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Full text of "Sprague's journal of Maine history"

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e^..,. .:..:.., -_l„OGY COLLECTION 



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GENEALOGY 
974.1 
SP74 
1919-1920 



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P-^^IV CONTENTS 



MAIXE INLAND SCENERY 




Contributed by Hon. Leroy T. Carleton. 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Sir William Phips 3 

The Little Towns, poem 19 

Documentary 20 

Norway Notes 24 

Colonel Arthur Noble 27 

Gorham in the Days of the First School Teacher 29 

Revolutionary Pensioners in Maine 35 

Something About Artemus Ward 40 

Berlin Voters in 1831 : 42 

Queen Anne's Moose '. 42 

Massachusetts Governors 44 

Fo.xcroft .\cademy Students in 1840 45 

Proclamation regarding Penobscot Indians ^ 47 

Sayings ©f Subscribers 48 

Browsings in the Editor's Library 49 

^'<>tes and Fragments 55 



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Sprague's Journal of Maine History 

Vol. VII MAY JUNE JULY 1919 No. 1 

Sir William Phips 

By John Fr.\ncis Sprague 

The title page of the work of Cotton Mather, which is the foun- 
dation of very much of the early history of New England, is ai 
follows : 

MAGN ALI A CHRISTI AMERICANA; 
THE ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY 

OF , " ; 

NEW ENGLAND, 
From its first planting, in the year 1620, unto the year of our 

Lord 1698 

IN SEVEN BOOKS 

By the 

REVEREND AND LEARNED COTTON MATHER, D.D.F.RS. 

And Pastor of the North Church in Boston, New England. 

The first edition was published in London in the year 1702, in a 
volume of seven hundred and eighty-eight pages. In 1852 this was 
republished by Si.as Andrus in Hartford, with a preface and "occa- 
sional notes by the Reverend Thomas Robbins, D. D." and again 
published by Silas Andrus & Son in 1853. 

It is a civil and ecclesiastical history of the earliest English settle- 
ments and plantations in Xew England, hence it is one of the orig- 
inal sources for all who desire to study men and events of importance 
in that period. The author has been accused of credulity and 
bigotry and such accusations cannot be well denied. 

He was a fiery and brilliant product of the times in which he 
lived and wrought; a leader in the days of credulity and bigotry, 
and yet with all of his prejudices and conceit he was one of the 
founders of American literature. 



C" ■^■;''r;)-^^i»-'--S.f|.:;;:J-\. -^^/-K;! 



\y. 



4 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

The ''Magiialia" is a curious blending of historical facts, the 
peculiar sectarian views of the Puritans, citations from the Bible 
and quotations from Greek and Roman classics and from nearly all 
the great characters in ancient history. Yet the authenticity of his 
historical data, when divested of religious exaggerations, has ever 
been and will doubtless always remain a standard authority. It is 
almost wholly to this work that one must resort to learn of the 
life of one of Maine's most famous and worthy sons, for Cotton 
Mather was the only one of the early writers who wrote fu'.y 
regarding him. He had at hand more facts pertaining to him than 
had anyone else for he and his father. Increase Mather, were his 
contemporaries 

After devoting nearly five hundred words to citing examples of 
men of fame in the Roman Empire, and other parts of the world 
who had arisen to great heights from obscurity and small begin- 
nings, the author introduces Sir William Phips in this manner : 

For my reader now being satisfied that a person being obscure in his 
original is not always a just prejudice to an expectation of considerable 
matters from him, I shall now inform him that this our Phips was born 
February 2, A. D. 1650, at a despicable plantation on the river Kennebec. 
and almost the furtherest village of the eastern settlements of New England.^ 

His birthplace is on a point of land in the southern part of the 
towTi of Woolwich near a little bay, called ''Phip's Bay" and was 
not in any sense a "despicable" place. 

He was the son of James Phips and one of the youngest of 
twenty-six children. James came early to New England from 
Bristol, England. 

Mather refers to the family in this wise : 

His fruitful mother yet living had no less than twenty-six children, 
whereof twenty-one were sons: but equivalert to them all was William, one 
of the youngest, whom his father dying left with his mother "keeping sheep 
in tKe wilderness' untd he was eighteen years old. 

During his boyhood days, struggling with his widowed mother for exist- 
ence, he was employed much of the time by sheep raisers and writers have 
frequently alluded to him as "the Shepherd boy of Woolwich".* 

But few facts are attainable regarding him as a youth except that 
he desired to learn the trade of ship building and when nineteen' 



Mather's Magralia p. 167. 

(') lb 2. 

"A Manuscript Account of Pemaquid" by Judge Groton Ccollections Me. 
Histo. Soc. vol. 2, p. 239) <ays : "James Phips. father of Sir William Phips. 
settled here (Pemaquid) about the year 1638. but afterwards removed to the 
banks of the Kennebec, in the town of Woolwich." 



SIR WILLIAM PHIPS 



years of age he served an apprenticeship of three or four years 
with a ship carpenter, and became master of the trade. 

At the age of twenty-two he removed to Boston where he worked 
in a ship yard for one year. 

At his home on the coast of Maine he had no school privileges 
and did not learn to read and write until his first year in Boston, 
and Mather says : 

by a laudable deportment, he so recommended himself that he married 

a young gentlewoman of good repute, who was the widow of one Mr. John 
Hall, a well-bred merchant, but the daughter of one Captain Roger Spencer, 
a person of good fashion .' 

He acquired learning by his own efforts and became a student 
of what books were accessible in the town of Boston. 

As his mental growth developed, his aspirations took a wider 
range and his ambition was to build a ship, own it and command it 
himself. 

He would frequently tell the gentlewoman his wife that he should be the 
captain of a King's ship ; that he should come to have command of better 
men than he was now accounted himself; and that he should be owner of a 
fair brick house in the Green lane of North Boston.* 

Soon after his marriage he entered into what was probably a 
partnership with some Boston men to build a ship near his birth- 
place on the Elaine coast, blather saying that 

he indented with several persons in Boston to build them a ship at 

Sheeps-ccat River, two or three leagues eastward of the Kennebec. 

Ill fortune was his first experience in this enterprise, for when the vesesl 
was completed and he was about, to load her with lumber the Indians made 
a murderous assault upon the inhabitants, and to preserve their lives he took 
them on board ard gave them a free passage to Boston.^ 

He was a doer as well as a dreamer and possessed a bold and ad- 
venturesome spirit. 

After arriving at Boston with his load of refugees, he learned 
from some ship captains in that port of a Spanish wreck on the 
coast of the Bahamas, and that in it were many valuables and large 
quantities of gold and silver. 

Boston friends had faith in him even if having mental reserva- 
tions about the truth of this ''sailor's yarn'' that Phips had told 
them. So, after some deliberation, he was financed to an extent 
sufficient to enable him to sail his ship to the Bahamas in search of 
buried treasures. His trip to the Bahamas, the explorations he 



C) lb 167. 
n lb 168 
(') lb 168. 



'§i^': 



I 



6 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

made and the evidence that he found convinced him that if properly 
equipped he could rescue this property lost in the ocean depths. 

Instead of returning to his home, he sailed directly to England 
and presented the matter to his government. His earnestness and 
intelligence, his apparent honesty, determination and persuasive 
qualities finally won at White Hall. In the year 1683, he became 
captain of a King's Ship, Algier Rose, a frigate of eighteen guns 
and ninety-five men. 

This voyage, however, was not successful. The crew mutinied 
once or twice imperiling his life, and after experiencing numerous 
hardships and dangers he again returned to England and was 
•equipped with another ship. 

He cast anchor at a reef of shoals a few leagues to the northward 
of Port de la Plata, upon Hispaniola. the supposed place of the lost 
wreck. While the men were engaged in the work of exploration 
a sea feather attracted attention. One of the Indian divers was 
ordered to investigate. The diver reported that the wreckage and 
a number of great gims were in the waters beneath them. Then 
the real work of search for and recovery of treasures began. It 
resulted in securing thirty-two tons of silver, much gold, pearls and 
jewels. 

"Captain Phips' crew had been hired on seamen's per diem wages. 
They had evidently not been informed of the real purpose of the 
expedition and when suddenly apprised of it and viewing the enor- 
• mous amount of wealth within their reach, their astonishment may 
easily be imagined. Neither is it surprising that a vicious impulse 
to become possessed of this marvelous prize possessed and over- 
whelmed them. 

Mather says Phips 

used all the obliging arts imaginable to make his men true unto him, 
especially by assuring them that besides their wages they should have ample 
requitals made unto them, which if the rest of his employers would not 
agree unto, he would himself distribute his own share among them.* 

When he returned to England in 1687 he carried with him treas- 
ure to the value of 300,000 pounds sterling. And yet when he had 
accounted and turned over to his employers their share, he had 
dealt so generously in sharing with his men that onlv sixteen 
thousand pounds belonged to him. He was the hero of the hour. 
The Duke of Albemarle "made unto his wife, whom he never saw. 
the present of a golden cup. near a thousand pounds in value." 



(•) lb 173. 



SIR WILLIAM PHIPS 



King James II. in consideration of the skill, energ\' and enter- 
prise displayed in this undertaking conferred on him the honor of 
knighthood. 

Before he returned home he was made High Sheriff of New 
England. 

He did not become a member of any church until ^larch 23, 
1690. when he joined the Xorth Congregational Church in Boston 
of which Cotton blather was pastor. During the remainder of his 
life he was active in its affairs. 

On April 28, 1690. he was at the head of a naval force sent out 
by the Massachusetts Bay Colony to capture Port Royal. He arrived 
there "May 11, and in a few days thereafter the fort was surrendered 
to him and he took possession of Xova Scotia, then held by the 
French, for the English Crown, ind administered to the inhabit- 
ants an oath of allegiance to King William and Queen Mary. But 
it was the increasing power of Canada that the Colony was the 
most concerned about and desired to conquer. 

Accordingly Phips was again placed in command of a fleet to 
capture Quebec, and sailed from Boston August 9, 1690. 

This enterprise was not successful, but returned without serious 
loss of lives. 

This failure was not entirely unexpected, as the colonists were 
not well prepared for it. Later he commanded another and better 
equipped expedition to Quebec which also failed. 

Under King Charles I the Pilgrims obtained a patent from the 
Virginia Company and (1620) sailed for the new world when ad- 
verse winds changed their course and they finally landed on Ply- 
mouth Rock, and then and there began the making of a new nation. 

They obtained a patent (1621-22) from the Council for New 
England, partly at least through the influence of Sir Ferdinando 
Gorges who had already made great efforts in colonization on the 
coast of Maine. 

Six years later they applied to the king for a royal charter which 
was obtained. 

At first it was the intention of the government to retain posses- 
sion of this charter, but later (1629) its custody was placed in the 
hands of the colonists. There was some serious contention over this. 
The colonists contended that their charter made them a corporation 
on the place, while some eminent English jurists held that the whole 
structure of the charter pre-supposed its residence to be in England. 



,■' ,.-A 



SPRAGUE'S JOURXAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



To understand more fully the origin of the trouble which subse- 
quently arose between the colony and the crown, it may be well to 
state that the Puritan leaders in America who were men of ability 
and intellectual power from the first contended 

that their charter created a corporation of. but not necessarih- within 
England ; that the powers of government which it granted were full and 
absolute, admitting of no appeal : that they held this not by commission, but 
by free donation; that they were not even subject to the laws of England, 
though by the terms of their charter they were to enact no contrary laws ; 
that parliament could not interfere to countermand their orders and judg- 
ments, nor could it set over them a general governor without their consent ; 
that, like Normandy, Gascoigne, Burgundy, Flanders, and the Hanse Towns 
of Germany, so were they "independent in respect of government ;" yet a 
limited allegiance to the mother country was acknowledged, because their 
commonwealth was founded upon the state, held its lands by an English 
tenure, and depended upon England for protection, advice, and the "contin- 
uance of naturalization and free liegance of themselves and posterity.^ 

These views were more democratic than were acceptable to 
Charles I and Charles II, whose legal advisors looked upon the col- 
ony solely as a trading corporation subject to the narrow construc- 
tion of the common law. The position of the Puritan statesmen 
was, however, held valid and adopted by the Long Parliament. But 
each starting with fundamental principles so divergent, it is not 
strange that they never harmonized. 

The colonists were in considerable conflict with the home govern- 
ment from about 1635 until the revolution in England (1688) when 
William and Mary became its rulers. 

Cromwell, while in sympathy with and disposed to concede to 
them nearly everything that they claimed as their rights, was en- 
gaged in tempestuous affairs in England and had but little time 10 
attend to colonial matters. 

Their persecution and at times barbarous treatment of the Quak- 
ers, and other intolerant acts, furnished the government with some 
ground for its opposition to- and unfair treatment of the ^lassachu- 
setts and Plymouth colonies, compelling them to surrender their 
charters had bred much ill feeling and rebellion was already brew- 
ing when in 1680 Sir Edmund Andros was thrust upon them as 
governor by the king. 

In 1663, Charles II had granted by patent to his brother the Duke 
of York, and afterwards King James II. certain territory and do- 
minion in New Ensrland which included the colonies of Massachu- 



O Barry's History of Massachusetts, pp 177-78. The author also cites 
Wirthrcp's Journal and Hutchin5on. 



SIR WILLIAAI PHIPS 



I 



setts, New Plymouth and the provinces of Maine and New Hamp- 
shire and the Narraganset country. Andros had then acted as an 
agent for the Duke of York and had charge of his mihtary forces 
in New York. 

Their opinion of him was unfavorable if not prejudicial. From 
first to last he was in trouble with the people whom he undertook 
to govern. One of his first contentions was that the title to all of 
the lands, including those taken and occupied by the settlers or 
purchased from the Indians, was in the crown. His attempted 
enforcement of this doctrine was a prolific breeder of disturbance 
and turmoil and ended in revolution. 

The story of this rebellion need not be told here, but is of pro- 
found interest to one studying the progress of freedom in America. 
Suffice it to say that on the morning of April i8, in the year 1689. 
the people of the town of Boston armed themselves and with great 
dehberation, arrested and imprisoned their governor and all the 
members of his council, his agents, officers and assistants. This was 
accomplished without firing a single shot, or the loss of a drop of 
blood. It was nothing less than a mob although a solemn and pious 
one. 

After having overturned their government, they with equal delib- 
eration prayerfully proceeded to set up a new one in its place, which 
was accomplished in a few days thereafter. 

Soon after his second attempt to capture Quebec, Phips hastened 
to England to impress upon the king, if possible, the importance of 
subduing Canada. He believed it to be the greatest service that 
could be done for New England, or for the crown of England, in 
America. The king received him with much courtesy and was 
favorably disposed towards the project, Mather observing that "the 
king did give him liberty of access unto him, whenever he desired it.'' 
But this was in the fated year of 1688 and before Phips could con- 
clude any arrangements with king James for this purpose, the people 
of his realm had arisen in their wrath, dragged him from his throne 
and driven him across the English Channel into France. 

At this time the Reverend Increase Mather was in England, 
having been sent there with other agents of the colonists for the 
purpose of seeking the full restoration of their early charter rights 
and privileges, of course thus far without avail. 

As soon as William and Mary were enthroned and order restored. 
Mather procured the assistance of Phips in renewed efforts to effect 
a settlement of all colonial differences with the government. 



10 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



King William differed somewhat with the New England repre- 
sentatives. Under his direction his attorneys drew a charter which 
; virtually created a new province under the name of the Province of 
Massachusetts Bay. By its terms the territories of ^lassachusetts, 
Plymouth and ^klaine were united into one jurisdiction. It provided 
• for a governor, deputy governor and a secretary appointed by the 
king, and twenty-eight councillors chosen by the people. 

At first Mather vigorously opposed this new charter, as it took 
from his people their former privilege of electing their own governor 
^ and contained other radical changes. 

Sir Henry Ashurst was an Englishman of influence who had long 
been a loyal friend to the colonies. Very soon after the king had 
; submitted this document to the New England agents, he and Phips 
L and most of the others interested decided that this charter w^as, upon 
1 the whole, much more desirable for the people than were the old 
[ charters, and better adapted to the new conditions which had devel- 
' open since their surrender. Mather was persuaded to agree to it. 
j Undoubtedly one diplomatic act of the king in asking Mather to 
! nominate officers for him to appoint under the new charter had a 
soothing effect and aided in bringing about the happy result. Any- 
how, it appears that he shortly afterwards assembled his associates 
then in London and organized a council-board who at once nomi- 
I nated Sir William Phips as their candidate for governor. 

He lost no time in appearing before his majesty, having been in- 
troduced by the Earl of Nottingham. His report and nominating 
speech to the king was as follows : 

Sir: I do, in the behalf of New England, most humbly thank Your 
Majesty, in that you have been pleased by a Charter to restore English 
Liberties unto them, to contirm them in their properties, and to grant them 
some peculiar privileges. I doubt not, but that your subjects there will 
demean themselves with that dutiful affection and loyalty to Your Majesty, 
as that you will see cause to enlarge your royal favours towards them. 
And I do most humbly thank Your Majesty in that you have been pleased to 
give leave unto those that are concerned for New England to nominate 
their Governour. 

Sir William Phips has been accordingly nominated by. us at the Council- 
Board. He hath done a good service for the crown, by enlarging your 
dominions, and deducing of Xova Scotia to your obedience. I know that 
he will faithfully serve Your Majesty to the utmost of his capacity; and if 
your Majesty shall think fit to confirm him in that place, it will be a further 
obligation on your subjects there.' 



(') Magnalia p. 201. 



SIR \VILLIA^[ PHIPS 



ii 



3 
•5' 




12 SPRAGUE'S TOURXAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Cotton Mather dilates upon this occurrence as follows: 

When Titus Flaminius had freed the poor Grecians from the ]>ondage 
rvhich had long oppressed them, and the herald proclaimed among them the 
articles of their freedom, they cried out, "A saviour! a saviour!" with such 
loud acclamations, that the very birds fell down from heaven astonished at 
the cr>-. Truly, when Mr. Mather brought with him unto the poor Xew- 
Englanders, not only a charter, which though in divers points wanting what 
both he and they had wished for, yet forever delivers them from oppression? 
en their Christian and English liberties, or their ancient possessions, wherein 
ruining writs of intrusion had begun to invade them all, but also a GOV- 
ERXOUR who might call Xew England his own country, and who was 
above most men in it, full of affection to the interests of his country ; the 
sensible part of the people then caused the sense of the salvations thus 
brought them to reach as far as heaven itself. The various little humours 
then working among the people, did not hinder the great and general court 
of the province to appoint a day of solemn THAXKSGIVIXG to Almighty 
God, for "granting" (as the printed order expressed it) "a safe arrivel to 
His Excellency our Governour, and the Reverend Mr. Increase Mather, w-ho 
have industriously endeavoured the ser\-ice of this people, and have brought 
over with them a settlement of government, in which their Majesties have 
graciously given us distinguishing marks of their royal favour and goodness.*' 
And as the obliged people thus gave thanks unto the God of heaven, so 
they sent an address of thanks unto their Majesties, with other letters of 
thanks unto some chief ministers of state, for the favourable aspect herein 
cast upon the province.' 

It was to such a shattered colonial government, where turmoil 
and disturbance had for many years been paramount with the people. 
that Phips was appointed to rule over and direct its destinies. 

The Province charter of 1692. was a far different instrument from 
the colonial charter of 1629. The new governor was to reorganize 
what was almost a wreck. Where envy and discord had abounded. 
he was to restore peace and good order. He must do it with what 
was practically a new form of government that had been forced 
upon its inhabitants, that changed and in some important ways les- 
sened their powers and radically readjusted the entire foundations 
and objects of the body politic. 

To add to all of his other perplexities, he found that by reason 
of the internal strife of the colonists they had neglected to protect 
the settlers in the province of Maine from the ravages of the Indians, 
and were themselves involved in quite a lively warfare with their 
own savages. 

He decided to immediately improve the situation in Maine, and 
Mather says : 

Wherefore Governour Phips took the first opportunity to raise an armv, 
with which he traveled in person, unto the East-Country, to find out and cut 

(•) lb 202. 



SIR WILLIAM PHIPS 13 



off the barbarous enemy, which had continued for near four years together 
making horrible havoc on the plantations that lay all along the northern 
frontiers of Xew England ; and having pursued those worse than Scythtian 
wolves till they could be no longer followed, he did with a very laudable 
skill, and unusual speed, and with less cost unto the crowm than perhaps 
ever such a thing was done in the world, erect a strong fort at Pemaquid.^" 

Then he was also confronted with a new and unprecedented con- 
dition that was full of difificulties with no light of past experience 
to guide him. Following their own interpretation of the Bible, the 
theolog}- of the Puritans had for centuries taught them that witch- 
craft did then, always had and always would exist in the world. 
It was heresy to doubt it. To deny its truth would call down the 
wrath of God upon their heads. 

And so when Phips became governor he found a part of the citi- 
zens of his commonwealth solemnly engaged in hanging neighbors 
and friends for riding on broom-sticks in the night time, being pos- 
sessed of devils, and practicing "detestable conjurations with sieves, 
and keys and pease and nails, and horse-shoes." 

Thus Sir William arrived, as stated by Hutchinson, 

at the beginning of as strange an infatuation as any people were ever 
obsessed of ; a considerable number of innocent persons were sacrificed to 
the distempered imagination, or perhaps wicked hearts of such as pretended 
to be bewitched." 

His connection with the witchcraft situation has for two and a 
quarter centuries been both praised and condemned by students of 
New England history. 

After the rebellious colonies had turned Andros' government up- 
side down and erected what was known as a "provisional govern- 
ment" without any authority whatever, they had held courts as 
formerly and had tried and convicted witches. When Phips arrived 
upon the scene their prisons and jails were overcrowded with impri- 
soned men and women accused of witchcraft. The new charter was 
then in force and it empowered the General Court to establish judi- 
catories and courts of record : the judges to be appointed by the gov- 
ernor. No meeting of the general court could be held for several 
months. The prisoners were demanding trial as their right. An 
emergency existed. Following English precedents the governor 
issued a commission for. a court of Oyer and Terminer and appoint- 
ed justices to try the witchcraft cases. 

Phips had fallen in with Increase Mather in London where they 
had renewed their acquaintance and became close friends. Mather 



C) lb 214. 

(") Thomas Hutchinson's History of Massachusetts (1795) V. i, p. 367. 



14 SPRAGUE'S JOURXAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



had in a way made him governor, and together they had brought 
home a charter that the people had been struggHng for for man\ 
years. Witchcraft was a part of their rehgiou.s creed, fhis belief 
among the peop.e was waning, but they knew with what intensity 
the Mathers yet adhered to it. And the Mathers too were wily and 
s astute politicians. It was felt among many that the governor was 

influenced by them. In the language of today Increase Mather was 
looked upon as the "boss"' of a powerful political and theological 
machine, and Phips was suspected of being a part of it. 

To add to the other unfortunate conditions, Phips hurriedly went 
to Maine which was a duty that he could not longer delay. The 
distressed settlers along these coasts and bays were on the brink 
of utter ruin and extermination at the hands of the savages. This 
expedition saved these settlements, but while these were being 
[ saved, at home they were violently fighting satan by trying, con- 

victing and hanging men and women for being children of the devil. 

He was absent three months and during the time much evil had 
been done. These are briefly the grounds upon which those who 
have blamed Phips have rested their case. While he was away the 
tide in public sentiment was turning against the pro-witchcrafters. 
Leaders among Puritans who had long been jealous of the power 
that the Mathers wielded over the people, even though they may not 
have become sincere converts to the progressive ideas regarding 
witchcraft, readily realized that it was at least "good politics" to 
join the liberals. 

On the other hand, it is an historical fact that Governor Phips 
immediately upon his return suspended the court, freed the prison- 
ers and' pardoned all who v.ere left alive and suspected of being 
possessed of devils. This cannot be gainsaid. His critics only 
reply is that he was not sincere in his position. It is now impossible 
for any but an infinite mind to determine what was in the heart of a 
human being two hundred and twenty-seven years ago. Hence we 
are inclined to give good intentions the benefit of the doubt. And 
after quite a careful study of what facts are now attainable we be- 
lieve they sustain this view. 

It is almost paradoxi^ral to apply the words "liberal minded" to 

t any of the forefathers of those days of darkness. And yet there 

I is much to be said in favor of Phips in this regard. Cotton Mather 

speaks several times of his belief in "liberty of conscience" which 

was quite radical at that time, and other things which hint of a 

glimmer of light in this direction. He was never popular with manv 



m 



SIR WILLIA^l PHIPS 15 

of the Puritan leaders other than the Mathers, which fact may also 
he reckoned in his favor as his friendship for them was apparently 
based more upon personal than political or religious ties. 

The ''Salem witchcraft'' so called, is a picture disgraceful and 
revolting when viewed from any angle whatsoever. All of the grim 
virtues of the Puritans, and they were many, can never efface the 
blackness of this inhuman and abhorent aft'air from New England's 
page in history. It is a woeful demonstration as to what depths of 
degradation and insane cruelty an unbridled adherence to religious 
fanaticism may lead the human mind into. 

