M. 373 

Amoako-Atta, Boakye .432 

Amrine, Robin D ... 302 

Amsler, Kenneth J 418 

Anderes, Gregory V 159 

Andersen. Connie R. 366 

Andersen. Jane E 363 

Anderson. Adrienne D 157,380 

Anderson, Annette 180,343 

Anderson. Bert D 307 

Anderson, Carl R 422 

Anderson. Carol J 432 

Anderson, Cylinda L 156 

Anderson, Corf D 380 

Anderson, David A. 380 

Anderson, Debbie R 343 

Anderson, Denise K. 332 

Anderson, Dennis P. 369 

Anderson, Dick . . . , .180 

Anderson, DouglasS 392 

Anderson. Erik S 324 

Anderson. Gary A 1 80 

Anderson, Gary D 187,373 

Anderson, Gregory 13.351 

Anderson, Harold E 432 

Anderson, Jacqueline S . . 432 
Anderson, Janet K 1 45. 290 

Anderson, Jett B. 201,351 

Anderson, John G 416 

Anderson, John M. . 388 

Anderson, John S 1 66 

Anderson, Joleen 309 

Anderson, Kirk B 166,343 

Anderson, Kristen K 290 

Anderson, Laura M 319 

Anderson, Margaret E 432 

Anderson. Marvin R 351 

Anderson, Michael B 324 

Anderson, Michael R. 380 

Anderson. Nancy L 153,290 

Anderson, Neil V 194 

Anderson, Rex M 380 

Anderson, Russell D. 1 79, 1 80, 1 81 

Anderson, Scott 180 

Anderson, Sonia S 168 

Anderson. Steve D 145,300 

Anderson, Steven E 327 

Anderson. Steven M 351 

Anderson, Teri L 145, 189, 432 

Anderson. William L 424 

Andres, John L 432 

Andrew, Cynthia L .180,181,182, 
332 

Andrew, Dean R 416 

Andrew, Deborah A. .145,192,332 
Andrews. Debra L 1 82, 432 

Andrews, Kathryn J 341 

Andrews, Robert L 432 

Angel Flight 176 

Angell, Scott W 351 

Angevine, Helene M 309 

Ankenman, Lee K 162. 432 

Annan, Alyssa L 332 

Annetf, Clarence H 432 

Annis. Jennifer L 424 

Annis, John R 373 

Anselmi, Kent E 371 

Anson, Elizabeth D 432 

Anstaeft, Nancy S 164 

Anstine. Mary F 293 

Anthony, Harry S 390 

Anthony, Russell V 432 

Antweiler, Marilyn B 426 

Apley, Susan D. 176, 187,401 

Appleby, Jon L 411 

Applegate, Terry L 380 

Appling, Scott 373 

Archer, Douglass K 399 

Archer, Patricia A 432 

Archer, Steven W 177 

Arensman. Michael G 322 

Armagost. Steven M 351 

Armbrust. James R 405 

Armour, Charles W. . . 1 76, 1 77, 432 

Armour, James L 432 

Armstrong, Amy L 173,290 

Armstrong, Jan P 1 52, 31 3 

Armstrong, Jody 332 

Armstrong, Kent W 300 

Armstrong, Mark J 432 

Armstrong, Mechelle 343 



Armstrong, Ten A 290 

Arnetl, Douglas A 351 

Arnert, Philip R 165,373 

Arnold Air Society 1 76 

Arnold, Jerry W 327 

Arnold. Jo E 161,426 

Arnold, Lindsay B . . 162,426 

Arnold, Richard L 392 

Arnold, Terrence E 351 

Arnoldi, Mary E 153,366 

Arnoldy, Diane K 424 

Arnoldy, Jeanne T 432 

Arnoldy. Lanette M. 424 

Arnoldy, Nancy S 432 

Arnone, Lisa L 192.332 

Arpin. AlcidT 432 

Arpin. LanaG 433 

Arpin, Richard W 416 

Arpin. Ronald D 416 

Arpin. Sidney L 392 

Arth. Karen A 424 

Arts and Sciences Council 163 

Artz, Donna K 433 

Asbury. Cindy L 153,343 

Asbury, Daniel B 405 

Asbury, Lonald K 373 

Ash. Debra K 174.332 

Ashburn, Richie F 388 

Ashcraft, Brenda L 433 

Asher, Lawrence J 433 

Aspelm. Nyla J . .157,343 

Association of Computing 

Machinery 1 64 

Association of General 

Contractors of America 1 72 

Atchity, Janets .152 

Atherly, Randall B 351 

Atkinson, Alan J 172.173,307 

Atkinson, DwightC 433 

Atkinson, Eric J 351 

Atkinson. Gloria A 177,433 

Atkinson, Steve C 405 

Atlakson, Kevin K 407 

Attaway, Jack A 351 

Atteberry, Donald G 433 

Afteberry, Kim R 343 

Attebery, Jean D 433 

Atterbury, Ruth A 401 

Atwell, David C. 1 79, 298 

Atwell, Leon ........ 351 

Atwell, Linda M . 156,302 

Atwill, Donald E 147.413 

Atwood, AlanR 394 

Atwood, William D 351 

Atzenhoffer, Mark D 1 86, 433 

Aubrey, Rick L 180, 181 

Auen, Cynthia A. 188,433 

Auer, KimL 151 

Aust. Elizabeth D 187.401 

Auxier, Bryan E 418 

Averill, Scott G 411 

Avey, Kimberly J . 433 

Aydt, Patrick B 161,196.373 

Aylward, JayneA 380 

Aylward, Kathenne M. .433 

Aylward. Robert R 351 

Aylward, Thomas M 433 

Ayres. Jacquelyn R. .155,183,401 

bbb 

Baalman, Karen M 341 

Baalman, Rhonda G 433 

Baar, Julia A 309 

Baay, Sherylyn F 177 

Babb, AnneR 293 

Babb. Samuel M 171,380 

Baber. Douglas L 324 

Babmgton, Wendy L 1 74, 332 

Bach, Rex C 380 

Bachman, Amy D 145, 290 

Bachman, James H 144 

Bachman, Melissa J 293 

Backes, Kenneth P 369 

Backhus, Janet L 175.426 

Bader, Terry F 149,433 

Badger, Cathryn S 162.433 

Badger, Christopher .194,197,351 

Badger, David A 351 

Badsky, Floyd A 176. 177 

Baehler, Gary L 187,433 

Baer, Randall L 373 

Baetz, Cindy 293 

Bagwell, Leanne S 380 

Bahner, Kevin A 405 

Bahr, Bill G 413 

Bahr, Karen L 175,433 

Bahr, PaulaS 433 

Bahre, Susan M 180,343 

Bahruth, Sheila D 165 

Baler, Jennifer A 426 

Bailey, Bruce G 173 

Bailey, Cynthia J 426 

Bailey. Kathryn A .143,155,433 

Bailey. Marilyn A 149, 433 

Bailey, Thomas F 433 

Bailey, Timothy K 433 

Baird, Darrel K 433 

Baird, James R 324 

Bajich, Helen 332 

Baker, Ann F 433 

Baker, Barbara 426 



Baker, Brenda G 


151,313 


Bauer, Michael E 


. 434 


Baker, Charles B. . . . 


180,351 


Bauerband, Stephen R. 


.422 


Baker, Cheryl L 


302 


Baugher, Marsha K 


162,434 


Baker, Cindy S . . 








316 




.... 1 55 


Baker, Greg L. 


191 


Bauman, Judith A 


293 


Baker, James W . 


167,351 


Baumgart, Jacqueline A 


.361 


Baker, Jerry L 


416 


Baumgart. Steven G 


... 300 


Baker, Jill C 


433 


Baumgarten, Lisa 


176,313 


Baker, Judy E. 


401 


Baumgarten, Winnie F 


313 










Baker. Margaret D . 


433 


Baumgartner, Peggy L 


434 


Baker. Martha L 


151 


Baxley. Coy S 


177 


Baker. Nancy K. 


. 165,183 


Baxter, Darrell J. 


. ..380 


Baker. Paul E. 


373 


Baxter, Richard R 


.434 


Baker. Randal W. 


. 161,351 


Bay, Michael W 


. 409 


Baker, Roger D . 


418 


Bay, Randall S 


388 


Baker, Stephanie D 


363 


Baynham, Pamela J 


183 


Baker, Steven W 


322 


Beadles, Sherri L 


. 434 


Baker. Susan L 


. 433 


Beagle, Barry T 


351 


Balcom. Ramona J. 


433 


Beal. Sandra L 


302 










Baldwin, Barbara J. 


426 


Beamer, Alexis J 


180 


Baldwin, Daniel 


182 


Beamish, Cynthia L 


434 


Baldwin. Lynn W. 


433 


Bean, Theodore A 


434 


Baldwin, Roma L 


180,426 


Beard, Sheila A 


426 


Baldwin, Thomas F. . 


409 


Beardmore, David H 


371 


Bales, Rebecca J. 


153,361 


Beardmore. Luanne 


174,396 


Bales, Robert K 


307 


Bearly. Elizabeth A. 


156.290 


Ball.AlesiaJ 


169 


Bearnes, Byron K 


296 


Bail, Dan A 


1 60 


Beason, James S. 


162 


Ball, JanaL 


363 


Beaston, Martha K 


192.434 


Ballew, Rebecca J. 


180,181 


Beatson, Jacquelyn R 


151,434 


Balzer, Nila L 


.316 


Beatty, Karen S 


343 


Banks, Carol A 


343 


Beatty, Margaret 


.203 


Banks, Jim R 


148 


Beaty, Jean 


.380 


Banks, Nancy A 


.433 


Beaty, Jo A 


380 


Banner, Christopher 


181 


Beaudet. Carolyn M 


143,434 


Bannister, Diane M 


290 


Bebermeyer, Rylan J. 1 7S 


180,330 


Banta, Thomas B. . . 


405 


Bechtel, Roger A 


.434 


Barancik, Kathy M. . 


332 


Bechtel, Theresa L. 


164,434 


Barb, Cheryl 


414 


Beck, David W 


165,434 


Barber, Chester I 


406 


Beck, Jennifer L 


.293 


Barber, Julie A 


343 


Beckenhauer, Dwane M. 


180,307 


Barber. Manorie 


152,396 


Becker, Cheryll A. 


180,434 


Barber, Rex A 


433 


Becker, Curtis J 


. ...305 






Becker, Evelyn E. 
Becker, Robert A 




Barclay, Lyndsey L. . 


373 


144 


Bare, Mark M . 


343 


Beckerdite, Claudia 


.434 


Bareiss, Loren D. 


147,307 


Beckerle, Harry S. 


392 


Bareiss, Sheri L 


153,363 


Beckerle, Holly L 


302 


Barger, Robert E. 


433 


Becnel, Harry P 


332 


Barker, Debra K 


192,341 


Becnel, Mary A 


.332 


Barker, Gary D 


.433 


Been, Emily S 


. .361 


Barker, Martin D 


172,433 


Beers, Greg 


.388 


Barker, Ricky J 


433 


Beers, Ray 


388 


Barker, Ruth A 


433 


Beery, Thomas A 146 


149. 173 


Barkis, LloyaK. 


366 


Beesley, Larry D. 


.189 


Barkyoumb, Susan 


433 


Beesley, Philip E 


160.296 


Barlow, Andrea L. . . 


151,290 


Behm, Karen A 


426 


Barads, Claudia S. . . 


290 


Beim. Timothy A. . 


159,351 


Barnes, Debbie J 


152,396 


Beineke, Betty K 


434 


Barnes, Donald C. . . 


170,351 


Beins. Max A 


.388 


Barnes, Greggory T. 


188,433 


Bell, Barbara A 


167,332 


Barnes, John F 


179,405 


Bell, Carla 


.302 


Barnes, Mary A 


154,302 


Bell, David G 


144,434 


Barnes, Roxie A 


426 


Bell, Deborah J 


434 


Barnes, Sue A. 


329 


Bell, Deborah L 


191,319 


Barnett, Carol J 


148, 175,433 


Bell, Josephine C 


434 


Barnett, Cynthia A. . 


433 


Bell. Kevin P 


411 




173,433 


Bell. Mary G 


302 


Barnett, Linda J 


332 


Bell, Sheryl A 


426 


Barr, Kathy J 


433 


Bell, Susan M 


309 


Barr, Richard N 


307 


Bell, Thena M 


156, 192 


Barrett, Bruce E 


176,177,298 


Bell, Thomas L 


147,413 


Barrett, James A 


351 


Bell, Thomas N 


202 


Barrett, John T 


145, 149.318 


Bell. William K 


195.369 


Barrett, Laura L 


341 


Ben. Rath 


.195 


Barrett, Lynn L 


1 56 


Benda, Beverly 154 


169.434 


Barrett. Michele 


361 


Benda, David L 


.373 


Barrett, Sheryl A 


433 


Benedict. TernS 


153.366 










Barron, Dayne C 


418 


Beneke, Melony L 


189 


Barron, Gregory C. . 


300 


Benhallam, Abderrafi 


.195 


Barstow, Tamara K 


426 


Benignus, Elsbeth J 


434 


Barta. Randall L 


433 


Benignus, Nancy V 145 


196,414 


Bartak, Kathryn J . 


156, 174,426 


Benignus, SaraS 


396 


Barth. Anne M. 


426 


Bennett, Carol J 


380 


Barth, Jeffreys 


146, 173,380 


Bennett, Debra L 


160 


Bartko, Patrick J 


1 72 


Bennett, Daniel M. 


409 


Bartley. Keith D 


390 


Bennett, Neisha L 


148,332 


Bartoszek, Teresa A. 


152 


Bennett. Sharon B. 


380 


Bartrom, Kregene E. 














Baseball 


219 


Benson, Kirk T 


434 


Basham, Charles E 


405 


Benson, Rebecca J 


309 


Basketball 




Benson, Siefgried D. ... 


.193 


Baskin, Vincent N. . . 


.179.181 


Bentley, Jane K 


309 


Basom, Gary D. . 
Basom, Teresa R. . . 








. 148,343 


Beougher, Duane 


424 


Basom, Thon A 


407 


Berentz, Kathenne 


... 1 74 




288 


Berg, William M 

Bergen, M. Betsy 


.394 


Bastian, Robert C. . . 


322 


...194 


Batchelder, Patricia A 


157 


Berger, Carla A 


151,341 


Batchelder, Paul H. . 


433 


Berger, Lonnie D 


330 


Batchelor, Daryl J. . . 


181 


Berger, Richard N 


324 


Bates, Gyll 


192 


Berges. Cynthia K. 


426 


Batsell, Stephen G. . 
Batson, Connie H. . . 


. . . .166,373 

194 






Bergkamp, Evelyn S. .147 


162.332 


Batt, Beverly A 


363 


Berglund, Tim A 


159,434 


Bait, Carl 


1 66 


Bergmeier, William R. . . . 


.... 434 


Batten, Mark B 


433 


Bergner, Thomas W 


. . .318 


Battenberg, Jay D . 


351 


Bergquist, Diane K 


154,363 


Bauer, Bradley L. 


327 


Bergren, Joni L 


157,332 


Bauer, Edward J. 


351 


Berke. Jeffrey H 


.405 


Bauer, Gary B 


407 


Berkley, Jacqueline K. 


155,332 


Bauer, Gregory G. . . 


418 


Berlekamp, Joseph D . . . . 


300 


Bauer, John W 


351 


Bernasek. Janice M 


361 



Berner, Kathryn M 

Berney, Rand C 

Bernhardt, Laurel L 

Bernica, Robert G 

Berning, Gary L 

Berning, Larry A 

Berning, Mark S 

Berra, Ronald J 

Berry, Elizabeth J 

Berry, Michael G 

Berry, Patty D 

Berry, Ralph C 

Berry, Rhonda L 

Berry, Zachary J 

Besch, Jeanine M 

Bessette, Roberta L 153, 
Bessier, Lynne E 1 46, 

Best, Peter H 

Beta Sigma Psi 

Beta Theta Pi 

Bettison, Judy L 

Betzen, Theodore G 

Betzold, Barbara A 175, 

Bevens, Charlotte L 

Bever, Dennis W 

Beverly, Georgiana 

Bey, Charles 

Beyea, KurtW 

Beymer, Lisa K 

Beymer, Robert K 

Bhangananda. Nitinai 

Bicentennial 

Bichel, Mark A 

Bichelmeyer, Jane C 

Bickle, Lynette R 

Bidwell. AnnE 

Bidwell, OrvilleW 

Bieberly, David D 

Bieberly, Gregory E 

| Bieberly, Julie A 

Biegler, Chris A 

Biegler, Craig R 

Biegler, Judy M 

Biehl, Cindy K 

Biehl, David L 

Bienhoff, Joel F 

Bienhoff, Mark W 

Biery, Rick F 145, 

Biery, Teresa E 

Biesenthal, Jane M 

Bigelow, Lana J 

Biggs, Bryan E 

Bilbrey, John P 

Billmgham, Tana J 

Bily, Cynthia A 

Binder, Stephen F. 
Binford. Kerry K. . 182, 

Binford, Mary E 

Bingham, Kim R 

Bioclub 

Birch, Carolyn A 

Birch, John W 

Bird, Alicia A 

Bird, Gregory J 

Bird, Jack E 

Bird, Ronald 

Birdsong, David 
Birkman, Jeffrey D 

Birzer, DebeJ 

Birzer, Matthew L. . 171, 
Bisagno, S. Kay 
Bischoff. Edward L 
Bischoff, Gretchen M. . . . 

Bish, JohnD 

Bishop, Barry W 

Bishop, Debi L 

Bishop, Everett D 

Bishop, James L 

Biswell, Julie A 

Black Awareness Week 
Black, James D 
Blackaby, Christina L 

Blackburn, Ellen D 

Blacker, Timothy L , 
Blackman, Merrill 
Blackman, Robin G 
Blackmer, Rebecca A. . 

Blackmon, Sandra G 

Blackwood, David L 

Blackwood, Sandra S 

Blaida. Kathryn A 
Blaida. Robert A. 
Blakley. Glen R 
Blanchard, Ezell A 
Blanchon, Therese A . . . . 
Blandmg, David 
Blanding, Joni M 
Blanding, Sylvia J 
Blank, Cheryl M 
Blankenship, Janet R 
Blaschke, William A , 
Blaske, Kathy J 

Blass, MikeL 

Blattner, Stuart E 
Blattner, Thomas L, 
Bleakley, David P. . . , 
Bleakley, Todd E 
Bleish, Steven V 
Blevins. Michael F 
Blew, Nancy K 
Blewitt, TimothyS. . , . 
Blick. BarbK. 
Blick, Joanne E 
Blick, JohnB, 
Blickenstaff, Barton D, , 
Blickenstaff. Robert D 
Blinzler, Carol A 



. . 302 

434 

426 

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.409 

195,409 

409 

380 

290 

185,373 

434 

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363 

351 

152,196 

192,309 

170,316 

145,434 

. 300 

307 

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166 

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332 

180,434 

288 

192,309 

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296 

313 

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167,309 

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192,343 

'329 
309 
434 
435 
435 

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288 
407 
307 
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288 

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I/'), 



Bliss, Elizabeth A 

Bloch, William C 

Block, Janet J 

Block, Jayne S 

Block and Bridle 

Blocker, H. Derrick 

Blocksome, Richard C. 
Blomquist, Denise I. 
Blomquist.SallyA 178, 

Bloom, Adalee A 

Bloom, Roni J 

Blount, John M 

Blue, Donna J 

Blue Key 
Blumanhourst, Michael . 

Blume, Debra D 

Blume, Harold R 

Blume, Steven L 

Blunk, Katie A 

Blush, George 

Blythe, JanaB 143, 

B'nai B'rith Hillel 

Boaldin, Bill 

Boand, Victoria A 

Bock, Donald R 

Bodecker, Barbara J. 
Bodelson, Michael A 
Boden, Richard 
Boeh, Stephen L. . 

Boeh, William L 

Boehm, Sharon A 

Bogart, Lee L 

Bogart, M Candace 
Boggs, Marion A 
Boggs, Pamela J. 
Bogina, Michael E . . 
Bogue, Gary L 
Bogue, Gregory E 
Bohannon, Martha F. 

Bohn, Jan R 

Bohn, Michael D 

Bohn, Rodney P 

Bohnenkamp, Donald R. 
Bohning.ScottA. 

Bois, Paul K 

Boisclair, Paula A 
Bokermann, Brian F. . . 
Bokermann, Neil C 

Bol, David G 

Bolan, Jonna L. 156, 1 

Boldt, Larry K 

Bolerjack, Steven M. 
Boles, Catherines 
Bolm, Deborah J 
Bollinger, Michael G. . . 

Bolt, Donnie E 

Bolton, Charles L. 
Bolton, Kevin L 
Boman, Roger J 
Boman. Shirley M 
Bommarito, Lawrence 
Bond. Lynette K 
'Bondank, Dianne J 
Bone. Jeffrey D. . . 
Bonebrake, Case A. . 
Bonebrake, David R. . 
Bonham, Michael W. . . 
Bonner, Timothy J 
Bonnewell, Robert L 

Bontz, Evan L 

Book, Barbara K. 
Boomer, Kathy L 

Booth, John E 

Bootman, Nancy D. . . . 

Boppart, MaryS 

Boren, Fred W 

Borgerding, David G. 
Borhani, Kathy J 
Borhani, Mostafa 
Born, Joanne M 
Bornheimer, Mary A. . . 

Borst, Lea M 

Bortz. Kathryn L 

Bosch, Catherine E. . . . 
Bosch, John F 
Bosch, Teresa J. 

Boss, Michael K 

Bossier, Ann L 

Boster, Scott A. 1 

Bosworth, Collis P. 

Botkins, Joyce E 

Bottiger, Mary E 

Bottom, Kay A 

Bouchard, Rheal J. 

Boula, Kim 

Bouray, Michael D. 

Bourk, Gil 

Bourn, Leslie J 

Bowden, Melanie J. . . . 
Bowe. Susan E. 
Bowe.TimN 
Bowen. Beth S. 
Bowen. Cindy M 
Bower, David W. 
Bowers, Douglas D 
Bowers, Mary L. 
Bowles, Thomas B. 
Bowman, Jacolyn E 
Bowman, John D. . 
Bowman, Mary M 
Bowman, Michelle L 
Boyd, Becky L 
Boyd, Debra A. . , . 
Boyd, Dianne M. 
Boyd, Garland H. . . 
Boyd Hall 
Boyd, Jean A 
Boyd, Timothy M 



165,343 
.332 



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426 

435 

192,302 

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351 

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171, 173 

160,401 

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192,361 

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.420 

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380 

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373 

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318 

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179 

.160 

174,435 

149,373 

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162,373 

435 

. 351 

313 

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. .313 

407 

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.- .366 

380 

394 

435 

.435 

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. . 1 59 

166,435 

.435 

305 

192,293 

178, 181 

. . .319 

173,435 

.327 

. ... 366 

309 

.426 

.436 

.332 

436 

411 

.426 

180 

175,380 

167 

290 

.... 1 73 

172,422 

180.436 

179,426 

.405 

189,436 

407 

.436 

... . 1 54 

436 

181 

.302 

. . . .351 

.309 

154,302 

.373 



Boyer, Keith E 193 

Boymgton, John W 330 

Boyts, Pamela K 316 

Boyum, Thann 160 

Bozarth, Jack M 436 

Bozeman, Richard T 436 

Bozeman, Susan K 436 

Brace, Mark A 373 

Brack, Kim E 436 

Brack, Les L 436 

Brack, Michael J. . 413 

Brackett, Barbara L 401 

Bradbury, Dana A 396 

Braden, Michael J 189,436 

Bradfield, Kevin E 176 

Bradford, Mary A 160 

Bradford, Sheri L 436 

Bradford, Thelma D 436 

Bradley, Dennis M 436 

Bradley, Gill L 426 

Bradley, Norman E 189,436 

Bradley, Rebecca L 436 

Bradley, Roger A 351 

Bradshaw, John K 373 

Brainerd, Paul W 369 

Braley, William 418 

Brammer, Elizabeth M 313 

Brand, Jean M 436 

Brandeberry, Jackie L.- 436 

Brandenberger, Jamie L 332 

Brandenburg, Albert L 298 

Brandner, Lowell E 194 

Brandsberg, Jill L 332 

Brannan, Mary J 313 

Brannan, Michael S 193,436 

Bransgrove, Gene . ... 196,380 

Brant, WesO 318 

Brantingham, Michell G 380 

Brashear, Stephen A 288 

Braun, Debora J 1 51 , 341 

Braun, Glenn R 380 

Braun, Mary J 436 

Braunagel, Caren A 396 

Braxmeyer, Patricia J. . 154,436 

Breault, John P 162,351 

Brecheisen, Kurt D 343 

Breckenridge, Lorraine E .152,155 

Breckenndge, Lurenda 156 

Bredow, Jonathan W 149 

Bredthauer, Annette K 160,380 

Breeden, Bradley A 436 

Breen.GailL 156,205,436 

Breese, Lynn C 436 

Brehm, Rebecca L 319 

Breipohl, Gary W 191, 420 

Breitenbach, Charles 298 

Breitenbach, Marjain L 298 

Brennan, George L 380 

Brennan, Lisa A 436 

Brennan, Terrence L 420 

Brenneis, Dennis R 436 

Brenner, Deborrah S 436 

Brensmg, Richard H 147,160,183, 

330 

Brest, Gordon A. 145,176,185,373 

Brettell, Allan 195 

Brettell, John E 436 

Brewer, Mia 157,436 

Brewer, Rebecca A 192,293 

Brewer, Steven 405 

Brewer, Tina A 401 

Brians, Chester L 172 

Bridgewater, Susan 155, 319 

Bnggs, Roderick C 144 

Bnggs, Paul N 185, 191,422 

Bright, Bah L 343 

Bright, Sheila M 192,436 

Bringham, Linda L. 160,343 

Brink, Linda J 380 

Brink. William A 352 

Brinker, Karen K 436 

Brinkley, James H 436 

Brinkman, Brenda J 1 54, 366 

Brinkman, Bruce E 195,330 

Brinkman. Cherie A 180,332 

Brinkman, Dennis J 1 80 

Brison, Leah J 436 

Bristow, Tara J 366 

Britegam, Jill 155 

Britegam, Joanna J 332 

Brito, Gustavo R 436 

Britton, Roger G 436 

Broadfoot, Jeffrey A 388 

Broadie, Ann M 319 

Broadie, Marilyn K 152,319 

Brock, James H 204 

Brock, Scott E 343 

Brockman, Lori L 380 

Brakes, Craig D 436 

Brokesh, Venita J 143,426 

Brooks. Rebecca J 426 

Brooks, Sandra A. 156,174,332 

Brooks, Susan J 151,332 

Brose, Lisa A 426 

Brose, Michael L 369 

Brothers, Michael J 418 

Brotton, Leslie E 409 

Brougher. Toni K 436 

Brougher, Vicki J 192 

Brown, Alan L 373 

Brown, Allen J 351 

Brown, Anne K 329 

Brown, Barbara J 436 

Brown, Bill E 168. 199 

Brown, Bradley V 351 

Brown, Brian T 373 

Brown, Bryan C 181,436 

Brown, Carol A 380 



Brown, Catharine A 

Brown, Chris P 

Brown, Dallas S 

Brown, Daniel K 

Brown, Donna D 

Brown, Gratz A. 
Brown, Jefferson M. 

Brown, Jodi J 

Brown, Karen L 

Brown, Leon L 

Brown, Leslie A 

Brown, LillieR 

Brown, Michael S. 
Brown, Nancy J. 
Brown, Norman D 

Brown, Pamela J 

Brown, Pamela J 

Brown, Patricia J 

Brown, Phillip W 

Brown, Rhonda J 
Brown, Ronald L. 

Brown, Ruby 

Brown, Sandra L. . 
Brown, Susan M 
Brown, Thomas L 
Brown, Tressia A. 
Brownback, Alan L. 

Brownback, Nancy E 

Brownback, Sam D. . 

Browne, Charles R 

Browne, Cynthia J 

Browne, Rebecca L 

Brownell, Loree 

Browning, Cynthia D 

Browning, Eugene C 

Brownlee, Douglas D 

Brownlee, James W 

Brozanic, Linda M 

Brubaker, Stuart C 

Bruce, Robert P 

Bruce, Suzanne 

Brucker, Lester R 
Brueggeman, Dale H 

Bruey, Lou A 

Bruey, Patricia J. 148, 

Bruhl, Bertha K 

Brumbaugh, Scott A 

Brumbaugh, Steven T. 



Bruna, Alan W 
Brungardt, Gregory N. . . . 
Brungardt, Kervin 148 

Brungardt, Richard 
Brungardt, Samuel J 
Brungardt, Terrence .... 

Brunin. Carol A 

Bruning, Keith D 

Brunk, Glesnor L 
Brunk.MaleaJ 
Brunker, Elmer R 
Brunnenkant, Karen S. . 

Brunner, Rich 

Brunt, Jane E 

Bryan, Daniel W 

Bryan, David H 

Bryan, June E 

Bryan, Kim F 

Bryon, Diana M 
Brzuchalski, Beverly A 
Brzuchalski, Charles W 
Bua-Aim, Somjetana 
Buchanan, Lina J 154 
Buchanan, Lois A. 
Buchanan, Shannon L 
Bucher, Denise M. 
Bucher, William A. 
Buchheister, James J. . . . 

Buchman, B. Rex 

Buchman, Frankie L 
Buchman, Karen A. 
Buchman, Susan K 
Buchner, Marcee L 
Buck, Diane M. 
Buck, Frederick E. . 
Buck, Pamela A 
Buckman, Jon E. . 

Bud, Loarn L 

Budd, David R 
Buehne, Janice S 
Buell.SherylL . 
Buhrer, Wayne E 
Bulba, Micaela . 
Bulk, Martina M 
Bulkley, Shelley S. . 
Buller, Rebecca J. . 
Bunch, Debra E 
Bunch, William A. . 
Bunck, Deborah L. 
Bunck, Dennis J. 
Bunck, Joseph H. 
Bundy.AlanL 
Bunge. Walter K. . . 
Bunnel. Randall D 
Bunting, Curtis E. . 
Burden, Susan J. 
Burdge, Brent A. 
Burgdorfer, Janet L 
Burger, Penny S, . 
Burger, Sheila M. . 
Burik, Kimberly A. 
Buris, Marlene 

Burk. Daniel J 

Burk, John C 
Burkdoll, Marcia A. 
Burke, Mary L 
Burke, Patricia L, . . 
Burke, Patrick T 
Burke, Timothy M 



182,396 

. 380 

436 

436 

179, 183 

.380 

313 

309 

351 

151 

174 

.436 

.401 

183.300 

.367 

152,363 

. 436 

. . . .436 

196,343 

149,437 

155 

. .313 

426 

. ... 1 94 

152 

437 

437 

147,296 

.437 

149,437 

. 319 

.329 

.426 

.380 

307 

. 307 

168,437 

183,380 

.388 

147,195 

324 

418 

147,414 

180,414 

437 

418 

49,173, 

327 

437 

380 

149,172 

189,437 



394 
.380 
159,351 
169,363 



US', 



149 

, 174,437 

437 

296 

437 

.146, 149 

. 176 

437 

352 

437 

437 

180,343 

177 

.327 

309 

. . 1 59 

.160,437 

437 

. 343 

380 

.172,188 

343 

. 437 

437 

437 

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147 

332 

380 

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. .. .437 

. .199 

352 

352 



. 373 

153,401 

188, 192 

. . .437 

302 

... 1 80 

173,401 

179 

. 293 

437 

437 

.407 



Burkhard, Kathryn D. . 1 57, 1 79. 31 3 
Burkhart, Doris L 388 

Burkhart, W. Mark 407 

Burkholder, David E 437 

Burkman, Galen R 307 

Burlington. John .182 

Burmeister, William ... 193 

Burnett, Christine . 363 

Burnett, David G 176,399 

Burnett. Laura L .192,313 

Burnett, Sarah L 332 

Burnette, Gara L. 167,180,396 

Burnick, DaleL. . 171,381 

Burns, Cheryl A 329 

Burns, Dian 205 

Burns, Paul W 185,437 

Burns, Sheila D 437 

Burns, William H 371 

Burr, Marlene K 175,437 

Burris, Jeffrey K 359 

Burris, Jill M. 167. 185,343 

Burrus, Susie 191,367 

Burtis, JohnO 352 

Burton, Charlene J 437 

Burton, James M 162,437 

Burton, Kenneth R 437 

Burton, Richard A 167,437 

Busby, Margaret D 437 

Busenitz, David L 343 

Buser, William D 324 

Business Council 1 69 

Busse, Gary A 149,437 

Busse, Kenneth R 437 

Busse, Stephen M 381 

Bussey, Lynn E 1 44 

Bussing, Chuck 146 

Buster, Sally 396 

Butcher, Sharon L 155,290 

Butin. Constance S 1 80, 332 

Butin, Sandra L 437 

Butler, Hugh D 191,437 

Butler, Joanne G 437 

Butler, RethaA 343 

Button, Amy L 1 94, 1 97, 396 

Button, Daniel J 411 

Button, David D 381 

Butts, Cathy A, 194 

Byard, Mack E 165 

Byarlay. Debbie 192,309 

Byington, Michael J 165 

Byrnes, Carolyn A 414 

Byrnes, Jeanne M 414 

Byron, Paula K 156, 196,293 

ccc 

Cable, Karen L 290 

Cacia Girls 150 

Cadet Corps 

Air Force ROTC 1 76, 1 77 

Cadwell, Eileen 309 

Caflisch, Leonhard R 437 

Cain, Fredrick L 352 

Cain, LyleJ 180, 187,352 

Cain, Randy 180 

Caine, Homer D 176 

Cairns. Melvin R 1 80 

Caldwell, Brenda K 309 

Caldwell, Lovina 343 

Calhoun, Joan K 1 94 

Calhoun, Karen R 156,437 

Calhoun, Richard R 307 

Calhoun, Robert A. 179 

Calkins, Steven H 437 

Call, Edward P 185 

Call, Jerilyn J 437 

Call, Julie A .397 

Call, Keith B 159,352 

Call, MaryP 437 

Callahan, Angela M. .143.175.401 

Callaway, Harold C 388 

Campbell. Austin B ...189 

Campbell, Barbara L .. 1 52, 397 
Campbell, Carol J 147,181.437 
Campbell, Christopher C .343 

Campbell, Clyde A 437 

Campbell, ConnieS. . . 332 

Campbell, Gerald G 352 

Campbell, Hugh J 369 

Campbell, Janet L 332 

Campbell, John R. 1 83. 307 

Campbell, Joyce L 426 

Campbell, Judith A 332 

Campbell. Kathy 361 

Campbell, Marc A 144,437 

Campbell, Marilyn K 438 

Campbell, Michael W. .390 

Campbell, Robert A, ,1 70, 438 

Campbell, Ronald A 381 

Campbell, Steven G 438 

Campbell, William R 438 

Campbell, Williams 318 

Campfield. Morris L 352 

Canfield, ConnieS 168,438 

Cannan, Susan G 438 

Cannell. Vicki L 332 

Cannon, John B 352 

Cannon, Linda K 1 "4 

Canny, Rebecca R ... 1 75, 333 

Canfrell. Candy C 381 

Caplmger, Candra J 150.302 

Capps. James R 438 

Carbaugh, Donna J 438 

Cardinal. Gail A 152.397 



Carey, Calvin M 
Carey. James C 
Carl. Tony A 
Carleton. Carla L 
Carlin, Roger E 
Carlson, Darvin A 
Carlson, Jennifer L 
Carlson, Jilmda L 
Carlson. Mark D 
Carlson, Mark W 
Carlson, Miriam G 
Carlson. Randall A. . . 
Carmell, Vicki 
Carnahan. Nancy S 1 
Carnes, Laura S 1 

Carney. Karla J 1 48. 1 1 

Carpenter, David H. . . . 
Carpenter. Denise 
Carpenter. Helen D 
Carpenter. Jack R. 
Carpenter. Janet I 
Carpenter. Shera V 
Carpenter. William R 
Carpenter, William R 
Carr. Carol A 
Carr. Carol A 
Carr, Charles R 
Carr, Charles R 
Carr, James E 
Carr, Katherme L 
Carr, Pamela L 
Carr, Robert D 
Carr, Stephen T 
Carrel. Debra S 
Carrier, David W 
Carrier, Donna 
Carson. Colette A 
Carson. Kenna S 
Carson, Sharon J 
Carter, Allen L 
Carter, Cammie C 
Carter, Debra L 
Carter, Don R 
Carter, James L 
Carter, John C 
Carter, Kent L. 
Carter, Mikel R 
Carter, Richard H 
Carter, Shern A 
Carter, Steve 
Carter, William C 
Carver, David L 
Carver, Jenna S 
Carver, Rose M 
Cary. James H 
Cary. Leslie W 
Case, Diana L 
Case. Elaine L 1 

Case. James G 
Case. Leila L 
Case, Teresa J 
Case, Timothy G 
Casey, Barry A 
Casey, Donna L 
Casey, Kendall F. 
Casey, Kent A 
Casey, Tedd A 
Casey, Todd A 
Cashier, Yvonne M. 
Caspers, Steven L 
Casselman, Marsha A 
Cassibba, Ralph J 
Cassing, Nancy 
Cassler, Nancy 
Castaneda. Cris T 
Castelli, Cynthia A 
Caster. Cathryn A 
Castetter, Kim E 
Caswell, Sandee L 
Cater, John M 
Cates, Larry K 
Cathn, Daniel L 
Catlin, Maurice A 
Catlin, Michael W 1 

Cato, C. Richard 
Catskellar 
Catt. Bradford E 
Cauble, Deadra L 1 

Caughron, Richard N 
Cech. Douglas J. 
Cederberg, Joel E 
Cederstrom, Dayn L 
Cellmer, Terrance L. 
Chaffee, Nancy S. , 
Chaffee, Paul D 
Chaffm, Verona J 
Chalmers, John 
Chaltas, J, Steven 
Chamberlain. Ronald L 
Chamber Orchestra 
Chambers, Barbara L 
Chambers. Curtis N 
Chambliss. Terry A. 
Chandler, C Jerome 
Chandler, Karen S 
Chandler. Teresa 
Channel. Mary A 1* 

Chapm. Dena L 
Chapm, Rosemary 
Chapman, Gregory P 
Chapman, Mary J. 
Chapman, Scott L. 
Chappell. Mary B, 
Chappell. Susan L 
Chaput. Susan A. 
Charles. Charene A 



152 

4 18 
438 

305 
302 

333 
4 S8 

-., 
401 



154,316 

175,426 

204, 205, 

438 

352 

293 



151 
392 
180 
309 
.151,302 
381 
399 
407 
439 
293 
196 

180,392 

439 

373 

. 343 

439 

156,426 
343 

181, 182 
439 
316 
204 
193 
352 
399 
177 
373 
152 
327 
439 
439 
439 

170.309 
439 

205. 439 

319 

,167,316 

352 

426 

152,367 
392 
373 
319 
194 
171 
373 
373 
309 
305 
401 
144 
293 
343 

193.439 
309 
333 
367 
426 

180,373 

166.439 
439 

144.439 
. 159.439 

48 

204. 205 

, 181,316 

288 

180,352 

439 

373 

171,439 

196,333 

392 

349 

195 

411 

390 

178 

349 

420 



333 

352 
439 
439 
324 
313 
153.426 
319 



Charles, Cheryl A. 
Chartrand. E 
Chartrand, Lucy A 
Chase, Gwen K 
Chase, Mary T 
Chatelain, Daniel E. 
Chatham, Michael D 144,14? 
Chavez. Martha M . . 

Cheatham, Thomas K 

Cheatum. Jody A 1 54, 1 74 



196, 



Cheek. Linda S 439 

Cheek. Randy K 288 

Cheerleaders 191,246 

Chellgren, Steven E 146,179.381 

Chestnut, Allan B . 296 

Chestnut. Christine 175.309 

Chestnut. Jon K 180,182 

Chestnut, Merlin B 1 44, 1 95, 296 

Chestnut. William B 373 

ChiDelphia 150 

ChiEpsilon 145 

Childs. Barry K 439 

Childs, James A . .300 

Childs. Susan E 439 

Chimes 145 

Chinen, Leonard T 352 

Chinn. JanelleK 341 

Chi Omega 313 

Chipman, James T 381 

Chisholm, Sue A 367 

Chism, SabnnaA 439 

Chitlangia, Anand 144 

Chowdhury, Ashesh 381 

Chrisman, Jennifer D. 439 

Christensen, Jon D 439 

Christensen. Keith H. . 194 

Christensen, Kevin D 422 

Christiansen, Karen L 363 

Christie, Kenneth A 405 

Christner, Rex A 147,439 

Christner, Terry A. ... .439 

Christy, Ray A 172,352 

Chubb, Richard M 352 

Chung. Do S 171 

Church, Chen J. . . 162,343 

Ciesclicki, Rob 197 

Cink, David E 180,192 

Cioni, Becky L 369 

Cioni.PeterJ 369 

Circle K 185 

Claassen, Douglas K 160,187 

Claassen, Norma J 194 

Claassen, Stuart L 173 

Clancy. Donnie D 390 

Clark, Ann M 290 

Clark. Bradley E 381 

Clark, Brenda J 165 

Clark. Crista 203.341 

Clark. Dave 1 74 

Clark, Deborah E 147.160,188, 
316 

Clark. Elaine J 439 

Clark, Gay A. . .. 439 

Clark, Gregory C 1 60. 1 93, 493 

Clark, JanaK 174 

Clark, Jennifer C 439 

Clark, Michael C 373 

Clark, Paul D 188 

Clark, RandleL 439 

Clark, Roberta M 439 

Clark. Sara J 153,319 

Clark. Steven M 147,373 

Clark, Tern 180 

Clarke, Clarences 176,177 

Clarke, Thomas W 439 

Classen, Dale A 373 

Clawson, Rodney R. 381 

Cleland, Sara A 424 

Clement, Daniel J 381 

Clements, Lawana 1 62. 439 

Clemmons, Mary J 361 

Cless, Gary C 399 

Cless, Stephen E 399 

Clevenger, Melinda L 439 

Clme, Charles K 352 

Clme, Gregorys 418 

Cline.KymL 192.333 

Clme, RemyD 439 

Clme, Roger H 439 

Clinton, Darryl L 439 

Clipsham. Robert C. 371 

Clipsham, Sean J 371 
Clothing, Textiles and Interior 

Design Club 174 

Clovia 316 

Coats. Linda J 439 

Coats. Robert L 424 

Coals, Vicki R . 439 

Cochennet. Carrie A. 290 

Cochran, MicheleR. 426 

Cockenll, Richard L 343 

Cockrum, Ernest H 373 

Cody, Mac A. 173.381 

Cody, MarkW 411 

Coe, RobW. 411 

Coen.JohnC 161 

Coetzee, Jacobus C 195 

Coffman. Barbara A 401 

Coffman, Geraldine A 361 

Cofran, Thomas L 164 

Cogswell, Dave A 381 

Colburn, Bradley C. 180 

Colby, Patricia A 174.439 

Cole, Cynthia A 439 

Cole, James E. 147 

Cole, Kathryn E 329 

Cole, Steven M 322 



Coleman, Kathrme L 17 
Collegiate Chorale 
Collegiate 4-H 

Colle, Lance D 

Collier. Ava T 

Collier. John N 
Collier, Marjone C 
Collier, Stuart R 
Collier, Teresa A 
Colling, Ron D 
Collinge, Linda L 
Collinge, Mark D 
Collinge, Michael A 
Collins, Annette K 
Collins, Charles P. 
Collins, Cheryl L 
Collins, Cynthia A 
Collins. Deborah A 
Collins. Gary W 
Collins, Monica M 
Collins. Wanetta 
Coloney, Patricia L 
Coloney. Steven J 1 6 
Colson, Connie J. 
Colyn, Leslie D 
Combs, Deborah A 16 
Combs, Laurel C 
Combs, Lawrence I 
Combs, Ronald J 
Combs, Stephen H 
Combs, Terri A 
Comer, Pamela J 
Commer, Roger D 
Compaan, Jamie L 18C 

Compaan, Melody L. 
Compton, Gilbert E, 
Compton, James F. 
Compton, Patty E. 
Compton, Ty L 
Conard. Susan E 
Conaway, Denise A. . . . 
Concert Choir 
Concert Jazz Ensemble 
Condie, Randy L. 
Condray, Scott R 
Condry, Ellen M 
Cones, David J 
Conger. Charles B. . . . 
Conkling, Judith E 
Conkwnght, Kay S 
Conn, Shelly C 
Connell. Joseph B 
Connell, Mark H 
Conner, Jerry E 
Conner, Martha J 
Conners, Annette J 
Connolly, Deborah S 
Connor, Brenda C 
Connor, Marc S. 

Connor, Ronald D 

Conoway, Denise A. 
Conrad, Kelly E 
Conroy, TomW 
Consumer Relations Board 
Converse, Cynthia S 1 

Converse, Mark A 

Conway. John F 

Conway. Kenny J. 

Conway, Mary A 

Cook, Carol S 

Cook, Charles M 

Cook, Douglas M 

Cook, Gary S. 

Cook, Ginger 1 

Cook, Giovanna T. 

Cook, John V. . 

Cook. Karen S 4 

Cook, Linda J. 1 

Cook, Marika F 

Cook, NilesJ. 

Cook, Robert R 

Cook, Roy N 

Cook, Teresa M 

Cool, Roderick H 1 

Cooley. AmyS 

Cooper, Alice E 
Cooper, Collefle R 

Cooper, David L 

Cooper, Dean L 

Cooper, James L 

Cooper, James L 147,1 

Cooper, John M 147, 1i 

Cooper, Karen L 

Cooper, Nancy J , 1 

Cooper, Patricia L 

Cooper, Peter 

Cooper, Richard D 

Coover, Michelle M 

Cope, John M 

Copeland. Malcolm L 

Copes. Joseph 

Corbin. Charles B 

Corbin, Cynthia A 1< 

Corbin, Mark R 1, 

Corcoran. Jeffrey B 
Corcoran. Theresa G. 

Cordes. Stephen E 1' 

Corfman, Teresa J 

Corkran, Deborah S 

Corman, Richard W . 
Corn. David A 1 

Cornelius, Gregory T 

( lornelius, Mary D 

Cornelius, Sandra S .11 

Cornell, Jack L 
Cornell. Shirley D. . . . 
Cornwell, Kellee A 



.439 
.343 

430 
177 
420 
.150 
373 
160 
.373 
.160 
44 il 
.307 
,140 
361 
431, 
440 
426 
13i 
424 

:-hh 

381 
440 

30m 
■;.l i 
187 
:<'.:■ 
296 
.309 
319 
36') 
187, 
333 
440 
300 
183 



440 
.440 
.373 
,440 
.309 
.440 
3'!.: 
176 
13 1 
44(1 
.440 



431. 