The Mathers were among the ablest exponents of the doctrine of 
witchcraft and defenders of the righteousness of punishing it by 
death. It is, therefore, interesting to read Cotton ^Mather's histori- 
cal account of the proceedings of his friend Phips in ending these 
accursed doings. When he arrives at this period in the life of Phips. 
he devotes several pages in attempting to establish the truth of 
witchcraft. He begins by saying: 

Xow, the arrival of Sir William Phips to the government of New 
England, was at a time when a governour would have had occasion for all 
:he skill in sorcery that was ever necessary to a Jewish Comisellor ; a time 
when scores of poor people had newly fallen imder a prodigious possession 
of devils, which it was then generally thought had been by witchcrafts in- 
troduced. It is to be confessed and bewailed, that many inhabitants of 
Xew England, and young people especially, had been led away with little 
sorceries, wherein they "did secretly those things that were not right against 

the Lord their God ""- 

and further on he says : 

Flashy people may burlesque these things, but when hundreds of the most 
sober people in a country where they have as much mother-wit certainly as 
|v' the rest of mankind, know them to be true, nothing but the absurd and for- 

ward spirit of Sadducism can question them. I have not yet mentioned so 
much as one thing that will not be justified, if it be required by the oaths 
of more considerate persons than any that can ridicule these odd phe- 
nomena." 

He seems intent upon finding some way to excuse and exonerate 
the governor for doing the noblest act of his life. And he finally 
seems compelled to say this much : 

Sir William Phips now beheld such deamons hideously scattering fire about 
the country, in the exasperations which the minds of men were on these 
thmgs rising unto ; and therefore when he had well canvased a cause, which 
perhaps might have puzzled the wisdom of the wisest men on earth to have 
"managed, without any error in their administrations, he thought, if it would 

(") Mather 205. 
(^) lb 207. 



f- 



;, 



i6 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



be any error at all. it would certainly be the safest for him to put a stop 
unto all future prosecutions as far as it lay in him to do it." 

For the performance of this duty, the queen of England, as Ma- 
ther says, wrote him "those gracious letters." She commended his 
conduct and thanked him for it in the name of humanity. 

His administration of colonial affairs proved of great benefit to 
the struggling settlers on the coast of Maine whose sufferings and 
destitution had been overlooked and sadly neglected under the rule 
of Andros. 

He fostered trade and industries among Maine people and espe- 
cially encouraged shipping. He has been called by writers the found- 
er of American ship building. 




Ml 






On Tr Tidiy t'lc iUu cl T tlr^jry, 

s 1 5 - .^ r F V > Of c-i Cc<i. in the Aftcr- 

'■o^i rrt^if'v Ar<l btng thi* Ticket with 









.^-^ 



■"^^^-^^^B. 






V 'F 






J^H,,^ 



^'-' i 



The King's Invitation to Funeral of Sir William Phips. 

He was full of energy and traveled into every portion of the 
colony to study the conditions of the people, to understand their 
needs and devise means for their relief and assistance. Regardless 
of the opposition which he encountered, we believe that he stands 
out conspicuously in the annals of those times as a personage of 
high integrity, unblemished honor, lofty purposes and a constant 
desire to promote the welfare of the people. 



(") lb 212. 



■# 



SIR \villia:\i PHIPS 17 

All writers have generally agreed that he was the first public 
nian in New England to see clearly that a mere defensive policy 
against France and against their Indian allies was useless; that it 
Xew England was to be properly defended she must be defended, 
not on the Kennebec, but on the St. Lawrence. Till that policy 
could be carried out the best plan was to threaten the enemy and hold 
him in check by a line of outposts.'" In pursuance of this policy 
he established two forts, one at Pemaquid and one near the mouth 
of the Saco.'** 

In a manuscript account of Pemaquid (supra) it is stated that "the 
principal fort was built by Sir William Phips, when Governor of Massa- 
chusetts ; in 1692, accompanied Maj. Church, he proceeded with a force of 
450 men to Pemaquid, and laid the foundations of this fort, which, in the 
language of an old writer, 'was the finest thing in these parts of America'." 

From that time on the colonies were more and more assertive in 
their demands that the English government should better protect 
them from the French menace. This spirit springing from the pa- 
triotism and foresight of Sir William Phips grew with the recurring 
events until such patriots as Sir William Pepperell, General Samuel 
Waldo and their compeers a half century later enforced its edicts at 
Louisburg and in the French wars. And this was in spite of Eng- 
land's continuous diplomatic folly and an unpardonable lack of 
interest on their part in American affairs. In this way the spirit of 
nationalism and a desire for independence grew — the manifest 
indifference of England to the protection of her colonies weakening 
the ties that bound them — until its fruition was complete at Lexing- 
ton and Bunker Hill. 

Some writers have belittled him as rough, uncouth and irritable 
in his manners and intercourse with men. Two authors, John Gor- 
ham Palfrey and J. A. Doyle, M. A., and Fellow of All Souls Col- 
lege, Oxford, have each produced valuable works on Xew England 
history, both the result of careful research. The former says of 
him : *'Sir William thoXigh rough enough at times, had powers of 
personal attraction." '" 

The latter observes that ''the rough, hot-tempered, self-made sea- 
man was to such predecessors as Winthrop. or even Bradstreet. what 
Andrew Jackson was to the younger Adams." " 

(") English Colonies in America, Dcvle V. 2 p. 314. 

(;;) lb 313. 

(") Palfrey's History of Xew England during the Stuart Dynasty, V. 3. 
(") English Colonies in America, Doyle V. 2. p. 294. 



i8 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

That Phips could have served as governor in such stormy timer 
as fell to his lot, without encountering opposition, is hardly con- 
ceivable. This came, we believe, largely from those envious of him 
and who were plotting and intriguing against him. 

He interfered, as it has been said, in a summary fashion with one 
Brenton, collector of customs at Boston. This resulted in an alter- 
cation between them. Doyle believes that "Phips had influential 
enemies in England ready to make the most of his errors and his 
unpopularity." It finally resulted in a petition to the king to have 
him removed. As soon as this occurred he went to England and 
while making ready to appear before the king in answer to the 
charges, he was taken suddenly ill and died in London. Mather 
says he left Boston November 17, 1694, and died in London Febru- 
ary 18, 1695. 

Portraitures of his personal appearance have been drawn by nu- 
merous writers since he was the shepherd boy of Woolwich. We ap- 
prehend, however, that all have been suggested by the description of 
Mather, his pastor and intimate friend. This is what he said : 

Reader, 'tis time for us to view a little more to the life, the picture of the 
person, the actions of whose life we have hitherto been looking upon. Know 
then, that for his exterior, he was one tall, beyond the common set of men, 
and thick as well as tall, and strong as well as thick ; he was, in all respects, 
exceedingly robust, and able to conquor such difficulties of diet and of travel, 
as would have killed most men alive; nor did the fat, whereinto he grew 
very much in his later years, take away the vigour of his motions. 

He was well set, and he was therewithal of a very comely, though a very 
manly countenance ; a countenance where any true skill in physiognomy 
would have read the character of a generous mind. Wherefore passing to 
his interior, the very first thing which there offered itself unto observation, 
was a most incomparable generosity." 

At the time of his death, the president of Harvard University de- 
livered "a funeral oration" which Mather quotes as follows : 

This province is beheaded, and lyes a bleeding. A GOVERXOUR is 
taken away, who was a merciful man; some think too merciful; and if so, 
'tis best erring on that hand ; and a righteous man ; who, when he had great 
opportunities of gaining by injustice, did refuse to do so. 

He was a known friend unto the best interests and unto the Churches of 
God; not ashamed of owning them. Xo : .how often have I heard him ex- 
pressing his desires to be an instrument of good unto them ! He was a zeal- 
ous lover of his country, if any man in the world were so: he exposed him- 
self to serve it; he ventured his life to save it: in that, a true Xehemiah, a 
governour that "sought the welfare of his people." 

He was one who did not seek to have the government cast upon him: 
no, but instead thereof, to my knowledge, he did several times petition the 



(") Mather (Supra) 217. 



SIR WILLIAM PHIPS 19 



King that this people might always enjoy the 'great privilege of chusing their 
< wn governour:' and I heard him express his desires that it might be so to 
vcveral of the chief ministers of state in the Court of England. 

He is now dead, and not capable of being flattered; but this I must testifie 
concerning him, that though by the providence of God I have been with him 
21 home and abroad, near at home and afar off, by land and by sea, I never 
vaw him do any evil action, or heard him speak anything unbecoming a 
Christian. 

The circumstances of his death seem to intimate the anger of God, in that 
he was *in the midst of his days' removed; and I know (though few did) 
that he had great purposes in his heart, which probably would have taken 
erfect, if he had lived a few months longer, to the great advantage of this 
province ; but now he is gone, there is not a man living in the world capaci- 
tated for those undertakings ; Xew England knows not yet what they have 
lost! 



THE LITTLE TOWNS 

By Hilda Morris 

Oh, little town in Arkansas and little town in Maine, 
And little, sheltered valley town and hamlet on the plain, 
Salem, Jackson, Waukesha, and Brookville and Peru, 
San Mateo and Irontown, and Lake and Waterloo, 
Little town we smiled upon and loved for simple ways, 
Quiet streets and garden beds and friendly sunlit days. 
Out of you the soldiers came. 
Little town of homely name, 
Voung and strong and brave with laughter 
They saw truth and followed after. 

Little town, the birth of them 

Makes you kin to Bethlehein. 
Little town where Jimmy Brown ran the grocery store; 
Little town where Manuel fished along the shore; 
Where Russian Steve was carpenter, and sandy Pat McQuade 
Worked all day in overalls at his mechanic's trade ; 
Where Allen Perkins practiced law, and John, Judge Harper's son 
Planned a little house for two that never shall be done — 
Little town, you gave them all, 
Hich and poor, and great and small ; 
Bred them clean and straight and strong. 
Sent them forth to right the wrong. 

Little town, their glorious death 

Makes you kin to Nazareth ! 

— From the Come-Back. 



iS: 



'. ^CI'.,.fS:'?|. 



.^'./^•'^>: 



20 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAIXE HISTORY 



Documentary 

RELATING TO THE EARLY HISTORY OF BREWER, 

MAINE 

(From Massachusetts Records) 

(Contributed by H. P. Sargent) 

f . _ - . . 

Commonwealth of ^Massachusetts. 

To John Brewer and Simeon Fowler, and other settlers; 

Know all men by these presents, that we, whose names are undersigned, 
and seals affixed, appointed a conmiittee by a resolve of the General Court 
of the Commor.wealth of Massachusetts, passed the 28th of October, 1783 
on the subject of unappropriated lands in the County of Lincoln, and by 
that and other resolves of the said General Court empowered to sell and 
dispose of the unappropriated lands of this Commonwealth in the said 
County for and in consideration of the sum of three thousand pounds in 
the consolidated securities of this Commonwealth, to us paid by John Brewer 
and Simeon Fowler, both of a place called Xew Worcester, in the County of 
Lincoln, gentlemen, in behalf of themselves and others, settled at that place. 
the receipt whereof, by their obligations for that sum to the treasurer of the 
Commonwealth, we do hereby acknowledge, do hereby give, grant, sell and 
convey to the said Brewer and Fowler, and other settlers at the place afore- 
said, a certain tract of land containing ten thousand eight hundred and sixty- 
four acres adjoining to Penobscot river and on the east side thereof, bounded 
as follows, viz. : Beginning at said river on the northwest comer of number 
one, or Bucktown, therce running north seventy degrees, east three miles, 
tvvo hundred and sixty rods : then north forty-eight degrees west two 
miles, two hundred and ten rods ; then north, sixty-four degrees east, one 
mile, one hundred and fifty-four rods : then north, forty-one degrees east, 
two miles two hundred and ten rods : then north seventy-five degrees east ; 
one hundred and eighty-three rods: then north eleven degrees west, fifty- 
six rods ; then north eighty degrees east, two miles eighty-eight rods ; then 
north fifteen degrees west, one mile and about forty-five rods to a bend of 
the said river, within about one hundred rods of the north-we-:t comer of 
Dodge's plan: thence southerly by the said river to the place begun at; 
excepting and reserving however, the lot called number twenty-one in said 
Dodge's plan, containing two hundred and sixty-four acres, which was for- 
merly sold to Robert Smith of Xeedham, and also suitable and convenient 
landings and roads to the same, from the lands purchased by Moses Knapp 
and associates, and the privilege of taking fish, which are to be held in 
common between the said Brewer and Fowler, and other settlers and the 
said Knap and his associates — to have and to hold the above — granted 
premises in the manner and proportion hereafter mentioned, viz. : to John 
Brewer, Simeon Fowler, George Gardner. Thomas Campbell. Jo-iah Brewer, 
and James Ginn. Gentlemen, Charles Blagden, Samuel Knap. Emerson Or- 
cutt, Joseph Mansell, Solomon Harthorn, Kennett McKenney. John Thomas, 
John Rider, Simeon Johnson. John Holyoke. Henry Kenney. John Hutchinor=. 
John Crocker, John Tibbetts, David Wiswell, Joseph Baker, Benjamin 



DOCUMENTARY 21 



5ncw, Solomon Sweat, Samuel Freeman, Jesse Rogers, Peter Sangster. 
(icori,^e Brooks, Jesse Atwood, Oliver Doane. Warren Xickerson, Eliphalet 
Xickerson, Paul Xickerson, Henry Cole, Ephraim Downs. Moses Went- 
wc^rth, James McCurdy, John Mansell, John Emen,-, Robert McCurdy, hus- 
bandmen, the widow of John Mansell, Junior, deceased, Hannah Ary, widow 
and the heirs of Simeon Smith, their heirs and assigns, one hundred acres 
enoh, to be so laid out as to include their improvements respectively, on 
condition that each of the grantees aforesaid, pay to John Brewer and 
Simeon Fowler five pounds lawful money within one year from this time, 
with interest till paid; and to each other settler on the said tract who has 
made a separate improvement thereon, one hundred acres, to be so laid 
out as will best include his improvements, on condition that each settler 
last mentioned pay to the said John Brewer and Simeon Fowler fourteen 
pounds, thirteen shillings and six pence, lawful money, within one year 
from this time, with interest till paid : and the residue of said tract to all 
settlers indiscriminately who have made improvements as aforesaid, on con- 
dition that each of such settlers pay to the said John Brewer and Simeon 
Fowler the sum of fourteen pounds, thirteen shillings, and six pence, law- 
ful money within one year from this time, with interest till paid, for each 
hundred acres which shall be assigned and set off to him out of the residu- 
ary part and in the same proportion for a greater or lesser quantity: pro- 
vided nevertheless, if any settler or other grantee aforesaid shall neglect 
to oay his proportion of the sum or sums aforesaid, to be by him paid, in 
order to entitle him to one hundred acres as aforesaid, in that case the said 
John Brewer and Simeon Fowler shall be entitled to hold the same in fee. 
which said negligent person might have held by complying with the condi- 
tions aforesaid on his part. It is further provided, that if any settler or 
l?rantee aforesaid shall neglect to pay his proportion of the sums to be paid 
for the residuary lands aforesaid, within the time aforesaid, the said John 
Brewer and Simeon Fowler shall he entitled to hold in fee the same lands 
which such negligent person might have held by complying with the condi- 
tions aforesaid on his part. Provided nevertheless, if any dispute or con- 
troversy shall arise between the said John Brewer and Simeon Fowler on 
the one part, and any settler on the lands aforesaid, or other person who 
has purcha^^ed cf an original settler there, on his part, in that case there 
i- hereby reserved full power and authority to the committee aforesaid, or 
tbeir successors in office, to adiust such dispute and controversy on the 
principles of equity, and to assign and convey to such settler, or to him or 
them who hold under such settler, his or their heirs and assigns, such quan- 
I tjty of the land aforesaid as to the same committee shall appear reasonable. 

and at such a rate as they may think just, so as that the said John Brewer 
."'nd Simeon Fowler shall have a right to receive from all persons interested 
"r which may be interested in the tract of land afore=;aid. a sum of monev 
*'f efjual amount with the several sums for the payment whereof to the said 
John Brewer and Simeon Fowler provision is hereinbefore made, in ca=e 
application shall be made to the said committee at any time within three 
years next following the date hereof: and the said committee, in behalf of 
^he «aid Commonwealth, covenant and agree that the said Commonwealth 
shall warrant and defend the premises 01 the conditions and with the 
rt.'>ervations aforesaid, to the grantees afore<=aid, their heirs and a'^sio-nc. 



I 



22 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAIXE HISTORY 



to be held in the proportion and manner, and upon the conditions aforesaid, 
against the lawful claims and demands of all persons. 

In witness whereof, the said committee set their hands and seals, this 
twenty-fifth day of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-six. 

Signed, sealed and delivered 

in presence of us, 
Lewis Whiting, Sam'l Phillips, Jr., (Seal) 

Jacob Kuhn, Xath' \\'ells (Seal) Committee 



A MAINE POLITICAL DOCUMENT IX 1845. WHEN THE SLAVERY 

QUESTION WAS WRECKING POLITICAL PARTIES 

(Contributed by Newell White of Thomdike, ^le.) 

To the Democratic Republicans of Maine 

House of Representatives, Washington, Jan. 27, 1845. 
On the 25th instant, a joint resolution, consenting to the annexation of the 
republic of Texas to our Union, passed the House of Representatives. 
Against that resolution we deemed it our imperative duty to vote. We of- 
fer you very briefly the principal reasons which controlled our votes. We 
were all desirous and anxious to have Texas reannexed to the Union. The 
terms and conditions were what we could not assent to. We believed, upon 
"just and honorable terms", that the territory should have been divided into 
equal, or nearly equal, portions of free and slave territory — or at least that 
that question should remain open, to be settled hereafter; while, in fact, the 
terms were such as, in cur opinion, to secure the institution of slavery in 
nearly all the territory. With a fair division of the territory, or with the 
question of slavery as an open question, to be settled and determined by 
Congress, we should have cheerfully given our votes for said resolution. 
Such terms are fully believed to be just, fair, and honorable, and what the 
free States had a right to expect: but without which we felt comxpelled, 
though with reluctance, to vote against the measure. 

ROBERT P. DUNLAP, 
HANNIBAL HAMLIN, 
JOSHUA HERRICK, 
BENJAMIN WHITE. 



SUBSCRIPTION FOR AN ANTLSLAVERY LIBRARY, AT 
WALNUT HILL, NORTH YARMOUTH, MAINE. 

(Contributed by Mrs. E. C. Carll.) 
1839 

John W. Gookin i Dolo. 

William Hamilton 50 cts, 

Wm. Hamilton, Jr 25 " 

Miss Clarisa Noble 25 " 



DOCUMENTARY 23 



Jt)nathan Libby 25 

William Buxton 20 

Alfred \V. Hayes 25 

Daniel Staples 25 

John Morton 50 

Caleb Morton 25 

Jeremiah Loring 12 

Sfth S. Lufkins 7. 12 

David Parsons ; 25 

haac Skillins 25 

Jacob Loring 25 

Samuel Herrick 25 

\V. B. Skillings 25 

John Hayes 93 

Amos Osgood 25 

Benj. Cole (Life of Lovejoy) 

Joseph Hayes 50 

Reuben Maxfield - 25 



-From the Gookin Papers. 



FORM OF OATH TAKEN FROM THE ANCIENT RECORDS 
OF THE PROVINCE OF MAINE 

I do swear and protest before God Almighty, and by the holy contents 
of this book, to be a faithful servant and Councillor, unto Sir Ferdinando 
Gorges, Knight, my lord of the Province of Mayne, and to his heirs and 
a>>iy:ns to do and perform to the utmost of my power, all dutiful respects 
• him and them belonging ; concealing their counsel, and without respect 
'M persons to do and perform, and give my opinion in all causes according to 
^y conscience, and best understanding; both as I am a Councellor for hear- 
inii of causes, and otherwise to give him or them my opinion, as I am a 
Councellor for matters of State and Commonwealth, and that I will not 
conceal from him or them and their councel any matter of conspiracy or' 
mutinous practice against my said Lord, 'his heirs and assigns, but will con- 
"'anijy after my knowledge thereof, discover the same and prosecute the 
•■»uthors thereof with all diligence and severit>', according to justice, and 
thereupon do humbly kiss the book. 

At the first General Court held at Saco, June 25, 1640. 

Before Richard Vines, Richard Bonighton, Henry Josseline and Edward 
Godfrey, councellors to Sir Ferdinando Gorges. 

ROGER GARD, Rgr. 

ROBERT SANKEY, Provost Marshal. 



24 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAIN'E HISTORY 



Norway, Maine 



Fraguientary Notes from DAVID XOYES. 
\ HISTORY OF NORWAY, Published in 1852 

i_ Early Grants of Land and First Settlers. 

j Soldiers at the Battle of Bunker's Hill. 

First Doctors. 
The Old Time Musters. 

The town of Norway is made up of the following tracts, or grams 
of land viz: the tract of land formerly known as Rustfield, pur- 
chased by Henry Rust, of Salem, Massachusetts, of the Common- 
[ wealth of Massachusetts in December, 1787, estimated at six thou- 

r' ^ sand acres; the Lee Grant, estimated at six thousand acres exclusive 
I of water ; the Cummings Gore, containing about three thousand and 

six hundred acres ; and three tiers of lots taken from the easterly side 
of the town of Water ford, viz : a strip one mile and a half \\nde, and 
seven miles long, estimated to contain six thousand seven hundred 
I and twenty acres ; and another tract called the **Gore,'' or Rust's 

Gore," lying south of the Waterford three tiers, and bordering on 
the northerly line of Otisfield, containing about seventeen hundred 
acres more or less, making in the whole a trifle over twenty-four 
thousand acres ; but at that time it was rather a custom to make quite 
liberal measure in eastern lands, therefore we may safely calculate 
the quantity to be, at least, twenty-five thousand acres, or more. 
' The Waterford three tiers, and the "Rust Gore," last described, 

lying south of the three tiers, from the westerly side of the town, 
1 making the whole length eight miles and one hundred and thirty- 

eight rods. The Lee Grant lies in the northeast corner of the town, 
the Cummings Gore between the Lee Grant and the northerly part 
of the Waterford three tiers, and that part called Rustfield lies south 
of the Lee Grant and the Cummings Gore, being the southerly part 
of what is now called the town of Norway. 



1786, — This year five individuals, viz : Joseph Stevens, Jonas 
Stevens, Jeremiah Hobbs, Amos Hobbs, and George Lessley, from 
the town of Gray, came into the place, and felled trees on the tract 
called Rustfield, excepting Jeremiah Hobbs, who commenced on 
the lot easterly of where the Congregational meeting-house now 
stands, and then supposed to be within the limits of what was after- 
wards called Rustfield. 



1801 — This year, Phinehas Whitney, on the Waterford three 
tiers, had the misfortune to lose his house by fire. It was a log house. 



NORWAY XOTES. 25 



to be sure; but it was al! he had. It was quite a distressing circum- 
stance to him and his family, who were in rather poor circumstances 
before the loss. Mr. Whitney was a soldier through all the revolu- 
tionary war. He was in the battle of Bunker Hill, and I have often 
heard him tell the story of that memorable contest. He said that 
just as he had put his last charge into his gun, the British forces 
had about reached their rude breastwork ; a British officer mounted 
the embankment, and cried out to his soldiers to "rush on. as the 
fort was their own ;'' Whitney then took deliberate aim at him. 
and, to use his own language, "let him have it," and he fell into the 
entrenchment. He then clubbed his musket, and cleared his way 
the best he could, and finally made good his retreat. 



Jacob Frost, who moved from Tewksbury, Mass., into Norway, in 
1800, was also in the battle of Bunker Hill. He was severely 
wounded in the hip by a musket ball, and taken prisoner. After- 
wards he was carried to Halifax, where he was immurred in a filthy 
prison, and his wound poorly attended to — the ball never being 
extracted ; he remained there several months, and suffered almost 
everything but death. While yet very lame, he, with three fellow- 
prisoners, planned a way to escape, by removing a stone, and digging 
out under the wall of their prison. 



1802 — I find a Dr. Heath on the valuation this year, but he was 
not the first doctor in the place. Dr. Shannon was the first, who 
stayed but a short time, and was succeeded by Dr. Barrett, who soon 
gave place to Dr. Heath. About 1803, he was succeeded by Dr. 
Swett, who left in 1805 ; and in the fall of that year Dr. Moses 
Ayer came into the town, and continued to practice till about 1824. 
and was generally esteemed as a very good physician. He then 
removed to Sangerville, but in the latter part of his life was subject 
to insanity, and died in the insane hospital a few years since. 