1 6 ; 


367 


1 /." 


152 


341 


300 


195 



175 
324 

1 6 1 
194 
,440 
.440 
334 
352 
309 
>■)/ 
324 
381 

(l,M 

. H|< 

440 

t(,M 

,440 
,205 
.440 

33.' 
.440 
.374 
343 
llVl 
.148 
440 
313 
.440 
440 
416 
440 

«,M 

3113 

424 
I HI I 

173 
13' 4 
u 1 

409 



Cornwell, Martha J 


440 


Cornwell. Nancy 


290 


Corrigan, Sue E 


361 


Cory. Linda M 


440 


Cory, Scott E 


399 


Cosgrove, Sarah J. . 


293 


Cossman. Douglas T 


325 


Costello. Teresa M 


183,192,367 


Cott, Jeff 


202, 407 


Cott, Richard H 


330 


Colt. Thomas W 


162,330 


Cotten, Jennifer J 


440 


Cottingham, Leann . 


440 


Cotton, Terry A . 


296 


Couch, Gregory E . . 


177,352 


Coughenour, Mark E 


.... 166 


Coulter, Susan E. 


397 


Coulter. Thomas P. 


371 


Council lor Exceptional Children 




170 


Couri, Robert M 


440 


Cowen, Melvm D 


440 


Cowen, Shirley F 


187.333 


Cowley. Craig R 


309 


Cowley. Kaye 


309 


Cox, Cherlyn D 


154,440 



Cox, Craig J 424 

Cox. Dean A 180 

Cox. Gina D 1 79 

Cox. Leslie L 192,333 

Cox, Paula N 361 

Cox.ReginaD 313 

Cox, Samuel J 197 

Coyle, Michael D 399 

Crabb, Jeremiah E. . . 374 

Craft. Glenn S 440 

Craig. Cynthia C. .151,160,316 

Craig, Denise L 182,440 

Craig, Douglas J 371 

Craig, Kellee A 293 

Craig, Rhonda L 414 

Craig, William M 374 

Cramer. Candace K 156.183,293 

Cramer, Connie S 440 

Cramer. Jane L. 150,307 

Cramer, Karin K 367 

Cramer, Stacia J. 440 



Cramer, William C 
Crandall, Robert J. 
Crandall, Susan J 
Crane, E David 
Crane, James B 
Cranston, Bradd L 
Crawford, Alan W 
Crawford. Gay V 
Crawford, Jeffery A. 
Crawford. Warren L 
Creason, Mark D. 
Creek, Kenny D 



161 
440 
440 
440 
298 
440 
374 
333 
169.409 
440 
440 
374 



Crescents ol Lambda Chi Alpha 



Cress, Lynn E 
Creviston, David A 
Crew 

Crews, Carol G. 
Cnsler, Michelle E. . . 
Cnss, Elizabeth D 
Criss, Elizabeth E 
Crist, Cynthia D 
Crist, Kelly J 
Crockett, Gayle A 
Crofoot. James W 
Crop Protection Club 
Crook, Thomas R 
Crosby, Mark S 
Crosier, Ronald B 
Crosley, Debra A 
Cross Country 
Cross, Debora L 
Cross, John H 
Cross, Michael J 
Crosson, Russell D. 
Crosswhite, Darrell 
Crouch, Marilyn K 
Crouch, Martha L 
Crow, Randall L 
Crowe. Teresa G 
Crowl, Gary M. 
Crump, Raymond P 
Crumrine, Ralphs. 
Crutchfield, Patricia E. 
Cudney, Nancy L . . 
Cullen. Pefer 
Cummmgs, William L 
Cummins, Walter S. . . 
Cunningham, Cindy A. 
Cunningham, Marilyn 
Currie. Curtis G. 
Currie. Marty R 
Currie, Michael R 
Currie, Ralph A. 
Currier, Mark A 
Currier. Martin L 
Currier, Roberta K, . 
Curry, Andrea J 
Curry, Beth A 
Curry. Kim J. 160, 1 

Curtis. David W 
Curtis. Jack A 
Curtis. Marsha L 1 

Curlnghl. Paula R. 
Cushenbery, Daryl W 
Cushman, Rhonda R. 
Cusic. Bernie K 



1'3 
165 
381 
212 

152,401 
440 

181.293 
178 
440 
318 
333 
399 
160 
194 
371 

309 
248 
333 
298 
352 
352 
307 



. 322 
352 
397 
441 
177 

180,374 

.322 

180 

178, 181 
.325 

180,361 
325 

.... 325 
381 
381 
381 

182,293 
293 



ddd 



Dahl, Denise J 
Dahl, Michael E 
Dahl, Robert J 
Dahlstrom, HugoG. . . 
Dairy Science Club 
Daise. Richard L 

Dakin.RoyL 

Dale, Duane A 
Dale. Melvm D 
Dale, Michelle M. 
Dale, Quentin B 
Dallman, Nancy C. . . . 
Dalton. Cynthia D 

Dallon, Janet 

Dammann, Karen S 
Dancy, Winnona D . 
Dane, Dedria L 
Daniel Moynihan 
Daniels, Kate 
Daniels, Sandra S . . 
Danielson. Bradley A 
Danielson, Candace S 
Danler, Patrick J 
Danler, Robert J 
Danner, Dearl H 
Dannucci. Keith J. . . . 
Danskin, Emily M 
Darby. Leora L 
Darnell, Gwen S 
Darosett, Gary W 
Darrah, MarkW 
Darrow, Shelli L 
Daubert, Kent J 
Daughters of Diana 
Davenport. Joel A 
Davey, Larry D 
Davidson, Dave 
Davidson, Douglas A. 
Davidson, Gary M. . 
Davidson, Sally K. . . 
Davidson, Stephen R 



.183,381 

169,409 

161 

352 

382 

147.352 

193 

293 

181,374 

341 

. . 168,401 

203 

148, 157,333 
152 



159,296 
.157,397 
344 
160 
344 
441 
441 
418 
183,290 
392 
151 
374 
382 
194 



133 



,424 
333 

3' 4 
.313 
.381 



Davignon, Roger E 441 

Davila, Gaspar M 382 

Davis, Amy K 361 

Davis. CarolS 441 

Davis, Cheryl E .319 

Davis, Chris N. ....... 441 

Davis, Clark H 325 

Davis, DaleB 37.1 

Davis. Daniel M 180.392 

Davis, Deborah D. . . 303 

Davis, Debra J 441 

Davis, Denise 155,333 

Davis. Fawn L 333 

Davis, FredncL. ... 189 

Davis, Gary R 318 

Davis, Gayle L 160.187,333 

Davis, George A 441 

Davis, Gregory D 388 

Davis. Gregory L. . 374 

Davis, John A . . . . 166 

Davis, Judith A 424 

Davis, Lynda S 161,441 

Davis, Lynn A 374 

Davis, Mary J 165,441 

Davis, MaryS ' 169,441 

Davis, Michael D 352 

Davis, Peachley 155 

Davis. Philip B 327 

Davis. Ramona L 333 

Davis, Randy N . 352 

Davis, RetfaA 441 

Davis, Richard L 162 

Davis, Robert D 420 

Davis. Roger L 374 

Davis, Sallie K 147,167 

Davis, Sherry L. 334 

Davis, Timothy R 189 

Davis, Vester D 1 55 

Davis, Vicki L 441 

Davison. Janet E 414 

Davisson. Stanley P 399 

Dawdy, David A 390 

Dawes, Michael A 388 

Dawkins, John L 441 

Dawson, Herbert E 441 

Dawson, Margie M 382 

Day, Cynthia J. . 334,441 

Day, Dennis 374 

Day, Michael J 318 

Day, Tracy 441 

Daylor, Paula K. 168,441 

Dayvault, MarkS 405 

Dean, Holly M 175,414 

Dean. Kent A 441 

Dean, KimberlyA 172,363 

Dean, William H 441 

DeBarge, Lynn A 167 

Debenham, Randy R 352 

Debold, Terence E 441 

Debrick, Connie M. 441 

Debrick, Kathy L 441 

Debrick, Rita B .154,167,361 

Dechant, David M 149 

Deck, Steven B 405 

Deckard, Kris T 382 

Decker, Patricia K 441 

Dednck. Randy ... .182 

Deffenbaugh, Eric P • 143.441 
Defries. Richard B 441 



Degeer. James E 382 

Degenhardt, Richard K. 300 
Degi.GregA 146,149,176,352 

Dehart, Steve D, , .... 441 

Demes, George F 441 
Deines, Janet S .183,191,341 

Deines, Peggy J 441 

Deitrick, Linda S 164 

Delimont, Barbara G . . . 309 

Dehmont, Dan 147 

Dell, Bruce D 399 

Delta Chi 318 

Del! Darlings 151 

Delta Delta Delta 319 

Delta Psi Kappa 1 45 

Delta Sigma Phi 322 

Delta Sigma Theta 1 85 

Delta Tau Delta 324 

Delta Upsilon 327 

Delta Zeta 329 

DeMand, JohnW 170 

Dembski, Jane L 156,180.341 

Demmg, Shawn D 341 

Demo, Daniel D 441 

Demo, Therese M 334 

Dempster, James L 188,441 

Dempster, Richard E 159,188,441 

Demuth, Dorothy L 149,172,441 

Demuth, Yvonne M 441 

Deneke.FredJ 161 

Dengler, Patricia M 361 

Denker. Terry E 195,322 

Denning, Dale P 147,399 

Denning, Douglas G 441 

Denning, Mark R 189 

Dennis, Dawn J 1 57 

Dennis, Elizabeth A 441 

Dennis, Scott M 166,441 

Dennis. Susan J 154,334 

Denton, Deborah D. 344 

Denton, Kim M 155, 363 

Denyer, Dana L 167,172,361 

Denyer, Marcy L 183,361 

Denzel.SusanJ 152,303 

Depenbusch, Lawrence 441 

Depew, Howard H 177 

Depew, Julie A 397 

Derouchey. Douglas W 382 

Derr, Donald D 322 

Desai,GinshD 144 

Desch, Joseph P 441 

Deschner, Kim M 344 

Detar, George F 1 73 

Deter, Daniel E 144 

Deters, David G 147,330 

Detnck, William R 178.181.382 

Dettmer. Deborah J 316 

Detwiler, Jan E 401 

Deutsch. Bradley L 441 

Deutsch, John L 300 

Deutsch. Steven L 305 

Devlin. Daniel L 296 

Devore, Paul C 405 

Deweese, Dennis D 1 72 

Deweese, Paul F 194 

Diamond Darlings 191 

Diaz, Carlos A 441 

Diaz, Jose F 374 

Dibben, Elaine M 441 

Dibben, Norman C 441 

Dick, David A , 159,441 

Dick, Randy L 352 

Dickason, Cynthia A 442 

Dickens. Loren E 442 

Dickerhoot, Bonnie G 180,309 

Dickerson, Sara 290 

Dickerson, William J 442 

Dickey, HalleyK, 442 

Dickman, Charles E 322 

Dicks, Christopher L 442 

Dickson. Dale K. . 176,352 

Dickson, DebraD 427 

Dicristina, Nadine M 442 

Didde, David C 352 

Dieckgrate, Cynthia 1 79, 344 

Dieckhotf.SueE 174,442 

Die Fledermaus 36 

Dierkmg.MarkC. 325 

Dierks. Charles C. 411 

Dierks. Lloyd R 374 

Dietrich, Gregory L. 382 

Dietrich, Mary S 442 

Dietz, CarmaJ 442 

Dietz, Charles H 442 

Dietz. Randy F 382 

Dietz, Steven D 179,420 

Dikeman, Sandra A 303 

Dikeman, Steven L, 442 

Dill, Julie A 150,367 

Dill, Thomas A 296 

Diller, V Heather 367 

Dillman, Dennis B. 392 

Dillon, Joan M 334 

Dillon, KathyL 382 

Dillon, Kurt R 369 

Dilts. Ray A 171 

Dmges, Donald T, 147 

Dmkel, Patricia 367 

Dipman, Cynthia K 152,344 

Dirks. Randall K. 147,442 

Dirks, Susan K ,442 

Dissel.StephanC 392 

Dittemore, Joni L 182,334 

Diveley, Connie J 175,401 

Diveley, Robert R, 352 

Diver. MarciaL. , 442 

Dixon, KnstiL, 427 

Dixon, Michael E 382 



Dizmang, Belinda G 


152,341 


Dlabal, Angela D 


. 334 


Dlabal, Deborah K, . 


167,442 


Doan, Richard L 


442 


Dobbie, Joann M. . . 


145,442 


Dobson, Debbie L. . 


177,344 


Doby, Cinde D 


.192,443 


Docker, Connie D 


. 401 


Dodd, Timothy J 


161.416 


Dodge, James W 


443 


Dodge, Jere L 


1 76 


Dodge, Terry J 


352 


Doe, Munehiro K, . , 


173,352 


Doebele. Barbara J. 


147, 194,367 


Doebele, Constance J 


143, 165, 




168, 176,443 


Doherty, Kathleen M 


334 


Doherty, Stephen J. 


371 


Dokken, Daniel P 


443 


Dokken, Peggy L 


443 


Doles, Dennis A 


374 


Doll. Candice R 


.363 


Doll, Dalene M 


367 


Doll, Julie A. , 


382 


Dolliver, Mark T 


197,409 


Dolliver, Matthew P 


409 


Dollmann, Steven C 


145, 149,418 


Dombaugh, Dena R, , 


.341 


Donahue, Debbie J 


427 


Donley, Keith B 


443 


Donmyer, John E. , 


443 


Donnell, Pamela J 


382 


Donnert, Hermann J 


171 


Donohue, Ann E 


290 


Donovan, Gary J 


369 


Doolmg, Melodi A. . . . 


367 


Doran, Janet L 


334 


Doran, Patrick J 


388 


Dorsey, Jalene D 


344 


Dorsey, Renea C 


153,443 


Dorsey, Tom H 


390 


Doss, Curtis J 


1 97 


Dotson, Deborah 


443 


Dotson, Lynda C. . . , 


155,185 


Doud, Vickie A 


148,341 


Douglas, Stephen L. 


...416 


Douglass, Jason J. 


388 


Dove, Devere 


407 


Dow, Steven R 


352 


Dowell, Diane M 


. 290 


Dowling, William N 


173,352 


Downie, Scott R 


193 


Downing, Joni R 


. .341 


Downing, Karen S . . 


344 


Downs, Ernest 


183 


Downs, Rose J 


183 


Doyen, Carol J 


168, 176,293 


Doyle, Greg S 


168,443 


Dozier, Morns C 


176 


Drake, Debra L 


187,397 


Drake, Richard L 


327 


Drees, Charles M 


443 


Drees. Duane W 


162,443 


Dreese, Patrick C 


161,424 


Dreher. Donald C 


147 


Dreher, Steven P. 


399 


Dreher. Teresa L 


303 


Dreiling, Debra A 


155,427 


Dreiling, Elynn M 


363 


Dreith, Jon 


330 


Drew, Jeff L, 


353 


Dntley, Paul M 


371 


Droge, Beverly 160, 


187, 188,443 


Drown, Bradford D 


325 


Drumhiller, Linda K 


443 


Drumhiller, Stephen A 


416 


Drumm, Don A 


. 374 


Drumm, Robin D 


172,382 


Dryden, Lester A 


353 


Dubroff, Michael 


186 


Duch, Lorinda M 


180,382 


Dudley, Debra J 


443 


Dudrey, Barbara J 


166,344 


Dudte, Timothy J 


443 


Duensmg, David T 


180,392 


Duesing, Denise 


.344 


Duffin, Andrew V 


1 76 


Dukich, Marsha L 


443 


Dumler. Sylvia J 


148.443 


Dunaway, Terry 


157 


Dunback, Joy E 


187,334 


Dunbar, Steven D 


300 


Duncan, Helen M, . . 


390 


Duncan, Jon B 


.443 


Duncan, Lynn M 


150,443 


Duncan, Stewart R 


162,296 


Duncan, Vicki L 


443 


Dunivent, Gayle K . . , . 


443 


Dunlap. Sherry M 


334 


Dunmire, Jocelyn D 


170 


Dunn, Becki A 


153 


Dunn. Craig A 


371 


Dunn, Jean A 


188 


Dunn, Joseph J 


443 


Dunn, Patricia D 


156,293 


Dunn, Ronald 


371 


Dunn, Wayne E 


443 


Dunne. Karen A 


151, 183,341 


Dunne. Patrick J 


325 


Dunning, Craig S. . 


382 


Dunton, Douglas K 


322 


Dunton, Lynn 


322 


Dunton, Marion D. . . 


443 


Dunton, Stephen M 


344 


Dupree, Janiece A 


363 


Dupy, Dwight 


173,401 


Durant, Jackie E , . 


153. 180,443 


Durant, Larry W 


180,374 



Durbin, Randal L. . 443 

Durler, Maurice G 443 

Durst, Rebecca L .145,162,290 
Dusch,KimC 427 

Dusin.AnnM 169,401 

Dutton, AndyD 298 

Dutton, Edward E 298 

Duwe. Margaret A 180,427 

Duwe. Roger D 1 77 

Dye, Rebecca A , ,443 

Dye, Robert L 193,374 

Dye, Timothy J 353 

Dyer, David K 411 

Dyer, Lynn A 334 

Dykman, Gary L 374 

Dykstra, Michael A 405 



Eagleton, Mark S 169,409 

Eakm, Barbara B 146 

Easter. Richard C 407 

Easterday, Stephen P 176,181 

Eatherly, Linda L. , ... . 172, 397 
Eaton. Mark T 168.204 

Eaton, Natalie J 361 

Eaverson, Deborah J. 443 

Eaverson, Robert G 179.443 

Ebert. George B 159 

Eberth.KeithA 305 

Eberth, Thomas E 443 

Ebright, Alan J 327 

Eby, Carl W 443 

Eckenberg, Gene W. 369 

Eddy, Adell L 443 

Eddy, Jan 397 

Eddy, Susan M 443 

Edelman, Charlotte 186 

Edelman, Mark A 443 

Edens, Jennie L 309 

Eder, Joel L 159,296 

Edgerley, Paul 325 

Edgerley, Susan 156, 168, 196, 205, 
341 

Edie, Robert J 374 

Ediger, Charlotte A 148,443 

Ediger, Cindy L 164 

Edmonds, James K 353 

Edmonds, Vicki S 443 

Edmonson, Luisa C 155 

Edmund, Kimberly A 382 

Education Council 1 70 

Edwards, A Thornton 185 

Edwards, Floyd W 298 

Edwards. Janet L 185.344 

Edwards, Janice A 303 

Edwards, Jennifer K 154,316 

Edwards, Sarah L 382 

Edwards, Susan F 443 

Edwards, Wayne L 1 49 

Effland, Claudia L 151,427 

Egan. Christine M. ... 1 96, 1 97, 341 

Egan, Diane 401 

Egan. Frances L . ... 196,197,443 

Egbert, Douglas D 327 

Eggerman, Jeffrey N. 369 

Eggers, Douglas W 443 

Ehler, S W 162 

Ehlers, Bruce J 353 

Ehret.SaraE 183,363 

Ehrhch, Joanna L 151,334 

Ehrhch.MelvmR 374 

Ehrsam. Alex G . . 369 

Ehrsam, Julie A 290 

Eichhorn, Connie M 443 

Eichman, James J 407 

Eickholt. Mane-Anne T. 443 

Eickmeyer, David A 374 

Eikenberry, Kent R 300 

Eilerl, Rebecca L 443 

Eisenbarth, Stephen L 374 

Eisenhauer, Carl A 374 

Eisiminger, Mary S 179,364 

Ekarl, Kimberly A 334 

Elder, Kent E 405 

Elder, Roderic L 443 

Elkms, MarcE 420 

Ellift, Connie J 443 

Ellilf. Donald A 444 

Elling, Joan E 167,444 

Elliott, Cameron M. . . .353 

Elliott, Denise 191 

Elliott, Leslie L 173 

Elliott. Robert L. 353 

Elliott, Sandra K 177,444 

Ellis, Doreen J 444 

Ellis, LonK 157 

Ellis, M Beth .151 

Ellis, Randall W 444 

Ellis, Roscoe 194 

Ellis, Walter C .392 

Ellison, Susan 290 

Ellsworth. Deborah D ... 334 

Elmer, Dana G 197,399 

Elmore, Stephanie M 188 

Elsahookie, Medhat M 444 

Elsasser, Scott E 416 

Elsea, Connie 157,303 

Elsen. Carolyn M 444 

Elsey. Bruce 444 

Emery. Barbara A. 444 

Emery. Teresa K. . . . 444 

Emig, Kathleen L 309 

Emig, Sharon S .154,293 



Endecott, Mark A 420 

Engel, Carol B 172,361 

Engel, Glenn R 344 

Engel, Karla K 397,175 

Engel, Maryann 293 

Engelhardt, Darryl L 161,416 

Engelhardt, Vicki 414 

Engelland. Glenn A. 444 

Engelland, Rhonda R 180,364 

Engels, Glenn M 388 

Engen, Robbie L 300 

Engindears 1 72 

Engineering Student Council 1 73 

Engle.Alan 177 

Engler, Verlyn R 330 

English, C Steven 444 

Enloe, Jack L. 374 

Enyart, JeniseG 444 

Epler, Deborah K 444 

Epperson, Carol L 427 

Erdwien, Mary C 427 

Erhardt, Larry D 327 

Enckson, Debra J .341 

Erickson, Judith M 309 

Erickson, Julie A 444 

Erickson, Marian S 364 

Erickson, Michael V 394 

Erickson, Shelley A 444 

Erickson, Timothy J 444 

Ericson, DebraD ... 160 

Ericson, Kevin C . 1 79, 1 80, 374 

Erkelens, Allison C 444 

Erker, Michael F 353 

Ernst, Jack R 172,405 

Ertl, GaryR 444 

Erwm, Terry L 177,303 

Erwine, Stanford W 388 

Esau, Michael M 182 

Esau, Vickie L 397 

Esch, Robert J 172.444 

Eschmann, Cyndee D 427 

Esser, Mary E 444 

Estelle, R Ramey 75 

Estill, Bradford W 405 

Eta Kappa Nu 146 

Ethendge, Warren A 330 

Etlmg, James B 405 

Etzel, Kathleen A 153.293 

Eubank. James W 162.183.405 
Eubanks, Willone E 172 

Eudaley, Deborah L 444 

Euker, Valerie D 444 

Eulert, Carol J 424 

Eustace, Dale .161 

Evans, Bryan D . . .162.444 

Evans, Elizabeth I 160,181,334 

Evans, Jan K 334 

Evans. Jerry R. 444 

Evans, Karen G 172,196,397 

Evans, Kathleen 334 

Evans, Leslie E 397 

Evans, Leslie W 353 

Evans, Lisa M. 169,427 

Evans, Mary M 444 

Evans, Randall K 353 

Evans, Sheryl J 175,444 

Evans, Stephen 369 

Everett, Evelyn A 427 

Everett, JohnW 411 

Everett, Teresa L . . .189,341 

Evers, Pamela S . 165.329 

Ewing, Janice L 148.334 

Exline, Robert W. 307 

Eyestone, Gail L 316 

Eyestone. T Richard 191 

Eyler, Jerry M . 444 

Eyler, Pamela B 444 

Eyman, Becky J 150,303 

ffff 

Fabrizius, Janice M 153 

Fabrizius, Karl 147, 179.305 

Fabrizius, Margaret 334 

Facklam, Roger L 1 66 

Faculty Senate 1 94 

Fagan.ChristaJ 187,316 

Fagan.JoA 155,344 

Fagerah, Adnan H 444 

Fair, Doris M 444 

Fairbairn, Scott W 388 

Fairchild, KippC 409 

Fall Follies 53 

Fallon, Loretta A 444 

Family and Child Development 

Club 174 

Fankhauser, Carol A 334 

Fankhauser, Tony H 444 

Fanning, Gary L 162,444 

Fanty, Mark A 193 

Farha, Connie A 303 

Farley, Brooke A 290 

Farmer, Faith A 329 

Farmhouse 330 

Farney. Jo A 1 94 

Farr, Joan E. 334 

Farr, Stoney 390 

Farr.TamiE 152, 183,382 

Farrell, Eugene 161 

Farrell, Maureen E 401 

Farrell, Ritchie L 298 

Farrington, Kipley E. .325 

Fasnacht, Glen F 444 

Faubion. Joseph E 177 



Faubion, Luanne 156.167,334 

Faulkner, Tom 179,307 

Fawcett.KimM 160.444 

Fay, Carolyn A 444 

Fears. Carla D 344 

Features 15 

Fee, Forrest M 444 

Fee, Suzanne L 177,303 

Feeney, Carolyn C 151 

Feeney, Gerald M 176 

Feese, Colleen G .148,157,194. 