In the fall of 1802, we had the first regimental muster, probably. 
that took place in the County of Oxford — at all events, the first in 
this regiment. The place of parade was on the spot which I shall 
now call the burnt district, about where Anthony Bennett's build- 
ings stood and just west of the little bowling-alley. The land was 
then new. and not much cleared, but had had the trees and bushes 
cut down and burnt over a short time before. This muster was a 
J^'reat day among the other days of that time. The citizens of the 



26 SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



place turned out voluntarily, and cleared off the logs and wood 
remaining on the ground; they pulled and knocked up the small 
stumps, and leveled the inequalities of the ground as well as they 
could for this important occasion. ]^Iartial music at that day, in this 
place, was an enlivening affair, as we had but little of it ; and in 
order to be well prepared for the occasion. John Bennett, a vounger 
brother of Anthony and Nathaniel Bennett, then quite a young 
man, w^ent down to New Gloucester and obtained a pewter fife, 
and on the evening before the muster, delighted the boys and girls, 
and even older ones, by playing a few tunes as a kind of prelude 
to the much-longed for, coming day. 

The ofiBcers of the regiment were as follow^s : Levi Hubbard, of 
Paris, Colonel ; Mark Andrews, of Buckfield, William Livermore. 
of Livermore, Majors ; William C. Whitney, of Hebron, Adjutant. 
The Companies were from Buckfield, Rumford, Francis Keyes. 
Captain ; Hebron, Paris, Otisfield, Mores, Captain ; Norway, Jona- 
than Cummings, Captain. Six companies in all; a pretty formida- 
ble military force, and armed with muskets of every color, length, 
and caliber ; some with bayonets, and more without ; but the greater 
part would burn powder, which some of them had learned the smell 
of at Bunker Hill, Saratoga, Yorktown, and other places, during 
our revolutionary struggle. The officers of the several companies ; 
at least the captains, were armed with a sword and a spontoon; and 
the uniform was a tri-cornered cocked-hat, deep blue coat, faced 
with bright red broadcloth, the facing turned out about four inches 
on each side of the front, buff or yellow vest and pants for the 
company officers ; and they looked grand, I tell you — especially those 
who bore a shining epaulette on one or both shoulders. 

On the opposite side of the street, about where the post-office and 
Real's block now stand. Ensign Reed had a lot of boards piled along 
by the side of the fence; and these served nicely for the "shanty 
fixings," where some of the good dames sold cakes, pies, maple 
sugar, (candy was hardly born then) and other little refreshments; 
while men and boys sold a little liquor, such as good old ''white 
face and molasses," known then by the sober cognomen of Black 
strap, with a little old Holland and Cogniac for the use of the offi- 
cers and other gentlemen of distinction — but all good enough. No 
fault was found either with the cakes, liquor, soldiers, or officers — 
in fact, everything seemed propitious, excepting that in the after- 
noon the wind blew rather strong, and the dirt and dust becoming 
pretty thoroughly stirred up by the horses' hoofs, and being rather 



m. 



l: 



COLONEL ARTHUR XOBLE 27 



dark colored from recent burning, the buff and white pants looked 
tremendously — for many of them appeared as if they were j^utting 
on mourning for the wash-tub. 

The regiment performed many maneuvers and evolutions laid 
down by old *'Steuben/' and other military tacticians. Both soldiers 
and officers received the hearty applause and approbation of all 
the lookers-on, and that was "glory enough for one day.'' The place 
felt proud of the parade, the soldiers felt proud of their officers, 
and the officers felt proud of their soldiers, but much more so of 
themselves. In short, it was a day of high exultation with all, as it 
seemed to revive up, and rekindle the patriotic feelings which had 
pervaded the bosoms of many old soldiers through the long war that 
had achieved our National Independence. 

The concourse of people was immensely large, and fortunately no 
accident occurred to mar the enjoyments and festivities of the day. 
The regiment, although afterwards curtailed of a part of its terri- 
tory, continued to increase in numbers and "military graces," until 
it embraced within its limits ten companies of infantry, one of ar- 
tillery, one of riflemen, one of cavalry, and two of Hght infantr\\ 
But those days of military parade and glory have passed away, and 
are now numbered among the things that are not; and probaWv 
a like fate awaits many of the things of the present day. 

(To be continii?.'! ) 



COLONEL ARTHUR NOBLE 

Colonel Arthur Noble was one of the heroic men of Maine, who 
was an officer under Sir William Pepperell, at Louisburg, and 
serv^ed with distinction in the French and Indian wars of the 
eighteenth century. 

He was a brother of James Noble, who was one of the proprietors 
of a tract of land which included what is now the town of Noble- 
borough, and about which there was much controversy during the 
first part of that century. 

Just when or where he was born has never been made entirely 
clear by historians. In a sketch of his Hfe by William Goold. in 
^^77, (Coll. Me. Hist. Soc. vol. 8, p. 114) appears the following: 

The descendants of Col. Xcble have a tradition that he was born at En- 
ni-killen, County of Fermanagh, and Province of Ulster, Ireland, and that 
the family emigrated to that place from Scotland. Arthur Xoble is srnDOsed 
to have come to America in about 1720, with his br::th?rs Frands and Jarnes. 



% 



m r. 



28 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 




The Colonel Arthur Noble Monument, Nobletx)rough, Me. 

He was commissioned by Gov. Shirley as Lieutenant Colonel under 
Colonel Samuel W^aldo, in the Louisburg expedition, and also held a 
commission as captain of one of the companies of the same regiment 
which was the second Massachusetts. 

At one time he was a trader at Arrowsic Island, and a farmer 
iind large land owner at Pleasant Cove. He owned a tannery and 
was a successful business man. 

After the capture of Louisburg, the French took more vigorous 
means to defend Canada. Governor Shirley induced the Duke of 
Newcastle to authorize him to equip an expedition to Nova Scotia 
to aid Lieutenant Gov. Mascarene who was commandant at Annapo- 
h's, in holding that province against French invasion. About i.ooo 
New England troops were raised and Nob^e was appointed com- 
mander. 

He was killed in his first engagement with the French and In- 
dians at Minas. in February 1747. 



GORHAM, MAINE. 29 



Gorham, Maine 



IN THE DAYS OF GORHAM'S FIRST SCHOOL TEACHER 

By LuciNA H. Lombard (Descendant in 5th generation from 
Sarah Phinney) 

'" 'We ought to have schools , said Elizabeth 
McLellan, one day; 'our children zcill be savages'/' 

"Good Old Times,*" (the direct result of the stories told Elijah 
Kellogg when a boy by his step-grandmother Martha McLellan 
Warren at the old homestead — burned several years ago — on Flag 
Meadow Road near Little River) tells us how the McLellan boys 
and girls played ^\-ith the Indian children and learned to imitate 
their ways. The boys ^'talked Indian, strutted about with knives 
and tomahawks" playing Indian and finally painted themselves In- 
dian-fashion to go on the war-path. It was no wonder that Mre. 
McLellan wanted some other playmates for them. 

This was in the spring of 1744. The home of the McLellans was 
seen "as you descend the Academy Hill, which was then covered 
with a heavy growth of rock-maple and yellow birch." It was a 
log-house on the western side of the road, close to where the brick 
house now stands, but nearer the Fort Hill Road and Tommy's 
Brook. A fallen pine served for a bridge across the brook which 
owing to the dense forest was a much larger stream than now. with 
many trout. 

Later on, toward the last of May, Elizabeth again broached the 
subject to Hugh, her husband saying: "'Here is Bryant with a 
family and Reed and Watson, and others are coming: I don't see 
what there is to hinder our having a school for all the children in 
the neighborhood. We might take one of the front rooms and put 
in some benches, and fix it for a school-room, in the summer at any 
rate; and if you build your brick chimney, we might then make fire- 
places in the other rooms as well as in the kitchen, and so we could 
use it in the winter. What a great thing it would be for the chil- 
dren ! For it is but little time that you or I get to 'instruct them.' 
'But where shall we get a school-master?' inquired Hugh. 

" 'Why, there is Sarah Phinney, she has good learning. 

" 'You can all club together and hire her.' 

■»»- 

C) Good Old Times, by Reverend Elijah Kelloy:g. (1877) Regarded as 
an accurate record of the early days of Gorham. Maine. 



30 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

" 'Whether I build the chimney or not,' said Hugh. T will put a 
stone fireplace in there just like this in the kitchen, and I will go and 
see if the rest will join me ; and if not, we will hire her ourselves. 
It is just as much our duty to give our children learning as it is to 
give them bread. I think the neighbors will like it in the summer ; 
but how could the children get here in winter ?' " You u411 remem- 
ber that your history tells that King Street (as it was then known) 
was full of stumps, and cradle-knolls and bushes. Along this road 
(now the Fort Hill Road) lived the white settlers; for then, what is 
now Gorham Corner was a forest. So Elizabeth replied, '' 'The 
older ones could come on snowshoes, and haul the younger ones 
on a sled. They might be obliged to lose a good many days, but it 
would be a great deal better than nothing'." 

Hugh found his neighbors of the same mind, and he accordingly 
put in some benches, and secured the teacher ; and the next week — 
the first week in June — school was under way. 

EHzabeth went out and worked in the field haying that her oldest 
son, William, might not lose overmuch of his school ; for in hoeing 
he had had to help his father, and was only able to go three days 
in a week. 

What would the scholars of today think of the hours their prede- 
cessors passed in the school room ? The sessions were from 7 A. M. 
till 5 P. ^I., from March to October, and from 8 till 4 during the 
rest of the year, the noon outing being from 11 to i, and vacations 
were almost an unknown quantity. Fast and Thanksgiving days 
were about the only day outings they had, as that primeval period 
antedated by some years such holiday bestowers as George Wash- 
ington, Bunker Hill and Fourth of July. We had not then begun 
to make the history which makes holidays. 

Out of school they still enjoyed their frolics with the Indian chil- 
dren at the encampment on the northern side of the brook. There 
were four Indian wigwams there covered with bass (linden) bark 
and the children had built a dam of wallows across the brook and 
in the pond thus formed had made three beaver lodges, imitating 
them perfectly, being helped by the older Indians who were kind 
to the white children ; treating them like their own, in times of peace. 

But fearful rumors were now abroad ; it was said that war was 
inevitable between the mother country and France : it was certain 
that the Indians would be stirred up by France, and let loose upon 
the frontier settlements ; and Maine was all frontier, — Gorham 
(Narragansett No. 7) lying directly in the Indian trail. In the 
latter part of May this state of suspense was turned into fearful 



w» 



GORHAM, MAINE 31 



certainty. An Indian runner in the service of the government 
brought word to Capt. Phinney that England had declared war 
against France. All was now activity along the sea-coast, arming 
forts and building garrisons, and preparing for an attack from 
the French by water. But the danger of the settlers in Gorham 
as in other inland towns was from the Indians. It was 19 years 
since the last Indian War but there were many whose parents, 
children, and friends had then fallen beneath the tomahawks. Many 
of the settlers had themse'ves fought and their recollections were 
still full of its horrors. But the excitement was some what allayed 
by the news that government had made a treaty with all the Indians 
this side of the Penobscot River, and with the Penobscots, to take 
part on neither side. The Indians acknowledged this, and appeared 
as friendly as ever. Soothed by this report, the inhabitants, loath 
to leave their fields and lose their crops in order to build a garrison, 
continued at their labors as usual, in spite of the efforts of Capt. 
Phinney, who put no trust in Indians nor Indian treaties. 

But Mr. McLellan made up his mind to run no risk by waiting 
but to put his own house in a state of defense. Taking off the bark 
roof, he made a protection all round with some heavy timber and 
loopholed it. He put on a new roof and planked and shingled it. 
Then he dug a small cellar under the floor. He stopped up the 
windows to the size of loopholes. A large trough which he made 
was put in the house and filled with water. Then he bought an extra 
gun, lead, powder and flint, and, thought truly that his house was 
about as good as a garrison ! This was in the fall. Passed down in 
our family is a tradition that during this work the school was of 
necessity suspended. 

It is interesting to stroll along this road and try to picture the 
scene of those early times. Did tall eglantine grow by the alders 
in the shade by the brook and low wild roses border the hill then 
as now ? As the way dipped with arrow straightness thru the vine- 
tangled gloom where clustered chumps of elder-bloom it reminded 
those of the settlers who had been born in the country-side of the 
Home Land of the dewy fragrance of twilight hedgerows. Xow 
perchance the path, trailed out where virgin's bower overran the 
weedy angle of a stake-and-rider fence. Small wonder that the 
children loitered where berry bushes grew or lagged to pick fragrant 
peppermint or pull and dig up roots of pungent sweet flag that their 
mothers after boiling and slicing it might candy in maple syrup. 
The wild yellow cherries (still common in our great grandmother's 
time, but only one bush of which I have ever seen) lived and the 



m: 



32 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



wiitch-ejii moved a spell as in those loved Scottish Highlands for 
which some of their parents' hearts yearned. But, finally, up the 
hill unswervingly the way led to duty. 

And Sarah Phinney, the teacher. Her home was at the junction 
of King and Queen Streets, near the old Indian trail — just beyond 
where ^Ir. Edward Roberts' house now stands. Again family lore 
musit describe her for us : ''Some what above middle size, with 
dark brown hair satin-smooth and large brown eyes that flashed 
when she was cross !" was the description of her mother given by 
great, great grandmother Hancock who my great uncle Colby Bean 
of West Buxton can remember. 

.And what did she teach ? "Well, that's telling," is the good hu- 
mored reply. 

Like Dickens' Air. Gradgrind — though not so sordidly nor so 
disagreeably we may be sure it was nothing but facts! 

In the colony of Massachusetts, up to 1754, or for rather more 
than a hundred years the free schools were for boys only, but there 
must have been some progressive woman's rights women in the 
Province of Maine before that year, though girl stock was not 
quoted as quite so high a figure then as now. 

Their course of instruction included sewing, embroidery, work- 
ing samplers (no house being considered furnished, in those days, 
without at least one hanging on the wall of the '* fore-room,") 
reading, writing, spelling and ciphering. 

The wee ones learned their letters standing at the teachers knee 
while she pointed them out with a long thorn. 

The Bible was the favorite reading book — indeed there was little 
else and was used as a speller also. 

Of a late Saturday afternoon — for school "kept" 6 days in the 
week then — they would go down by the brook with their samplers 
and sitting by the line of flowers that grew on the banks she would 
say "Now make your hems with care," or "Take dainty stitches — 
this way," as she poised the long, slim needle between her deft 
thumb and fingers. 

She told them stories of "Merrie England." And how Elizabeth 
one of England's good queens had liked to do needlework, her white 
fingers darting in and out as she wrought wondrous pictures of 
famous battles or of brave knights and fair dames on the lengths 
of tapest.r}'. For was not England Mother England still, though 
2.000 miles of ocean rolled between? 

At the time our story began there had been 6 months of preaching 
by itinerant ministers in the log church on the hill beyond Capt. 
Phinney 's and just below the' fort. 



•>r', i' 



GORHAM, MAINE 33 



Behind this peaceful frontier life there was always the alertness 
for news. But the spring passed quietly, the Indians coming as 
usual to camp at the brook. 

There was open war between the government and the eastern 
Indians, and it was said that the Penobscots had been seen with 
their war parties. This was in July. 

The Saco River tribe was then but a broken down remnant so 
that they helped instead of bothered the whites. In August the 
government (finding the Penobscots were not only determined not 
to aid in subduing the other Indians, but were also, if they could not 
remain neutral, — disposed rather to join with them) declared war 
against them and offered a bounty equal to a hundred dollars in 
silver for each Indian scalp.^ But before the Gorham settlers had 
heard of this the Indians had left town and also gone from Sebago 
Lake as was told by a company of government rangers who guided 
by three Saco Indians were scouring the woods. One of these 
rangers was James Emery the famous hunter. 

The leader was Capt. Bean. The settlers at once began work on 
the garrison so as to have it ready to put their crops in when har- 
vested. Gorham at this time had no road to any other place except 
Portland. The garrison stood on the west side of the road near the 
old burying ground on the top of Fort Hill, the highest land in town. 

Col. Gorham's saw mill on Little River had been built in 1741. 

In September, half of the settlers going to Portland, only Q 
families were left to face the merciless foe. Cattle had been 
stolen or killed in the meantime, and the people knew that attack 
could not be far off. The garrison was now finished ; but the gov- 
ernment provided only 20 soldiers (rangers) to scout from Capt. 
Bean's Block house at L'nicon Falls, 3 miles below Salmon Falls — on 
Saco to Yarmouth. 

In the spring of 1746, Capt. Phinney begged the people to go into 
garrison. All but four families complied. 

In the fort, Sarah taught in the less troublous times as best she 
could. But preservation needs must be foremost in the minds of 
all. Religious services were held in the south-east flanker of the 
fort. 

At the time of the Indian massacre, Capt. Bean and his rangers 
who happened to be in Portland at the time heard the report of the 
cannon from the fort and hastened to the rescue. At the banks of 
Little River, the trail was lost, and as it was not found till noon of 



C) See page 47. 



■^'-'t. 



^>?0 



34 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

the next day the Indians with their captives had too much the start 
to be overtaken on their way to Canada. 

Soon after this ii soldiers and a corporal were assigned to the 
command of Capt. Phinney. Two months after the attack which 
took place April i8, 1746, Mrs. McLellan killed the Indian chief 
Worafiibus and his braves carried him by the old trail to Sebago 
Lake where he was buried under a white birch still standing on the 
south shore at Sango Lach in Naples ; as told by Whittier. 

After the Indian battle, about this time, things slowed down a 
|- little for the white men, but it was not till Sept. 26th, 1759 that 
i news of the capture of Quebec was received and 14 years of endless 
I \vorr\- and some blood shed was over. 

l The road from Gorham to Buxton (Flaggy Meadow Road) was 

i then only a bridle path by spotted trees. Over this road Samuel 

Leavitt came a-courting. His sweet-heart was the Gorham school 

marm. Sarah Phinney. His suit prospered, for we are told that 

she married him and went to live in Buxton.'' 



Sarah Phinney was a great, great grand-daughter of Lieut. Joseph 
Rogers who came over when a boy with his father in the ''May- 
flower." 



Tor well she keeps her ancient stock. 
The stubborn strength of Plvmouth Rock. 



Now as then, "near the school, the church doth stand.'' 



To the Hon. Jonathan Bozviiian, Esq., fudge of Probate of JVills, &c., for 
the County of Lincoln, &c.: 

Sir — We the Subscribers being the major part of the Selectmen of Pownal- 
boro hereby Certify your Honor that Charles Callahan late of said Pownal- 
borough Gent., has absented himself for more than three ^^lonths from his 
habitation & has left Estate Real and personal to the value of more than 
Twenty pounds within said Town and from the best Intelligence we can 
obtain we verily believe the said Charles Callahan went voluntarily to our 
Enemies and is still absent from his usual place of abode & without this 
State with our Enemies — Given under our hands this 26 day of October A D 

1777. 

EDMUXD BRIDGE, 
ASA SMITH, 

Selectmen of Pozvnalboro. 
A True Copy att. ROL. CUSHXG. Reg. 
From Documentary Historj- of Maine (Baxter Mss. Vol. XV, page 260). 



REVOLUTIOXARY PEXSIOXERS IX MAIXE 



35 



An Alphabetical Index of Revolu 

tionary Pensioners Living 

in Maine 

(Compiled by Charles A. Flagg, LreRAMJJ^Bfv^cfek 
(Maine) Public Library.) 

(Continued from Vol. 6, page 157.) 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. Age. ' County. 



Remarks. 



'3oc Eames, Ebenezer. . . Mass. line Private. 

Eames, James Mass. line Private. 



•35d 

'40 

•3.5d 

•3od 

•40 

•3o<l 

•35c 

'40 

•3o<i 

•3oc 

'35c 

•40 

'40 

•3od 

•3od 

'3.Sd 

•40 

;3oc 

'35c 



Eames, Samuel Mass. line Private. . . 

Eastman, Daniel. . . ^lass. mil Private. . . 



80 Oxford. 



Eastman, Daniel. 
Eastman, Jacob . . 



Mass. state. . . . Private. . 
X. H. line Musician. 



Eastman, James. 
Eastman, John. . 



N. H. line Private. . . . | 

N. H. line Private | 



Eastman, Zachariah. Mass. line Private. ... 

Eastman, Zechariah ' 

Eas'mon, Sarah ' 

Eaton, Benjamin. . . Mass. mil Private | 

Eaton, Ebenezer. .. . Mass. line and Private ; 

X. H. line. 

Eaton, Eliab Mass. line iCorr- and; 

Serg. ] 

Eaton, Eliab ! j 

Eaton, Lliah Mass. line i Private i 

Eaton, Samuel .Mass. line i Private I 



7l!Oxford... 
78 Oxford. . . 
72 Kennebec 

78 York 

83 York 

68 1 Oxford. . . 

72 York 

77 York 

81 Oxford.. . 
60 1 Oxford. . . 



78 Cumberland. 
95 Cumberland 

78 Oxford 

73 Somerset . . . , 
68 Kennebec . . . 

70 Somerset. . . 

77 Franklin. . . 
70 Somerset. . . 
75 Cumberland 



(•20) d. Aug. 19, 
1833. 

Res. NewTy. 



Res. Cornish. 

i('20). 

Res. Parsonsfield. 
d. Xov. 13, 1833. 
i!'20) d. Sept. 6, 
I 1827. 
!('20). 

;Res. Scarborough. 
iRes. Fryeburg. 



|('20). 

!C20). 

1 

' Res. Strong. 



•3od 

•40 

•20 

'40 

•:i.5d 

•40 

•35 1 

'3.Ki 

•40 

'35c 

•35d 

•40 

'35c 

•35c 

;35d 

'35 c 

'35d 

•a.jd 

'35 d 

'40 

'35c 



Eaton, William i^^Iass [Private 

Eddy, Celia ; i I 

Edes, Thomas iMass. mil jPrivate 

Edgecomb, James . . ^lass. line Private 

Edgerly, Richard. . . X. H. mil iPrivate 

Edgerly, Richard | 

Edminster, Xoaha.. Mass. line Private 

Edmonds, .\sa Mass. line ;Pvt. & Serg 

Edn.uns, Eunice I 

Edwards, Joshua. . - Mass. line Sergeant . . 

Edwards, Xathaniel. Mass. line Private. . . . 

Edwards, Samuel. . . Mass. state. . . . .Artificer. . . 

Edwards, Stephen. . Mass. line Sergeant . . 

' i I 

Elden, Gibeon ^Mass. line Private 

Llden, Giheon Mass. line Private 

Elder, Joshua Mass line Private.... 

Elder, Joshua i , 

Eldridge, Daniel Mass. line iPrivate 



'35d Elliott, Jacob Mass. mil iPrivate. 

•40*^ |F-lliott, Jedediah 



78 Penobscot . . 
70 Cumberland 

78 Cumberland 
77 Cumberland 
85 York 

79 York 

73 Penobscot. . 

77 Waldo 

83 Waldo 

S3 Kennebec . . 

79 York 

b2 York 

70 York 



— York 

73 York 

70 Kennebec . 
76 Penobscot. 
73 York 



Mass. line Private. 



70 Cumberland 
77 Cumberland 
73 Cumberland 
79 Cumberland 



Res. Eddington. 

Res. Otisfield. 
('20, Edgcomb). 
:('31a.) 

Res. Limington. 
('20, Xoah). 

Res. Belfast. 

1('20). 
i('20). 

('20) d. Feb. 12, 
1825. 

(•20). 

Res. Dexter. 
('20) d. June 10, 
1832. 

Res. Falmouth. 
'20. •31b). 
Res. Windham. 



36 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



i 




J ^ 












List. 


Name. 


s 


ervice. 


Rank. 

1 


Age. County. 


Remarks. 


'3oc 


Ellis, Atkins 


Mass 


line 


Private 




('20) d. Oct. 18, 
1833. 














'35c 


Ellis, Edward 


N.H. 


line 


Private 


75 Kennebec . . . 




'20 


Ellis, Robert 


Mass 




Private 






'35c 


Ellis. Robert 


\. H. 


line 


Private. .. 


69 Ke -rebec. . . 




'40 










74 Kennebec. . . 


Res. Sidney. 


[ '350 


Ellis, Samuel 


Mass. 


line 


Non. :om . 










officer. . . 


SO Washington . 


(•20). 


f '40 


Elwell, Jeremiah . . . 








50 Cumberland . 


Res. Poland. 


! ^ '35(1 


Emerson, Samuel. . . 


N.H. 


state. . . . 


Fifer & Fife 
nrajor . . 


79 York 




'40 


Emerson, Samuel. . . 








76 York 


Res. Kennebunk. 


'40 


Emen/, Ahi(}a)l 








SO Somerset .... 


Res. Fairfield. 


'35c 


Emerv, Daniel 


Aia.«3. 


line 


Private 


75 Kennebec . . 


d. Nov. 18. 1830^ 


•35c 


Emer>-, Daniel 


Mass. 


line 


Private 


76 York 




'20 


Emery. Daniel 


N.H. 




Private 






'20 




Mass 




Private 




■ 


f '35d 


Emery, Isaac 


Mass. 


mil 


Private 


77 York 




! '35c 


Emery, Jacob 


Ma.ss. 


line 


Private 


77 York 


('20). 


'35d 


Emerv, James 


Mass. 


line 


Private 


7S York 


d. Sept. 12, 1832. 