313 
Fehr, David L 298 

Fehr, Leslie B. . . 444 

Fehrenbach, Eldon D 159,444 

Feightner, Sharon A. 1 46, 1 49. 1 73. 

444 

Feild. Dianne 191,367 

Felder, Paula A 175,444 

Feldkamp, Cynthia 290 

Feldkamp, Terry L 148,414 

Feldman, Roberta L 444 

Feldman, John C ... 143 

Felton, Richard E 176,177,420 

Felton, Thomas L . 188 

Felts, Barbara A 344 

Fencing Club 191 

Fengel. Jams M 309 

Fenley, Paul F 382 

Fenlon, Clement P 390 

Fennema, Diane R 444 

Fenton, Donna M 427 

Fenton. Gary K 353 

Fenton, Tom A 147,444 

Ferguson, Kent L 353 

Ferguson, Ruth 444 

Ferguson. Terry L 418 

Fernandez. Oscar M 353 

Ferris, Connie A 329 

Ferro, Franks 444 

Fessenden, Charles B 422 

Feyerherm, Joan L 444 

Field, Amy L 319 

Field, Harry L 144 

Field, Ralph G 159 

Fields, Gregory L 374 

Figurski, Donald L 194 

Filby, Jeffrey B 445 

Filiatreault, Gregg L 445 

Fincher, KennaS 180 

Fine Arts Council 1 95 

Fine, Connie 382 

Fine, Shirley L 180 

Finger, Greg F 374 

Fmgland, Robert L 149,374 

Fink, Doug R 201 

Fink, Sara A . .367 

Finnigan, Kathryn J 445 

Finnigin, BrendaM 180.334 

Fioramonti, E John . 445 

Firestone, Donald D. 146,173,185, 

374 
Fischer, Gregg K. 353 

Fischer, Kathryn J . . 427 

Fiscus, Chen L 180 

Fish, Peter R 160,296 

Fishburn, Casey G. . . 420 

Fisher, Deanna 445 

Fisher, Debra L . 1 50, 1 70, 445 

Fisher, Gary W 183,307 

Fisher, Jim C. 149 

Fisher, Kimberly S 154,194.344 
Fisher, Mary L 316 

Fisher, Rita A. 344 

Fisher, Tena I 344 

Fisher, Terry L .445 

Fisiminger, Susan M 1 53 

Fitch, Gregory K 445 

Fitch, Julie K 334 

Five. Jane A. 1 54 

Flack, Thomas D 445 

Flaherty, Michael E 178. 181 

Flair. Robert F 388 

Flaming. Nancy F 313 

Flanagan, Mary E 163.344 

Flannigan, Richard D 171 

Fleischman, Lee B 177.186 

Fleming. James T 162 

Fleske, David H 330 

Fletcher, Deborah A. ... 152 

Fletcher. Donna L 445 

Fletcher. Michael T. 445 

Fletcher, Peter S 161,296 

Fletcher, Tern L 382 

Flick, John 407 

Flickner. Raymond G 1 44, 1 59. 296 
Flin, RossM . 177 

Flinn, JerylA 445 

Flora, Tresa L 156 

Flouer, Jack A 181 

Flouer, Michael G .177 

Flower. Michael G . 1 76 

Floyd. Barbara A 182,427 

Fluderer. Jo A 445 

Fluderer, William H 445 

Flynn, Kathy 150 

Flynn, Lisa M 153, 197.367 

Flynn. Mary K 303 

Foelsch, DouglasS 353 

Foerster, Stephen L 1 80, 1 93, 424 
Fogerson. Debra M .313 

Fogler, Robert J 146,149 

Fohey, Michelle L. . 445 

Foley, Donna F 445 

Foley, Robert L ... .325 

Foley, Susan J 192.445 

Folger. Elizabeth A 160.445 

Folk. Sherry L 445 



Folkerts, Don A 144,169.407 

Foltz, Becky L. 313 

Foltz, DebraL 309 

Football 230 

Forbes, Laurie A 445 

Forbes, Melissa A , 160 

Ford, Carl D . , 413 

Ford. Charles A 374 

Ford. Don T 374 

Ford, Fred L. 307 

Ford Hall 332 

Ford. Michael J 353 

Ford, Nancy A 334 

Fore, Jane A 147, 167,445 

Fore, Jenny L 314 

Foreman, Melmda K 179,382 

Forestry Club 161 

Foret, Gregory W 353 

Forke, Scott C 307 

Forrest, Keith P 445 

Forrest, Robert S 392 

Forsberg, Lon L, 364 

Forsberg, Rochelle L. . 303 

Forster. Melanie P 382 

Forsyth. Brad 300 

Fosberg. Kathryn 405 

Foster, Anne K 445 

Foster, Celeste K 367 

Foster, David W 374 

Foster, Debra M 177,303 

Foster, Don 322 

Foster, Gary L 445 

Foster, JohnS 318 

Foster, Kelli I . . . . 445 

Foster. Kent R 445 

Foster, Lisa 163 

Foster, Mark E 388 

Foster, Robert D 180,371 

Fountain, Debra M, 156,445 

Fountaine. Charles W 445 

Foust, TinaM. . 173.303 

Fouts, AmyL 293 

Fowler, Daniel L 424 

Fowler. Donald K 382 

Fowler, Douglas D. 146.149,173, 

393 

Fowler, Ronald K. 382 

Fowles, Jan M 344 

Fowles, Janet K 1 66. 445 

Fowles. Rita K 175.361 

Fowles. Ronald R 1 72 

Fox. Deborah K 160.427 

Fox. Kenneth L 194 

Fox, Larry D 143.169,407 

Fox. William L 382 

Francis. Louise 316 

Francq, Carole A 194 

Frank, Lawrence V 371 

Franken, David P 166.374 

Franken, JohnW 422 

Frankenfield, Peggy A 445 

Franklin. Douglas L 196.374 

Franklin, Earl B 176, 194. 196 

Franklin. Mark A 445 

Franklin, Wayne L 187,197 

Frantz. Doreen K 151,334 

Fraser, Barry R 382 

Frasier. DuaneW 162,330 

Frasier.JoeL 179,330 

Frazier, Jerome B 353 

Freach, G S 374 

Frederick. Phil B 445 

Fredrick, Bruce L 144 

Frednkson. Douglas 149 

Freed. Stephen W 418 

Freedmg, Catherine 319 

Freeland, GailaM 445 

Freeland. Gloria 203 

Freely. Debbie L 313 

Freeman. Bruce R .353 

Freeman. David W 300 

Freeman. Patricia A 445 

Frees. Jerry L 183.411 

French, Brona S 334 

French, Deborah K . 445 

French, Faire . 154,330 

French, JeaneneG 162,445 

French, Larry L 193 

French, Russell W. 325 

Frewen. Cynthia J 293 

Frey. Edward H 353 

Frey, Joyce L, 166.316 

Frey, Ruth A 397 

Freyenberger, Stanley . . 162 
Frick, Christine E. 427 

Fnck, Nancy L .445 

Fnck.SuziL 334 

Fnebus. Melanie A. 334 

Fnedel. MikeD 394 

Friednch. Raymond L. . 445 

Friend, Lindsay A 160,364 

Friend. Susan C. . . 445 

Friesen, Bradley W 147.445 

Friesen. Cynthia L 382 

Friesen. Janice E 175,317 

Friesen, Roberts. 382 

Fnnt.GaryD 165,445 

Frisque, John T 390 

Fritson. Rodney D. . . . 418 

Fritzemeier, Randy J 330 

Froebe, Donald D. 164, 445 

Frohne, Richard F. 445 

Fromholtz, Cindy M. . . 334 

Fromme. Debra J. 181,182,397 
Frost, Jell R 179, 181 

Fry, Cynthia L 143,293 

Fry, RoselynG 445 

Frydendall, Douglas L 374 



Frye, DarcyL 180.344 

Frye, Linda S 445 

Frye, Raymond E 445 

Frye, Rebecca A 180 

Fuessle. RichardS. . 399 

Fuhrman, William A 445 

Fuhrman, William D 353 

Fulkerson. Kevin L 318 

Fuller, Carol D 334 

Fuller, Deborah A 313 

Fuller, Leonard E 194 

Fuller, Virginia E 179 

Fullerton, Julia A. . . . 361 

Fulton, Joy L 427 

Fulton, Rick A 445 

Funderburg, Lois J 446 

Fundis, Roxanna M 178,181 

Funk, Bonnie R 148,446 

Funk.BrendaJ 175,401 
Funk.GlennE. .146,173,413 

Funk, Keith M 374 

Funk, Marilyn K 170,446 

Funk, Rodney M 180,185,374 

Funkhouser, Jack R 353 

Fuqua, Fred 446 

Furney. Mark A 144,168,204 

Furnish, Susan J 174,446 

Fussell, Larry G 369 

Fyfe, Gregory B 149,172,446 

ggg 

Gaar, Anne E 367 

Gabel. Crystal L 446 

Gabel. Susan R 446 

Gable. C. Michael . . . 446 

Gable, Debora K 446 

Gaito, Michael E 374 

Gale, David M .353 

Gahtzer, James L 186 

Gahtzer. Steven J 186 

Gallagher. Richard R. 1 94 

Gallagher. Steven P 325 

Gallagher, Tom L 164 

Gallaway, DaleW 418 

Galle, JackG 296 

Galle.KayA 446 

Gallego. Jorge I 374 

Gallehugh, Keith C 307 

Galhon. Randa 180,427 

Gallon, Mary E 446 

Gallup. Donald R 388 

Gallup. George A 388 

Galvin, Richard R 446 

Galyardt, Susan I 173,313 

Gamba, Julie A. 147,341 

Gamble, Diana L. . 446 

Gamma Phi Beta 341 

Gamma Theta Upsilon 146 

Gan|idoost, Mohammad 195 

Gantz, Gary R 407 

Gantz, Michael W 382 

Gaplmger, Candi J. . 192 

Garber, Susan D 446 

Gardner, Charles R. 446 

Gardner, Leonard M 353 

Gardner, Mary 414 

Gardner, Michael J 344 

Gardner, Nancy C 446 

Gardner, Rebecca C 151,341 

Gannger, Susan L 180,334 

Garner. John B 149 

Garnson, Vicki L 446 

Garrelts, Kathy K 164 

Garrett. David A 172 

Garrett. Elaine G 303 

Garrett. Roann K 414 

Garrett. Rosann G . 143,414 

Garrett, Terry J 307 

Garrison, Stephen J 300 

Garrison, Victoria L 1 70 

Garst, BariA. 174,446 

Garten, Carl H 187,446 

Garten. Casey D 147.159,187,330 
Garten, Gary F 382,180 

Garten, Mark L .446 

Gartner, Christopher 1 72, 422 

Cartrell, Gregory A. .171,330 

Gartrell, Susan K .154, 187,309 
Garvert, Terrance J. 1 95, 405 

Gary, Randy L 172,446 

Gassaway, Teresa A 382 

Gast, David C 307 

Gaston, Paul M 374 

Gates, Joni L 446 

Gates, Shelly L 364 

Gattshall, William Q. , , .160 

Gatz.CharlaK 334 

Gatz. Janet K 446 

Gatz, JohnE 446 

Gatz, Susan M 160,344 

Gatzoulis, Paula L 152,313 

Gaudreau, Suzanne 334 

Gaunce. Candee L . . .334 

Gay, VickeyL .427 

Gayle. Shelly J. 154, 174,364 

Gaylord, Jeanette F 1 50. 344 

Gbodi, Timothy A 186 

Gebhards, James R 446 

Gebhart. Mark D 390 

Gebhart, Sheryll S 1 56, 290 

Gee, Darrell C 374, 185 

Gee, Kimberly K 309 

Gehlbach, Debra L 314 



Gehnng, George M 411 

Gehrt, Alan K 305 

Gehrt, Teresa A . . 446 

Geisert. Michael T 183,354 

Geist, Elaine 145 

Geist.GaryE 446 

Geitz, Gregory A 446 

Genchan, Jonette R 192.427 

Gentry, Robert H 382 

George, Ann E 143,148,167,181, 
334 
George, Philip D. . 296 

George, Veronica A. 364 

Geraghty, Susan E 401 

Gerard. Roy W. 446 

Gerboth. Danny L. . 322 

Gerhardt, Aimee G 314 

Gerlach. Carl R . . . . 325 

Gerlach. Debra N 446 

Gerlach, Paul M 446 

Gerlaugh, Mitchell B. 189 

Germann, Deborah K 401 

Gerstberger. Jeff F 411 

Gerstner. Lisa L 192,314 

Gfeller, Douglas R . . 189.374 

Gholson, Jennifer L. 446 

Gianforte, Thomas J 446 

Gibbs, Sue J . .143,148,317 

Giblin, Marguerite A 344 

Gibson, Barbara M. . . . 334 

Gibson, Craig A 369 

Gibson, Daniel W 424 

Gibson, Marsha A 367 

Gibson, Roger E 424 

Gibson, Shawn D 155 

Giesch.JohnA 405 

Giger, Debra L 290 

Gigstad. Alfred O 296 

Gilbert, Scott A 382 

Gill, Jeffrey L . .374 

Gillan, Kathleen A 156,293 

Gillaspie, JudyM 344 

Gillen, P. Richard 374 

Gillett, Catherine A 175.188.293 
Gillette. Curtis J 405 

Gilliam. Peggy A 149,173,334 

Gilmore, Deborah D 446 

Gilmore, James W 446 

Gilmore, Lynn A. 427 

Gilsleider, Edward F. 382 

Ginn, MaryL 169 

Given. Patricia J 155,361 

Gladden, Linda C 446 

Glanville, Beth A 176,293 

Glasco, Calvin 411,183 

Glasgow, John E 177,185 

Glasker, Patricia A 446 

Glatt, Andrew K 300 

Glatt, Christopher G. . . 354 

Glaze, Debbie L 446 

Glaze, James B 149,446 

Gleason, Martin J 446 

Gleue, Theresa M 187,344 

Glick, Denise L 148.174,309 

Ghdden.MaryE 153,191,192,367 
Glotzbach, Joseph C. 405 

Glotzbach, Susan M 177,341 

Glover, Diane K . 160.446 

Gnaegy, David L 409 

Gobber. Jana S 329 

Gobel.MaryE 446 

Gochenour. KimG 424 

Goddard, JonaJ 428 

Godfrey, Janna L .334 

Godfrey, John B. 180 

Godfrey, Terry S. 180.188,309 

Godsey, Bruce F 382 

Godsey, Julie A 382 

Godspell 35 

Goeckel, Carol L 317 

Goermg, Diane S 334 

Goerl, Valerie A 428 

Goetz, Ronald E 446 

Goff, Janet A 157,401 

Goforth, Gregory L 196,354 

Goforth.ToddA 354 

Goheen, Dalta G. . . . 396 

Goin.NancyC 151,319 

Gold, David N 307 

Goldberger, Sara 181 

Golden Hearts 1 52 

Goldsmith, Linda G. . , 364 

Goldstein, Alan M 186 

Golt 223 

Gonterman, Pamela J 319 

Gonzales, Lucinda M. 188,446 

Gonzalez, Michael L 147,422 

Gonzolas. Edward 180, 413 

Good, Craig A 160.330 

Good, Lisa 179,446 

Good, Mary A 156 

Good, Ricky C 375 

Gooden, Kenneth B 149 

Gooding, Martha J 361 

Goodnow Hall 343 

Goodman, William R 173 

Goodrich, Tracy J 401 

Goodsell, CarolS. .183 

Goodwin, Bruce W 446 

Godley, Barbara E 364 

Gordon, Daniel E 392 

Gordon. James L 187.416 

Gordon, Steve J 298 

Gorman, L Kevin 446 

Gorman, Roger C. . . 149 

Gorton. Robert L. . , 194 

Gosnell, Joni ... ... .447 

Goss, Carol E 162 



Gossen, Larry A 159 

Gottsch. Karen K 382 

Gottschalk, Eugene 394 

Gottschalk, Gary M 177,354 

Gough, Cynthia L. 174,447 

Gould, Saundra E 180,334 

Gouldmg, Theresa D. . 447 

Govert, Julie L. 187,382 

Gowen, Alicia K 401 

Graber, Dean A 162 

Graber, Keith W 180 

Grady. Margaret A 447 

Graff, Barbara J 334 

Graff, Elaine L 152,397 

Graff, Gary M 375 

Graft, John F 159,411 

Graff, Victoria S 447 

Graham, Curtis G 165 

Graham, Gay E 447 

Graham, John R 199 

Graham, Lloyd R 354 

Graham, Lynn J 344 

Graham, Steven H 354 

Grain Science Club 161 

Granberry, George S 327 

Granberry. Margaret 1 56, 293 

Grandy, Michael L 354 

Graney, Joseph S 172,422 

Granstrom, David E 382 

Grant, John J 447 

Grapengater, Dana L 354 

Graf, David C. . 388 

Grauerholz, Marcus R 305 

Graul. Brian J. . . 178, 181 

Graves, Carolyn L 174,447 

Graves. Jennie L 155, 173 

Graves. Marc L 418 

Graves, Sharon K 170,401 

Graves, William D 369 

Gray, Barbara J . 341 

Gray, Kathy E. 151 

Gray, Pamelas 180 

Graybeal, Patricia 161 

Greek Follies 51 

Greeley. Paul K 388 

Green, Cheryl E 344 

Green, Daniel J 375 

Green, David D 161,162,296 

Green, Dee A. 447 

Green. Marcia B 309 

Green. Natalie K. 150,165,424 

Green, Pamela Y, 1 53, 1 92, 329 

Green, Polly A 397 

Green, Thomas H 375 

Greenbank, Janet 314 

Greenberg, Barry S 447 

Greene, Earl F 288 

Greene, Judy L 334 

Greenlee, John W 411 

Greenwood, Debra A 344 

Greer. Irvm S . . 193 

Greer. William L 354 

Gregg. Stephen L 354 

Gregory, Joan E 171,344 

Gregory, Juliana . . 447 

Gregwire, Roberta L. 447 

Greig, David 322 

Gress, Judith K. 159,160,187,188, 

447 

Greusel, David B 344 

Gnce.CaraM 293 

Grider, Nancy E 447 

Grier, Carol J . . 179.447 

Grier, Christopher A 149,171,447 
Grieves, Brad A. 409 

Grieves. Kevin D 409 

Griffin, Betty L. 428 

Griffin, Susan K. 165,447 

Gritting, William J. 354 

Griffith, Edward L. . 399 

Griffith. Lori A 192,314 

Griffith, Stephen J 288 

Griffith, Susan L 143,401 

Griffith, Thomas S 418 

Grimes, Gail M 303 

Grimwood, James T. 185,375 

Gripp, Lisa A 401 

Gnsham, Cynthia S 183.192,364 
Grissom, Joni F . . 293 

Groenewold, Joan K 424 

Grogan, Michael R. 1 62, 298 

Gross. Jeff L 177 

Gross, Timothy L 447 

Gross, William M 161,354 

Grossardt, Eileen E. 155,192,334 
Grossardt, Philip F 447 

Grossarot, Theodore 146 

Grossenbacher, Jeffery 322 

Grothusen, Janet S. 447 

Grout, Katharine D 167 

Grout, Pamelas 143, 192 

Grover, Joyce K 447 

Groves, Randy D 147, 307 

Grout. PamS. '. 155 

Gruber, Betty J 188,344 

Gruber, Cynthia D 290 

Gruber, Randall R 160.188,447 

Gruber. Terry M 447 

Gruenthal. Linda A 447 

Gudikunst, Pamelas. 147, 152,319 

Guillen, Teresa M 188 

Guipre, Keven A 448 

Gump, MaxE 180 

Gunn, Frances A 155, 183 

Gunther, Greg J 405 

Gunzelman, Rita J 303 

Gurnsey, Michael A 330 

GuStalSOn, MarkM . 165.393 



Gutchin, llene 186 

Gutchin, Ira P 186 

Gutierrez, Raul J 393 

Gutknecht, Deborah L. . . . 364 

Gutzman, Linda K 424 

Gutzman, Melissa A . 397 

Gutzman, Ricci L 424 

Gwin, Francis E 179,354 

Gyang, ErastusO. 186 

hhh 

Haack. PamlaJ. 290 

Haag. Jeffery E 375 

Haas, Joseph G 418 

Haberkorn, Michael R 344 

Habiger, Mary B 344 

Hachinsky, David M 174,193,448 
Haddock, Michael J 448 

Hadicke, Joni L 317 

Haertling.SallyA, 153.293 

Haffener, Connie A 1 50, 1 76, 448 
Haffener, Joe A 171,173,422 

Haffener, Teresa S 165, 448 

Hading, Michael N 375 

Hagans, Robin A, 448 

Hagedorn, Stephen W. 448 

Hageman, Steve J 149,354 

Hagen.LoisJ 148 

Hagen. Randell S. . . . 307 

Hagenmaier. Marsha A 143,148. 

317 
Hager. Daryle E 375 

Hagerman, Dennis R. 448 

Hagerman, Joyce D 448 

Haggard. Markham R 448 

Hahn, Carol L. 166,180.188,428 

Hahn, Carole A 448 

Hahn. Douglas E. . . 300 

Haifleigh. Debra G 145,194.195, 

382 
Hamline, ChadW . . ,180, 181 

Hamlme, Dallas D. 179 

Ha|i, Ah T 382 

Hajovsky, Robert J 448 

Hake, Lynn D 448 

Hake. Nolan F 422 

Halawani, Abdul-Aziz 448 

Hale. DanielS 160 

Hale, Karen L . . 319 

Hale, Steven C 405 

Hale.VelvaC. . . .159,382 

Haley, Paul J 448 

Hall, Barbara A 382 

Hall, Douglas A 147 

Hall, Kathryn L 448 

Hall, Mary A 448 

Hall. Maureen L . .. 157.172.314 
Hall, Robert E 163, 195 

Hall, Sharon G 448 

Hall, Suzan 181 

Hall, Tracy 307 

Hambelton. John J 322 

Hambnght. Marjorie B 156,448 

Hamilton, Bradley 188 

Hamilton. James J. 179,195.197 
Hamilton, James J. . . 307 

Hamilton, Nancy A 1 75. 428 

Hamilton, Raymond J 1 89 

Hamilton. Stuart A. , 382 

Hamlett, Charles A 318 

Hamm, CarolS 175, 185,317 

Hamm, Dana L 161,448 

Hamma.JulieA 160,334 

Hammeke, Kevin F 448 

Hammeke, Mary E 401 

Hammerh, Barbara A. 361 

Hammond, Susan L . 448 

Hampl, Julie L .143,148,150,169. 

196,344 

Hanchett, Tara S 334 

Hancock, Karen J 319 

Hand, Jennifer J 428 

Haney, Karla J 448 

Hang Gliding 264 

Hankins. Kevin G 424 

Hanna, Donald 147, 180 

Hannatord, Roger W 307 

Hanning, Valerie D 156 

Hansen, Carol J 170,448 

Hansen. Gary W 195,418 

Hansen, George B 177 

Hansen, Jeanne E. 178 

Hansen. Nancy J 196.383 

Hansen. Terry J 448 

Hansley. Stephen M 418 

Hanson, Carolyn S. . .401 

Hanson, Dirk A 307 

Hanson, Margaret A , , .401 

Hapgood, Curtis R 288 

Haque, Ekramul 195 

Harbach, Evelyn J 317 

Harber. Sheryl L 185 

Harbert, Cathie A 364 

Harbison, Rex W 187, 188 

Harden. James M 1 59, 354 

Harden, Philip A. , .. 171,195,422 

Harder, Jan A 156 

Harder. Melinda L 290 

Harder, Ron J 448 

Harding, William D 180 

Hardman, Barry S. .166.422 

Hardman, Jan E 157,344 

Hardman, Kristi J 187,344 



Hargrave. Joseph R 180,181.182 
Hargrave, Kittie V 180 

Hargus. Herschella K 344 

Harkey, Jerry P 448 

Harlan, Nancy L 156,448 

Harlin, Maureen C 334 

Harmon, David P. . 407 

Harmon, William J 162 

Harms, Wayne A. , , 149,448 

Harned, Holly A 314 

Harold, Bryan D. 164,305 

Harp, Richard D 409 

Harper, Mark A 344 

Harper, MarkW. , 448 

Harper. Robert L 191 

Harpster, Leslies. . 341 

Harrington, Nancy K 335 

Harris, Cyd A 171 

Harris. Jean 176.448 

Harris, NancyS 448 

Harris, Sally K 414 

Harris, William R. 168, 195, 203, 371 
Harrison. Brent A 448 

Harrison, Debra L 448 

Harrison, Ivan E 187 

Harrison, Jane A 448 

Harrison, Kim A 181 

Harrison, Nancy A 367 

Harrison. Paul D 195,390 

Harry Chapin 103 

Harryman, Joan D 448 

Harsh, Alicia K 314 

Hart. Barry T ,354 

Hart, Laura E 329 

Hart. Lawrence R 422 

Hart, Mary A ,448 

Hart. Paul J 205 

Harter, Penelope K. 344 

Hartfield, Freddie D 448 

Hartig, Mary M 183,448 

Hartman, Andrews 307 

Hartman, Davy S 293 

Hartman, Matthew S 354 

Hartman, William R 318 

Hartnett, Kim L 448 

Hase, VickieS. ,162 

Haselhorst, Ronald J 371 

Haskett. Joyce K .187 

Haskins, Judy K 169,448 

Haslett, LisaS 448 

Hass, Kenneth J 318 

Hassan, Umaru 186 

Hassig, Marilyn 341 

Hasten, Arthur A 394 

Hatcher, Bryan C 411 

Hatcher, Cmda A. 152,175,448 

Hatfield, John R. . . . 405 

Hathaway, Cynthia A 329 

Hathaway, Melissa K 175,176,329 

Hattan, Michael A 405 

Hattrup, Darlene M 335 

Haug, Edward W . . ... 390 

Haug.Tom 390 

Haugh, Dennis A 149 

Hause.JaneC . 361 

Hauser, W. Maxine 288 

Hausmann. Gary J. 354 

Havel, Eileen F .414 

Havel, NitaL 180, 181 

Havens, John H 407 

Haverkamp, Bryce F 1 63. 1 94 

Hawk, Debbie 180 

Hawkins, Laura J 397 

Hawkins, Ten J 448 

Hawkins. Trudy J 335 

Hawkinson, Paul G 195,307 

Hawn, Raymond B 160 

Haworth, Daniel R. . . 172,448 

Hawthorne. Bradley C 375 

Hawthorne. Susan E 448 

Hax, Christopher ... 409 

Haxton, Rickey L. 354 

Hay, Karen L 180,290 

Haymaker Hall 351 

Hay. Rebecca J 344 

Hay, Wesley R 180,354 

Hayden, Richard G 327 

Hayes. M. H. . . 345 

Hayes, Monte L 383 

Haynes. Bradley R 449 

Haynes. Elaine B 191 

Haynes, Jeanine E 449 

Haynes, Robert G 160,449 

Haynes, SteveS 327 

Hays. Linda S 401 

Hays. Ross E 383 

Hayter, Dick 191 

Hazen, Richard D 354 

Hazen, Robert E 354 

Hazzard, Daniel M 369 

Heacock, Anita L. 449,162 

Headnck, Daniel E 164.167,383 
Healy. Frank G 160,449 

Healy, Mark J 405 

Healy, Matthew F , , . .420 

Heathman, James B 166,375 

Hecht, Janet M 449 

Hecht, JohnL 180,354 

Hecht, Robert D 411 

Hecht, Teresa R, 180,414 
Heckman, Chad C 411 

Heckman. John E. 449 

Hedda Gabler 36 

Hedger, MarjoneJ 156,354 
Hedger, Marsha L, 335 

Hedke, Dennis E 449 

Hednck. Nancy K, . , 170,449 
Hednck.SallyA 363 



Hetlel.TimH 325 

Hetty, Elaine C 143,148,188,317 
Heidebrecht, Brent L. 388 

Heidrick, Ruth A 449 

Heikes, Janice K. . . 196,401 

Heikes, Keith A 161 

Heim, Danny W 399 

Heiman, Judith M 335 

Heiman.Tim 149, 173,327 

Heimer. Barbara J 1 96, 428 

Heimer. Kathleen A 335 

Hein. Robert H 288 

Hein, JohnW 148,335 

Hem, Margaret M 153,424 

Heinen, Michelle R 192,314 

Heiniger, Susan R 317 

Heinnch, Forrest 354 

Heinz, Patrick D 181 

Heinz, Richard M 375 

Heitschmidt, Diane K 401 

Held, Jon J 172, 193, 449 

Helferstay, Cynthia 165,449 

Heline, Linda F 449 

Heller, Barry R 193 

Heller. Sally A 155 

Hellman, John E 390 

Hellmer, John F 394 

Helm, Janet L 367 

Heimer, Dennis W 1 72, 449 

Heimer, Kendall J 149,449 

Helms, VickiL 192,293 

Helton, Timothy M 418 

Helvey, Richard L 161,449 

Hemberger, Brenda 160 

Hemmer, Michael W 375 

Hemphill, Susan . . 449 

Henderson, Bonnie J. 335 

Henderson, Carol W 342 

Henderson, Carrie 191 

Henderson, Grady 376 

Henderson, Kevin S 307 

Henderson, Kim D 155 

Henderson, Linda S 179 

Henderson, Marlene K 143 

Henderson, Mark 325 

Henderson, Shenlyn S. , . 1 75, 335 
Henderson, Susan B 150,303 

Henderson, Susan R 342 

Hendricks, Charles R . . 418 

Hendrickson. Jana D 424 

Hendry, David W 405 

Henke. Marsha K 156. 383 

Henke, Maurene L 428 

Henke, Nancy J 156.175,335 

Henley, James B 145 

Henley, Mark E 183 

Henn, Anthony W 383 

Henn.Carla J 449 

Henne, Pamela M 309 

Henness, Timothy C 298 

Henoch. Richard B. . . 180, 327 

Henncks, Vernon J. .147, 449 

Henry, Cynthia K 449 

Henry, Florence 449 

Henry, Frank J 418 

Henry, Frank J 449 

Henry Jackson 86 

Henry, Lisa D 180,364 

Henry, Stephen L 394 

Henry, Terry L 354 

Henry, Terry W 160,330 

Hensler, Patricia J 335 

Hensley, Kathy D 179 

Hensley, Kenneth S. . 424 

Hensley, Kevin C. 185,376 

Hentzler, Carol L 335 

Hepperly, Mary L .157.176,397 
Heptig. LoraA . 166,449 

Herbers, Martin E 159, 354 

Herbers, Mary S 1 57, 1 80, 31 7 

Herbers, Susan K 335 

Herbert, Susan L 309 

Herl, Jacqueline 449 

Herman, John D 390 

Herman, Kathryn A 449 

Herman. Sandra J 449 

Herme. Lucas M 188 

Hermes, Steve 197 

Hernandez, Olivia B 335 

Herold, Don 405 

Heronemus, Daryl L .171,449 

Herring, Quentin J 354 

Herriott, Janet L 155 

Herrmann, Charles E. 1 77, 1 80, 376 
Herrmann, Darrell E. . 177, 1 80, 376 

Herrmann, Patrick K 160 

Herron, Lyndell D 449 

Herron, Maynard M 171,449 

Herrs, Steven A 165,449 

Herwig. Suzanne A 1 60, 290 

Herz, Saleh M 383 

Herzog, Gregorys. . . 179,411 

Heslop. Stephen J 418 

Hess, Connie J 335 

Hess, Janette L 401 

Hess, Kathryn A 181 

Hess, Michael H. 354 

Hettenbach, Bruce E 449 

Hettrick, Brian T 345 

Heuermann, Paul A 192,407 

Hevermann, Pamelas 335 

Hewett, Phillip W 192,182 

Hewson, Roberta D 449 

Heylin, Michael T. . . ,422 

Hibbard, Gordon V. .143.165,449 

Hickel, Gregory A 416 

Hickert, Daniel E 449 



Hicklin, Miriam L 192.309 

Hickok, Timothy W 371 

Hicks, Dianna L .335 

Hicks, Judith A 335 

Hicks, LindaS 153,449 

Hicks, Marcia 156,449 

Hicks, Michael D 422 

Hiebert, Dallas D 376 

Higgins, Jane M 335 

Higgins, Joni K 449 

Higgs. Debra S 143,172,173,401 
Hildebrand, Donald S 330 

Hildebrand. JohnW 177,449 

Hildebrand, Rex E 307 

Hildebrand, Shan A 154,414 

Hilderhof.GaryB, , 300 

Hiles, William T 345 

Hilger, Charles J 205,371 

Hill, Brenda J 345 

Hill, Brian K. 354 

Hill, Charlotte J 361 

Hill, Cheryl A 152,449 

Hill, Cheryl J. . . 154,449 

Hill, Clarence A. 172,449 

Hill, Cornell C 187 

Hill, Deborah S 345 

Hill, Donald A 376 

Hill.JeanieE ... 449 

Hill, Jeffrey C 383 

Hill. KnstaM 345 

Hill, Mary S 335 

Hill, Roger R 449 

Hill, Susan E 180,345 

Hillebrandt, Carol A 1 47, 1 96 

Hillman.RexV 376 

Hills, Scott W, 409 

Hilton, Barry P 300 

Hiltz, Susan M 401 

Hilyard, Mark 193 

Himebaugh, Karen S 364 

Hindman. Kristi L 345 

Hinkel, Jill A 170,361 

Hinkson, Craig Q. 449 

Hinman, M Keith 181 

Hinson, Donald J 298 

Hinson, Lois A 449 

Hinten, Steven R 449 

Hintz, David J. 449 

Hintz, James R 424 

Hipps.AlanH .195 

Hirning, Mary L 314 

Hirt, Steven E 185,376 

Hiskett, Larry W 383 

Hitch, Daniel L 390 

Hitt, Stephen H 181,449 

Hittle, Lisa L . 180,181,182 

Hitz. Lottie M. .319 

Hixson, Barbara J 183,450 

Hjetland, Peggy L 383 

Hobble, Deborah F. 145,176,329 

Hobson, Judy A 450 

Hobson, L Leon 171, 173 

Hobson, Patti S 157,428 

Hoch, Joseph C 354 

Hoch, Sydney A 319 

Hoch.WyattA 180.307 

Hodge, Sharon D 450 

Hodges, Marilyn A . 450 

Hodges. Terry L 411 

Hodgson, Kim A 424 

Hodgson, Michael L. . . . 354 

Hodnefield, Lon ,361 

Hodson, Philip A 160 

Hoeckle. Cheryl L 401 

Hoefgen. Debra K 290 

Hoener. Carolyn . 148,175.361 
Hoenk, Karen A 335 

Hoerman. Connie M 450 

Hofelt, William C 193 

Hoff, Beverly J 167 

Hoffine, Susan L 450 

Hoffman, Barbara L 157 

Hoffman, Calvin C 450 

Hoffman, Joan K 314 

Hoffman, Linda K. 450 

Hoffman, Mark A 416 

Hoffman, Pamela E 174,183.196, 

401 
Hoffman. Steven J 1 43. 1 69. 1 97, 

407 
Hoffman, Susan L 152,293 

Hoffmann, Stephen J 327 

Hofmann, Robert J 376 

Hofmeier, Dennis G. 325 

Hofmeister, Phyllis E 428 

Hogan, Terry L 288 

Hoge, Cordelia G 319 

Hoge, DeIG 151, 174 

Hogerty, Kathryn A. 151,342 

Hoglund, Bruce A 450 

Hoglund, Gregorys 371 

Hogue, Craig E 161 

Hoisington, Laura I 169.428 

Hoisington, Paula J 179,181,345 

Hoke, Brent K 376 

Holborn, Jeanne A. 151,450 

Holbrook, Lorinda S 1 75, 345 

Holcom, Sandra K 162, 450 

Holcomb, Mark A 354 

Holcomb, Suzan G 1 92, 335 

Holder, Blaine K 161,450 

Holder, Mary C. . 185,450 

Holeman, Linda L 146,170,309 

Holl, Diane K 383 

Holland, Barbara J 364 

Holland, Constance L 450 

Hollander, Stephen J 394 

Holle, Barbara R 309 



Holliday, HarleyS. 




162 


Huelskamp. Clinton A 


288 


Hollinberger, Thomas S 


19b 


416 


Huerter, Susan M 


428 


Hollingsworth, Michele V. 




367 


Juettenmueller, Jeannie 


157 


Hollis, Brian W 




450 


Huey, Daniel E 


450 


Hollis. Ralph . 




450 


Huey. Kirk E 


41 1 


Holhs, Laura S. 




X"! 


Huffman, Kathy L 


383 


Holloway, Linda S 




364 


Huffman, Terry E. . 


418 


Holloway, Randall L 




.450 


Huggins. Howard M. 


450 


Holloway, Richard D 




450 


Hughes, Cynthia 


346 


Holman, Beverly E 146, 


I 48 


175, 


Hughes. Dennis L 


450 




188,414 


Hughes, Jeffrey D 


405 


Holman, Steve C 




.383 


Hughes, Jeraldyn L 


450 


Holmes, Carol E 146 


170, 45C 


Hughes. John D 


167 


Holmes. David K 




29H 


Hughes. Lonnie J 


354 


Holmes, Joe D 




450 


Hughey. Beverly A 


346 


Holmes, John A 




179 


Hull, Terry A. 


180 


Holmes, Luann 148 


1/4 


450 


Hullman, Kathryn L 143 


175,450 


Holmes, Rodney E 




.376 


Hullman, Kim H 


450 


Holmquist, Kristin D 




428 


Humbarger, Glenn E 


450 


Holste, Curtis A 




450 


Humbarger, Joyce E 


401 


Holste, Harlan G 


162 


305 


Humes, Deann 


1 73, 335 


Holste, Jay H 




.296 


Humfeld, Terry L 


354 


Holste, Sylvia N 




.450 


Hummer, Whitney A 


314 


Holt, Debra L 




160 


Humphrey. James M 


325 


Holt, Denise J. , 




364 


Humphreys. Randy B 


307 


Holt, Kathryn A 




310 


Humphreys. Wendy W 


174 


Holt, Lynn R 


160,296 


Hundley, Allan B 


176 


Holt. Mark I 178 


181 


.417 


Hung, Peter M 


346 


Holt, Michael T 




383 


Hunsley, Stephannie A 


150 


Holt, Nancy L 




.346 


Hunt, Alan H. . . 


369 


Holt, Susan E 




450 


Hunt, Brenda S 


148,451 


Holthaus, Debra K 




.428 


Hunt, David W 


179.354 


Holthus, Teresa C 


15; 


,177 


Hunt, Deborah L. 


451 






.169 




180 


Holtman, Michael E . 




305 


Hunt, Jeffrey B 


451 


Holton, George M 


149 


.450 


Hunt, Sheri A 


175,317 


Holub, GaryS 




450 


Hunt, Ten J 


317 


Holub, Rodney J. 




450 


Hunter, Steven R 


451 


Holyfield, Roger L 




450 


Huntsman, Jennifer 


451 


Holznchter, Shirley A 




428 


Huppe, Gary S 


451 


Homecoming 




65 


Hurlburt, Mary M 


160 


Home Economics Council 


.175 


Hurlburt, Randy K 


172 


Home Economics Education Club 


Hurley, Allen L 


144,451 






175 


Hurley, Barbara E 


451 


Home Economics Extens 






Hurley, James A. 


327 


Professional Section 




.175 


Hurley. Martha L. 


167,450 


Honer, Steven L. . 




.407 


Hurst, Gary L 


376 


Honig, Catherine A 




.414 


Hurst, John P. 


376 


Honstead, William H 




.197 


Hurst-Walker, Deborah K 


451 


Hood. Patsy A 




.174 


Hurt. Linda L 


170, 32S 


Hood, Thomas P. . . . 




.376 


Hurtig, Frank S 


417 


Hooker, Holly K 




.314 


Huschka. James A 


300 


Hooper, Shern L 




167 


Huseman, Bob E 


451 


Hooper, Thomas K. 


159,35* 


Huseman, William A. 


451 


Hoover, Alan J 




371 


Huser, Bernard P 


451 


Hoover, Stephen J. 




.450 


Huseth, Gregory C 


451 


Hopkins, David W 




450 


Hustead. David R 


383 


Hopkins, Debra J 




180 


Huston, Donna K 


402 


Hopkins, Holly A 




367 


Huston. Randall W 


451 


Hopkins, Thomas L 146, 


149 


173, 


Huston. Terry A 


451 




177 


,450 


Hutchison. Jay N 


354 


Hoppas, Douglas W 




40', 


Hutchison, Jon M 


181,376 


Horan, Kathleen D 




450 


Hutchison. Maria S 


397 


Horan, Tim 




450 


Hutton. Bradley D 


369 


Horine, Troy E 




354 


Hutton, Lacinda G 


303 


Hornbaker, Kenneth O 




330 


Huxman, Marilou 


180,451 


Hornecker, Susan L 




335 
.335 


Hyde. Douglas W 
Hyson, Joyce A 


451 
142,424 



Hornung, MaryG 153,175,346 

Horst, GuyR 388 

Horticulture Club 162 

Horton.JohnR 146 

Hoseney, Cheryl L 367 

Hoskinson, Rex A 1 60, 330 

Hossain, MD Mosharra 450 

Hostin, GaryL . . 298,450 
Hostinsky, Dale D 144,159,450 

Hotchkiss, Julia A 293,310 

Houck, Sheryl L 428 

Houf, William G. 149,171,354 

Houghton, Joan 157,364 

Houghton, Linda K. .193.335 

Houghton, Patricia L 160 

Hougland, Steven C. ... 388 

Houk, Janet M 154,175.414 

Houlder, Edith C 314 

Houser, Mark C 383 

Housh, Richard D 450 

Housing * 286 

Houston, Hilda R 155 

Houtz, Becky A 383 

Hoverder, Jamie 364 

Howard, Bonnie G 167 

Howard, Elizabeth B 367 

Howard. Gregory W 388 

Howard, Robert L 407 

Howard. Ruth E 170.183,450 

Howe, David M 322 

Howe, Marcia L 450 

Howell, Jerald A 149 

Howell, Rick S 422 

Howell, Ronald T 354 

Howes. Brian T 369 

Howlett, Harold D. 189 

Hoyt. TinaM. .310 

Hrabe, Christy 157, 180,293 

Hrones, Karen L .314 

Huaman. Rosa 1 383 

Huang, Francis Y 195 

Hubalek, Verne A. 159,450 

Hubbs, Susan L 157 

Hucke, Brenda L 317 

Hudson, Donald L 413 

Hudson, Judy M . .450 
Hudson, Kristie L 154,383 
Hueben, Brian C. ...388 
Huebert, Michael 420 



III 

ICC Council 195 

Idol, Kern S 296 

lllgner, Rick . . 146 

Imboden, Kathy B 346 

Immenschuh. Carole A 151 

Ingle. Paul B. 376 

Ingram, James R . 322 

Ingram, Karen A 192,346 

Ingram, Nancy G .314 

Ingram, Sheryl A 143,148,157. 

167,314 
Ingram, Stephen W 405 

Inman, Tammy J 383 

Institute ol Electrical and 

Electronic Engineers 1 73 

Inter-Collegiate Athletic Council 

228 
Inter-Fraternity Council 195 

Intramurals 258 

In Tenebris Association 1 64 

Ireland. Deborah A 397 

Ireland. James R 451 

Ireland, Randal W 418 

Ireland, Tara R 290 

Irons. Stephen M 160.376 

Irvin, Douglas W. 180 

Irwin. JohnW 149.288 

Isaacson. Janna J 402 

Isaacson, Marsha R 151, 303 

Isch. Ellen M 319 

Isch, Lisa I ...148.319 

Isenberg. Carol E. . . . .335 

Isenberg. Marine E 335 

Isenhower, Dana J 402 

Isern, John M 451 

Isern, Myron J 451 

Ives, Bradley D 4 1" 

Ives. Marianne . . 173.293 

Ives. Randy . 409 

Ives. Ron M 394 

Iwert. William H 451 

Iwinski. David M 451 

Izadi. Reza 451 



■ ■ ■ 




Johnson. KristineG 




335 


Kappa Alpha Psi 




.187 


Kilby, Pamela 


157. 160,335 


■ ■ ■ 




Johnson. Kyron D 




371 


Kappa Alpha Theta 




31,1 


Kilgore. Patricia A 


454 






Johnson. Laurie D 




If 


Kappa Delta 




363 


Kilgore, Tern 


335 






Johnson. Leroy 


178 


181 


Kappa Delta Pi 




146 


Kill. Colleen P. 


154,342 






Johnson, Leslie D 


151 


335 


Kappa Kappa Gamma 




.366 


Kille, Barbara A 


157,303 


MMM 




Johnson, Linda K 


162,402 


Kappa Kittens 




1'..' 