'35d 


Emery, James 


Mass. 


mil 


Private 


70 York 




'35d 


Emery, Job 


Mass. 


line 


Private 


87 York 

1 


(•20, Sib). 

d. July 27,1832. 


'35c 
'40 


Emery, John 


Mass. 


line 


Private 


SO Somerset .... 


(•20). 








87 Somerset 


Res. Bloomfield. 
Res. Mont\-ille. 


'40 


Emerv, Joseph 








63 Waldo 


•35c 


Emerv, Joshua 


Mass. 


Ime 


Private 


71 Cumberland . 


d. April 6, 1827. 


•35c 


Emery, Nathaniel. . 


Mass. 


line 


Private.... 


77 Somerset. . . . 


(•20) d. May 6,. 
1824. 


'35c 


Emery, Ralph 


Mass. 


line 


Private 


70 York 


('20) d. in 1830. 


'35d 


Emerv, Samuel 


Mass. 


line 


Sergeant . . 


79 Somerset .... 


('20). 


•35d 
•35d 


Emmon«, Pendleton Mass. 
Erskine, David Mass. 


mil 

mil 


Private 

Private 


89 
75 


York 




Lincoln 




: •35d 


Fsty. Edward 


Mass. 


mil 


Pvt. &Serg. 


SO 1 Kennebec . . . 


" 


'35c 


Eustice, Jacob 


Mass. 


line 


Private.... 


71 Hancock. . . . 




•35d 


Evans, Benjamin. . . 


Mass. 


mil 


P\-t.of art. 


84 York 




f: ;4o^ 


Evans, James P . . . . 








68 Kennebec . . . 


Res. Gardiner. 


■ '35d 


Evans, .James Pratt 


-\iass. 


state 


Private 


791 Penobscot. . . 


d. March 14, 18.33. 


'35d 


Evans, John 


Mass 


mil 


Private. . . . 


82 Somerset .... 




'35c 


Evans, Joseph 


Mass. 


line 


Private 


86 Kennebec . . . 


('20) d. April 15, 
















1826. 


'35c 


Evans. Nathaniel... 


Mass 


line 


Private 


72 


Hancock .... 


('20) d. June 14, 
1819. 


i '35d 


Evans. William .... 


Ma.ss 


mil 


Private 


69 Oxford 




'40 


Eveans. William . . . 








75 Oxford 


Res. Fryeburg. 


r '35d 


Eveleth, Isaac 


^Tass 


mil 


Private 


73 Cumberland . 


I '35 d 


Eve leth, James 


Mass. 


line 


Pvt.&Corp. 


82 Kennebec . . . 


d. Jan. 22, 1834. 




(wido'c). 






of cav. 






'35c 


Everett, Josiah 


Mass 


line 


Private .... 


74 Somerset 


(•20). 


' '40 












Res. New Portl'd. 

r20). 


•35c 


Everton, Zenha-iah. 


Mass 


line 


Private 


70 Lincoln 


•35c 


Ewer, Jonathan .... 


Mass 


line 


Private 


75 Kennebec . . . 


('20) d. Jan. 29, 

1829. 
Transf. from Mid- 


•35c 


Fairbank, John 


Mass 


line 


Private... 


80 Lincoln 












' 


dlesex County, 














Mass., 1826, d, 
July 10, 1830. 


•35d 


Fairbank, Nathaniel Mass 


line 


Private .... 


80 Kennebec . . . 


•35d 


Fairbanks. Elijah. . . 


Mass 


mil 


Private 


78 Kennebec . . . 




•40 
•35c 


Fairhart': a Lylin 








74 Kennebec . . . 
77 York 


Res. Wayne. 

('20). 


Fairfield. John 


Mass 


line 


Private 


•35c 


Fairfield. William. . 


Mass. 


line 


Private 


60 York 


('20). 


'35c 


Fall, George 


N. H. 


line 


Sergeant . . 


60 York 


('20, '31b). 


•35e 




2dN. 


H. regt. . . 


Sergeant . . 


— York 


("29 as Falls). 




'40 


Fa' in, John 








80 Lincoln 


Res Bath Same 










as Fan in? 


'40 


Fa'nington John 








83 Penobscot. . . 


Res. Brewer Same 










as Farrington. 


'40 
'35c 










85 Lincoln 

81 York 


Res Boothbay. 

r20). 


Farnham, Jonathan 


Ma.<s. 


line 


Private 


'35c 


Farnham, Jonathan 


Ma.<3. 


line 


Private.... 


6S York 


d. May 20, 1823. 


•35c 


Farnham, Nathaniel 


Mass 


line 


Private 


77 Oxford 


('20, N. H. line). 


'40 


Farnham, Nathaniel 








83 Somerset .... 


Res. -Mercer. 


'40 


Farnham, Ralph . . . 








»4 York 

: 


Res. Acton. Same 
as Furnham? 


•40 
'35d 


Fnrrsirt/rth, A hi n nil. 
Earns worth, Robert 








90 Lincoln 

70 Lincoln 




Mass 


navy.. . . 


Pvt. & Sea- 




•35d 


Farnsworth, William 


N. n. 


line 


Private & 
Lieut. 


81 Lincoln 

! 





REVOLUTIONARY PENSIONERS IN :\IAINE 



2>7 



List. 



Name. 



Ser\-ice. 



I I 

Rank. Age. 



County. 



Remarks. 



'20 Farnum, Jonathan . Ma; 

*35d Farnum, Simeon . . . Ma; 

*40 j 

'35d Farrand, William. . . Mass. mil. 



line. 



•20 

•.3.^c 

•40 

•3.5d 

•40 

•3o<l 

•35a 

•3od 
•40 
•35d 
'35d 



Farrin. John Mass 

Farrington, Abner. .Mass. line. 



Private .... 
Private. . . . 

; Private & 
\ Drum... 

Private 

Private. . . . 



78 Penobscot. 
So Penobscot . 
72 Somerset. , 



Farrington, Ithamar. Mass line. 

Farrington, Ithamas 

Farrington, John. . Mass. mil. 

Farrington. William Ma?s. line. 
I 
Mass. line. 



P^-t.&Serg. 
Private 



82 Lincoln. . . 
88 Lincoln . . . 

75 Oxford. . . . 
84 Oxford 

76 Penobscot. 



Farris. William 
Farris, William 

Farrow, John Mass. line 

Fassett, Richard . . .Mass. mil 



Serg. maj. 
I &Adj... 
Private. . . . 



•3oc Faxon, John ^^ass. line. 

'35d Fay, Silas Mass. line. 

•3oc jFeiker, Joseph X. H. line. 

;40 

•30c Fenderson, John . . . ^Lass. line. 

*3od Fenderson, Pelatiah Mass line. 

*40 Fennin, Richard 



•35d 

•40 

•3od 

'3oc 
•35c 
•3oc 
'3oc 

'35d 
'40 



Private. . . 
i Private & 
' Drum. 

Private .... 

P\-t.iCorp. 

Private. . . . 



72 Cumberland 

78 Kennebec . . 
81 Kennebec . . 
77 Lincoln .... 
So Somerset . . . 



Same as Farnham? 
Res. Xewbiirg. 

Same as Fan in? 

Res. Warren. 

Res. Livermore. 
Same as Farming- 
ton, J? 
d. Aug. 11, 1832. 



Res. China. 
('20, 'Sib). 



Private. 
Private. 



53 Washington . ('20). 
84 Waldo 

74 Somerset . . . 
SO Somerset . . . 

78 York 

75 Cumberland 

79 Kennebec . . 



|Fernald, Dennis. . . .Mass. mii. . 

1 Fernald, Elizabe'h . . 1 

Fernald, Hercules ..Mass. line. . 
Fernald, Nicholas . . See Furnald. 
Fernald, Tobias, . . . Mass. line. . 
Ferren, Jonathan. . .Mass. line. . 

Ferrin, John Mass' line. . 

Ferrin, .Richard. . . .Mass. line. . 



:Fessenden, Ebenezer Mass. mil 
Fie/ ett, Luc 



Private. 
Private. 



Private. 
Private. 
Private . 
Private. 



Private. 



76 York. 
79 York. 
84 York. 



71 York 

65 York 

7S Lincoln. , 
73 Lincoln. 



(•20). 

Res. Embden. 

(•20). 

('20, 'Sib). 

Res. Litchi.eld, 

Same as Ferrin 
('20, -Sib). 
Res. Llliott. 



('20) d. Jan. 182S. 
C20). 




'Soc Fickett, Nathaniel 

'35c Fickett, Vinson .... Mass. line . 

•40 Fickett, Zebulon 

'40 Field, KarheL. 

;40 F>eld, l.uH 

]35d Fields, Thomas Mass. state 

,40 Fields, Thomas 

'3oc Fii eld, John Cont. navy. 



•3oe Fifield, John C 

'40 

;35c Fifield, John Mass. line. 

•An ^^^^^' Ebenezer Mass. line 

40 Piles, tut her 

'35d 

•:jod 

•3,->d 

•3.K1 
;4u 

'35c 



('20). Same as 
Fennin. 

77 Oxford ('31j). 

88 Cumberland . Res. Cape Eliza- 
beth. 
74 Cumberland . ('20) d. May 23, 
; 1832. 
!.('20). 

jKes. Harrington 
I Res. Greenwood. 
iRes. Paris. 



77 Cumberland 
81 Washington 

88 Oxford 

SI Oxford 

84 Kennebec . . 
90 Franklin . . . 
81 York 



_ Oxford. 



Private. 
Private 



35d 
'35c 
'40 

•35d 

'35c 

"40 

'35d 

'40 

•35d 

'2{} 

•40 

'35d 



Files, Samuel Mass. line. . 

Files, William Aiass. mil. . 

Fillebrown, James . Alass. mil. . 

Fillebrown, Thomas Alass. state 

Fish, Da^-id Alass. line . . 

Fish, Jacob Ma.ss. miL . 

Fish, Simeon N. ti. line. . . 

Fish, Simeon 



I 

Private . . . 
Private. . . . 
Pvt.iNcCorp 
-Matross. . 

Private 

. Private . . . 
: Private 



7g Oxford 

5S Oxford 

7(3 Cumoerland 

toSO Cumberland 
74 Cumoerland 
7:5 Uumoerland 
77 iveimeoec . . 
71 xvenneDec . . 
7(j Kennebec . . 
~;i ivenneoec . . 



S3 Oxford . 
7S i-incoln. 
08 Lincoln. 



Fisher, Ebenezer. 
Fisher, Elijah ... 



Mass, line . 
-Mass. line. 



Private.. 
Private.. . 



Fisher, Jacob Mass. line Private. 



Fisk, Abner Mass. mil Pvt.& Serg. 

Fisk, David Alass | Private 

Fitts, Abigail 

Fitts, Samuel Mass. mil Private. . . . 



75 Penobscot . . 

7h Oxford 

82 Oxford 

74 i ork 

78 iork 

78 iork 



89 Kennebec . 
72 Cumberland 



iRes. New Sharon. 

jTranst.from Strai- 

I ford Co., N. ri. 

I l»:i6. 

I ('2U .\iass. line, 

I ^0). 

jRes. l-ryeburg. 

.'(•20«fe^31basFile) 

JRes. Gorham. 
. (.::U<i: dlbasfile) 



IRes. Winthrop. 
a. Jan. z^^, la23. 
Same as t'ink.! 



I Res. Patricktown 

riant. 
K'20, 31b). 

I xt.es. Livermore. 
v^iU). 
|Keb. Kennebunk. 

iSame as Fish? 
'Res. Litchheld. 



38 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



List. 



Xamf. 



Ser\'ice. 



Rank. 



Age. 



County. 



Remarks. 



'3oc 

'35c 

•35c 

'35c 

•35d 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 
'35c 

'35d 
f .'35c 

*' '35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'40 



'40 
'20 
'35d 
•35c 

'35c 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

•35d 

'35c 



•35d 
•35d 
'35c 
•40 

•40 

•35d 

•35d 

•35d 
•35c 

'3r,c 
•35c 
•40 
'35c 

•35d 
•40 
'35d 
•35c 

'35d 
'35c 
'40 



Fitz, Abraham iR. I. line Private. . . . , 

Fitzgerald, David . . Mass. line Private. . . .] 

Fitzgerald, John. . . . Mass. line Private. ... 

Flagg. .Asa X. H. line Private J 

Flagg. Isaac X. H. line Private j 

Flagg, Samuel A.. . . Mass. line .... Drummer . , 



Flamming, James . . Alass. line Sergeant . . 

Flanders, John Mass. line Private i 

Flanders, Philip. ... X. H. line Private 



s. line Corporal 

s. line Private.. 



Fletcher, Elizabeth . . 
Fletcher, Jeremiah . 

Fletcher, John 

Flint, Levi 

Flint, Thomas Cont. navy. . . . Mariner. 

Flood, Henrv Mass. line Private. 

Flood, James Mi ss. hne Priv: te . 

i '' 

Fly. William A.'^ass. state. . . . Private. 

Fobs, Jonah Mass. line Private. 

Fogg, Aaron Mass. line Private. 



Fogg, Caleb Mass. mil Private 

Fogg. Charles Mass. line Private 

Fogg, George Mass. line Private 

Fogg, George ; | 

F"Qf:, Hannah j ; 



67 Kennebec . . . 

60 A'ork 

S3 Lincoln 

6f< Penobscot. . . 

S6 Waldo 

70 Lincoln 

75 Lincoln 

95 Kennebec . . . 

76 Kennebec . . . 

77 Waldo 

S2 Waldo 

6S Oxford 

78 Kennebec . . . 

72 Oxford 

86 Kennebec . . . 
67 Cumberland 



79 York 

71 Cumberland 



83 Lincoln . 
85 Oxford . 



60 York. 



'35d Fogg, Samuel jMass. mil. 



Private & 
Drum. 



Folron, John ;Mass Private. 

Folson , ^N'^cses. . . . X'^. H. state. .. . Private. 
Folson, John Mass. line Private. 



73 Kennebec . . 

71 Oxford 

72 Lincoln. ... 

73 Kennebec . 
60 Cumberland 

to70 

78 Somerset . . . , 

83 Somerset. . . 



82 York.. 
75 Oxford. 



Forbes, William. 



jMass. line Private. 



Ford, Caleb i^!ass. mil Private 

Ford, Charles Mass. sta^ Private 



Ford, Joshua. 
Ford, Miles.. 



'35d Ford, Xathaniel. 
40 Foss, Elias 



Mass. line Private. 

Mass. line Private. 



Mass. line Pvt.v&Corp. 

&Serg... 



72 Penobscot. 

78 Penobscot . 

79 York 

77 Oxford . . . . 
82 Oxford 

74 Oxford 

68 Kennebec 

75 Kennebec 



74 York. 



'35d Foss, Isaiah. 



. Mass. mil. 



Foss, James. 
Foss, John. . 
Foss, Joseph . 



Fill's, Susannah . 
Foss, Zachariah 
Fosse, L.lias. . . . 



>T3SS. mil. 
^Tas3. niiL 
Mass. line. 



Private & 
Drum. 

Private 

Corporal . . 
Private 



79 Somerset. . . 

85 Cumberland 

84 York 

74 Oxford 

81 0.xford 



('20). 

('20. "SlbV 
(•20, '31b). 
d. Sept., 1822. 

("20). 

Res. Xobleboro. 

('20) d. Aug. 18, 

1827. 
('20, 31b). 
('20). 

Res. Freedom. 
Res. Summer. 

f'20). 

Res. Clinton. 

,'20 ship "Han- 
cock", "Sib). 

('20). 

','20) d. Sept. 22, 
1825 

('20, Fobes) d. 

1826. 
('20) d. Feb. 5, 

1832. 

('20). 

{'20, '31b). 
Res. Wales 
Res. Gorham. 



Res. Cornville. 
Same as Folson. 

Same as Folron, d. 

May 23, 1830. 
f'20). 
Res. Bangor. 



Res. Sumner. 

('20) d. Aug. 15, 
1830. 



Same as Fosse. 
Res. Limington. 



Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 



Foster, Penan. . . 
Foster, David. . . 



Foster, Jonathan 
Foster, Parker. . 



Mass. state 
R. I. hne.. . 



Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 



Private. 
Private. 



Private. 
Private 



Private. . 
Sergeant 



85 York 

74 Cumberland 
68 York 



Foster, Samuel. . 
I 

Foster, Stephen. 
Foster, Stephen . 
Foster, William . . 
Fowle, Phineas. . 



Fowler, John 

Fowler, Matthew, 



R. I. line. 
Mass. mil. 



.Mass. state 
R. I. mil ., 



Mass. mil. 
iMass. line. 



Private 

Private 

.Sergeant . . 
.•^ergeant . . 

Private 

Private 



74 York 

82 Kennebec 

85 Hancock. 

73 York 

79 York 

82 Kennebec 

78 Kennebec 

74 Kennebec 
84 Lincoln. . 
77 Vork 



80 Cumbeiland 

70 Waldo 

77 Waldo 



•Res. Dixfield or 

Peru. 
Res. Limington. 
;'20, '31b). 
('20, '31b). Same 
i as Foss. 

C20) d. April 7. 

1825. 
;('20). 
('20). 

Res. Elliot. 
('20, Corp.) d. 
I April 7, 1825. 

Res. Leeds. 

('20) d. Sept. 12, 

1819. 
Id. Aug. 25, 1832. 

i('20). 
Res. Unity. 



REVOLUTIONARY PEXSIOXERS IN MAINE 



39 




'35d 

'3oc 

•Sod 

•3od 

•40 

'3od 



Fox, John [Mass, mil Private 

Foy, James iN. H. line Private 

Foy, John iMass. line Private... 

Foy, Moses :Mass. mil Private. . , 

Foye, Moses ' , 

Frank, James Mass. Une Private. . . 



'3oc 'Frank, Thomas. 



Mass. line. 



•35c 'Frederick, Joseph . . ICont. navy 



Private. . 
Mariner. 



Oxford 

York 

Kennebec. . . 

York 

York 

Cumberland 
Cumberland 



80 Somerset . . 



'35c 

'35c 

"40 

•35d 

•40 

•20 

•3.5d 

'40 

'3od 

•40 

'40 

•35d 

'3od 

•40 

•35d 



'35e 

•35d 

'40 

'35c 

•35e 



•35c 

•35c 
•40 
•40 
•35c 

•40 
•35c 

'35d 
•40 
•35c 
'35c 



Freeman, John 1st . iMass. line Private. . . . 

Freeman, John, 2d . Mass. line Private. . . . 

Freeman, John 

Freeman, John Mass. mil Private. . . . 

Freeman, Sampson . ' 

Freethey. Joseph . . . Mass. Private. . . . 

French, Ebenezer. . . iX. H. line Private. . . . 

French, M ary 

French, Obadiah . . . Mass. state... Private.... 

French, Sa-ah | , . . . 

French, William . . . . \ 

French. William. . . . Mass. mil Private. . . . 

Frost, Elliott (Mass, line Private. . . . 



Frcst, Jacob [Mass. mil Pvt.<t Serg. 



Kennebec . 

York 

Kennebec . 
Lincoln. . . 
Kennebec . 



Kennebec 
Franklin . 
Kennebec 
Oxford . . . 
Oxford . . . 

York 

York 

York 

Oxford . . . 



■3oc Frost, John iCcnt. navy . . : . Midshp'n. 83, Wj shir.gton. 



'.S5c Frost, Mark IM; ss. line Private.. . . 

*35d Frost, ^fosps. ...... j Mf ss. mil Private. . . . 

•35c Frost, Nathaniel . . . ;Mass. line Private. . . . 

'20 Frost, Nathaniel . . . 'Mass Sergeant . . 

•40 Frost, Phinehas . . . . ' 

•35c Frost, Samuel Mass. line Sergeant . . 



1 40 Frost, Sarah. . . 
•35c Frost, Stephen. 



75 



Kennebec. . 

Oxford 

York 



i('20)d. Jan. 1,1S2S 



Res. Berwick. 

('20) d. Oct. 11, 
1831. 

('20, ship "Alli- 
ance"), 
d. March, 1822. 

('20). 

('20) d. 1822. 

Res. Monmouth. 

Res. Waterville. 
Same as Fruthy. 

Res. Jay. Z 

Res. Turner. 
Res. Canton. 

('20). (as Flliot). 
Res. Flliot. 
Invalid pensioner, 

1785. 
('20, Mariner, ship 
"RaJeigh") 
■20. '31b, 

d. Feb. 17, 1829. 



Cont. na\'y . . . . Marine. 

I 



Mass. line Lieut. 



46lOxford. . . 
70 Kennebec 
I 

76 York 

S2.Y'ork 



'35c Trost, W^illiam . 

•35c Fruthy, Joseph Mass. line Private. 

•35c Frye, Ebenezer N. H. line Captain. 

'35c Frye, Nathaniel, Sr.^lass. line.._'. . Lieit... 



80. York. 



27» 



Ra- 

Oct- 



Frye, Nathaniel.' . . . Mass. line, Sth Lieut. . . . 
regt. 

Fuller, Aaron Mass. line Private... 

Fuller, Aaron 

Fuller, Andrew Mass. line Private. . . 

Fuller, Barzilla Mass. line, 8th Corporal . 

r.gt., 



Fuller, Barzilla Mass. line Private. 

Fuller, Enoch Mass. line Private. 



2, 



80 Hancock. 
83 Hancock. 



75 Hancock. 



i ^ I 



Oxford. 



78, Oxford 

83 Cumberland 
78! Lincoln 



— Oxford. 



Fuller. 








Fuller, 


Isaac 


Mass. 


line 


Private 


Fulhr, 










Fuller, 


Robert 


Mass. 


line 


Private. . . . 


Fuller, 


William..... 


Mass. 


line 


Pvt.&Corp. 



Furbush, Benjamin. N. H. line Private 

Furnald, Nicholas. . Mass. line Private 



•35d jFurnham, Ralph. 



Mass. mil Pvt. and 

1 I Serg. 



69 Oxford . . . 

i 
79 Kennebec 
85 Kennebec 
85 Lincoln. . 

72 Kennebec 

89 Oxford.. . 

77 Oxford. . . 

73 Kennebec 
79 Kennebec 
75 Kennebec 
72 Oxford . . . 

I 

78 York 



Res. Bethel. 

('20)d. Oct. 
1823. 

Res. Elliot. 

('20 ship ' 
leigh") d. 
8, 1824 

('20) d. June 
1827. 

Same as Freethev. 

('20, '28). d. 

March 9. 1825. 

('20, '28, '29) Re- 
linquished bene- 
fit of act of 1818 
for that of 1828. 
d. Apr. 17,1833: 
Dolly Frye, wi- 
dow. 

Res. Otisfield. 

('20) d. Jan. 31, 
1820. 

('29) d. Aug. 8, 
1833: Mary Ful- 
ler, widow. 

('20, Barzillia, 
'31b). 

('20). 

Res. Winslow. 

Res. Cushing. 

('20) d. Apr. 27, 
1833. 

Res. Hebron. 

('20) d. March 18, 
1829. 

Res. Gardiner. 

(•20)d. May 25. 

1822. 
Same asFarnham? 



i I 



40 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



SOMETHING ABOUT ARTEMUS WARD 
By Charles E. Waterman 

diaries Farrar Brozvnc (Art emus Ward) zi'as born 
in Waterford, Maine, April 26, 1834, son of Levi and 
Caroline (Farrar) Broivn, and died in Southampton, 
England; January 23, i86y. His body first found a 
resting place in Kensal Green, England, but zcas after- 
ward brought to Waterford for reinterment. Arte- 
mus Ward's uncle Daniel married Anna Hamlin, sister 
of Hannibal Hamlin. 

Colonel Henry Watterson is running a series of reminiscences in 
the Saturday Evening Post on men, women and events during eight 
decades of American history entitled ''Lookifig Backward." Coi- 
one! Watterson is always interesting, no matter what he is writing 
about ; but it was scarcely to be expected he could write on a sub- 
ject connected with Oxford County. During his long life Mars' 
Henry has come in contact with most of the important personages 
of his own country, and some of those across the water. These 
include such men as Huxley, Tyndall, ^lill and Spencer. Paradoxi- 
cal as it may seem his only acquaintance with Oxford County was 
gained across 3.000 miles of water in England. His point of con- 
tact and acquaintance was Artemus \\^ard, who was then (1866) 
making a lecture tour through that insular kingdom. 

It is well known that at this time Charles Farrar Browne, or Ar- 
temus Ward as he is more generally known, was in the last stages of 
tuberculosis, or consumption as it was called at that day. "His 
condition was pitiable," says Colonel Watterson. ''he was too feeble 
to walk alone, and he was continually struggling to breathe freely 
* * * * Nevertheless he stuck to his lecture and contrived to 
keep up appearances before the crowds that flocked to hear him." 

In this issue of the Post (March 22) Colonel Watterson gives a 
detailed account of Browne's last days, which are quite generally 
known to Oxford County people, and then proceeds to give a bio- 
graphical sketch of him and his parents and in this he makes some 
mistakes. He spvs his father (Levi Brown) was state senator and 
probate judge ; but a perusal of the list of senators fails to disclose 
his name, and no documents among the records in the probate office 
of Oxford County can be found with his signature as judge. Nor 
does the History of the Town of Waterford published in 1879 men- 
tion such a far+ 






l:>"^t^ '-.)■ 



^;>si 



ARTEMUS WARD 41 



It seems probable there has been a mix-up in the poHtical records 
of the family. Daniel Brown, (the children of Levi Brown were the 
only ones to add a final e to the name) an older brother and partner 
of the father of Artemus Ward, was state senator, but not Levi 
Brown. The only man by name of Brown to hold the office of 
probate judge in Oxford County was Dr. Thomas H. Brown of 
Paris. 

Colonel Watterson says "little is known" of Artemus Ward or his 
antecedents, which appears to be a fact, for he is not the only writer 
to make mistakes concerning him. 

Don Seitz, business manager of the New York World, wrote an 
article about Artemus Ward and his birthplace in Scribner's ^laga- 
zine away back in 1881, when he was editor of a local paper printed 
in Norway, only a few miles distant from Waterford, and he made 
the statement that Levi Brown was a merchant and land surveyor, 
and that he served the town of Waterford as clerk, selectman and 
representative to the legislature. The town records disclose the 
fact thaf he served the town in the first two capacities but not in 
the last. It was his brother, Daniel Brown, who was the legislative 
representative. 

People of Oxford County are interested in everything which 
pertains to Artemus Ward, for not only is he her foremost humorist 
but he is near the head of his class in the English speaking world. 

If Artemus W^ard's father never assumed the dignity of probate 
judge in Oxford County, the will of the humorist reposes in the 
archives of the office. It was his last "goak." By this document he 
left millions to Horace Greeley to provide an asylum for printers — 
millions he never possessed. Quite likely he felt the need of such an 
asylum, and this grim "goak" may have put it into the heads of Ar- 
thony J, Drexel and George W. Childs to build the stately home for 
aged printers at Colorado Springs. 

Colonel Watterson also says Artemus Ward apprenticed himself 
to a printer, serving out his time first in Springfield. Mas^, and later 
in Boston. This may be a fact, but there are traditions in his native 
county that he learned the trade in Norway in the office of the Ad- 
vertiser, which was owned at that time by his brother, Cyrus W. 
Browne. The History of Norway says he was employed as com- 
positor there. 

There is one woman yet alive, Mrs. David Porter Stowell, now 
of Dixfield, who remembers him while employed in the Advertiser 
office 



■/i^ayi' '■::■. I 



42 SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

LIST OF VOTERS IN BERLIN, NOW A P.ART OF PHIL- 
LIPS, MAINE, 1831 

The Legislature of Maine by an Act passed January 31, 1824, 
incorporated the town of Berlin which comprised "all that part of 
Plantation No. 6 in the County of Oxford, which lies east of the 
'line dividing the tenth and eleventh lots west of the four thousand 
acres, so called, with the inhabitants thereof." 

In 1846 (Chap. 46 Special Laws of Maine) the former act was 
repealed and a part of the town was annexed to the town of Phillips 
in Franklin County. 

Recently Mr. \\\ Burt Cook. Jr., Assistant Librarian of the Law 
Library, Brooklyn, New York, presented to the Maine State Li- 
brary the following list : 

Samuel Aspinwall, Thomas Aspirwall. Charles Austin, James Brackett, 
Nathaniel Brackett, Seth Billington, Daniel Beedy, Nathan Beedy, Peter 
Beedy, Joseph Beedy, Moses Berrey, Elliot Berry, John Berrey, Ebenezer 
Berrey, Jacob Carr, Daniel Carr, Osgood Carr, William Calden, Joseph S. 
Carlton, Joseph S. Carlton, Jr., William Carlton, Thomas Calder, James 
Dill, Frederick H. Evelett, Ichabod Foster, Benj. Fairbanks, James ]\I. Fair- 
banks, Robert E. Fairbanks, Jacob Fish, Lewis Fish, Peret Fish, James 
Hewey, Ezekiel Harper, Eben Harnder, Pearley Hoyt, John -Jewell, Joel Jud- 
kins, William Kempton, Wm. Kempton, Jr., Joseph Kempton, Ezra Kempton, 
James Luskin, Steven Luskin, John Luskin, Benjamin Luskin, Ebenezer 
Levitt, Daniel Marrow, Cabin ^larrow, Joseph ^lasterman, David Marrow, 
John Newman, Christopher Orr, Leonard Pratt, Sylvanus Pratt, Benjamin 
Pratt, William Parker. N. C. Parker. T. J. Parker, Asa Reed, George Reed. 
'Samuel Thorn, Rufus Thompson, Daniel Tracey, James Tuck, Jeremiah 
Tuck, Josiah Tuck, John Toothaker, Stevens Thomas, Reuben Smith, William 
Smith, Jeremiah Stutson, Nathaniel Winship, Richard Winship Ebenezer 
Whitnev, Thomas Booker, Daniel Booker. 

ICHABOD FOSTER, 
JOEL JUDKIXS, 

Selectmen of Berlin. 



QUEEN ANNE'S MOOSE. 

(From Old Massachusetts Records.) 

At a Council held at the Council-chamber in Boston, upon Thursday, the 
13th of November, 1712, present : his Excellency Joseph Dudley, Esq'r., 
Gov'r; the Hon'ble William Tailer, Esq'r, Lieut. Gov'r; & of ye Council, 
Elisha Hutchinson, Peter Sergeant, Penn Town send, Joseph Lynde, An- 
drew Belch, El'm Hutchinson, Isaac Addington, Esq'rs ; present, also, the 
HonTDle Govern'r Saltonstall, of Connecticut; Captain Elford, of the Hector 
man of war. 

His Excellency acquainted the gentlemen that he had yesterday received 
a letter from Captain Elford. importing that he was commanded by the 
Lords of the Admiralty to transport to Great Britain, in her Majesty's ship 



QUEEN ANXE'S MOOSE 43 



Hector under his command, three moose deer that are upon Fisher's Island, 
and that the ship is at Xew Yorke, tifty leagues distant from the said island. 

Captain Elford then further acquainted the gentlemen present that it is 
impracticable at this season of the year to bring the queen's ship around 
from Xew Yorke to Fisher's Island, to take in the said moose deer, without 
utmost hazard of her Majesty's said ship. Governour Saltonstall informed 
that the stag moose was lately killed by his own unruliness, but that the 
dam and the young stag were well and fit to be transported. 

It's concluded that there is no method for transporting the said moose 
to Xew Yorke but in a large open boat, of which there are numbers at Xew 
Yorke ; and that his Excellency Governour Hunter be desired forthwith to 
send one such boat, well man'd. for that purpose, and an officer to oversee 
and take care of their transportation to Xew Yorke, Governour Saltonstall 
declaring there is no open boat within his government capable of that service : 
that the Honourable Governour Saltonstall be desired to direct Captain 
John Prentice, of X'ew London, whome he named for that end, to take such 
assistance as he shall think necessary to see the said moose deer well ship'd 
off, with the advice of Governour Hunter's officer ard ore officer from 
Captain Elford, and that Governour Saltonstall shall furnish hay & qates 
necessary for their passage ; that a letter, with a copy of this agreement and 
resolve, be sent to ^lajor \Mnthrop, or his son, at X^'ew London, to be read\ 
to deliver the said moose accordingly; and another copy be sent to Gover- 
nour Hunter, and copys of the same be given to Governour Saltonstall and 
Captain Elford by the Secretary: that the matter may be effected with all 
care possible.* 

ISA. ADDIXGTOX, Sec'ry. 



i 



*The united efforts of three provincial Governors failed in delivering 
these moose on board the Hector, as shown by a letter without address, 
dated April i, 1714, and signed by J. Burchett, Secretary of the Admiralty. 
He recites the failure of Captain Elford to bring home three moose deer 
^'procured by Gen'll X'icholson for the Queen, and kept on an island in X'ew 
England belonging to Major Gen'll Wait Winthrop" : and he directs his 
correspondent (evidently the captain of another man of war) to notify 
Major-General Winthrop and the Governor of Connecticut that a fresh 
attempt must be made to ship them, or such of them as after so long an 
interval may be still living. The following reference to them occurs in 1 
letter to Wait Winthrop from his son, dated X'ew London, Augiist 20, 17x3: 
■"Deacon Plum came just now to tell me y't Havens and Latham, &c., was ter- 
rified by ye buck mooses running at them ye last Sabbath day, 
and they drove them into ye water, and chast them about with 
a canoe till they tyred them, and then w'th a saw cut off ye buck's homes : 
and he immediately gott ashore and dyed in a moment. This is y'r story. 
They are a company of base, distracted fellows, and I doubt, it being a very 
hott day, that they surfetted ye poor creature, or else kill'd him w'th clubs. 
And I am afraid they did it because the creature had bitt some of y'r corne, 
and to get ridd of them. They kil'd ye other ye last year after such a mad. 
iniprudert manner. And if ye Queen should send a ship on purpose for 
them, what should we doe? Doubtless X'icholson will have some orders 
about them. It is a great misfortune to us to have them come to such an 
<'i^<l after all ye noyse has been made about them." — Eds, 



44 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



f PLYMOUTH COLONY GOVERNORS 

(From 1620 to 1692, elected by the people for seventy-one years.) 

I John Carver 

t William Bradford 

I Edward Winslow 

f Thomas Prince 

■ ^ Josiah Winslow 

Thomas Hinckley 



MASSACHUSETTS 


COLONY 


GOVERNORS 


- 


28 to 1692, elected by the people) 






Mathew Cradock 


years 


of service 


r 


(Chosen in England) 




•■- 




John Winthrop 


" 






13 


Thomas Dudley 


« 






3 


John Haynes 


u 






I 


Sir Henry Vane 


If 






r 


Richard Bellingham 


it 






10 


John Endicott 


it 






16 


John Leverett 


" 






& 


Simon Bradstreet 


u 






II 


Sir Edmund Andros 


(f 






S 


(Appointed by King James . 


and 






deposed by the people of the 


colony) 






- 



GOVERNORS AFTER UNION OF THE COLONIES AS THE 

PROVINCE OF MASSACHUSETTS BAY 

(x\ppointed by the King of England) 

Sir William Phips 1692 

Earl of Bellamont 1699 

Joseph Dudley 170^ 

Samuel Shute ■ 1716 

William Burnet 172S 

Jonathan Belcher 1730 

William Shirley 1740 

Thomas Pownal 1757 

Sir Francis Bernard 1760 

Thomas Hutchinson - I770 

Gen. Thomas Gage 1774 



V 



>a 



FOXCROFT ACADEMY STUDENTS— 1840 



45 



STUDENTS OF FOXCROFT (MAINE) ACADEMY 
FALL TERM, 1840 

(Contributed by Henry M. Packard) 



I 



Xame 
Hiram Anderson, 
Orin Bartlett, 
Sedman K. Bartlett, 
David Barker, 
Jacob Bemis, 
Axel H. Bicknell, 
George W. Blethen, 
Isaac D. Blethen, 
Jonas L. Blethen, 
Evans Blake, 
Joseph D. Brown, 
Joshua Buck, 
Seth L. Carpenter, 
Charles Cofran, 
Elkanah A. Cummings, 
Thomas Doe, 
Orville B. Favor, 
Samuel W. Furber, 
Ebenezer H. Gibbs, 
')a-ol W. Gibbs, 
Davis X. Gower, 
Thomas C. Gower, 
John Harrington, 
Francis B. Haskell, 
Augustus Herring, 
Alvin Herring, 
America Harlow, 
Jacob V. Herrick, 
Abner Hinds. 
James \V. R. Hill, 
Ruel W. Hough, 
Freeland S. Holmes, 
Thomas X. Ho^mer, 
-Mark C. Jennings, 
J- \V. P. Jorden, 
J^el W. Kelsey, 
^aron L. Kelsey, 
^Villiam Lowney, 
I^avid Moulton, 
^'>ner S. Oakes, 
Cynis A. Packard, 
I-ewellyn D. P. Palmer, 
C. Orin Palmer, 



Residence 
Sangerville. 
Abbot. 
Harmony. 
Exeter. 
Wellington. 
Sebec. 
Foxcroft. 
Dover. 

Foxcroft. 

Guilford. 

Guilford. 

Foxcroft. 

Dexter. 

Parkman. 

Glenburn. 

Dover. 

Milo. 

Glenburn. 

Abbot. 

Parkman. 

Sebec. 

Guilford. 

Guilford. 

Sangerville!. 

Harmony. 

Dover. 

Sangerville. 

Dover. 

Foxcroft. 

Camden. 

Dexter. 

u 

Guilford. 

Guilford. 

Sebec. 

Foxcroft. 

Sangerville. 

Blanchard. 

Athens. 

Dover. 



46 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Name ^ Residence 

William T. Pearson, Bangor. 

Joseph W. Prentiss, Foxcroft. 

Richard H. Rice, 

Charles Rogers, Cambridge 

Silas Royal, Dover. 

Wm. W. Robinson, Dover. 

Thomas B. Seabury, Parkman. 

William H. Soule, i Karmony. 

Collins M. Stevens, Foxcrof:. 

Decatiir Stetson, Dover. 

Elbridge A. Thompson, Sangerville. 

J. Stacy Tucker, Foxcrof:. 

L. Lincoln Tucker, t-. 

E. Henry Williams, Winthrop. 

Hannah Buck, Guilford. 

Hannah F. Chamberlain, Foxcroft. 

Harriet S. Chamberlain, ** 

Emily S. Chandler, ** 

Augusta A. Edes, 

Susan O. Farnham, Dover. 

Abby A. Foss, 

Sedelia A. Follett, Wellingror. 

Araminta R. Greely, Foxcroft. 

Eliza Ann Herring, Guilford. 

Emily H. Herring, *' 

JeriTsha R. Holmes, Foxcroft, 

Clarissa W. Holmes, " 

Elizabeth C. Jones, " ' 

Mary E. Kidder. Dover. 

Sarah A. ^loulton, Foxcroft. . 

Marilla S. Xickerson, Dover. 

Xarcy W. Palmer, 

Eliza B. Sawyer, " 

Augusta A. Steavcns, ** 

Amanda E. Thompson, Sangerville. 

Rebecca B. Tower, Foxcroft. 

Mary Tower, « 

Ellen :\r. Tyler, 

Elizabeth B. Walker, ' Dover. 

Cordelia Weston. Foxcroft. 

Lydia P. Whitney, Dover. 

Cynthia J. Young, . Foxcrof! . 

Males 57 

Females 28 

Total , 85 



'■m 



A PROCLAMATION— INDIANS 47 



I 



' - A PROCLAMATION 

W hereas the Tribe of Penobscot Indians have repeatedly in a perfidious 
manner acted contrary to their Solemn Submission unto his Majesty long 
since made and frequently renewed. 

r have therefore at the desire of the House of Representatives with the 
Advice of his Majesty's Council thought tit to issue this Proclamation and 
to declare the Penobscot Tribe of Indians to be Enemies, Rebells and Trait- 
ors to his Majesty King George the Second. And I do hereby require his 
Majesty's Subjects of this Province to Embrace all opportunities of pursu- 
ing, captivating, killing and Destroying all and every of the aforesaid In- 
dians. 

And whereas the General Court of this Province have Voted that a bounty 
or Incouragement be granted and allowed to be paid out of the public Treas- 
ury to the Marching Forces that shall have been employed for the Defence 
of the Eastern and Western Frontiers from the first to the twenty-fifth of 
this Instant November — I have thought fit to publish the same and I do 
hereby Promis that there shall be paid out of the Province Treasury to all 
and any of the said Forces over and above their Bounty upon inlistment, 
their Wages and Subsistance the Premiums or Bounty following viz. 

For every ]MaIe Penobscot Indian above the Age of twelve years that 
'hall be taken within the Time aforesaid and brought to Boston Fifty Pounds. 

For every Scalp of a Male Penobscot Indian above the age aforesaid 
brought in as Evidence of their being killed as aforesaid Forty Pounds. 

For every Female Penobscot Indian taken and brought in as aforesaid 
and for Every Male Indian Prisoner under the Age of twelve Years taken 
and brought in as aforesaid Twenty five Pounds. 

For every Scalp of such Female Indian or Male Indian under the Age of 
twelve years that Shall be killed and brought in as Evidence of their being 
killed as aforesaid. Twenty Pounds. 

Given at the Council Chamber in Boston this third day of November 1755 
and in the twenty ninth Year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord George the 
>econd by the Grace of God of Great Britain France and Ireland King 
Defender of the Faith. 

By his Honour's Command, S. PHIPS.' 

J. WILLARD, Secry. 

God save the King. " ~' 

Resolved That there shall be allowed and paid out of the Public Treasury 
ro any Number of the Inhabitants of this province, not in the pay of the 
Covernment, Who shall be disposed to go in quest of the Indian enemy, &: 
*'hall before they go signify in Writing to the Chief Military Officer of Yt. 
part of the Province from which they shall go, their Intentions, with their 

C) Spencer Phips was then Lieutenant Governor of the Province of 
Mass. Bay and was acting governor at this time. 



m 



M^ 



48 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



names the following Bounty Vizt. For every Indian Enemy that they shall 
kill and produce the Scalp to the Gov. & Council in Evidence, the Sum of 
three hundred Pounds. 

For Every Indian Enemy they shall Captivate & deliver to the Governor & 
council, the Sum of Three hundred and Twenty pounds. 

Also, — ^\''oted. That the same allowance be made to private Persons who 
shall captivate or kill any of the Indian Enemy which is made to soldiers 
on the Frontiers of the Province. 

From Documentary History of Elaine (Baxter Mss. Vol. 24, p. 63"). 



Sayings of Subscribers 

William N. Titus, Lawy3r, Alna, Maine: 

Sprague's Journal of Maine History is a work that will always be appre- 
ciated. It takes an important place in preserving- the history of Maine, and 
will be of priceless value to generations to come. 



Charles M. Starbircl, Dan\'ille, ]Maine: 

I have every number of the last volume of the Journal, and have profited 
much from reading them. Number three was of special interest to me. The 
lives of eminent Maine men are of worth to all and a valuable contribution 
to the history of the state. 



S. P. Crosby, St. Paul, Minn: 

I read and reread the brief biographies of three Chief Justices of Maine— 
Appleton, Peters, and Savage — all of whom I had the honor and pleasure 
of knowing. All were great jurists and noted gentlemen. And the Flagg 
historic article relating to the War of 1S12 and the conduct of the British 
while in Bangor, make one think of the outrages of the Germans in Belgium 
— only, a smaller scale. 

There is some special history at the time of the Bam Raising of the "long 
bam" now standing upon the old Crosby Homestead in Atkinson Maine. 
This event would sometimes be mentioned by the older settlers of Piscata- 
quis, when I was a boy. The late Major I>aac Blethen once told me that he 
was present upon that happy occasion. " with more than three hundred 
others." it being a large gathering for that time. It was no doubt a good 
old time for those days, and I believe my grandfather said " it took one 
whole barrel of Xew England rum— with head out— and each happy-go-lucky 
fellow could help himself." Xot so much temperance then in Maine— or 
elsewhere — as now. 

The barn was erected, I should estimate, between 1825 and 1830, perhaps 
earlier. And sometime in the early 8o's — 1880-81-82 — the Bangor Commercial 
dug up or found somewhere quite a full account of this Crosby Raising and 
published the same. I read it casually at the time, and recall that at the 
banquet held after the frame was in place, a poem was read by some one 
present, which was very appropriate to the occasion. .\nd this was pub- 
lished in full in the Commercial in the early 8o's. 



wmiv 



mimi 






■'or.'-^iA 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

PUBLISHED QUARTERLY 



Entered as second class matter at the post office, Dover, Maine, by John 
Francis Sprague, Editor and Publisher. 

Terms : For all numbers issued during the year, including an index and 
all special issues, $i.oo. Single copies, 25 cents. Bound volumes $2.00 each. 

Postage prepaid on all items, except bound volumes west of Mississippi 
River. 

Commencing with Vol. 3, the terms will be $1.00 only to subscribers who 
pay in advance, otherwise $1.50. 

This publication will be mailed to subscribers until ordered discontinued. 



OUR MESSAGE TO YOU 

FIRST TEACH THE BOY AND GIRL TO KNOW AND LOVE 
THEIR OWN TOWN, COUNTY AND STATE AND YOU HAVE 
GONE A LONG WAY TOWARD TEACHING THEM TO KNOW 
AND LOVE THEIR COUNTRY. 



i^ROWSINGS BY THE EDITOR IN HIS OWN LIBRARY 

IV. 

On our shelves are two Maine books, which, though nearly a 

century old and not classics are of interest; from their pages we 

obtain glimpses of Maine when it was young and ambitious, just 

I entering upon its career as a sovereign state ; and peeps at the 

habits, customs and sentiments of our ancestors when they were 

iXMring the burdens of pioneers and lirst settlers. 

When these books were written American literature as we regard 

i It today was in its formative period. 

I Its real foundations were laid by the Mathers, John Cotton, Sir 
Henry Vane, Jonathan Edwards and their compeers. For despite 
their illogical theolog}', fanatical piety and cruel intolerance, those 
^ttrn men with empires in their brains'' were the beginners of 
whatever system of literature the world now recognizes as the 
truition of purely American ideals. 

It had its birth at a time when the Puritans sent missionaries to 
: C'.nvert the Church of England crowd in Virginia, but who were 
I>ersecuted by the followers of the Stuarts that they finally took 
\ '■^'fug^e in the Catholic Colony of Maryland, where absolute reli- 
|K5<'Us tolerance prevailed. 



i]\riV,r>rAk 



'I' 



■\^}..i. \i-*'.>.Jf* 



K 



50 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



That movement in the history of the American mind which vital- 
ized our hterature and gave it coherence — of which Ralph Waldo 
Emerson was the prophet, and Concord its Mecca, was then 
(1830-5) only in the budding process, but it soon after burst forth 
and made its amazing impress upon civilization. 

Channing to be sure had attained to the age of fifty years, and 
seven years before his "Evidence of Revealed Religion," and ''Essay 
on National Literature" had been published, but it was later that 
the world bowed its acknowledgment to him. England was then 
just beginning to discover Washington Irving, who has ever since 
strangely held a larger circle of admirers there than at home. 

Emerson was attempting to be a L^nitarian minister in the very 
church in Boston where Cotton blather, a century and a half before 
had preached, and who. could he have foreseen the event, would 
undoubtedly have pronounced a curse upon him and all the trans- 
cendental breed. The future brilliancy of Emerson, Alcott. ^lar- 
garet Fuller, Thoreau. Hawthorne, Lowell. W^hittier and Holmes 
was not then even a dream on either side of the Atlantic. 

It w^as four years before Horace Greely had graduated from a 
two or three years course as a "tramp printer" and broken into 
New York city wnth a capital of ten dollars in his pocket. 

Up to this time the art of literature had made but little progress 
in Maine. 

One of her honored sons, James Sullivan, had written the first 
history of its colonial period, and William D. Williamson had a few- 
years before completed his invaluable history of Maine. 
• But this can be said to the credit and honor of the men in that 
day: there was a larger per cent of them who were deeply inter- 
ested in the history of their state, and manifested greater pride in it 
than has been the case of any succeeding generation. 

Maine had been a state less than two years when the Maine His- 
torical Society came into being with William King, who had been 
the first governor of Maine, for its first president. Its first roll of 
membership included names of men who were controlling factors 
in the business, political, religious and educational affairs of the 
new state ; congressmen, senators, governors and judges of the 
supreme court ; men who were then and ever will be recognized as 
builders of a great commonwealth, a part of the greatest goverr 
ment on earth, were members — not merely ornamental and paist 
ones but active and earnest in its work. The pages of ^pers 
series of the Collections of this society are interspersed • 



u^ 



?;.,■, ^ 



EDITORIAL 



of vast historical worth and which are gems as Hterary productions 
written by men busy with poHtical problems of a new state and a 
new nation. 

It is easy to say ''there were giants in those days" and possibly 
the maturity of years prompts the saying. There may be giants in 
our generation. Light is gHmmering — if not in the east at least in 
the southwest part of Elaine tor, down on the banks of the beauti- 
ful Androscoggin, at Lewiston Falls, one Arthur Staples presides 
over a literary aggregation whose work is calculated to cheer those 
who rejoice in all things that stimulate intellectual activity in Maine 
along literary and historical research lines. 

Mr. Staples has just produced a delightful volume entitled ''Just 
Talks on Common Themes.'' 

We had previously read these "talks" in the Lewiston Journal, 
but again perused them with much* pleasure. 

The words "common themes" may be properly applied to it and 
yet it is full of uncommon things — ^philosophy, logic, humor, great 
thoughts — stories which are pictures of the lights and shadows of 
human life, its foibles, its strength and greatness, its sorrows and 
its joys portrayed by the hand of an artist whose vision has had a 
glimpse of the soul of men and of things. 