Killion, Cindy L 


454 


www 




Johnson, Lon E 




424 


Kappa Sigma 




369 


Killion, Janette S 


454 


Jacka, Carl G 


451 


Johnson, Mary J 


153,452 


Kappelmann, Mary F 


150 


303 


Killough. John E 


388 


Jackson, Brian C 


330 


Johnson, Michael D. 




327 


Karlm, Deanna M 


157 


364 


Kilpatrick, Sean D 


383 


Jackson. Denise M 


182.451 


Johnson. Michael G 




4',' 


Karlin, Julie A 




310 


Kimball, Harry E 


193,454 


Jackson, Howard T 


l 76 288 


Johnson, Montrula 


152 


180 


Karnes, Howard A 




232 


Kimble, David E 


146.173,399 


Jackson, Joseph M 


162 


Johnson, Muriel J 




4',.' 


Karr, Steven D 




422 


Kimmel, Halsey W 


418 


Jackson, Latessa R 


155 


Johnson. Nancy J 


145,153 


4',.' 


Karst, Catherine R 




342 


Kimple, Kandace A 


428 


Jackson, Sharyl L 


451 


Johnson. Pam 




151 


Karst, David W 




305 


Kimsey, Gwen L 


454 


Jacob, Cynthia K , 


428 


Johnson, Rex G 




</t, 


Karst. Stephen 




305 


Kmast, Pamela S 


170.428 


Jacob. Steven D 


354 


Johnson. Richard L 




3M3 


Kasl, Cecilia M 


187 


414 


Kinder, Richard A 


149 


Jacobs, Brent D 


305 


Johnson, Robert L 




194 


Kasten, Teresa A 




361 


Kinoscher, Katherine 


203, 204 


Jacobs. Carl L 


298 


Johnson, Robert R 




41 1 


Kasten, Veronica S 1 48, 


177 


l'ii, 


King, Ann C 


154, 189 


Jacobs, Charles C 


451 


Johnson, Robert P 




399 






364 


King, Ann E 


428 


Jacobs, Doti L 


179 


Johnson, Robert S 




322 


Kaster, Larry V. 


160,450 


King, Deborah J 


335 


Jacobs, Joan M 


451 


Johnson. Sandra K 


196, 42E 


Kathka, David K 




417 


King, Edward A 


454 


Jacobs. MendyS 
Jacobs. Roxanne M 


314 


Johnson. Scott M 




305 


Katterhenry. Curtis A. 




377 


King, Joan A 


172,397 


451 


Johnson. Sharon D 


146, 170,402 


Kaub, David F 




377 


King, John E 


454 


Jacobs, Theodore R 


388 


Johnson, Shenl L 


156,290 


Kauffman, Byron B 




.377 


King, Marcia A 


454 


Jacobs. William R 


451 


Johnson. Stacy A 




<4i, 


Kauttman, Noreen 




335 


King, Marilyn A 


148, 174 


Jacobsen, Scott L 


178. 181 


Johnson, Steven D 


48. 172 


195. 


Kaufman, Dean A 




!55 


King, Michael E 


355 


Jacobson, Carol S 
Jacobson, Stephen B 
Jacques. Paula 
Jacques. Robert M 
Jatfens. Peter M 
Jahnke, Debra 
James. Cherne L 
James. John D 
James. Joni K 
James, Merilu 
James, Susan M 


451 
407 






IHK 


Kaufman, Nathalea J. 




335 


King, Philip N 146 


149, 173,393 


Johnson, Susan J 


174 


335 


Kaufman, Russell F 




355 


Kingston. Arietta M 


397 


335 

451 

376 

352 

155, 183 

451 

. 335 

143. 148, 310 

451 


Johnson, Veda M 




i."< 


Kaufmann, Rodney D 




355 


Kinnaman. Mark B 


355 


Johnston, Brenda 




1(0 


Kaufmann, Tom V 




453 


Kinnard, Arthur H 


454 


Johnston, Cynthia J 




453 


Kaup, David R 


201 


413 


Kinney, Kristi L 


367 


Johnston, Denise R 




453 


Kaup, Janette E 157 


196, 36* 


Kinsch, Nicholas L. 


177 


Johnston, Jerry D 




422 


Kaup, Steven C 




!HH 


Kinsey, Hugh C 


454 


Johnston, Jody S 


188 


458 


Kautz. Michael G 




383 


Kinsey, John M 


177 


Johnston, Mala D 




383 


Kealmg, James H 


l'ii 


383 


Kinsler, Ross N 


298 


Johnston, Pam J 
Johnston, Randolph P 


164 


3 2, 
170. 
355 

3Kf 


Kearney, Bob C 
Kearny, Michael A. 
Keating. Elizabeth A 




355 
388 
453 


Kiracofe, Zane D. 
Kirchhoff, Steven P. 
Kirchoff, Diana L. 


160,464 
305 
454 


James, Vickie L 


148,451 


Joiner, Dave L 




Keating. Mary C 


167 


453 


Kirk, Chuck 


411 


Jamison, Mark 


451 


Jokerst. Kathleen M 




.453 


Keating, Rick A, 




453 


Kirkendall, Karen M 


180,310 


Jamison, Monte D 


346 


Jones, Albert R 




453 


Keck, Debra A 




402 


Kirkman, Kathleen J 


346 


Janicke. Timothy J 


168, 202 


Jones, Beverly A 
Jones, Bonnie L 




2' in 


Keehn, Anne M 


169 


453 


Kirkpatnck,CarlW 


170 


Janisch, Nancy A 


383 




.428 


Keeler, Jeffrey L. 




1KII 


Kirkwood, Glynnis A 


454 


Janke, Edward L 


171, 173,451 


Jones, Charlotte A 




453 


Keeler, Karen J, 




196 


Kiser, Kimball P 


355 


Jankovich, Richard B 


371 


Jones, Clay G 
Jones, Clifton C 


173 32/ 


Keen. Ray A. . . 




194 


Kisner, Mark A 


176,454 


Jansen. Terry A 


171,376 




3.'/ 


Keeten, JanS 




453 


Kissick, Kim A 


454 


Janssen, David M 


145, 354 


Jones, Colleen K. 




.383 


Kehneier, William R. 




147 


Kissing, Michele K. . 


201,342 


Janssen, Gerald W 


191, 192,451 


Jones, David A 




453 


Keil. Glenda R 143, 148 


150,346 


Kite, Edward K 


195,405 


Janssen. Kimberly D 


317 


Jones, David E 




405 


Keil, Terry D 




288 


Kite. John G 


144, 167 


Janssen, Royce C. 


143,390 


Jones, Debra E 


192,290 


335 


Keim. Jerry L 




453 


Kite, Ronald A 


171, 185.377 


Janssen. Stanton J 


159 


Jones. Dennis R 




181 


Keith. Karen G 




346 


Kitten Kruiters 


1 92 


Jantz. Jonathan P 


144, 149 


Jones. Diane L 




290 


Keith. Raymond E 




MM, 


Kittner, Jane E 


197 


Jantz, Merle F 


149, 172.354 


Jones, Donald E 




176 


Kellams, Robert K 




453 


Kiwiey. J Michael 


188 


Japp. Susan B 


175.451 


Jones, Gary L. 




453 


Kellenberger, Vickie 


179 


428 


Klaassen, Matthew K 


. . 202, 296 


Jaques, John C 


165,354 


Jones, James C 




399 


Keller. Cheryl J 148,174 


175 


335 


Klahr, Michael D 


454 


Jaquith, Steve L 


369 


Jones, Jamy A 
Jones, Jana M 




453 


Keller. Daniel J 




296 


K-Laires 


188 


Jaramklo, Gerardo 


188 


176 335 


Keller, I Oletta 




407 


Klasmski, Danette E 


402 


Jarrett, Teresa E 


451 


Jones, Jams A 




453 


Keller, Laura L 




310 


Klassen, Delton C 


383 


Jarvis, David A 


451 


Jones, Jetfery R 
Jones, Jetfery W 




307 


Keller, Mark R 


182 


325 


Klaumann, Teresa K. 


143,183,428 


Jaster, Nancy L 


451 




40'. 


Keller, Stephen P 




164 


Klein, Kathleen A 


160, 161, 188, 


Jatko, James H 


178, 181 


Jones, Margo A 
Jones, Mark A 




361 


Kelley. David W 




383 




454 


Jauch, Lawrence R 


194 




4'..'. 


Kelley, RaynaS. 




453 


Klein, RhodaL 


454 


Jauernig, Jeft D 


369 


Jones. Maria S 




.453 


Kellner, Timothy L 




304 


Klein, Roderick A 


296 


Jauernig, William J 


369 


Jones, Max A 




453 


Kellogg. Richard J 




390 


Klein, Scott S 


418 


Jaynes. Leesa A 


364 


Jones, Nadine N 




4'. '. 


Kellogg, Robert R 


187 


453 


Kleiner, DeLame K 


180 


Jetlerson Starship 


23 


Jones, Nancy K 


151 


342 


Kelly, Barbara J 148 


156,364 


Klema, Dell J . 


143. 185 


Jetfery, Jimalene R 


160 


Jones, Pamela L 




453 


Kelly, Karen L 




303 


Klema, Janet L 


153 


Jeffries, Greg A 


325 


Jones, Patsy Y 




453 


Kelly, KentC 




355 


Klema, Kaye L 1 53 


175, 187,346 


Jelinek, Nancy A 


175,310 


Jones, Reginald D 
Jones. Rex 




453 


Kelly, Michael J 




.325 


Klenke, Susan M 


335 


Jenkins, Edward L, 


354 




407 


Kelly, Nancy L 




428 


Klepper, Richard G 


454 


Jenkins, Margaret J 


335 


Jones, Rhys A 
Jones, Rick L 




114 


Kelly, Nancy S 




342 


Kleusch, Thomas E 


454 


Jenkins, Nancy J 


290 


355 


. 167 


Kelly, Nina M 


157 


314 


Kleweno, Christina J 


192,367 


Jenkins, Philip W 


371 


Jones, Richard P 




.393 


Kelly. Sharon S 


148 


346 


Kliewer, Glen M 


355 


Jenkins, Rob E 


298 


Jones, Robert T 




393 


Kelly. Shauna L 156 


I'll 


319 


Kliewer, Patrice M 


454 


Jennings. Gaynelle A 


185 


Jones, Rodney L 


143 


,453 


Kelly. Stephen R 




453 


Kline, Roderick A 


192 


Jennison, Tindel K 


183,376 


Jones, Ronald P 


176, 183 


,405 


Kelpe, Ronald M 




371 


Kling, David L 


347 


Jensen, Marjone A 


335 


Jones, Susan C 160 


175, 188 


,317 


Kelsey, Francis A 


162 


3',', 


Klipowicz, Paul V. 


147.454 


Jensen, Peggy M, , 


175, 187,451 


Jones, Teresa M 




453 


Kelsey, Richard M 146, 


149 


173, 


Klock, Edward L 


424 


Jensen, Rita L 


451 


Jones, Thomas M 




','i ■: 






423 


Klocke, Arlan D 


383 


JethroTull 


57 


Jones, Timothy J 




453 


Keltz, JackD 




413 


Kloefkorn. Randy L, 


454 


Jilka, Catherine M 


168,451 


Jones, Wilene A 




1',;- 


Kemnitz, Dennis R 




.453 


Klopfenstein, Carol 


180 


Jllka.JohnP. , 


180,394 


Jordan, Michael D 




453 


Kemp, Kevin C. 




4 S3 


Kloster, Karen J 


156 


Jilka. Rose 


156.180,402 


Jordan, Roberto J 




IP, < 


Kemper, Annetta M 


179 


141, 


Knackendoffel. Nancy A 310 


Joerg, Cindy A 


157,452 


Jordan, Walter B 




11..' 


Kemrite, Harold D 




383 


Knackstedt, Nancy J 


402 


Johannsen, Nancy J, 


452 


Jorderberg, Kathryn 




1 HI ) 


Kenagy, Leigh A 


153, 32$ 


Knapp, Jerald S 


166 


John, JernanneG 


335 


Joslyn, Randy L 
Joss, Delma D 




453 


Kendall, Constance M 




367 


Knapp, Walter E 


170 


Johns, Geralynn L 


168.452 




290 


Kendall. Joe D 




355 


Knauss, Douglas E. 


189.454 


Johns, Norman D 


162.452 


Joy, Aden 
Joy, Danny W 
Joyce, Ann 


162 453 


Kendnck, David A, . 




383 


Knecht, Linda K 


151.342 


Johnsen, David W. 


383 




.411 


Kennedy, Charles D 




303 


Knetter, Paula P. 


. .153,290 


Johnson, Ann R 


175,187,317 




335 


Kennedy, Constance A 


i'.: 


402 


Knierim, Debra R 


154,397 


Johnson, Beatrice A 


155 


Joyce, Jodee L 




453 


Kennedy, Kay E 




453 


Knight, Gary E. 


.371 


Johnson, Brenda G 


452 


Joyce, Patrick L 
Joyce, Rex M 




.453 


Kenney, Calvin R 




453 


Knight, Joey D 


325 


Johnson, Brian W. 


383 




.411 


Kenney, Mark B 




13'. 


Knight, Robert D 


161 


Johnson, Bruce A 


376 


Juarez. Joyce A 
Judge, Patty L 
Julian, Arlyn D 
Julian Bond 




453 


Kenning, Eleonore M. . 


157 


314 


Knight, Virginia A 


454 


Johnson. Calvin D. 


159, 188.452 




33 '. 


Kent, Mary J 


180 


.124 


Knilans, Matthew J 


162,454 


Johnson, Daniel E 


388 




330 

/'. 


Kent. TapleyW 
Kenworthy, James R. 




161 


Knipp, Sam H 


454 


Johnson, David 


327 






413 


Knipper. Mary B 


336 


Johnson, Debra L 


383 


Julian, Glenda E 


167 40; 


Kepka, Gary E 




454 


Knoche, Jane E. 


347, 180 


Johnson. Debra S 


192,335 


Junge, Richard C 
Jungmann, Jennifer A 
Juno, Julie A 




.1 ' , ! 


Kerkuliet, Michael F. 




454 


Knocke. Jodi R 


148,290 


Johnson. Debra S 


. 310 


172 361 


Kerley, Donald E 




3',', 


Knoebber, Elizabeth 


336 


Johnson. Diane K. 


452 


154 


303 


Kerr, Patricia A 




342 


Knoepfle, Mark G 


454 


Johnson, Donald R 


.143,354 








Kershaw, Karen L 




■13.1 


Knoll, Thomas J 


167 


Johnson, Donna J 


402 


■ ■ ■ 






Kershner, Curtis R 




327 


Knop, Amy J 


314 


Johnson, Edward A, 


452 


l^l^l 






Kerwin, Janet S 


180 


346 


Knopick, Thomas J. . , 


407 


Johnson, Gail A 


383 


l/l/l 


f 




Kesl, Peggy M 




fi,1 


Knopp, Clayton R 


454 


Johnson, George A 


171 


WV WV w 


L 




Kessler, Barbara E 


156,290 


Knopp, Janice E 


347, 180 


Johnson. Gwenolyn S 


160, 188 


|%|\I 


V 




Kessler, Scott A 


193 


424 


Knopp, Max E 


330 


Johnson, Heather K 


147, 162,452 








Ketter, Dorothy W 




454 


Knowles, Curtis J 


318 


Johnson, Janel L 


422 


Kadavy. David J 




453 


Ketter. Mary P. 


192, 34C 


Knowles. Kenton V. 


454 


Johnson. Janet E 


452 


Kahl, Mary 




199 


Ketterman. Kent E 




180 


Knowles, Melodie S 


347 


Johnson. Janice L . 


319 


Kaiser, Robert H 




453 


Kettler, Denise L. . . , 


177 


317 


Knox, Jacalyn E. 


151.364 


Johnson, Jeanne M 


157,452 


Kaiser. Rose M 


177, 187 


317 


Khan. RabN 




188 


Knox, Kenneth 


411 


Johnson, Jolene K 


397 


Kahvoda, Scott N 


149 


f/i, 


Kidd. GevinC 




180 


Knudson, Mary K 


...... 157 


Johnson, Julie A 


319 


Kallenbach. Susan L. 




402 


Kidwell, David A 




332 


Knutson, Kevin T 


193 


Johnson, Karen L 


188, 196.310 


Kammer, Anne 




164 


Kier, Nancy T 




346 


Koch, Deborah S. 


167, 177.454 


Johnson, Kay L 


452 


Kanaga, Mary E 




428 


Kiernan, Theresa M. . 150 


176 


203 


Koch, Kevin Erskine 


182,183 


Johnson. Kendal D 


390 


Kanaga, RoseS 




428 


Kiggwe, Samuel M 




186 


Koch, Nicholas F. 


171,173 


Johnson, Kent R. 


452 


Kannard, Kraig E 




376 


Kilbourn. Sharon K. , 




in i 


Kocour, Barbara A . 


153, 167 



Koechner, Joseph L 160,183.296 
Koehler. Edward C 383 

Koehn. Charles E 172,173 

Koehn. Matthew A 388 

Koelsch, Jane 157 

Koenig, Stephen W. 173,191 

Koepke. Leslie A 147,342 

Koger, Barbara A 428 

Kogler, Larry R 300 

Kohake. Marcia R 170,454 

Kohl, Vicki M 454 

Kohman, Julie E 428 

Kohman. Kurt 454 

Kohman. Ray J 454 

Kohr, Larry D 305 

Kolarik, Thomas J 454 

Kolega, Robert M 318 

Kolich. Margaret J 383 

Kolling, Jana M 428 

Kolman, Joseph J 177.454 

Kolman, Venette R. 155.414 

Kolo, Rebecca F 1 86 

Komin, Kathryn M 336 

Kongs, Beverly J 155,454 

Kongs, Nancy K 180,335 

Konicek, Jeanette M 454 

Konicek, Stanley A 159,187,296 
Koontz. Kathryn L 290 

Kopitnik, Lawrence J. . .. 355 

Kopshinsky, Daniel W 355. 