But this is a rambling digression from an intended mention of 
two oldish books. One is "Xew England And Her Institutions. 
By One Of Her Sons." It is well known that the author was 
Jacob Abbot. It was published by R. B. Seeley and W. Bumside, 
Fleet Street, London, in 1835. 

Reverend Jacob Abbot, D.D.. was born in Hallowell, Me., Nov 
14th, 1803. He was a graduate of Bowdoin and for a time was a 
professor at Amherst. In 1839, he became a permanent resident of 
Farmington, Elaine. His death occurred Oct. 3, 1879. He was an 
author of note, a prolific writer of juvenile books as well as some 
works on American and English history and biography. In all he 
wrote more than 200 volumes. 

This book evidently was written mainly for the purpose of giv- 
ing English readers a view of country life in New England. 

It vividly describes scenes, places and customs in a newly settled 
country which must have been exceedingly entertaining to people 
in the old world. Much of it relates to observations made while 
travelling by carriage along the highways, and one can readily 
recognize trips that he made in the state of Maine : 



#*•■ 



52 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



At intervals of a few miles, the log house of some enterprising settler 
would attract the eye, as we rode along, feasting upon the novelty of the 
scenes before us. till we came suddenly to the borders of a beautiful pond; 
which was literally encircled with mountains, from whose distant and rocky 
summit we looked down upon the beautiful valley. 



No one will expect to find in regions so distant, and in society so new, the 
artificial courtesies and ceremonies which regulate intercourse in fashionable 
circles. In the dwelling of the farmer you will generally tind plain, frank, 
manly sense, with a good degree of intelligence respecting the general state 
of the world, and the political conditions of his own country. 

The topics treated upon in the book are the farmer; ecclesiastical 
organizations; the church and religious revivals, slavery, holidays, 
college life, district schools, etc. 

In his chapter on holidays he names only three. Thanksgiving, 
Independence Day and Fast Day, making no mention whatever of 
Christmas, showing that, even as late as 1835, the Puritan's ancient 
dislike of that holiday still survived in New England. 

The other book is ''The Budget ; or Attempts at Immortality, by 
Messrs. Von Dunderhead." It was published in Hallowell. Maine. 
by Glazier, Masters & Co. in 1830. The author of this book is un- 
known. Maine book lovers have never been able to solve the mys- 
tery. 

Joseph Williamson's Bibliography of Maine, says that "the name 
of the author was inquired for in Hist. Mag. 1862, but elicited no 
reply." 

It is a book of tales and sketches, and like Dr. Abbot's book is 
valuable for its side-lights on human life, its endeavors and its 
activities in the primitive days of our state. 

It contains "A Legend of the Kennebec," which is a story of the 
sett!ers around Merrymeeting Bay, during the war of 181 2. ''Living 
Yankees," etc. 

Among its imageries is a tale of Bowdoin College in 1828. Possi- 
bly some one may fancy comparing college boys pranks of the nine- 
teenth, with similar doings of the twentieth century. 

Old Bowdoin's Halls have rung many a time and oft with the frolicksome 
shouts of a crew- of lads who arrogated to themselves the proud title of 
"Old Dominion"'. Many a mad prank, and many a disturbance that has called 
forth the frowns of government, had its origin in their secret council cham- 
ber, ^lany a goose, whose mysterious abduction has astonished its owner. 
has yielded up its last breath in this haunt of frolic and roguery. Many an 
orchard has deposited its fruit, and many a garden its vegetables within 
the walls of "number twentv-nine." 



:'.:.:■ «. .otBV'lvr: ■;('.: 



\U ;,] 



EDITORIAL 53 



? 



The darkness of impenetrable mystery rested upon the doings of this 
dreaded club. Its existence was only known by the hieroglyphic notice on 
the college doorposts, — appearing, none knew how, and vanishing, none knew 
when, and by the consequences of every meeting. Noises, — the sound of 
shouts and yells, — the heavy tramping of feet, and ever and anon, the out- 
breaking of some discordant chorus, often roused the peaceful student from 
his midnight slumbers ; and if perchance some one, more bold than the rest, 
sliould determine to have a peep at the noisy gang who were serenading him 
so sweetly, the opening of his door would be the signal for silence, and his 
curiosity would be unsatisfied, unless it was satisfaction to see a multitude of 
spectre-like figures in the likeness of nothing in Heaven above, nor in the 
earth beneath, gliding away with noiseless footsteps into the impenetrable 
darkness. Darkness was their element, the light of the moon they abominated, 
and the nights of their meetings were always dark and cloudy. Government 
had often endeavored to find a clew to unravel this mystery, but their pene- 
tration was here at fault. At length they gave over the attempt, comforting 
themselves with the idea, that it was only the effect of a natural efferves- 
cence in youth, and that this club might, like a safety valve, served to let off 
spirit, which, if confined, might cause a more serious explosion. 

The club was composed entirely and exclusively of seniors, and but a small 
part of them were judged worthy or willing to become the depositories of 
its im.portant secrets. The last meeting of the year had arrived, and a new 
set of those who were thought most meet to take the place of the departing 
members, were to be initiated into the deep and solemn mysteries of "The 
Old Dominion". 

For sometime previous, no disturbances had arisen from their meetings, 
and the irritated students began to hope that the troublesome society had 
breathed its last, and that at length they might be permitted to lie down with- 
out the fear of a midnight disturbance before their eyes. But they were 
doomed to hear the sonorous voices of the seniors of '28 mingling in their 
usual melodious howl. At midnight, when every light was extinguished, 
and the sound of the snorers was heard echoing through the long entries. 
one long, protracted shout was heard, the signal for the commencement 
of the usual ceremonies attendant upon an initiation into this august body. — 
then followed, at measured intervals, the sound of heavy feet falling upon 
the floor. Those to be initiated were ushered into a room from whence 
issued heavy clouds of tobacco smoke, and which was only lighted up by 
the dim and flickering effulgence of a faint blue flame which issued, as it 
were, from the centre of the floor. Around that dim light set a circle of 
fiendish looking creatures, on every face of whom was a mask, and in every 
mouth a cigar. Every one rose at the entrance of the members elect, and 
one more hideous than the rest, who bore the high and mighty ofiice of Ruler 
in that synagogue of devils, stet>ped forth, and in a voice which seemed 
rising from the very recess of his beautiful body, addressed them thus, — 

We the ancient and honorable Dominion, which existed long before the 
commencement of time, and who. in the profundity of our kindness, have 
come to dwell in this highly honored institution, understand that you, poor 
iui>erable worms, are desirous also to come and sit among the clouds as we 
in our great happiness do. We have therefore deigned to li-ten to your 
wi->hes and to enroll you among our numbers. Listen, then, poor worm-^. to 



54 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



the obligation you are to receive. Take the oath and break it not. You 
promise that you will never reveal the secrets of this, The Old Dominion, 
and you will neither spare lungs nor lying, in forwarding its interests, and 
that from time to time, henceforth, and forever, you will declare war, 
exterminating war. against Government and Geese, — President and Pigs, — 
Tutors and Turkeys. 

This is not all of it, but this with the following "college song, ' 
may suffice to give the reader a glimpse of college enterprises in 
Brunswick village, eighty-one years ago. 

Bring the jugs cut. 

Pull the plugs out, 

Do not spill the cre'tur, 

DofF your nightcap, 

Drink your blackstrap : 

None can ask for better. 



A recent issue of the Piscataquis Observer contains the following : 
Mrs. W. A. Hillman hag an account book which her father, the late Col- 
Silas Paul, kept while collector of the Congregational Parish of Foxcroft 
and Dover when its meeting house was built. The stock for *'a site and for 
building a house" w^as divided into shares of $25 each and the first payment, 
one quarter, was made May ist, 1851, or 68 years ago. 

The stockholders and the number of shares each subscribed for were: 
Silas Paul, 4; John H. Loring, 4: William Huntress. 2: Joshua Young, i; 
Joel Pratt, 4; Joseph and O. B. Crooker. 2; Cyrus Holmes. 2: Arthur Hilton, 
i; Salmon Holmes. 2: Samuel Pierce, i: C. S. Hammond, 2: Seth C. Pratt, 
I ; A. & L. S. Tucker, 2; T. H. Chamberlain i; Nathan Carpenter, 2: John 
Hale, 3: Samuel Greeley, 2; Daniel Mansfield, i: George W. Goodwin. 4; 
Benjamin Johnson. 2: John G. Mayo, 4: Sawyer & Woodbury. 4; Allen 
Chandler, 2 ; David Gilman, Jr.. 3 : George V. Edes, i : Nathaniel Cham- 
berlain, 3; Hiram Dcuty, i : Henry A. Cole, i : Chase Parker. 2: W. F. Samp- 
son, i; James Bush. 4; S. P. Brown, 4: G. H. Foss, i; H. N. Greeley, i: 
Moses Gary, i; William Parsons, 2; C. P. Chandler. 3: John Osbom. i: 
Lyman Lee, 2: D. & William Mitchell, 2; W. Parker & C. H. B. Woodbury 
in behalf of the church, 30. 



NAMES OF SOLDIERS OF THE REVOLUTION BURIED IN 
THE VILLAGE CEMETERY, NEW SHARON, MAINE 

(Contributed by Thomas F. Dyer). 
Capt. Thomas Fields (said to have served with John Piul Jcnes) 
Samuel Bradley. 
John Wyman. 
James Dyer. 

Hbenezer French (name in Sprague's Journal, Vol. 6, p. 161. » 
Nehemiah Hardin (or Harden). 



NOTES AXD FRAGMEXTS 



I 



Notes and Fragments 

We take the following from the Monson (Maine) correspondent 
of the Piscataquis Observer: 

A goodh- number of members of Euclid chapter, O. E. S., were present 
at the regular meeting Friday evening to participate in a surprise party for 
Mrs. Amelia D. Knight, more commonly known here as "Aunt Amelia/' 
which took place after the regular work of the lodge. 

"Aunt Amelia" became a member of the chapter soon after it was organized 
20 years ago and is held high in the esteem of its members. The following 
is a brief sketch of this grand old lady's life as told in her own words: 

"In the old Rice family Bible in Jqhn R. Flint's house it is recorded that 
Amelia D. Rice was born in Monson April 7, 1839. The modern house of 
Dr. Varney now stands on the lot where I first saw the light. A quaint old 
house was there 80 years ago and a creaking old signboard announced to 
the public that the place was Capt Rice's Tavern. The old building was 
burned in the big fire of i860. 

"I have lived over half my days, off and on, in the village, though soon 
after my marriage 60 years ago we went to Pennsylvania. Since my hus- 
band's death in 1888 I have lived in various towns in ^^laine but for the past 
few years have lived in my native village. I am surrounded by younger 
relatives and friends, all ^f whom are very dear to me. 

The ''Captain Rice" here referred to was Peabody H. Rice, who 
with his brother John H. Rice, moved from the Kennebec region 
about the year 1835. 

Both were active and enterprising young men who later became 
active in the afifairs of ^lonson and the County of Piscataquis as 
well. The Captain was engaged in trading, lumbering, tavern keep- 
ing and farming. 

He was an office holder in Monson for many years. He repre- 
sented the Monson class in the Maine Legislature for one term, 
about i860. He met with a severe accident, several years prior to 
his death which ever after confined him to the house. 

John Hovey Rice, became a lawyer, entered politics, for many 
years had a leading part in political events in Piscataquis County, 
and was County Attorney for several years. He was a meml^er of 
Congress from the fourth congressional district, serving in the 
thirty-seventh, thirty-eighth, and thirty-ninth Congress. He was a 
man of marked ability and one of Maine's most popular congress- 
men. His son, Mr. F. Willis Rice, now a publisher in Chicago, 
refers to him in a recent communication (v. 6. p. lys) to the Journal. 



56 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



We thank Brother Fred Sanborn, for the following kind notice of 
the Journal, in the Norway Advertiser, in its issue of May 2, 1919: 

The last (Feb.-March- April) number of Spragiie's Journal of Maine 
History is here. Its leading article is by Charles E. Waterman of Mechanic 
Falls and tells of the Shaker Communities of Maine. 

Mr. Waterman edited the Oxford Democrat the past winter during Mr. 
Forbes's sojourn in Augusta making laws. He is one of the best historical 
writers in this section. 

If interested in Maine history, you ought to be a regular subscriber to 
Sprague's Journal, published at Dover, Me. 



William Edward Gou!d, a former resident of Portland, died on 
Tuesday evening, April 15, 1919. at his home in Brookline. Mass. 
Deceased was a member of the well known family of that name and 
he was born in Portland on June t8, 1837. Of the years he had 
devoted much of his time in preparing family histories of his direct 
and collateral lines and had contributed much historical matter for 
the Argus columns. Mr. Gould is survived by two sisters and two 
brothers and by a son and a daughter. His brothers are Major John 
M. Gould and Samuel C. Gould of this city. His sisters are Mrs. 
Elizabeth Rowland of Akron, Ohio, and Miss \Maria D. Gould of 
Portland. His son is Neal Dow Gould of Portland and his daugh- 
ter is Mrs. Alice Pattison of St. Louis, Mo. 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 

Prices I Pay — of every U. S. Coin 
worth over face — 15 cts. 

WANTED What are your wants.' Perhaps I 

Rare Coins, Stamps -and Curios can supply them 

Stamp Catalogues and other Philatelic and Xuinismatic 
literature at puVjlishers prices 

\AJ. B. GOULD 
292 Hammond St. Bangor, Maine 



CONTENTS 57 



MAINE INLAND SCENERY 










f ' "A, ^ 






<vj^,£v»5i,^,- J^^ fc r^ii*y^>,, 



(Contributed by Hon. Leroy T. Carletcn. 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Sir William Pepperreil 59 

The Rhyme of the Baronet's Name jy 

The Boy on Pulpit Rock 78 

The Old Eastern Cemetery. Portland 79 

Pertinent Inquiries for Maine People 81 

Xorway Notes 82 

Norman H. Fay 86 

Stephen Orman Brown 89 

Documentary .7 94 

A Daniel Webster Letter 99 

Editorial , 100 

A Brave Maine Irishman 102 

Notes and Fragments 105 

Sayings of Subscribers 108 



54 



YEARS the insurance Man of Somerset Co. 

Never a Failure— Never a Law Suit—What more do you want? 

(Member Soc. Col. Wars; Sons Am. Rev; Past A. A. G.. G. A. R.) 

CHARLES FOlSOM-JONES, SKowHecAN Maine 



Wc have positive evidence of the reliability of the advertisers on these pages 



«1 



m^M 



58 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



■ j !i ||i^iBi<t i |R)<J;i ' 't< | 't'« ' wwy»y''^'iW' ' ts. *»» »!'W!t ! j.WW^<P'^ ' H'a s^ ^ 



5^ ^ f 



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SIR WILLIAM PEPPERRELL. 



#■ 



■# 



Sprague's Journal of Maine History 

Vol. VII AUG. SEPT. OCT. 1919 No. 2 

Sir William Pepperrell 

Maine as a district and as a state has had four of her citizens 
knighted for activities of worth and super-importance by the Eng- 
lish government: Sir William Phips, in the seventeenth, the first 
Sir William Pepperrell and the second Sir William Pepperrell in 
the eighteenth, and Sir Hiram ]\Iaxim in the nineteenth century. 

The parents of the first and last named were poor in worldly 
affairs and unable to bestow upon their children such educational 
privileges as the youth of their times, who were more fortunately 
circumstanced, generally received. With the exception of the sec- 
ond Pepperrell none of them were college graduates. Phips, espec- 
ially, was bom and reared in conditions of real destitution. 

Sir William Pepperrell's fatlier had acquired some property, had 
established a profitable commercial business and his children never 
knew from actual experience the meaning of poverty as the Phips 
family or even, in a lesser degree, as did the Maxims. 

His father, Colonel Wil'iam Pepperrell, was a Welshman, a native 
of Ravistock Parish, near Plymouth in Wales." The exact date of 
his birth is not known. His parents were of the common laboring 
folk and, when twenty-two years of age, he left his native shores 
for America and settled on the Isles of Shoals, some ten or twelve 
miles from the mouth of the Merrimac. within the borders of what 
is now the state of New Hampshire, and nine miles southerly from 
Kittery Point. Here he pursued the vocation of deep sea fishing 
for several years, during which time he accumulated a small amount 
of money that he invested in fishing boats, which he let to neighbors 
•less frugal or fortunate than himself. This was the beginning of 
the foundation of what was at that time an immense fortune and 
that gave the Pepperrell family wide-spread influence and power 
throughout the colony as well as an enviable credit and reputation 
in England. 

(>) Usher Parson.s* Life of Sir William Pepperrell (Boston, I8r>.'5) p. 1. 



'hV7 -L^E 



-V 'fUsviS 



6o 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



A fevv years prior to this John Bray emigrated from England to 
America and made a home for himself and family at Kittery Point. 
He was an expert boat builder and later becamie a large builder and 
^wner of ships. He also acquired wealth and was a man of prom- 
inence in the community. 

One of his family was a daughter, Margery, less than two years 
of ^e when he sailed from England and when he b-gnn life at 
Kittery Point. Young Pepperrell frequently had business with 
John Bray. So, after a residence of five or six years there, and 
after having met and become acquainted and much smitten with 




Col. William Pepperrell. First of the Family in America. 

the charms of the daughter, Margery, then a comely girl in her 
'teens, he naturally decided that Kittery was a more promising 
location for him than the rather barren and lonesome Isles of 
Shoals, which boasted of no such attractive young girl among its 
settlers as ^largery Bray. When she was seventeen Pepperrell 
sought her hand in marriage but her tender years were offered as 
an objection by her parents. The young man from Wales pros- 
pered in fishing, shipping and trade, and when Margery had 
attained to what her father conceived to be a proper age for wed- 
lock, he wisely consented to the union and made the happy couple 



m 



SIR WILLIAM PEPPERRELL 6i 



a wedding gift of a piece of land, the site of the present Pepperrell 
mansion in Kitten-. 

When Captain John Smith visited Piscataqua in 1614, a large 
Indian population flourished there. This Indian settlement was 
called Newichewannocks, whose sachem lived at Ouampegan (now 
South Berwick). Soon afterward a fatal epidemic swept off a 
large portion of liis tribe making it more accessible for English 
settlers who began to arrive as early as 1623. In the early years 
houses were erected in the Piscataqua valley near the water's edge. 
The communication between settlers was carried on by water for the 
first fifty years; then rough bridle paths were constructed through 
the woods. The building of log houses was gradually extended 
away from the coast line and along these paths, which eventually 
developed into highways for ox-carts, chaises and other vehicles of 
that day. and the high power autos of this day. 

Mills increased on the small rivers and lumber and ship-timber 
floated down the river in rafts to be sihipped to various European 
and American ports. But the most extensive and lucrative busi- 
ness was the fisheries. This became a great industry^ They were 
carried to many parts of the world and exchanged for tobacco and 
corn from the south; for tropical goods from the West Indies; 
dry goods, sails, naval stores, cordage, wines and fruit from Eng- 
land, Spain, and Portugal. It was this business that the Pepj>er- 
rells and Brays were engaged in. 

The disastrous Indian war of King Philip, in 1675, was a fatal 
blow to these prosperous people. And after its close Indian depre- 
dations continued to such an extent that there was but little change 
for the Ijetter until Governor Phips, in 1693, built forts at Pema- 
quid and at the mouth of the Saco river. Yet the Pepperrells, 
conducting a business on the ocean, did not suffer from the raids 
anrl conflagrations of the Indians, following the close of the King 
Philip war, as did many others on the Maine coast. They pros- 
pered and with their surplus earnings invested in lands until they 
became the largest land owners in that vicinity. 

William Pepperrell, Junior, Sir William Pepperrell, was born at 
Kittery Point, June 27, 1696. As a boy he attended the village 
school Vv^here he acquired only rudimentary learning; but under 
the guide of a competent private tutor he was taught land survey- 
ing, became proficient in ship navgigation and learned something 
of geography. From childhood to manhood he lived in the midst 



;;'r-**rf -^ 






62 SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

of sav^e warfare and breathed the air of self protection by the 
shedding of blood. The events, which he heard the most of as a 
youth, were tales of Indians burning villages and scalping his 
neighbors all the w^ay from Kitterv* Point to Casco Bay. Reared 
among such scenes it was only natural that he should have been 
imbued with a military spirit when only a lad. At sixteen he aided 
in keeping ward and watch, and bore arms in patrol duty. 

On the death of his only brother, Andrew, the firm name of 
William Pepperrell & Son was changed to The William Pepperrells. 

When not attending school, he assisted in his father's store, 
which was laborious, for they dealt in provisions, naval stores and 
similar heavy merchandise. His recreations were generally water 
sports with boys and girls, who were the children of fishermen, and 
hunting game in the adjacent forests. Thus, both his w^ork and 
play tended to promote muscular development and the power of 
enduring fatigue. They gave him a robust frame and vigorous 
mental quality. Such a Hfe ever makes strong men, physically, 
mentally and morally. 

In 1 716 the Pepperrells bought of the agents of Benjamin Black- 
man who had purchased it from the original proprietors, Gibbons 
and Bonython, a large tract of land which included a considerable 
portion of what is now the city of Saco, extending from the ocean 
several miles along the Saco river. Within it were the water 
powers where are now situated the cotton mills and other manu- 
facturies of that busy burg. This purchase, while made in the 
name of the elder Pepperrell, was purchased for his son, William, 
then a- minor, and subsequently conveyed to him. In 1729 young 
Pepperrell bought land adjoining to such an extent that he was soon 
the sole owner of nearly all of Saco, then named Pepperrellboro, 
and Scarboro. He erected mills and sold lots to settlers, all of 
which increased iheir income and constantly augmented the valife 
of their estates. Soon after the Saco purchase he arrived at the 
age of twent\"-one years. He assumed, as a partner of the firm 
of Pepperrells, the duties of an outside manager^ having charge 
of the improvements made there and of contracting for the building 
of vessels on the Piscataqua and Saco rivers. 

That ship building had become very profitable with them is illus- 
trated by the fact tliat the ship carpenters of the Thames com- 
plained to the government in 1724 that their trade was being 
impaired by the Pepperrells and other ship bnilders in New Eng- 



■V//OKI i 



SIR WILLIAM PEPPERRELL 63 

land. For the purpose of favoring British manufacturers, parlia- 
ment had prohibited the manufacture of woolens in America for 
exportation from one colony to another, and in London were fav- 
ored by an act forbidding the hatters of the colonies to employ 
more than one apprentice. Hence, fostering colonial ship building 
harmonized with England's narrow and selfish policy of restricting 
manufacturing here and incidentally inured to the welfare of the 
Pepperrells. 

The younger Pepperrell also conducted much of the trade of his 
firm with Boston and in London. Theirs had an ascendency 




Mrs. Margery (Bray) Pepperrell, wife of Col. William Pepperrell. 

over all other mercantile houses in New England. Thus the young 
man was brought into a close and intimate connection with the 
public men in Boston. This led to an entrance into the delightful 
Boston aristocracy of that period, by which means he cultivated 
courtly manners and an address of ease and politeness. The his- 
tory of the Puritans has been written for us in two kinds and by 
two classes of writers. One by the methodical historians and plod- 
ding antiquarians, by those delving into the dry details of all the 
events, the other by the poet, the dramatist, and the novelist. Both 
have instructed us and pleased our fancy. Upon Hawthorn's pages 



%%' -1 



K. 



64 SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



we behold the ancient Puritan society ; austere, solemn, prayerful, 
rigid ; and we also see the later colonial aristocracy laced and pow- 
dered, with its dignified and proper daiicing- and amateurish indul- 
gence in frivolities which their forbears had forbidden as having 
been designed only by and for the enemies of God. William Pep- 
perrell lived in the days of tlie latter. 

'With them he was a favorite. At an early age honors sought 
him. He was commissioned justice of the peace at the end of his 
minority and was soon offered the captaincy of a company of cav- 
alry. From this he was promoted to major and then made colonel, 
which placed him in command of all the militia of Elaine. In 1726 
he was chosen representative to the General Court from Kittery, 
which then included Eliot and the year following received further 
political promotion as appears by the following notice: 

Boston, June i, 1727. 
Sir, — I am directed by the Honorable Lieutenant-Governor and Council 
to acquaint 3'ou that you are elected and appointed a councillor or assistant 
for the ensuing year, and that your attendance at the council-board is 
desired as soon as may be. 

Your humble servant, 

J. WILLARD. 

Among the Boston families which William met socially was that 
of Grove Hirst, a man of distinction in the colony. He was a 
successful merchant, had acquired much wealth, was well known 
and influential throughout New England. His wife was a daughter 
of Judge Sewall of the Supreme Court. The Hirsts were con- 
nected by marriage with that most excellent, famous and eccentric 
individual whose name and doings are stragely intertwined with 
almost every^thing and everybody of consequence in early York or 
Kittery, the Reverend William bloody, better known as Parson 
Moody. 

Grove Hirst had a daughter prepossessing and attractive and 
regarded as a beautiful young lady by young Pepperrell and one 
other that we have information of. He had met the lady in the 
social circles of Boston and when she was visiting at Parson 
Aloody's, he made frequent calls and was quite attentive to her. 
The other admirer chanced to be none other than the parson's own 
son who was a schoolmaster in York. Possibly an embarrassing 
situation. But Pepperrell was successful in love as well, as after- 
wards, in war, and succeeded in winning Marj^'s affections and on 



.;^... 



SIR WILLIAM PEPPERRELL 



March i6, 1723, they were united in marriage. The Pepperrell 
mansion at Kitterv' was enlarged and became their home. 

In 1730 Governor Belcher had a friend whom he desired to make 
clerk of the Court of Common Pleas, but this was a prerogative of 
the judges to appoint and they preferred the old incumbent. A 
sort of dead-lock or political contest was on between the governor 
and the court. It was furious but short. While the court were 
not compelled to obey his wishes he possessed the power to sum- 
marily remove them and appoint others in their places. This he 
immediately proceeded to do. His new appointees were A\'illiam 
Pepperrell, Junior, chief justice, Samuel Came, Timothy Gerrish, 
and Joseph bloody, associates. In this arbitrary fashion the gov- 
ernor succeeded in placing his favorite in office. This was Ameri- 
can politics in the first part of the eighteenth century. Mr. Pep- 
perrell was not a la^\'yer but set about in his usual energetic man- 
ner to qualify for his new position. He commenced by ordering 
from London a law library. He read law as any law student would 
have done in those days, and devoted all of his spare momenta to 
informing himself regarding the rules of law and court procedure. 
That he continued to hold this place until his death, in 1759, is 
assurance that he made a good judge. 

Ihe causes which led to the capture of Louisburg in 1745 are a 
part of the epic stor\^ of a New France in the New World. 
Dreamed of by the explorers and discoverers of the sixteenth, it 
was \-italized by the adventurers, missionaries and colonizers of the 
seventeenth century and for more than a himdred years was a 
tiagical. conflict between the Anglo-Saxon and the Latin for 
supremacy until Wolfe captured Quebec in the eighteenth century. 
Acadia, including ancient Xova Sotia, and English settlements 
along the sea coast and rivers of Elaine, constituted much of its 
battle ground. Cape Breton, an island guarding the approaches to 
the St. Lawrence, was in the early part of the seventeenth century 
in the possession of the English colonists. By treaty in 1632 it 
was restored to France. In 17 10 with the fall of Port Royal, whicli 
was taken by New England troop? and renamed Annapolis, Cape 
Breton again fell to the English as did the rest of Acadia. The 
English held this island by possession until the treat)' of Utrecht 
in 17 13. when what is now Xova Scotia was ceded to Great Britain. 
France retaining the island of Cape Breton and renaming it Isle 
Royale. This was all of Xew France that then remained of al! 
her Atlantic possessions. 



66 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



France immediately began to fortify the harbor, formerly known 
as English Harbor, giving it a new name, Louisburg, in honor of 
the French monarch. Louis XIV. Whether or not the English 
representatives at L'trecht overlooked the strategic importance of 
tihis situation is not clear. But it was a menace to the interests 
of Great Britain and her colonial possessions. A fortified seaport 
on the ocean front of the island could not be otherwise. Ever 
since the days of Governor Phips, Xew England had been incessant 
in warning the home government of the dangers of French inva- 







Mrs. Mary (Hirst) Pepperrcll, wife of Sir William Pepperrell. 

sion, but many times without avail. Generally the English adminis- 
trations did not take a lively interest in anything regarding Ameri- 
can affairs until some serious, international condition developed in 
European politics that endangered her colonial interests. Such a 
situation arose in 1743. 

England had been involved in war with Spain. It was feared 
that the reverses of Spain would drive her to drawing France into 
the conflict as an ally and leaders in Xew England had foreseen it 
and striven to awaken the government to what seemed to them 



SIR WILLIAM PEPPERRELL 67 



impending perils. Events during the first of that year proved their 
fears to be well grounded. Early in October a goveniment 
schooner arrived at Boston from England, bringing dispatches to 
all the governors that in ten days after her departure war with 
France would be declared, and orders from the Admiralty to all 
na\'al commanders on the coast to prepare for hostilities. 

Colonel Pepperrell received the following letter from Governor 
Shirley : 

Boston, October 10, 1743. 
Sir — Having received advices from Grealt Britain that there is great dan- 
ger of a rupture with France, I think it necessary and accordingly direct 
you forthwith to advertise the exposed towns and settlements hereof, and 
to take proper care that the inhabitants secure themselves and families 
against any sudden assault from the Indians, and that they do not expose 
themselves by being too far from home in this time of danger, and that the 
companies in your regiment that are not much exposed, be in readiness 
to relieve any of the neighboring places in case there should be any occa- 
sion for it. I am. Sir, 

Your friend and servant, 

W. SHIRLEY. 

On the 13th, Pepperrell writes to all his captains a copy of the 
foregoing, and adds : 

I hope that he who gave us our breath will give us the rourage and pru- 
dence to behave ourselves like true-born Englishmen. 

Your friend and humble servant, 

W. PEPPERRELL. 

France declared war March 15, 1744, and England two weeks 
later. The people in no part of the colonies took deeper interest 
in the preparation for the capture of Louisburg than did the inhab- 
itants along the coast of Maine, who for years had endured so much 
suffering and distress from the Indians allied with the French 
against the English. It was the principal theme of conversation 
in every home, shop, mill and store and in all the pulpits as well 
Boston realized better than London the necessity of wresting Louis- 
burg from the French if safety to trade and navigation and the very 
existence of the colonies was to be insured. Each pro\nnce at that 
time maintained one or more armed vessels. The General Court 
was divided upon the expediency of undertaking this enterprise 
v\-ithout powerful aid from England. A large number of its mem- 
bers were conservative, lacked faith in the possibility of success 
and opposed it. Plad a less resolute and resourceful man than 



68 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Shirley been governor the project would probably have failed of 
maturing. The governor's foresight was greater than any of the 
others and his determination to accomplish his purpose was un- 
wavering. In the latter part of 1744 he wrote letters to the min- 
istry imploring them to co-operate with him in protecting colonial 
interests. Eany in January (1745) orders were dispatched to 
Commodore Warren, then at the West India station, to proceed to 
New England with his squadron and co-operate with Governor 
Shirley in protecting the fisheries. The whole subject of the pro- 
posed expedition had to be acted upon by the General Court. The 
governor desired to know in advance what its action would be. 
Then he deemed it necessary that for a time all of the plans should 
remain a secret. Early in January he requested it? members to 
take an oath of secrecy regarding a proposition that he was about 
to lay before them. Secrecy was observ^ed for some days until a 
member of the legislature, who was a pious deacon, and had a habit 
of raising his voice when talking to the Lord, was overheard in his 
private devotions invoking Heaven for its blessings upon the gov- 
ernor's secret plans. \\'hen it thus became known the boldness of 
the scheme astounded everyone. It was referred to a committee 
who reported adversely and it was supposed that it was on the dis- 
card pile forever. But Shirley could not thus be thwarted. He 
caused petitions from merchants in Boston, Salem and other parts 
to be circulated and presented to the legislature, requesting a 
re-consideration of its action. After quite a protracted debate a 
final vote was taken, January 26, 1745. Shirley's friends carried 
it by a majority of one vote. From that time on the people of the 
colonies were seething with patriotism. All were united on protect- 
ing American interests by removing once for all from this continent 
the French menace. 

The first and most difficult task before Governor Shirley was the 
choice of a commander of the expedition. Xew England had no 
trained military officers of experience. After much consideration 
and consultation with public men of the colonies, the selection of 
W^illiam Pepperrell. of Kittery, was decided upon. He was well 
and favorably know^n throughout Xew England, was extensively 
engaged in the fisheries, popular and wealthy. In the vernacular 
of today he was a good " mixer "of agreeable manners and had 
long held the offce of president of the governor's council. His 
patriotism was unquestioned and all had faith in his sterling quali- 



SIR WILLIAM PEPPERRELL 69 



ties and a belief that he would succeed. Having- decided after 
considerable hesitation to accej>t of the command, he entered on 
the duties with his usual tenacit}^ and determination. He advanced 
five thousand pounds to the province from his own fortune. The 
enlistment was rapid, owing much of its success to the popularity 
of Colonel Pepperrell. Religious feeling- ran high. Pepperrell 
took Parson Moody along as chaplain of his regiment. The good 
parson's religious zeal ingrained with more or less bigotry- impelled 
him to carry upon his shoulder a hatchet " for the puq>ose of 
destroying images in the French Catholic dhurches." Deacon 
John Gray of Biddeford wrote Pepperrell : " O that I could be 
with you and dear Parson bloody in that church, to destroy the 
images there set up and hear the true gospel there preached." ' In 
less than two months from the day the court voted, a military force 
of 4,220 men had been recruited. Of these 3,250 men were from 
Massachusetts, about one-third of w^hich were from Maine.' He 
now bore the military title of Lieutenant-General. 

Nova Scotia proper extended westward from the Strait of Canso 
to Cape Sable and was then in possession of the English who had 
two garrisoned forts in it, one at the mouth of the Strait on an 
island called Canso, and the ether on the north side in the Bay of 
Fundy, called Port Royal, or Annapolis. The commander at 
Louisburg on hearing that war had been declared attacked and cap- 
tured the Canso garrison and conveyed the prisoners to Louisburg 
before news of the declaration of war had reached Boston. A 
similar expedition was directed aga'nst the fort at Annapolis but 
Governor Shirley anticipating hostilities had sent reinforcements 
which enabled it to repel the assault. This was the situation when 
Pepperrell with his troops left Boston March 24, 1745, and arrived 
at Canso on the first day of April. Pepperrell sailed from Canso 
and landed on the place selected the following morning. Com- 
mander Warren, learning on his way to Boston that Pepperrell had 
sailed, changed his course for Canso. 

Space will not permit us to describe the siege in detail. On 
May 7, Pepperrell and Warren sent to Commander Duchambon, 
in the name of the king, a demand to surrender. This Duchambon 
refused to do. There was some misunderstanding between Pep- 
perrell and Warren before a complete co-opration of their forces 
was perfected. Late in the afternoon of the 15th day of June, 

(^) lb. 52. 

(■■') Maine at Louisburg, Burrage. p. 21. 



■■;>l;;!:tMv| 



JO SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Ducliambon sent a flag of truce to Pepperrell's lines, askin.g for a 
suspension of hostilities and terms of capi'tulation. These were 
agreed to and finally completed on the i6tli and on June i/th the 
provincial troops entered Louisburg at the southwest gate with 
General Pepperrell and Colonel Bradstreet at the head of the column 
and the other higher officers in the rear. The French troops were 
stationed in front of their barracks. Dr. Henry S. Burrage in his 
Maine at Louisburg (supra.) page 42, in describing this scene says: 
Salutations were exchanged, and then the French " with their arms, music 
and standards " marched down to the shore, and were taken on board the 
transports which were to return them to their native land. 

About two thousand of the inhabitants of the city, six hundred 
and fifty veteran troops, thirteen hundred and ten militia, and the 
crefw of the French war vessel, the \'igilant, were trans|X)rted to 
France requiring fourteen ships for their removal. 

As Pepperrell viewed the magnitude and strength of the enemy'.- 
fortifications, he exclaimed, " The Almighty, of a truth has been 
with us." 

Directly after the surrender of Louisburg, General Pepperrell 
gave a banquet to the officers wdio had so bravely conducted the 
siege. Some of the gentlemen expressed their apprehension tliat 
dinner would be spoiled waiting for the chaplain's long blessing. 
But for once the parson surprised and pleased them with brevity 
When all were ready, ]\Ir. Moody lifted up his hands and eyes to 
heaven and said : 

Lord, the mercies thou hast bestowed, and thy mercies and benefits have 
been so wonderful, that time is too short to express our sense of thy good- 
ness;' we must leave it for the work of eternity. Fill us with gratitude, 
and bless what is set before us on this occasion of joy, for the sake of 
Christ our Lord. Amen. 

The capture of Louisburg inscribed on its pages a new chapter 
in the histor>^ of the world: a for\vard step in the progress of 
American independence was taken and a new name added to the 
roll of Anglo-Saxon heroes and patriots. 

Among the officers and soldiers engaged in this expedition, who 
were then and later prominent in the public affairs of the District 
of Maine, were General Samuel Waldo, whose name by reason of 
the **' Waldo Patent." and in other ways, is indissolubly interwoven 
with our early history ; Colonel Jeremiah Moulton. Colonel Dudley 
Bradstreet, Colonel Arthur Noble, Morris O'Brien, then from Scar- 
boro, and later of Machias, and father of Jeremiah O'Brien, who 



SIR WILLIAxM PEPPERRELL 71 

planned and organized the capture of the British armed cutter, the 
Margaretta, in Machias Bay. June 12. 1775, and the first American 
to haul dowTi the British flag in a naval battle. 

Pepperrell remained at Louisburg imtil July 4, 1746, when he 
departed for his home in Kittery. During all the time of his tarry 
there his duties were arduous, hi^ responsibilities great, and his 
trials, discouragements and perplexities many. 

The Louisburg affair was a mo'st excellent prepara-tory course 
for the great drama of the revolution that fate had in store for 
them a little more than a quarter of a century later. It was music 
from the same old fifes and drums used at Louisburg that rallied 
the patriots at Lexington and Bunker Hill. Its recollection 
stren^gthened their confidence and self-reliance and inspired them 
with a new spirit of nationalism. Statesmen of foresight in other 
parts of the world realized that a new factor in its affairs had 
appeared. ^Ir. Hartwell said, in the House of Commons, in 1775, 
that the colonist? 

took Louisburg from the French single-handed without any European 
assistance, — as mettled an enterprise as any in our history, — an ever-lasting 
memoriai to the zeal, courage, and perseverance of the troops of New- 
England. 

Yet stubborn stupidity blinded the eyes of royalty in 1776. and 
the birth of a new nation dedicated to freedom and human rights 
resulted. 

The children of Sir William and Lady ^lary (Hirst) Pepperrell 
were Elizabsth, b. December 29, 1723, and Andrew, b. January 4, 
1726. They had two other children who died in infancy. Eliza- 
beth married Xathaniel Sparhawk, ]May i, 1742. Their son, Wil- 
liam Sparhawk, by the will of his grandfather, Sir William, became 
heir to his great estate, conditioned that he should change his name 
to Pepperrell. In pursuance of this his name was changed to Pep- 
perrell by the Legislature of Massachusetts. In October, 1774* 
fifteen years after the decease of his grandfather he was created a 
Baronet." He married a daughter of Colonel Isaac Royall of Bed- 
ford. He was a pronounced royalist and at the beginning of the 
Revolution (1775) went with his wife to England where be Hved 
until his death in London, December 2, i8r6, when the title became 
extinct. 



(*) American Baronets No. .1. p. 150. No. G. p. 1S7. No. S. {). -J.T). Putn:nn*s Mas:, 
for Sept., lSo7, v. X. p. 407. 



SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAIXE HISTORY 



Andrew Pepperrell, the second child of Sir W'ilham, gra(kiated 
with honors at Harvard College in 1743. A writer of those times 
in speaking of him says : " To personal beauty in him were added 
grace of manner? and elegant accompli sliments, rarely attained in 
our hemisphere at that period." 

In 1746 he was betrothed to a highly accompHshed and beautiful 
young* lady, ^Nliss Hannah Waldo, daughter of General Samuel 
Waldo, associated with his father in the siege of Louisburg. They 
had been warm friends for a life-time and their families were on 
terms of the closest intimacy. The alliance was hailed with joy in 
■both homes. And right here we find ourselves within the realm of 
romance — romance that has enchantment and yet is strange ; where 
love intertwines with tragedy and all is overshadowed with mystery. 
For a half centurv^ this story- seems to have run down through the 
pages of historv' in this wise: that the wedding day was appointed; 
wonderful preparations were made in a st}de and magnitude never 
before known in Xew England. It brouglu not only the elite from 
Maine but distinguished society people from other parts of the 
cx>lonies as well, for all were delighted to contribute to the happi- 
ness of and do honor to the son and daughter of two of their 
beloved heroes of Louisburg. That at the last moment before the 
entire assembly the bride discarded long years of devoted love and 
blighted the life of her lover by abruptly declining to give her hand 
in wedlock ; and that Andrew disappointed and heartbroken on the 
second day, thereafter, dropped dead is the streets of Portsmouth, 
and that on the third day the wedding party, gathered from far and 
near. for a merry marriage feast, followed his cold remains to the 
silent tomb of his ancestors for their eternal rest." Usher Parsons 
wrote the Life of Sir William Pepperrell in 1855. In this work 
the author publishes certain letters as a " vindication " of ]\Iiss 
Waldo. He states that the " Pepperrell papers have been scattered 
to the four winds " and that it was only after much research " that 
enough have been gathered to set the affair right." Several of 
these letters, which passed between Sir William and General 
Waldo, are exceedingly friendly expressing mutual hope that the 
union would be consummated. Nathaniel Sparhawk. in one of his 
letters wrote: 

The love affair between Andrew Pepperrell and Miss Waldo, now of four 
years' duration, is still pending?, much to the annoyance of both families, 
as well as trj-ing to the patience of the young lady." 



(*) rurwin's Journal ami Letters, p. ,'S2. 
Cj Par.^ons' suiira, p. 21f». 



'g#- 



•re) 



SIR WILLIAM PEPPERRELL 



73 



That all of their friends and relatives took a hand in helping on 
the match seems apparent. Stephen Waldo, a merchant of Boston, 
and a relative of Waldo, wrote to Andrew : 

I hope, my friend, it will not be long before we have the pleasure of see- 
ing you in town to disappoint the enemies as well as to complete the 
approaching pleasure, which you have in view, in enjoying the society of so 
cbarmng and desirable a young lady as is Miss Hannah.' 




fej.alMiffllliiliiHJii: 



The Pepperrell Mansion, Kittery, IMaine. 
Built by Col. William Pepperrell in 1682. 

It appears that there was much procrastination in the affair to 
the evident vexation of all their friends. Some, if not all of this 
vva^ ca.ised by the ill health of Andrew. Parsons says: . 

* * * but a few days before the one appointed for the wedding 
arrived, Andrew wrote to her that circumstances had occurred which would 
make it necessary to defer it to another day which he named as more con- 
venient to himself. * * * She returned no answer; the guests from 
far and near, minister and all, assembled at the appointed place, when she 
enjoyed the sweet revenge of telling Andrew that she would not marry 
one who had occasioned her so much mortification, and who could not have 
that love and friendship for her that was necessary to her happiness. 

That it was a bitter disappointment to the two families is proven 
by these letters. General Waldo wrote Sir William from London: 

I was greatly chagrined at the news of my daughter's changing her mind 
and dismissing your son after the visit you mention, whic' I was apprised 
of by her, and concluded the affcir would have have had the issue I had 
lon,^ expected and desired. 



lb. 



74 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Parsons naively remarks that 

The young lady enjoyed more consolation than any of them. In less th>..i 
six weeks she was led to the altar by Thomas Fluker, Esquire, secretary of 
the province. 

From the evidence produced by Parsons that part of the Curwin 
account' relative to Andrew's sudden death in Portsmouth seems 
to fall. Other writers since Parsons, like William Goold in his 
" Portland in the Past '' seem to concur in the conclusions arrived 
at by him regarding this episode. And yet we cannot escape the 
thought that i>ossibly the Honorable Secretary- and ^liss Waldo, 
'had they so desired, could have related something that might have 
made it all clearer than it has ever been since the days of their ill- 
fated betrothal. 

Whatever the facts may have been, is there not buried in that 
musty bit of eighteenth century history, material for a fascinating 
•tale of love and intrigue? 

And here we may be pardoned for diverting tO' the fact that when 
the first belchings of the American Revolution startled an amazed 
world, a young Boston rebel was deeply in love with Lucv^ Fluker, 
a daughter of this union, much to the regret of her aristocratic 
parents who were fervent loyalists. It was a case of flagrant dis- 
obedience if not of actual elopement, when in defiance of parental 
authority she peisisted in marrying the one who later became the 
Patriots' hero and Washington's friend, General Henry Knox- 

Regarding his grandson who inherited his fortune and title, 
Cecil Cutts Howard in a brochure, The Pepperrells of America, 
says : 

Wilham Pepperrell Sparhawk bom in 1746, married Oct. 24. 1767. Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Mary (Mcintosh) Royall of Medford, Mass. He became 
chief heir of his grandfather (Sir William Pepperrell) on condition that. 
at twenty-one years of age. he should drop the name of Sparhawk and be 
known as Sir William Pepperrell. 



(*) Judfre .Samuel Curwin. autlior of Curwin's .Tournal and Letters (supra) was 
of the ol<l New England fauiily of that name and was born in Salem in 171.">. and 
graduated at Harvard in 17.').">. He was enjrajred in commercial jiur'^uits and a 
person of {jreat influence in the colony. He was captain of a compai:y under 
General Pe[»perrell at Louisburjr. When the war of the Revolution broke out he 
remained a loyalist and removcKl to Enjrland. He was an intlmat** friend of the 
second Sir William Pf'i)perre]l. also a loyalist, who fled to En<rlan<l. Thus he 
must have had first haiul knowledge of the Pepperrell fanrily. Ht' was a man of 
learning and ability as is fully disclosod by his writinjrs. The work above 
referred to contains, besides the journal and letters, several sk('t<h«*s of Louis- 
burg sur\'ivors, and noted loyalists one f>f whicii is "The PepperrtdN of Kittery." 
and in it is this account of Andrew. The material for this book was nrepared 
and edited by Geortre Atkinson \\'ard. A. >L. a well-known histori'^al writer, and 
published by Leavitt. Trow & Co.. Xew York, and Wiley and Putn.im. Lon<lon. 
(third edition) in 1S4.'>. In view of these facts, it is ha^-dly conce = vable tint 
Jndjre Curwin coiiM have Vieen so much in er»-<»r aas Pars<»ns' ver-^ion of the 
matter would indicat**: and even if he ha<l been misled it is fully as strange 
th;^t !-o careful a writer as Ward should not have discovered the fact. 



SIR WILLIAM PEPPERRELL 75 



In 1767, on arriving at his majority, hrs grandfather's wishes were agreed 
to and he assumed the title. He has been known as Sir William Second, 
and also, in the family as " young Sir William." The year before assum- 
ing the title, he graduated from Harvard College, and was later a coun- 
cillor and mandamus councilor. A ro3'alist, he fled to England in 1775. 
with his wife, children and wife's parents and kindred. His wife died on 
board ship and was buried at Halifax, N. S.. Oct 8, 1775. "Young Sir 
William " received a great deal of attention in England and was painted by 
West, in a large group which represented him as he was when he presented 
his brother Tories to the king, craving the King's most gracious favor. 

■ Judge Cunvin in his work herein referred to says of him : 

The fortune of General Pepperrell far exceeded any that had been 
amassed in New England, and his enterprise and public spirit shed a wide- 
spread influence around. He loaned a large sum for the furtherance of 
the expedition he was destined to command. And notwithstanding that 
Franklin and other prominent men of the middle and southern provinces 
pronounced the cor tempplated siege and attack of Louisburg to be Quixotic^ 
so satisfied was Pepperrell of the feasibility of the plan, and that the reduc- 
tion of that stronghold of the enemy was an object of vast importance, that 
he wiDingly hazarded fortune, fame, and life itself, for its accomplishment. 
His zeal in ihe business imparted new life to the people, and h? finally 
succeeded in influencing the co-operation of all the New England govern- 
ments. 

Fortune adhered to him in this, as in all his commercial enterprises, and 
to the good judgment he displayed, as well as to his example of personal 
bravery, is the final success of the expedition mainly to be attributed. 

Tll^e Honorable Everett Pepperrell Wheeler of New York, who 
has made exhaustive research into the history of Sir William Pep- 
perrell, in a pamphlet published in 1910, entitled " Memorial in 
support of the nomination of the name of Sir Wilham Pepperrell, 
to be inscribed in the Hall of Fame for Great Americans," gives a 
most able and valuable summary of his career and achievements. 
From this we make the excerpts which follow : 

* * * He was the most enterprising and successful colonial merchant 
and one of the most distinguished colonial statesmen. 

He was a skilful and successful colonial general. Under his leadership 
regiments from the different colonies learned to co-operate against regular 
troops entrenched behind strong fortifications. The veterans of Louisburg 
were the backbone of the New England forces at the beginning of the 
revolution. 

* * * He was a typical American ; typical of the time when the exi- 
gencies of life were such that a man of talent could not limit himself or 
his intelligence to one particular occupation, but when the nceessities of 
the situation in which our fathers were placed, compelled him to play many 
parts, which in a later and more complex civilization would be filled by 
different individuals. 



-je SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAIXE HISTORY 



* * * Jealousy on the part of Governor Shirley kept him from service 
in the field at that time. (i755) but he exerted himself actively to raise 
troop's for the ^\-ar then going on with the French, and he was entrusted 
with the command of the forces which guarded the frontiers of Maine and 
New Hampshire. Just as the war began to be successful, on the sixth day 
of July, 1759, he died. 