Korb, Rebecca J 319 

Korb, Teresa K 319 

Korte, Rose M 428 

Korver, Kim D . 454 

Kosko, Joy E 428 

Kossoy, Faith S 336 

Kost, John A 355 

Kostelec. Maureen A . 336 

Koster, Derald R 454 

Koukol, Darwin L 377 

Koukol, Mark A 454 

Koukol, Nancy J 414,180 

Kowalzyk, Kay S 175 

Kraft, Kathryn L 192.336 

Kraft, Randall E 455 

Kraft, Scott C. 1 99, 204, 205, 298 
Kraft. Terrence R 176.177 

Kraismger, Susan K 336 

Kramer, Charles M 1 95, 298 

Kramer, John C 393 

Kramer, Joyce M . . 169,455 

Kramer, Mary A 173.455 

Krause, Darrel E 147,377 

Krause, Robin S 402 

Krause, Starla J 1 75, 402 

Krchma, Alice E . . . 165 

Krehbiel, Bradley J 182.455 

Krehbiel, Debra K 179,455 

Krehbiel, Patricia L 160,361 

Krehbiel, Peggy A .336 

Kreidler, Margaret L 428 

Krempa, Ellen M 402 

Krenger, Teresa A 428 

Kreutzer, Pamela 164,402 

Krier. KirbyW. 455 

Krier, Thomas J 377 

Knshnan, Subramania 144 

Kriss, Joseph T 355 

Kriss, Phillips. 327 

Kriwiel, Margaret J 397 

Krizek, Brian E ' 288 

Krizek, Craig L 288 

Kroeger, Anna M 170.310 

Kroeger. Hedwig E. 148,310 

Kroening, Mary L 336 

Kroh, Roger L 325 

Kropf. Donald H 160 

Kroupa, JoanC 148,180,428 

Kroupa, Sharon L 147,303 

Krueger, Kathaleen A 336 

Krug. JohnR. . .305 

Krug. Karen E 383 

Krug, Philip C 195,305 

Kruse, Teresa M 1 74, 428 

KSDM-FM 165 

K-State Players 165 

K-State Singers 182 

K-State Sports Car Club 1 93 

KSUARH 196 

KSU Wildlife Society 165 

Kubie. Diane C 336 

Kuchem, Christopher L. 172,455 
Kuebelbeck, Rick W 327 

Kueker, Richard J 167 

Kuhn, Steven A. 325 

Kulich.SteveJ 355 

Kull, Daniel D 369 

Kumar, Pramil 144 

Kummer, Frederick S 355 

Kuniholm, Alan G 422 

Kunz, Michael 405 

Kunz, Theresa . . 153.342 

Kurfiss, Brenda K 310 

Kurfiss, Debra J .455 

Kurtz. Allen D. 159,355 

Kurtz, QuentinE 455 

Kurtz, Sue L 336 

Kurz, Kenneth W 418 

Kussman, Janice M. 455 

Kussman, Richard L. . ., 145,455 
Kutnmk, Deborah A 455 

Kutnink, KathyJ 455 

Kutter. Ronald L. . . 327 




Laakso, Brenda J. 171 

Laaser, Gregory N 455 

Laaser.WimL 367 

Lacey, Dennis V. 177 

Lacy, Anne K 179,314 

Lacey, Marilyn E , 180,367 

Lacy, Stephen M . .. . . 405 

Lacy. Susan M 153.290 

Ladd.AlanJ ...160,455 

Ladd.CarlR 160,296 

Ladd, Sally J 310 

Ladner. Kristy 336 

Ladner, Robin A 164,405 

Lafferty, Terrie L 152,170,177,303 
Laforge, Robert R 164,165,383 

Lagergren, Ralph E 143,455 

Lahue. BriceW 455 

Lair, Gregory D 399 

Lala, Brenda J 148,174,303 

Lallement, Linda J 310 

Lally. KathermeM 336 

Laman, Rene J .310 

Lambda Chi Alpha 371 

Lambert, Jack L 194 

Lambert, Patricia A 146 

Lambie, Barbara J 1 53, 294 

Lambie, James R 172,455 

Lambie. Susan A 455 

Lamoreux. Sherry L 303 

Lance, Douglas H 355 

Land, Beth ... 157 

Landis. Laura L 403 

Landon, Daniel J 185,188.192 

Landon Lectures 86 

Landnth, Brenda J 160,310 

Landnth, Melanie A 148,310 

Lane, Mary J 204 383 

Lang, Jane A. 455 

Lang. Kathleen L 428 

Lange. Jeffrey M 455 

Lange, Patti A 455 

Langenkamp, Mary C 182 

Langenkamp, Robert A 455 

Langenwalter, P 388 

Langley. Lyle E 369 

Langley. Marilyn K 455 

Langton, Cathleen J 160,187,336 
Larabee, Mary M .347 

Larkin. Stephen P. 179,355 

Larsen, Jane E. 166 

Larsen, Linda 151,303 

Larsen, Peter E 300 

Larson, Brent G 455 

Larson. Charyl D 291 

Larson, Craig A 296 

Larson, Galen L 161 

Larson. G Kent . . . 411 

Larson. Janette E 455 

Larson. Knstme L 291 

Larson, Lauren J 161 

Larson. MarkW. 455 

Larson. Thayne A 325 

Lash, Elizabeth L 361 

Lashbrook, RoyC 179.180 

Lassen, Dennis L 455 

Lassen. Linda A 361 

Lassman, Bonita A 188 

Last. Gregory D . . . . 418 

Latta, Ronald 413 

Latta, Susan K 180,317 

Lauber, Pamelas 455 

Lauber. Robert D 144,159,455 

Lauck. Debra D 154,319 

Laudel, Sharon A 455 

Laue, Geraldine A 151 

Laue, Harold L 411 

Laughery, Sondra F 455 

Lauritzen, Lucinda L 455 

Lavme, EricL. 189 

Law, Robert S 409 

Lawrence, Carol S 177.455 

Lawrence, Cindy D 347 

Lawrence, Larry L 1 76 

Lawrence, Richard W 390 

Lawson, Carolyn A. 157.294 

Lawson, Forrest C 1 80. 393 

Lay, Linda K , . . 294 

Layne. Daryl E 377 

Layne, John D. 166 

Lea, Leslie C 383 

Leach, Ann J 160,455 

Lear, Nancy L 310 

Lear, William R 173 

Leary. Kathleen 314 

Leasure. Doral E. 189 

Leavitt. Wallace C ... 1 62, 383 

Leboeuf. LeeC 455 

Leclerc, Byron W ...193,322 

Ledell. BertilA 455 

Lee, Curtis Ft. 187 

Lee. David L. 180 

Lee, Hong W . 195 

Lee, John D 180 

Lee, Margaret M. 168 

Lee, MarkS. .. .143, 163 

Lee. Sandra C 455 

Lee, Tana S. 152,342 

Leeburg, Jane E 347 

Leech, Elizabeth A, 193 

Lefever, Samuel C 183 

Legge, Diane K. . 178 



Legler. Donald A 388 

Lehman, Robert L. . . . 355 

Lehman, William W 369 

Lehmann. Dixie S 383 

Lehner, Pamela J 336 

Lehrman, Verney D 172,455 

Leiszler, James G 171 

Leithauser, Gail A 146 

Leland, Stanley B ...... 455 

Leman, CariS 162,176329 

Lembnght, James A 455 

Lemmons, Blaine E 377 

Lentell. Brian A. . 384 

Leon, Rebecca M 188,384 

Leonard, Evan L. 455 

Leonard, Larry D .384 

Leonard, Michael A. 180.181.371 
Leonard, Patricia L 170 

Leshovsky, Deann M 428 

Lesslie, TeddiA 455 

Lester, Terry L 455 

Letch, Peter E 371 

Letourneau, Karen 151,403 

Lett, Kirk R 455 

Levell, Emily A 183 

Levenson, Lee A 355 

Levin, Jeffrey L 159 

Levine, Elissa R 162 

Levy. David S ... 411 

Lewallen, Stephen L .149,455 

Lewandowski, Rick J 355 

Lewis, Allen L 455 

Lewis, Clifford S. 424 

Lewis, Dee A. . . 148, 175,336 

Lewis, Gregory K 455 

Lewis, Jane A 456 

Lewis, Janene 310 

Lewis, Janet 337 

Lewis, John G 327 

Lewis, Kayleen C 456 

Lewis. Kirk J 456 

Lewis, Lisa S 337 

Lewis, Marty A . 157,291 

Lewis, Michelle A 180,181,182 

Lewis, Peggy J 303 

Lewis, R Perry 41 1 

Lewis, Shannon M 337 

Lewis, Steve J 347 

Lickteig, Dorothy J 456 

Liebl, Barbara E. 456 

Liebl, Stephen A 411 

Lies. Stephen J 456 

Lietz, Richard G. 305 

Lietzan, Christopher 325 

Light Brigade 1 77 

Lignitz, Larry G 424 

Lillard, David S 456 

Lillard, Diane L 384 

Lillard. Rebecca L 403 

LilyTomlin 23 

Lilly. Jerry A 195 

Lindahl, Carols 347 

Lmdau.MaryR 337 

Linder, Lee J 456 

Lindemuth, James T 456 

Lindenmuth, Leslie D .172,288 

Linder, Jay E . 393 

Lmdgren, DebieJ 397 

Lindgren. Fred 456 

Lmdholm, John C 172.173 

Lindholm, KathyK, 153,187,456 
Lindshield, Charles A . .. 330 

Lindstrom, Mary A 1 53, 456 

Line, Nancy S. . . . . . 319 

Linenberger, Steven P. .". . 394 

Linenberger, Susan A 314 

Linenbroker, Melanie A 456 

Link, Gerald L 159 

Link, Malcolm K . 456 

Linn, Brian G 456 

Linn, Gary D 456 

Linscott, Sarah A 314 

Linscott. Sheryl A 337 

Linvill, Laurie G. . . .163,196,367 

Linville, Randal L 330 

Lipovitz, Francis A 456 

Litch, JohnE 355 

Little, Douglas J 147,422 

Little, Richard L 355 

Little, Rita A 456 

Little Sigmas 1 52 

Little Sisters ot Athena 1 53 

Little Sisters of Minerva 1 53 

Little Sisters of the Gold Rose 1 53 
Little Sisters ol the Pearls and 

Rubies 154 

Little Sisters ol the Shield and 

Diamond 154 

Little Sisters of ThetaXi 155 

Little Sisters of the White Rose 



Lockyer, Ann L . 169,457 

Locy, Shelley D 314 

Loder, Bryce J. 457 

Loeb, JoeH. . . 146 

Loeb. LinoyR. 457 

Loewen, Christine K 175 

Loflin, JoannA 174,337 

Logan, Brian C 146,457 

Logan, Cynthia K .151,403 

Lohkamp. Deedra A. . . . 403 

Lohrentz, David K 422 

Lohrentz, Margie A 157 

Lohrey, Cynthia J 457 

Lollar. Michael D 377 

Londeen, David S 180,377 

Long, Harvey A 1 64 

Long, Jo A. 347 

Long, Kenneth D 457 

Long, LynA 337 

Long, Patrick 457 

Long, R. Dale 369 

Long, Stephens E 147 

Long. Steven P 424 

Loo, JanisK 175.188.384 

Loomis, JackL 399 

Loschcke, Christian 183 

Lott, Michael L 347 

Loucks, Cynthia G. 314 

Lough, Susan D 347 

Loughary, Steven J 409 

Louk, Debora M. . .172, 173 

Love, Linda J 153,457 

Love, Mary L. . . . 164,457 

Love, Melanie 457 

Loving, Patti G. 457 

Low, Douglas M 377 

Low, Kelley 457 

Low, Kendall C. 394 

Lowdon.JaneD 174,457 

Lowdon, Janet R 170,179.457 

Lowe, Sheree 150,303 

Lowrey, Drew I 188,355 

Lowry, Tamara R 151,162,337 

Loyd. Thomas 307 

Lucas. Ann M 457 

Lucas, Gary F. 422 

Lucas, Steven E 457 

Luce, Roger C 457 

Luck, Janet K 337 

Luck, Richard D 393 

Lucke, Gregory A 305 

Luckeroth, Michele 1 57. 294 

Ludlum, Ted . 203 

Ludwig. Susan M. 457 

Ludwig. Sylvia R. 384 

Luebbers, Dennis J 411 

Lueker, Deborah A 291 

Luke, Charles W 457 

Lukert, Carol A 187,347 

Lukert, KarlF. 377 

Lukert, Susan K 157 

Lukinac, Cynthia D 384 

Lukow, Eugene W 377 

Lundberg, Cheryl A 424 

Lundberg, David W 457 

Lundberg, Donna L 457 

Lundberg, Steven J 180 

Lundgren, Gail A 170,457 

Lundhigh, Marcelyn A 361 

Lundin. Marsha L 457 

Lundquist, DebraA 174,428 

Lundsted, Nancy J 367 

Lundstrom, Gayle D 303 

Lundstrom. Richard A 421 

Lundy, Joan M . 428 

Lungren, Herbert J 457 

Lungren, Kathy M 457 

Lungren, Tern D 167,310 

Lupton, James W 305 

Lust, Keith M 305 

Lustgarten, Eddie H. . . 390 

Luthi, Allison J 397 

Luthi, Joni R 397 

Luttrell. Vicki F. 156, 169, 172,294 

Lutz, Randall L 355 

Lux, Lynn M 361 

Lyle, Dwight R . 399 

Lynam, Patricia . . , 180,319 

Lynch, Dennis R. .377 

Lynn, Naomi B 194 

Lynton, Peter D 407 

Lynton, Suzanne L 303 

Lyon, Barbara J 303 



mmm 





154 


Maben. Pamela S 


428 


Littleton, Cindy L 


156 


Macaluso, Nick J 


.411 


Livingood, David W. . . . 


180 


Mach, Scott W 


.407 


Livingston, Marsha R 


457 


Mack, Alyson B 


310 


Livingston, Michael J 


457 


Mack, James W 


176 


Livingood, Amy L 


.156,367 


Macke, Patricia A 


183,337 


Livingston, Sue A. 
Ljungdahl, Marilyn .... 


397 






. . 457 


MacLaird, Steven A. 


177 


Llamas, Patricia A 


384 


MacNish, Thomas A 


384 


Llamas, Stephen A 


394 


Macon, Gwendolyn S 


155, 192,384 


Lloyd, Steven W 


. .196,424 


Macy, Cindy M, . 146, 


147, 148, 160. 


Loader, Barbara A 


347 




175.188,317 


Lober, Terence A 


196.322 


Maddox, Jerrold 


195 


Lobmeyer, James A 


.187,377 


Maddux, Michel A 


180,418 


Lockard, Nancy E. 


457 


Maddux, MitziC. 


181,317 


Locke, Mark A 


171.457 


Maechtlen, Michelle 


337 


Lockhart. Valarie A. , 


428 


Magana, Audie B. 


457 


Lockyear, William L. . . 


457 


Magee. Matthew K 


355 



Maggard, Carol J 162,196,403 

Maggio, Mark R 388 

Maguin, James M 1 44 

Mahaffey. Edward A 162 

Mahan, Jesse H . . . 322 

Mahaney. JayW 457 

Mahoney, Janet A 153,183,186. 
347 

Mahoney, Patricia A " 154 

Mahoney, Thomas H 394 

Main, Jennifer L 152,397 

Majors, Nancy J 428 

Malcolm, Eugene G 164 

Malin, Becky A. .180 

Malinowski, Patricia 457 

Mall, DeniseE. . . 347 

Mallard, Harry C. 457 

Mallory, Pat 197 

Mallory, Patricia L 457 

Malm. David L 171,457 

Malone, Bradley P 457 

Malone, Kathleen A 169,337 

Malone. MarkS 399 

Malone, Sue A 157,457 

Maloney, LuA. 154,319 

Maltby, Daniel P. 417 

Mance, Thomas E 1 62, 384 

Maness, Mark M 457 

Mangan, Stephen L 355 

Mann, Donna L 397 

Mann, George W. 322 

Mann, Joseph D 371 

Manry, JohnR 457 

Mansberger, Curtis D 369 

Manuel, Milton L 194 

Manzo, Wilfred F 377 

Marcel Marceau 22 

Marcelle, Yvonne M 457 

Marching Band 180 

Marcotte, Renee S 180,181,457 

Marcuson, Bradley A 457 

Marietta, James R 162,405 

Marietta, John C 195,409 

Marietta, Kala J. 146,149,173,457 

Marihugh, Kenneth L 377 

Maritan, Mickey J 300 

Markee, James M. . 399 

Marken, Harvey E 384 

Marker, Jeff A. 411 

Markey. Douglas B 407 

Markham, Marcie L 457 

Marks, James M 377 

Marks, John W 180 

Marksman, Barbara J. 157 

MarlattHall 373 

Marlow, Denver D 457 

Marmet, Terry W 457 

Marmor, Frederick W 160,458 

Marquez, Edward J 371 

Marr, John M 194 

Marr, Patricia A 337 

Marr. Steven K 458 

Marrs. Donnie D . . 458 

Marrs, Ramona A 458 

Marrs, Valeria L 458 

Marschman. Kent L. ... 305 

Marsh, Debra K 303 

Marsh, Mary A 161,458 

Marsh, Susan M 458 

Marshall. Deborah K 181 

Marshall, Glenn D 185,458 

Marshall, Leigh A 176,385 

Marshall. Mark L 327 

Marston, Barbara D. 347 

Marston, Twig T 296 

Marten, Paula S 154,458 

Marteney, John D 167,424 

Martens, Beth D 314 

Martens. Kent A. 371 

Marti, HumbertoA, . . 458 

Martin, Bryan V 377 

Martin. Christina K 310 

Martin, Deborah L. 385 

Martin, Debra J 192.428 

Martin, Jackie A 337 

Martin, Kathryn J. 385 

Martin, Michael R 325 

Martin, Nancy A 337 

Martin, Nancy J 179, 414 

Martin, Patricia R 424 

Martin, Paul C 165 

Martin, Peggy J 458 

Martin, Ralph C 406 

Martin, Richard A . . . . 393 

Martin. Richard A 458 

Martin, Scotty J 195.325 

Martincich, Keith E, .377 

Martinez, Jesus R 394 

Marvel, Randall W. 289 

Maskus, Shirley E ...153.428 

Mason, David P 300 

Mason, Ernest L 180,377 

Mason, Lucy N . 458 

Mason, Marvin 1 77 

Massa, Joseph L 458 

Massey, Randy M. 307 

Massoth. Glenroy R 458 

Massoth.JoeJ 385 

Master, Amrapali . 458 

Masters. Cynthia J 157,329 

Masters, David R. . 171.173.422 
Masters. Wilma L 153,183 

Masterson, Cynthia K 337 

Mathes, Dana L 355 

Mathews, Debra L. 337 

Mathews, Gorenzo A 187 

Mathews, Mark R. 300 

Mathews, Pamela J 174,428 



Mathewson, Judith J 170, 
Mathis. Samuel E 
Mathison, Deborah K. 
Matlack, RexW 
Matlack, Roxanne 
Matlack, Terry C. 
Matley, Charles A 
Matney. Constance M 
Matousek, Carl W 
Matson. Dean L 
Matson, Karen S 148, 

Matson, Kent D 
Matthew, Randall K. 
Matthews. Douglas A 
Matthis, Judith A 
Mattingly. Kathleen 
Mattson, Lisa L. 
Matyak, Judy M 
Matz, EydieR 183, 

Matzeder, Leo P. 
Maupin, Kimberly A 
Maupin, Michele A 
Maurer, Samuel G 
Mawhiney, Lisa K 
May, Cynthia E 

May, David C 

May, Deborah J 
May, Rosemary A 
May, Suzie 
Maydew, Brian J 
Maydew, Janette 
Mayer, Gregory L 
Mayfield, Garold M 
Mayhew, Cynthia A 
Mayo, Michael G 
Mayo, Steven A 
Mayse, Lawrence W. 
McAdams, Douglas R. 
McAfee, Cheryl L 
McAlister, David L 
McAllister. Cynthia S 
McCalhster. Lynn 
McAllister, R. D 

McAndrew, Susan M 

McAmis. Vickie 
McArthur. West K 
McAtee, Joseph M 
McAuhffe, Susan B 
McBee, Shelley A 
McBride. Ronald H 
McBnde. Steven B 
McCabe, Francis D 

McCall, Cynthia S 

McCandless, Debra K 

McCann, William T 
McCarter, Steven W 
McCarthy, Caren J 
McCaustland, Heather C 

McChesney, Joseph L 
McClam, David D 
McClanahan. Alan J 
McClanahan, Kenneth C 
McClary, Kent M 
McClary, Michael D 
McClelland, Dave 
McClelland, Jeffrey D 
McClmtock. Gary W 
McClintock. William 

McCluggage, Mark D 

McClure, Cynthia A 
McClure, Gay 
McClure, Steven L 
McClure, Susan J 1 52. 

McConaughey, Kent E 
McConaughey. Patrick J 
McConnell. Kevin P. 
McCool, Timothy I 
McCord, Barbara J 
McCorgary, Larry W 

McCormic. Steven E 

McCormick. Allen C 
McCormick, John E. 
McCormick, Sharon K. . . . 
McCosh, Cathy J 154, 

McCoskey. Steven L 
McCowan, Diana L. 
McCoy, Martha A 
McCoy, Michael D. . 
McCoy. Thomas M 
McCraner, Carol 
McCrann, Lisa P 
McCrary, Sharon L 
McCray, Chnsti 
McCreary, Terry L 
McCreight. Jane 
McCnllis, Marilyn 
McCulley, Scott M 
McCullough. Joseph B 
McCullough, Mikel J. 
McCundy, Mark F 
McCune. Greg A 
McCune, Linda D 152. 

McDade. Jeffrey R. 
McDaniel, Cindy C 
McDaniel. KimW 
McDaniel. Nancy S. 
McDaniel. Pamela D 
McDiftett. Shelley L. 
McDiftetf. Timothy L 143. 
McDonald, Gary L. 
McDonald, James P 
McDonough, Kathryn J 
McDowell, Ravae J. 
McElroy. Norval R. . . . 
McElwain, Rhonda S 
McEndree, Vicki G 



385 

385 

303 

163, "07 

191 

.347 

162.458 

385 

193.458 

179, 182 

385 

458 

347 

303 

291 

174,458 

192,428 

193,347 

152,319 

337 

458 

174,458 

347 

416 

416 

364 

156,294 

330 

458 

330 

159 

337 

458 

160.296 

355 

146 

152.337 

288 

161.458 

153 

355 

157,314 



458 
355 
458 
403 

48, 154. 
361 

1 80 S77 



367 
377 
289 
355 
377 
369 
369 
181 
300 
385 
385 

149.355 
414 
310 
377 

196.314 
423 
458 
371 
179 
347 
296 

164.165 
458 
164 
347 

168,385 
413 
310 

146.458 

172,407 
300 
458 
458 

170,317 
458 
355 
310 
314 
458 

191,458 
355 
458 
406 

154,319 
191 

157.428 
377 

153.347 
303 
347 

183.421 
377 

185 
458 
458 
458 
156 397 



McEwen, Patricia A, 


147,367 


McFadden, Edward H. 




458 


McFadden, Patrick M 


197.45! 


McFadden. William C 




1 7 7 


McFall. Larry D 




J55 


McFall. Nancy R 




33/ 


McFall. Ronny D 




)00 


McFarland, Connie S 




.458 


McFarland, Frank R 




n,1 


McGee. Karen E 




4 58 


McGee. Sandra K. 




15? 


McGee. William L . . 


60,188 


.'Ml 


McGeeney. Suzanne rV 




458 


McGhee, David R 




458 


McGill. Matt 




193 


McGillick. Veronica 




189 


McGinness, Clare A. 




.1 1 8 


McGinty. Laurie J 


180 


181 


McGivern. Michael R 


172.322 


McGivern, Toni M 




•: 1 


McGonagle. Timothy J 




418 


McGranaghan. Margaret 147 


291 


McGranaghan, Thomas 


32/ 


McGrath, Barbara A 




4 55 


McGrath. Julia A. 




337 


McGrath, Stephanie A 




459 


McGrath. Timothy H. 




459 


McGraw, MarciaG 


142 


459 


McGrew, Robert L 




399 


McGntf, Patricias 




14 7 


McGritf, Robert W 


49, 171 


377 


McGuire. D Duane 


168,459 


McGuire, Tamela A 




185 


McGuire, Teresa A. 




459 


McGuirk. Kelly J 




)!.,<> 


McHugh, Michael L 




,459 


Mcllhon. Stephen J . 




32b 


Mclntyre. Pegge A 




397 


Mclntyre. Robert R 




885 


Mclver.BradJ 




3 7 1 


McKaig. Douglas R 




,180 


McKaig, Susan M. 




459 


McKam, Sheila D 


62, 180 


414 


McKay. John R 




I'M 


McKay. Kevin W 




459 


McKee, Charles D 




377 


McKee, Charlotte A 148,167 


19? 






34? 


McKee. Jack K, 




377 


McKee, Judy A 


148 


•; •: 7 


McKee, Sharon A, . 




189 


McKenzie, Jetfery D 




393 


McKenzie, Marvin B 


162 


■■ill 


McKmley, Randolph A 




146 


McKinney, Katheryn A 




145 


McKmney, Wayne A 


159, 33C 


McLaughlin, Kathleen 




459 


McLeland, David A. , 


I 78, 180 


iOb 


McLeod, Deborah S 


15* 


303 


McLeod, Terese M 




w, 


McMahon, Renee 


154 


403 


McMillen, Gwendolyn 


179,319 


McMurray, Dee A 


150,459 


McNaughton, Gary A 


144 


146, 


149, 


73, 191 


45 ■ 


McNeil, Deborah L 




424 


McNeil, Richard I 




289 


McNeill, Anna L 




403 


McNeive, Lucy K 




151 


McNerney, Coleen A 


170 


459 


McNerney, Frances M 




34/ 


McNickle, Tim A 




330 


McNitt. JayD, 




.155 


McNorton, Karl W, 




18/ 


McNorton, Kevin E. . 




327 


McPheter, George R 




406 


McRae, Patricia A 




367 


McRoberts, Jeanette 




■,.',; 


McSpadden, Floyd F. . 




176 


McVay. KathyS, 


169 


4D ', 


McVey. Bart L 




421 


McVey, Craig L 




459 


McVey, Denise L. 




155 


McVicker, Marilyn M 




459 


McWhorter. Daniel M 




8/1 


McWilliams. Gordon C 




385 


McWiiliams, Robben L 




330 


Meacham, Frank D, 


176 


177 


Mead, Mary E 


156 


to; 


Meade, Sandra A 




397 


Meagher, Freda M 




403 


Mealman, Linda K 


17C 


11,4 


Means, Carol 




347 


Means. Daniel E 




371 


MECHA 




1 88 


Medical Technology Club 


166 


Mears. Timothy P 




41 1 


Medill. Carol 


157 


")4 


Medill, Rhonda L 


153 


347 


Meehan, Barbara L 




115 


Meeks, Herbert L 




300 


Meengs, Mary L 


167 


459 


Meharg. Randall L 




459 


Mehl, Karen A. 




303 


Mem. Steven A 




305 


Meinke, Michael S, , , 




11)5 


Meisenheimer, F. E. 




'155 


Meitl, Gerard F 




1 IV 


Meitl, Susan M 




455 


Meitner, John T 




406 


Melcher, Jeffrey L. . 




377 


Melgaard, David K 


I7£ 


181 


Melhus. Melinda . . 




115 


Melhes. David N 




455 


Mellor. Karen A 




455 


Melnick, Robert 




195 


Melson, Chris A 


160, 29£ 


Mellon, Coral E 




• i ". 



Menard. Terry M 355 

Menaugh. Steven A 203.204,205, 

459 

Mendenhall. Jana B 459 

Menehan, Melissa . . 361 

Mense, Deborah J 157,192,294 

Men's Glee Club 183 

Mercer, Brad F ,459 

Mercer, James A 177 

Mercer, Susan J 429 

Merchant, Hashim A ,459 

Merder. James D ,183 

Merillat, Chris H 327 

Merklein, Paul W 160 

Mernfield. Carol L 342 

Merritt. Randall E 147 

Mertz. Robert D 307 

Mertz. Sara J 187.314 

Mertz. Wendi J 459 

Messenger, Evan S 159,459 

Messenger, Tanya L. 459 

Messmer, Deanene S 291 

Metcalf. Bill L, 322 

Metheney, Larry A 41 1 

Metsch, Diane M 403 

Metzinger, Joe W 298 

Metzler, Bradley D. , , , 399 

Meyer, Allen D 305 

Meyer, Brenda S 459 

Meyer, Colleen J 1 79 

Meyer, Connie S 459 

Meyer, Craig A 459 

Meyer, DarrelW 377 

Meyer, David J 459 

Meyer, David L 300 

Meyer, DebraL ,150,459 

Meyer, Donna R 148,317 

Meyer, Dwight C 459 

Meyer. Frank W 176 

Meyer. Gary W 459 

Meyer, Rex H 305 

Meyer, Vicki L. . 459 

Meyers, Carol A 459 

Meyers, Paula K 1 55, 1 64, 1 68, 

200, 459 

Mezger, Dena E 173,403 

Micheels, Marlene M 459 

Michel, Michael E 167,459 

Michel, Vickie L 459 

Michels, Gary L 183,330 

Michels, Kay L 459 

Mick. Perry J 318 

Mickelsen. Ross 194 

Mickelson, Roger C 167.377 

Microbiology Club 1 66 

Middlekamp, RickD 299 

Middleton, Jeffery P. ,355 

Mierau, Constance L 403 

Mika, Joseph D .385 

Mikesell, Tressa A, 183,310 

Mikols, Wayne J 424 

Milberger, Mary L 1 87, 1 88, 347 

Milburn, Michael W 1 49. 369 

Milby. Randy D .166 

Miles. Melody D 347 

Miles, Steven W 160.296 

Millard. Barbara S 367 

Millen, Mary L 429 

Miller, Alan G 459 

Miller, Carol L 174,194,367 

Miller, Charles E 377 

Miller, Charliss A 156 

Miller, Coleen 347 

Miller, Cynthia L .459 
Miller, Debra K 146.149.173,459 

Miller, Gregory B 147.167,459 

Miller, Jane A 347 

Miller, Jeanine 156, 175 

Miller, Judy E 194 

Miller, Kathryn A 319 

Miller, KathyP 151,459 

Miller. KathyW 337 

Miller, Kim A 330 

Miller, Kirk W, 385 

Miller. Marcia A 459 

Miller, ManlynS 201,459 

Miller, Mark W , 406 

Miller, Marvin L 459 

Miller, Mary A 294 

Miller, Maura M. 176.177 

Miller, MelanieA 385 

Miller, Michelle .424 

Miller. Neil A . .355 

Miller, Paul L. .. . 148 

Miller. Peter N. 161 

Miller, Robert C 355 

Miller, Robert E 318 

Miller. Ruth A 460 

Miller, Sandra L 156. 192. ?94 

Miller. Scott M 180 

Miller. Stacey J 148,175.460 

Miller, Stanley R 177 

Miller, Stephen L 394 

Miller, Steven J . . .183,385 

Miller. Thomas 406 

Miller, Vickie K 4?9 

Milligan, Randy J 391 

Mills, Brian J .,,,,399 

Mills, David W 460 

Mills. Earl E. ,355 

Mills, Keith A, 418 

Mills, Laurie I 364 

Mills. Lorraine A 403 

Mills. Margaret A 294 

Millsap, Teresa C, , 364 

Millsap, Timothy M 305 

Milner, Susan E. 460 

Minear. Donald G 385 



Minnis, PatC 


180.460 


Minnix, James M. 


418 


Minor, Kathleen A. 


167,460 


Minturn, Martha L 


180,414 


Mirocke, Annette C 


385 


Miskimins, Joel A 


460 


Mital. Anil 


144 


Mitchell, Danna M 


429 


Mitchell. Deborah A 


460 


Mitchell, Gary R 


176 


Mitchell, Gregory P 


165,460 


Mitchell, Lowell R 149 


195.421 


Mitchell, PaulD 


356 


Mitchell. Phyllis 


429 


Mitchell, Shelley D 


397 


Mitts, Kathleen A 


192,364 


Mlinek Wendi E 


175,337 


Moats, Bilhe M 


460 


Mock, Debora K 


403 


Mockry, Eldon F 145 


149,460 


Moddrell, Nancy 


153.319 


Moden.Joleen 148,160 


187,403 


Moeckel, Merle J 


460 


Moeder, Leon 


460 


Moeder, Susan J 


460 


Moehlenbrink, Larry 


183,388 


Moeller, Chris R 


460 


Moeller, Debra L 


347 


Moeller, Diane K 


189,460 


Moheng. Mitchell C 


166,289 


Mohler, Michael H 


460 


Mohler, Paula J 167 


180.460 


Mohney. Charles D 


377 


Mohr, Julie K 


460 


Mohr, Wilma L 


460 


Moll, Charles A 


356 


Mollett, Kathryn 


156 


Molzen, Myron A 


180,356 


Moncada, Luis F 


460 


Monfort, Darrell R 


460 


Monfort, Nancy S 


187,403 


Monk, Gwen A 


. 319 


Monks, Andrea J, 


310 


Montague, Donald 


197 


Monteleon, Rosalie M 


385 


Montgomery, Lisa C 


151, 179 


Montgomery, Nancy J 


319 


Montgomery, Robert G 


146, 149. 




182 


Montgomery, Susan F 


162.347 


Montgomery, Theresa 


347 


Moody, Jo E 


429 


Moore, Alan D 


,187 


Moore, Alisa K 


460 


Moore, Carol A 


167,460 


Moore, Dee A 


403 


Moore, Gregory A 


385 


Moore, Gregory D 


325 


Moore Hall 


380 


Moore, James P. . 146 


173,461 


Moore, Jeffrey W 


388 


Moore. Kenneth D 


413 


Moore, Kim L 


4?9 


Moore, Kimberly J 


154,320 


Moore, Lucian 


461 


Moore, Lynn A 


424 


Moore, Melissa 180 


181,361 


Moore, Michael 


388 


Moore, Michelle K 


367 


Moore, Nancy E 


175,403 


Moore, Robert A 


144 


Moore, Susan K 


347 


Moore, Suzanne K 


150,294 


Moore, Thomas 


168 


Moore, Timothy R. 


318 


Moore, William D 


16?, 461 


Moore. William E. 


194 


Moore, William K 


356 


Moorman, Catherine A 


337 


Moors, Mary C 


337 


Moots, Craig K. 


411 


Morain, Michelle 


461 


Morano, Michael A, 


461 


Moreland, Dave 


189 


Moreland, Richard C. . 


?99 


Morffi, Raul R 


16? 


Morford, Quentin A 


461 


Morgan, David J 


385 


Morgan, Joyce L 


151,461 


Morgan, Kathryn A, 


461 


Morgan, Kimberly A 


397 


Morgan. Pamela 


461 


Morgan, Peggy J 


196,347 


Morgan, Phillip L. . 


377 


Morgan. Thomas H 


296 


Morgan, Timothy J 


394 


Morgenstern, Pamela 


337 


Morgenstern, R 


461 


Morin, DaleE 


461 


Morin, Terrence J 


413 


Morray, Brian S 


. 356 


Morrell. Mickey V 


159, ?96 


Morrical, Gregory W 


16?, 377 


Morris, Bradford H 


461 


Morris, Daniel W 


461 


Morris, Derrick E 


461 


Morris, Jeffery B 


3?7 


Morris, Julia A 


. ..429 


Morris, Linda K 


155 


Morris, Mary F , 1 70 


196,337 


Morris, Michael E 


391 


Morris, Tresia E 


461 


Morrison, Kile R 


407 


Morse, Roanna L 


291 


Morse, Robert E. 


385 


Morse, Steven K 


461 


Mortar Board 


147 


Moris, Robert S 


300 



Mosbacher, Richard D 377 

Moseley, Pamela K .188.291 

Moser, Gregg A 388 

Moser, Herbert C 167 

Moser, Jeffrey C 388 

Moser. Jon A 161 

Moser, Mary E 175,361 

Moser, Monte B ,377 

Moser, Theresa K .337 

Mosharrat, Zubaida 461 

Mosley, Kim D 318 

Moss, Don V. ....... , 369 

Moss, Marilyn C 291 

Moss, Melinda A 314, 347 

Mossman, Donna M 461 

Mossman, Rick L 165,461 

Mount, Elizabeth A 153 

Mowry, Gerald S 327 

Moxley. Mark A 307 

Muchow, JanaK 180,310 

Muck, Frederick T 307 

Muckenthaler, Michael J . 461 

Muckenthaler, Terry 3?0 

Mudd. Anthony D 461 

Mudd, FalvianG 394 

Mudd, Patrick P 195,394 

Muehlbach, Christopher J 1 89 

Muehlbach, Mary L 189,385 

Mueller, Ann E 160,170,364 

Mueller, James C , 461 

Mueller, Janice M 167,347 

Mueller, Jill E 166 

Mueller, Jo M 4?9 

Mueller, Lawrence H 3?5 

Mueller, Linda L 4?9 

Mueller, ThelrnaG 172,294 

Mueller, Thomas E 461 

Mueting, Dale F 385 

Mueting, Duane H 385, 171 

Mugler, David T 144 

Mugler, Connie S 310 

Mukhebi, Adrian W 186 

Mulch, Gary L 327 

Mulhem, Aboulrahman A 385 

Mulhern, Dan 

Mullen, Bruce A .143,461 

Mullen, Kevin M 327,356 

Mullen, Richard G 461 

Mullin.MaryJ 461 

Mulvihill. Joanne L 461 

Munden, David G 330 

Munkres, Terrill J 148,172,461 

Munoz, Arthur C . 188,461 

Munoz, Manuel C 188 

Munson, Gaylord R 183, 330 

Munz,OlenM 461 

Muret, William E 347 

Murphy, Andrea M . .. . 175 

Murphy, Claire E 429 

Murphy, Daniel D 305 

Murphy, Dianne L ... 153 

Murphy, Karen I 364 

Murphy, Marcia A 317 

Murphy, Mary A . . . , 403 

Murphy. Michael W 185, 4?4 

Murphy, Nancy J 154,403 

Murphy, Neil E 149,377 

Murphy, Phyllis A 143,180,403 

Murphy, Sylvia C 180,403 

Murphy, Ted 173,461 

Murray, David A 461 

Murray, James C 1 77 

Murray, Jane E 347 

Murray, Janinne M . , . 1 69, 329 

Murray, JereL 294 

Murray, Robert G 385 

Murry, Janice 183 

Murry.JohnP. 409 

Murthy, Alampalli V 461 

Muruli, Bartholomew I 1 86, 1 95 

Muse, Risa K 337 

Musick, Janet K 187,188,347 

Musick, Marta A 314 

Musick, Nancy L 314 

Musil, Gregory L 177 

Musil, James K 161,388 

Musil, Patrick E 377 

Musisi.SethL 186 

Mussemann, Sharla K 461 

Mustoe, Nancy D 291 

Muwanga-Zake, Elijah 186 

Myer, Mark L 412 

Myer, Melinda A 294 

Myers, Janet L. . 150, 183,461 

Myers, Joe C 356 

Myers, Kathleen A 337 

Myers, Kristy A 310 

Myers, Lisa A 347 

Myers, Ramona L 429 

Myers, Susan M. 1 73 

Myrick, Timothy E 461 

Myzer, Teresa L 1 92, 303 



nnn 



Nace, Diane M 310 

Nace, JohnR 461 

Naegele, Elaine 148,414 

Naethe, Nancy J 180 

Nail, Jim E 193 

Nally, Rodney E 176,299 

Napier, Bruce A 171 

Napier, Mary L 170 

Nash, Margaret M 461 



Nason, Randall R 171,413 

Nass, Michael 406 

Nations, Karen Z 1 80, 429 

Natural Resources Management 



Club 


16? 


Nauert, Connie M 


347 


Nave, Sherry M 150, 1 


/6, 347 


Navinskey. Cynthia L 


461 


Navinsky, Marcia L 


385 


Navinsky, Terry L 


, 461 


Nay, Cynthia A 


461 


Naylor, Gary L 


347 


Neaderhiser, Stephen 


461 


Neal. Catherine 


164 




164 


Neal, Jen L 


414 


Neal, Linda L . . . 157, 167,348 


Nealy, CarlaK 189,429 


Nealy. Cathy R 189,429 


Nease, Dennis A 


461 


Nech, Douglas W 


356 


Nederman, Jeffry A 


41? 


Nedwed, Jan 1 


55, 3?0 


Neely, David G 


371 


Neely, Debbie K 


348 


Neiblmg, David L 


.356 


Neibling, Marjone M 157, 180, 181, 




329 


Neiblmg, Walter H 


461 


Neibling, William H. 


423 


Neier. William C 


356 


Neighbors, David C 


399 


Neighbors, MarkS 


399 


Neill. George T 


461 


Nelkin, KennethS 


461 


Nellans, James C . 


461 


Nelsen. Brad J 


385 


Nelsen, Kirk , , 


377 


Nelson, AlineG 148,160,317 


Nelson, Ann K 


317 


Nelson, Bruce A 


461 


Nelson, Cathy L 


. 303 


Nelson, David C 1 


72, 389 


Nelson. David J 


418 


Nelson, Deborah L 


310 


Nelson, Dennis F 


462 


Nelson, Elizabeth R 


168 


Nelson, Eric L 


.462 


Nelson, Greta F 173.294 


Nelson, James 


407 


Nelson, Jeffrey A 


399 


Nelson, Karla 


303 


Nelson, Kayla J 


167 


Nelson, Lily J 169,192,348 


Nelson, Lloyd D 


. 356 


Nelson, Lynne C 


348 


Nelson, Marsha K 


429 


Nelson, Raebern L 


160 


Nelson, Richard L 


412 


Nelson, Rodney A 


289 


Nelson, Ronald W 


462 


Nelson, Sally G 


303 


Nelson, Todd A 


389 


Nemechek, Eugene C 


462 


Nemechek. Michael C 


356 


Nesbit, Mary J 1 


51,462 


Netherton, Rene M 


348 


Netherton, Tammy A. 


462 


Neufeld, Jolene S 


337 


Neugent, Paula J 152,192,348 


Neumann. Jeanette L 170,429 


Neumann, Thomas A 


. ,406 


Neumann, Yvette 


. 462 


Nevins, Laurel A • 178, 1 


31,337 


Nevins, Marlys E 


462 


Newby, Fran 


174 


Newby, Stanton L 


159 


Newcomer, Rick V 


307 


Newell, Karen K 


46? 


Newington, Dirk B 


46? 


Newkirk, Alan D 147,2 


Newsome, William 


, 389 


Newton, Cathy M 


168 


Ney. John T. 


46? 


Neyer, Patricia L 


385 


Nichols, Becky J 


310 


Nichols, Harold J 


195 


Nichols, Laurence E 


, 399 


Nichols, Nancy A 


46? 


Nichols, Polly 154,462 


Nichols, Ronald D 


. .307 


Nichols, Steven T 171,348 


Nichols, Tim 


180 


Nicholson, Donna J 


348 


Nicholson, Larry A 


46? 


Nicholson, William D 


.377 


Nicholson, William G 


389 


Nickel, Connie J 


403 


Nickell, Nancy K 178, 181 


Nicolay, James G 


189 


Niederee. Michael C 


41? 


Nielsen, Danny L 


.296 



Nielsen, Marilyn J. , , 
Nietfeld, KatherineA. 
Nighswonger, Ted J 
Nightengale, Cathy L, 
Nightengale, Peggy J 
Nightingale, Debra K, 

Nill. WilliamS 

Nitzschke. Kevin J. . 
Nivens, Mary D 
Nixon. Charles C, 
Nkugba, Erne C 
Nobel, Larry 
Noe, Bruce A. , 

Noel, Lionel C 181 

Noel, Rhonda S 155 

Nofsinger, Ronald L 462 



152 

462 
60, 462 

337 

80, 337 

. 430 

,318 

406 
67, 196 
71,462 



180,377 



Nolan. John R 


378 


Orosco, Sandra K 


462 


Noland. Robert C 


325 


O'Rourke, Maureen P 


153,291 


Noll, David S 


371 


Orr, Dean K 


462 


Noll, Janet L 


57, 403 


Orr, Dennis W 


300 


Noll, Jeffrey E 


59, 378 


Orr, Marcia K 


462 


Noll. MarkT 


296 


Orten, Dana J 


164 


Noller, Pamela J 


51,462 


Orth, Douglas G 


409 


Monamaker, Thane W 


462 


Orth, Gerry D 


348 


Nordboe, Connie J 


430 


Ortmann, Michael P 


146,170,357 


Nordhus, Debora A 


56, 174 


Orvis. Terry C 


462 


Nordin, Margaret N 


194 


Osborne, David F 


357 


Mordhng. Melanie E 


462 


Ossom, Bassey E 


1 86 


Moren, Alice V 


. . 462 


Ost, Kirk D 


369 


Norman, Bernard W - 


183 


Osterman, Eric D 


463 


Norman. Laurie A 143, 


48,317 


Ostermann. Scott L. . 


406 


Norman, Sara J 


337 


Ostfeld. Adrienne L. 


385 


Norris, Gale E 


356 


Oswald, Andrew L 


144,163,307 


Norris, Mary K 


462 


Oswald, Bill J 


307 


Norris, Stacy K 


348 


Oswald, Leslie E 


367 


North, Lawrence J 


300 


Otey, Joseph B 


325 


North. Linda E. 143, 


67,362 


O'Toole, Frank K 


417 


North, Sheila A 


53, 364 


OToole, Kathleen A 


.157,463 


Norton, Daniel J 


407 


O'Toole, Patrick J 


412 


Norton, Gary L 


166 


Ott, Cynthia E . 


192,385 


Norton, Susan M 


320 


Ott, JonS 


357 


Norton, William B 


409 


Ott, Kent A 


406 


Nossaman, Melanie S 


462 


Ott, Timothy M 


348 


Noteis, Victoria L 


462 


Ottaway, Douglas A 


463 


Nottingham, David l_ 


356 


Ottaway, Kathleen M 


463 


Nottingham, Lyle D 


462 


Otte, Jane M 


337 


Novotny, Bruce J. 


356 


Otto, Daniel L 


307 


Movy, Cindi 


462 


Ouellette, Dulce M. 


463 


Noyes, Bradley A 


318 


Oukrop, Carol E 


143 


Nuckolls, Jill D 


314 


Ousdahl, Kimberly J 


342 


Muessen, Michael J 


462 


Ousdahl, Lisa P. 


463 


Nulik, Rodney L 159, 


60, 330 


Outten, Beverly V 


463 






Overgaard, Marcia L 
Overmiller, Karma J. 




Nuss, Lyman 


62, 330 


187,201,317 


Gutter. Connie D 143. 


79, 362 


Overstreet, Nancy L. 


1 74 


Mutter, Judith A 173, 


83,430 


Owen. David R 


180.385 


Nutter, Nancy E 310, 


81, 180 


Owen, Greg D 


412 


Nyberg, Lyndell 


78, 181 


Owens, Charles H. . 


421 


Nyquist, James A 


80, 462 


Owens, James H 


193 






Owens, Robert W. . . 


146,149,378 


^^^ j^^ ^^^ 




Owens, Teresa G 
Oyer, Doug L 

V\f\\ 


162 

417 







-^^ ^K^ ^^^ 


r\ 


Oberfell, Susan D 


314 


LJLJ 


LJ 


Oberg, Bradley G 


462 


w* w* 


r* 


Oberhelman, Kathy J. 


462 


1 1 1 


1 


Obermueller, Bnce B 


462 






Oblinger, Warren G 


289 


Pace, Camilha A 


337 


O'Brien, Charles E 


423 


Pack, Jams A 


157 


O'Brien, Gmny 


337 


Page, Beverly A 


463 


Ochs, Roger K 


356 


Page, Brenda K 


337 


Ochs, Tern L 


430 


Page, Cynthia M 


180, 181,463 




378 


Page, Pamela R 
Paidy, Sudhakar R. . 




O'Connor, Margaret M 


462 




O'Connor, William M 


330 


Painter, Dolores W . 


463 


J'Dell, Christopher L 


325 


Painter, Kristie A . 


150,337 


Odell. JohnP. 


191 


Pakstis, Gail L 


463 


Jelkers. Shelley J. 


348 


Palma Philip F 


147,163,407 


Oesterreich, Teresa 


46,446 


Palmateer, Mary E. . 


145 


Oetinger, Cynthia L 


. 320 


Palmblade, Freddie E. 


162,393 


Ogan, Thomas W, 


462 


Palmer. Bruce E 


. . . 357 


Ogden, Debra L. 


92, 385 


Palmer. Dwight R 


357 


Ogle, Bill A 


80, 462 


Palmer, Kim K. . 


397 


Ohley, Kenneth D 


462 


Palmer, Kirk W 


385 


Ohno, Tsutomu 


462 


Palmer, Michael L. 


318 


Ohrens, Doris J 


175 


Palmer, Russell W. 


180 


Olander, Jane A 


304 


Panhellenic Council 


196 


Olandt, Vicki 


180 


Pankratz, Barbara A 


- 463 


Olberdmg. Daniel J 


172 


Pankratz, Gary L 


. 378 


Olberding, William L 


462 


Pannbacker, Mary K 


430 


Oldberg, Sandy L 


92, 348 


Pappas, Pamela K 


314 


Oldham, Andrew L. . . 


378 


Paramore, Cynthia J 


463 


Dlds, GaryD 


371 


Parcel, Pennie 154 


179,182,403 


Olds, Gregory D 163, 


79,371 


Parents' Day 


45 


Oleen, Charles E. . . . 


160 


Parhamovich, Jeffrey 


385 


Oliver, Michael P 


82,325 


Paris, Allan J 


418 


Oliver, Sara L 


294 


Park, Gilbert N 


159,296 


Ollenburger, Marolyn A 


348 


Parke, Patrick P. 


308 


Olli.igton.MarkH 


195 


Parker, Bonnie 


366 


Olmstead. Debra F. , , 


364 


Parker, Carolyn S 


463 


Olsen, Nancy R 


87,403 


Parker, James W 


330 


Olson, Beverley J. . 


348 


Parker, Jeffrey J. 


413 


Olson, Connie J, 


43,403 


Parker, Kathleen J. 


430 


Olson, DanS 


330 


Parker, Kim J. . 


342 


Olson, Dana G .... 


21, 183 


Parker, Landon K 


406 










Olson, John T 


79,183 


Parker, Mark M 


418 


Olson, MarkS 


71,378 


Parker, Marshall D. 


325 


Olson, Philip D 


307 


Parker, Robert E 


143 


Olson.RenetA 155, 


83, 462 


Parker, Robert W 


169,407 


Olson, Richard W 


160 


Parkins, Kathleen J 


385 


Olson, Susan K 


168 


Parks, Cynthia L 


304 


Oltjen, Larry M 


369 


Parks, Darrell D 


162 


Dltjen, Rita A 154,180. 


83, 430 


Parks, Mark K 


463 


Oman. Ruth J 


79, 462 


Parks, Wendy 


337, 180 


Omega Pearls 


. 1 55 


Parmely, Janice K. . 


463 


Omenski. Phillip 


43.462 


Parmely. Teresa J. . . 


167,292 


O'Neal, Kelly D 


325 


Parr, Howard F 


325 


O'Neal, Randy L 


87, 356 


Parr, Kellee R 


357 


Onello, Ann L 


462 


Parr, Patricia A. 


463 


Opat, Thomas D 


462 


Parrish.GlendaW. . 


463 


Oppitz, Constance C. . 


50. 364 


Parry, Becky J 


430 


Oppitz. Lawrence W. 


299 


Parsons, David C. . . 


407 


Oppitz, Michael E 


62. 299 


Parsons, Debra D. . . 


179,292 


Orazem, Frank 


194 


Parsons, Evan W 


193 


Organizations 


140 


Parsons, Irene K.