* * * He was the most conspicuous figure in America during the w^r 
of the Au'S'trian Succession and the Seven Years War, and thus achieved a 
greater international reputation than any American prior to the Revolution, 
His achievements at Louisbvrg have been fully referred to. At the begin- 
ning of the Seven Years War, he was appointed by the Crown a major- 
general and was efficient and successful in the work entrusted to him by 
the Newcastle ministrj'. But the campaign generally was unfortunate. 
When Pitt came into power he sent over two efficient generals, Amherst 
and Wolfe, and gave Pepperrell the chief command in the colonies appoint- 
ing him a lieutenant general in the Royal Army. 

Had it not been for sickness he would have taken the field and actively 
shared the glories of Quebec and the capture of Fort Duquesne. The plan 
of the campaign which led to the overthrow of the French sway in Canada, 
and prepared the way for the American revollution. was fought according 
to the plans laid down by Pepperell. 

* * * A fisherman's son, he raised himself to honor and wealth. 
Although not bred a la\v}'er, he presided with ability as a Chief Justice. 

Although not trained a soldier, he commanded the armies of the colonies 
v/ith courage, fortitude, foresight and success. No record has ever leaped 
to light that casts a shadow upon his memory. Just and upright in all his 
own dealings, he knew how to be generous and merciful to others : fearless 
and resolute himse-lf, he knew how to encourage the wavering, and stimulate 
the doubting. He was polite without insincerity, liberal and hospitable 
without extravagance. 

The one controling purpose of his life was duty. He became in youth a 
member of the Congregational Church, and continued a devout and con- 
sistent adherent to its principles. But he was free from that narrowness 
and bigotry that disfigure the character of some of the New England colo- 
nial leaders. At home and abroad, in the counting-house and in the Legis- 
lature, on the bench or in command of the provincial army, he embodied in 
action the religious conviction that became in youth an e'S<^ential part — 
indeed, the foundation of his whole character. Perhaps the best evidence 
of this is that prosperity never made him arrogant, or marred the simplicity 
and straightforwardness of the man. And thus, to the day of his death, 
he enjoyed alike the confidence of the Indians in the Maine forests, the 
British Governors sent to rule the provinces, the merchants of Boston and 
London, the aristocracy of Beacon street, and his neighbors at Kittery. 

He was intimately friendly with Jonathan Edwards and others of that 
group of intellectuals of New England, of whom Edwards was a leader. 
His close associates were people of culture and eminence. ^ 



SIR WILLIAM PEPPERRELL y-j 



In these pages we have only attempted to slightly touch upon 
some of the principal incidents in the life of this famous son of 
?\Iaine, beloved by the people of his province and honored and 
respected by the government of Great Britain. 

His military career is an important chapter in the history of the 
French wars from 1745 to 1758. 

He was one of the first, if not the very first, to advocate building 
a fort on the Penobscot. Subsequent to ihis death his advice was 
heeded and Governor Pownal erected the fortification (Fort Pow- 
nal) that bore his name and was of unmeasureable importance to 
the settlements of eastern Maine. 

His life work as a publicist and military leader was really carry- 
ing into effect the same policy — a more vigorous one by the crown 
against the French — that Governor Phips, anot'.er eminent Maine 
character was nearly a centun.- before die father of. 

Sir William Pepperrell died at his home in Kitter}-, November 
6, 1759, and Lady Pepperrell died there November 25, 1789. Par- 
sons (supra) p. 320 says: 

His funeral obsequies were attended b}- a vast concourse. The drooping 
flags at half mast on both shores of the Piscataqua, the solemn knell from 
neighboring churches, the responsive minute-guns from all the batteries, 
and the mournful rumbling of muffled drums announced that a great man 
had fallen and was descending to the tomb. 



THE RHYME OF THE BARONET'S NAME. 

Would you learn to rightly spell 
The ancient name of Pepperrell? 

Just as the Baronet of old 

Wrote it out in letters bold? 

Then these simple lines recite, 

And you will surely have it right: 

Of letters four, make ten from these, 

P's and r's and !'s and e's ; 
Begin with P and e, and then — 

Use all the letters that you can ; 
That is to say. in Pepperrell. 

Use doubles p and r and I. 

—JUSTIN HENRY SHAW. 



K 



78 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

The Boy on Pulpit Rock 

TO HERBERT GRAY COBB 

KILLED IN ACTION 

Oct. 14, 1918 
(By Windsor P. Daggett) 

The author of these gracious lines in a note to the editor says.^ 
"Lt. Herbert Gray Cobb, son of Mr. and Mrs. William L- Cobb of 
IVoodfords, Maine, z\.'as killed in action at Bruillcs-sur-Mcuse, Oct. 
14, igi8. He zvas a junior at the University of Maine zchen lie 
enlisted i)i April, 191 J. He crossed to France in September of that 
year as leader of the lo^d Inf. Ba.id. On his twenty-third birth- 
day, Feb. 8, ipi8, at an Officers' Training School in France, he 
received his commission as 2nd Lieutenant. He was assigned to 
Co. L of the 6ist Reg- Inf., and sazc service for several months. 
At the time of his death he zcas Laisson Officer for his battalion. 
According to the inscription on the cross at Jiis grave, he hod been 
raised to the rank of ist Lieut. He is buried in the Argonne Ceme- 
tery at Romagne zcith 2^,000 other American heroes f 

Against God's open sky of searchless blue, 

Kissed by September breeze, 
Sebago shimmering at our feet ; and you, 

Companion of the trees, 
Against that background — lake and sky and space — 

A living statue stood : 
In all the youthful splendor of your grace. 

With gift of life endued. 

We loved the imaged ledge, the paths entwined, 

And Pulpit Rock so steep, 
Where lonely Hawthorne soothed his boyish mind, 

Hushed in the woodland deep. 
I thought he stood beside your eager form — 

Looking so far ! looked he. — 
He took your hand and pressed it, oh, so warm. 

Then left it lingeringly. 

'Gainst crimson cloud, 'gainst lurid sky, unmoored, 

A Yankee troopship lay; 
There 'neath its world-flung, star-lit flag you stood. 

Beckoned by Liberty ! 
Oh, who could mourn your death ! You pledged your dreams 

Of honor, valor, truth ! 
My heart still sings 'round Pulpit Rock, where gleams 

A halo of immortal! youth ! 



=^/ 



V 



OLD EASTERN CEMETERY. PORTLAND 



You stand there still, your high gaze turned to west — 

Your helmet silver white ; 
A sun-ray strikes the cross upon your breast, 

Your altar fire to light. 
You stand — oh, flowers are bright beyond the sea; 

But here where pine trees wave, 
Your body'll rise, your spirit mightest be 

Where homing hearts are brave. 








Herbert Gray Cobb, on Pulpit Rock. 



THE OLD EASTERN CEMETERY IN PORTLAND, MAINE. 

x\t a meeting of the Elaine Genealogical Society, (1885), John 
T. Hull in a paper read by him, said : 

For nearly two hundred years the Eastern Cemetery has been the only 
common burying place of the territory now comprised within the limits of 
Portland. From the time of the first settlements made on this peninsula, 
it has been a place of sepulture. Here, undoubtedly, after his troubled life, 
lies the dust of George Cleeve, the first perm.anent occupant of Machigonne 
(now Portland). His grave is surrounded by others, his contemporaries 
m the establishment of civilization in this former wilderness. Unhonored 
and unknown are the graves of our rude forefathers. 

Here are also the monuments and tombs of many of the distinguished 
and eminent of the town, who have been prominent in its affairs during 
two centuries of its history. 



um 



8o SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



This venerable cemetery is well worthy of the study of our historians 
and antiquarians, for in " this hallowed spot where our departed friends 
repose" the fathers of our hamlet are buried. Some of them have had 
their names immortalized in the history of our country, as its defenders on 
land and sea; and of others their lives and characters are unknown or 
forgotten by the present generation. 

Among the most ancient gravestones that has any legible inscription 
thereon is the following: "Here lyes ye body of Mrs. Mars- Green, ye 
Daur of Capt. Nathanael and Mrs. Mary Green of Boston, aged 54 years- 
Decd May ye 23d 1717." 

The earliest maps in existence, of the territorj^ now Portland, show this 
place designated as the " burying ground." It was thus probably appro- 
priated by George Cleeve, as it joined his homestead lot on the north side, 
although no 'title of it was ever given the town. After the re-settlement 
of the town in 1719, and the coming of Parson Smith to Falmouth, he by 
some means obtained a title to the land on the south side of Smith (now 
Congress) street, which included the School House lot, and the present 
Eastern Cemetery. This was undoubtedly one of the titles which caused 
him great vexation of spirit, for although a portion of it was in use as the 
common burying ground, ithe town had a doubtful claim to it. They laid 
out a street or passage way to the yard from Congress street over the land 
owned by Mr. Smith, which was called " Funeral Lane." The people and 
authorities were urging the Parson to give them a good deed to this bury- 
ing ground, yet he held on to this old graveyard with its mouldering remains 
of our forefathers, with a tenacious grasp. At length when on his death 
bed. and when he had become unable to sign his name, he made a convey- 
ance to the town of the land which now comprises the School House lot 
and the Eastern Cemetery. A clause in his deed is as follows, viz. : 
"Meaning to convey all the land I now own, possess or claim, on the south- 
east side of Smith (now Congress) street, between the stone wall of the 
neck; the fence that separates the burning ground from the land of the 
late Gov. Hancock (John Hancock) and others, and the land in the posses- 
sion of the heirs of the late Moses Pearson and others, and said Smith 
street; whether included in the above described or not." 

The sum paid by the town for this lot was £71 5s. The witnesses to the 
deed were Peter T. Smith and John Frothingham. The deed was executed 
May 6, 1795. Mr. Smith died on the 25th. 

The burying ground at that time, and for twenty-five years later, was 
that portion of the present cemetery south of the main avenue. The 
entrance to it was b}' the Funeral Lane, previously mentioned, now included 
in the school house yard. The land between this avenue. Congress and 
Mountfort streets, was un fenced and used as a public common. On Fourth 



-».-^' 



beer, gingerbread, &c.. which place and booths are weM remembered by our 
older citizens as kept by some of the prominent characters, among the col- 
ored population. One of Portland's poets has written the following: 
*' About Marm Shepard's booth they hang. 
As scores of children come and buy. 
While some rude boy pours out this slang, 
And 'beer I eggs I pies', a dozen cry.'' 



TM% 



PERTIXE^^T IXQUIRIES FOR MAINE PEOPLE 8i 

PERTINEXT IXQUIRIES FCiR MAINE PEOPLE TO 

CONSIDER. 
(Portland Evening Express.) 

Maine will observe its looth anniversary as a State next year 
and what would be more fitting than that it. or some designated 
organizations, mark as many as possible of its historic sites? There 
are many notable events that Avill be forgotten unless some perma- 
nent memorial is erected to recall them to future generations. 
W'Tio knows the location of the birtlhplace of the first governor of 
Maine in Scarboro. or who knows the renowned leaders in cit\', 
.tate and nation who rest in the oM Eastern or Western ceme- 
teries? What marker commemorates the first naval battle of the 
Revolution at ^lachias? W'here is the tablet that sihould designate 
the house wbere the immortal Lafayette stayed while in Portland? 
Who knows from any permanent marking that a future King of 
England, then Prince of Wales, sailed from Portland after his 
memorable visit to the L^nited States? How do strangers know 
tlhe house at Brunswick where the wonderful story, Uncle Tom's 
Cabin, was written? Who will remember in the years to come the 
spot in Maine where the steamer Roosevelt, which made possible 
the discovery of the X'orth Pole by Peary, was built and who knows 
where the explorer spent his bo>-ibood? Who has any idea where 
the parents of Longfellow are buried, or where Nathaniel Haw- 
thorne spent his youth? Do tablets mark the scenes of the birth 
of Sir Hiram ^Maxim and his equally famous brother Hudson? 
Does anyone know tihe house in which Hannibal Hamlin spent his 
declining days and finally died? What marking is there to point 
out the James G. Blaine mansion, outside of the indistinct door 
plate? Who knows where the world-renowned Artemus Ward 
was buried? A person who tries to locate the grave of Elijah 
Kellogg has great diffculty to tell which of the ElijaJ.is on the 
tombstones is that of the famous preacher and author. Where is 
the site of the first house in Portland or the first churcih in Elaine? 
What tablet records the wonderful history of Portland Head light. 
or the original tower which stands today as firmly as it did in 
Washington's time? What marking has the old home of Thomas 
B. Reed, or in fact of any of the homes of the men who have made 
the name known throughout the civilized world? What bronze 
or granite record is there of John A. Poor's memorable fig'ht to 
make the Grand Trunk a reality, or to mark the sjXDt from which 
was started the first train over this now great system? 

Some of these mav already liave been atteniled to by the patriotio and vijrilant 
Milne D. A. R., but many of them are beinj? shamefully ne}i:Ie<'t<'d : ami tlie list 
can be surprisinjrlv iii<re;is.'d bv a little study alonj; the lines indicated by tl'<^ 
above timely article.— (EDITOR.) 



^fH : 



82 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAIXE HISTORY 

Norway, Maine 

Fragmentary Xotcs from DAVID XOYES, 

HISTORY OF NORWAY, Published in 1852 

First Churches and Meeting Houses. 

Capt. Jonathan Cunnning's Dream. 

The Old Time Raisi>igs, and Musters. 

(Continued from page 27.) 

The meeting house built in the village was the first in the town, 
and, as some (who ought to know ) say, was tjhe first Universalist 
church erected in the District of Elaine. In 1805, the Universalist 
Society of Paris and Norway was incorporated by act of the Legis- 
lature of ^Massachusetts. 

I now proceed to give some account of the Congregational church 
and society in Xorway, as that was the next in order of organiza- 
tion, except what w^as done to fulfil the requirements of the law, 
before any society was formed. 

It seems, by the best authority within my reach, that Air. Gould, 
some years afterwards settled in Bethel, was the first minister that 
was hired to preach in the town ; and it being summer-time, he 
preached in Jeremiah Hobbs' barn — length of time unknown. A 
minister by the name of Chapman, who probably resided in Bethel, 
Used sometimes to pass througii the town and preached a few 
times; and occasionally a missionary made a visit, and ministered 
to the people. Mr. Nathan ^Merrill, of Gray, a Baptist preacher, 
sometimes visited the settlement, even before its incorporation, and 
generally preached when he cam.e here: he likewise solemnized 
several of the first marriages in the place. 

In 1832 and '33, William A. Evans made a short stand in Nor- 
way, as an attorney, and did some business for the time he was 
here, but finding the feed rather short, sought a better field. Moses 
B. Bartlett, an attorney from Bethel, and William W. Virgin, an 
attorney from Rumford, came into Norway village three years or 
more ago ; they are doing a decent business, and bid vtry fair to 
become useful and eminent gentlemen of the legal profession. I 
do not feel disposed to eulogize living characters too strongly, lest 
it might excite feelings of vanity in the subjects, and of envy- in 
the minds of others: Imt I wdll add one word in regard to Mr. 
Virgin, who has ccnmienced one very important suit since coming 



NORWAY NOTES 83 



here, and it has had a happy termination in his marriage with a 
daughter of H. G. Cole. Esq. Mr. Bartlett married a lady from 
Brunswick before coming to Norway. 

A minister by the name of Stoddard, about 1801 or 1802, 
preached for a considerable time, and the people were so well satis- 
fied, that tliey came to the conclusion to settle him: but some 
things derogatory' to his character as a preacher coming to light, 
they finally dismissed him from any further duty — as thev believed 
him to be a wolf in sheep's clothing, who might devour some of 
the lambs. Mr. Stoddard was probably witty, if not good; and 
thinking (rightly too) tliat Capt. Jonathan Cummings exerted con- 
siderable influence adverse to his settlement in the town as a 
minister of the gospel, on preaching what he termed his farewell 
sermon, he paid rather a sarcastic compliment to Cummings. He 
pretended to have had a remarkable dream, and obtained the latest 
news from the infernal regions. Beelzebub, the Prince of Devils, 
had hastily summoned a grand council of his co-workers in evil, 
to consult on the furtherance of his nefarious designs. He stated 
to his compeers that he had received intelligence that the town of 
Norway, on this earthly ball, was about to settle a minister of the 
gospel, and that tjhere must be some plan contrived to prevent such 
terrible obstacle to his own rule and reign in poor Norway. After 
much elaborate discussion, his Satanic Majesty ordered his best 
and fleetest horse to be brought up, while he was making hasty 
preparations for his journey. In the meantime, some one of his 
sage counselors inquired of him if t-':ere w^as net some person in 
Norway who could be furnished with an agenc}' to do the business 
for him, and save the journey. He began to deliberate en tl:e sub- 
ject, and suddenly exclaimed, " O yes ! there is Jonathan Cum- 
mings : I had at first forgotten that he was there; he can f'o the 
business just as well as I can. so you may put up my horse again." 
And it seems he was not mistaken in his agent, for he has done the 
business just as well as his master could, had he come on purpose. 

In old times, in this town, it was a custom at the raising of build- 
ings, when the frame was completely up. to have what was called. 
a name for the frame, which was always either a poetic couplet. 
or several verses, according to the taste or inclination of the per-on 
giving the name. The ceremony of naming a frame was as fol- 



84 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAIXE HISTORY 

lows: The hands on the frame paraded either on the ridge-pole. 
or front plate, and the two persons who were to be the speakers 
Vyrere stationed, one at each end; a bottle of good liquor was sent 
up by the owner, and after it had passed from one end of the frame 
to the other, one of the speakers sung out, " Here's a fine frame, 
that deserves a good name, and what sliall we call it ? " The other 
speaker then gave the name, and when through, the first cried out, 
" Will that do? " Those on the ground answered, '' O yes ! " The 
hands on the frame then gave three cheers, which were responded 
to by three more from those on the ground : then one closing cheer 
from the frame, and the bottle of liquor was thrown from the 
frame by the person who gave the name. The circumstance of 
raising a house for a favorite miaister called forth a poetic effusion 
for a name from one of the boys. 

In the fall of 1S12, Capt. Bailey Ekxiwell undertook to raise a 
company of volunteers to serve one year in the war; and later in 
the season obtained a full company from this and neighboring 
towns. After completing the compliment of men, they chose 
Bailey Bodwell for their Captain, William Twombly. Lieutenant, 
and William Reed, Jr.. and Gustavus A. Goss, of Paris, second and 
third Lieutenants ; they finally marched to Burlington early in the 
winter. Bodwell. on account of some improper conduct, left the 
army and returned heme, some time in the summer of 1813; but 
the company generally served out their year, and then mostly 
returned home. Seth Pike, a son of Dudley Pike, died in the cam- 
paign, as also did Jacob Tubbs, Jr., a son of Jacob Tubbs. Joseph 
Dale came home sick, and never recovered ; he died in a few 
months, leaving a family of nine children to the care of his widow, 
with httle or nothing for their support. 

It appears by t'^e record that Lieut William Twombly obtained 
his discharge in the summer of 1813; and on the nth of Septem- 
ber, William Parsons, Jr., was promoted to Lieutenant, and Cad F. 
Jones was elected Ensign. The company then had 70 privates, 
exclusive of commissioned officers and Sergeants; and the south 
company numbered nearly as many more, altogether making suite 
a formidable military force. 

Sometime in the summer of 18 1 6. Capt. Amos Town was pro- 
moted to the rank of Major, and subsec[uently to Colonel of the 
regiment ; and as a natural consequence, by regimental order, the 



NORWAY NOTES 85 



company met and elected Lieut. William Parsons, Jr., for Captain, 
Ensign Cad F. Jones, for Lieutenant, and John Whitmarsh, Ensign. 

On the loth of Oct., 181 5, a Court Martial convened at Paris, 
for the trial of Capt. Bailey Bodwell, on several charges exhibited 
against him by Enoch Knight, and fourteen others. After hearing 
all the testimony and arguments, pro and con, the Court decided 
that Capt, Bailey Bodwell be removed from office, and disqualified 
for holding any military office under the Commonwealth for one 
year. 

At the May inspection, in 181 8, the company, t'hen commanded 
by Henry Rust, Jr., " after inspection, the reading of the law. and 
partaking of some refreshment, was marched to the ground selected 
for the purpose, and attended to target-firing. The judges 
appointed for that purpose, awarded the first prize, $5, to ^Ir. 
E. F. Beal for the best shot ; the second, $3 to ^Ir. Steplien Green- 
leaf ; and the third, $2, to Mr. MalaJchi Bartlett." 

Perhaps some of the great gims among the modern peace socie- 
ties, and other modern reformers, may turn up their noses and sneer 
at such historical matters as this ; but they ought to remember that 
our forefathers, and even many who are now upon the stage, have 
seen the times when a good military^ force, well equipped, with 
twenty-four ball cartridges in their boxes, was a much more solid 
argument against an invading foe, and made a far deeper inpres- 
sion, especially if used, than all their paper manifestoes. 



The city of Auburn, ]\Iaine, on Sept. 12, 1919, held its semi- 
centennial celebration. The historical address was delivered by 
the Honorable George C. Wing who is one of the men of Maine 
who takes a deep interest in its history. 

Step by step, from earliest beginnings, he traced Auburn's growth 
— in industry, in conTinerce, in education ; and it was a narrative 
that must have brought a little thrill of civic pride to those who 
heard, for it showerl, in Judge Wing's clear and illuminating style, 
how this fair community by the Androscoggin has won an honored 
place among New England cities. 

One does not exaggerate in saying that this history by Judge 
Wing will become an historic document — a striking contribution to 
Maine's literature and knowledge. 



^: 



86 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF ^^AIXE HISTORY 



N0R:MAX H. FAY. 
By tht Editor. 

Do yow believe in visions and the visionary f This is a true 
recital of a young jnan's vision in Maine years ago and zchat came 
of it. The zi^riter broke into the zvorld as a very verdant \ou)i^ 
attorney at laic, at a pretty spot on the River Piscataquis that zms 
locally knozcn as ''Abbot lozcer village/' but apparent to the zcorld 
at large through the U. S. postoffice department as Abbot Village, 
Maine. At about the same time a young man from MassacJiusetts 
was residing there temporarily zcith Mr. and Mrs. George IVcst, 
parents of the young lady zcho had then recently become hus' zcife. 
The Wests lived on a small farm on the cross road leading from 
the " zcest road" up by the farm of a good old friend — long since 
passed to the beyond — *' Taff " Race. The Wests zcere a family of 
intelligence, culture and respectability, thrifty but not zcealth\ as I 
noic recall the facts. This young num and myself zcere of about 
the same age. He zvas a reader and lover of books and z<.'e soon 
became congenial spirits in many zvays and spent pleasant hours 
together discussing Napoleon and other great zcorld characters. I 
recall that he zcas considerable of a student of Napoleon and much 
more familiar zcith the literature of the subject than L Regarding 
the current politics of our country zee zcere also in full accord. 
Rather ill health zcas, as it nozc occurs to me, the principal reason 
for his remaining there unoccupied for so long a period. He told 
me of his trade zAiich zcas that of a machinist and confided to me 
some of his hopes for the future. His aim zcas to begin a small 
business in his line somezchere in Maine. He felt that it zvas a 
much better place for one zi'ith little capital, depending largely upon 
his ozvn labor zcith zuhich to make a start than zcas his ozcn state. 
He had a high opinion of Maine end liked the state and its people;' 
thus having an exalted appreciation of the zvhole state as zi'elT as 
of one of its fair daughters. Soon I learned of his locating at 
Dexter, occasionally met him and as the years passed zcatched his 
progress in the industrial zcorld zvith keen interest. 

On June i^, IQIQ, I attended his funeral. It seemed as though 
all the inhabitants of Dexter had turned out to do honor to his- 
memory. The large Universalist Church building zcas filled to its 
utmost capacity. Three hundred and sixty or more of his em- 
ployees, the Masonic fraternity of the tozcn, the governor of thd, 
state, the speaker of the Maine House of Representatives, the presi- 



NORxMAX PL FAY 



dent of the Mai)ic Senate, E.v-Coiigressnia.; Frank E. Guernsey, and 
many other eminent men and state officials, including the surviving 
members of the executive council of i^hich body he zcas a member 
zchen stricken by death, z^erc /-resent to fay man's last homage to 
Jiis fellozc ma)}. All in ihct long processioji of his workmen zcho 
follozced Jiis remains to their last resting place zcere sincere 
mourners, some of z^'hom had been zcith him from the first. 
Among such zcere the tzco " Fassett boys " — knozcn in the days 
gone by zchen all zcere young as " Cal" and '' Addie" — z^-ho zvent 
zcith him from Abbot Village to Dexter as helpers zchen he made 
his humble beginning as a leading iron vjorker of Maine. Many 
years had dozen azcay since I had last seen them — seen them as 
merry, laughing lads. I knezv them instantly despite the finger 
marks tlmt the touch of time had left upon them and they reminded 
me of the old days. Looking into their saddened eyes, I saio the- 
Norman Fay of forty and more years ago. He zcas a likeable fel- 
lozi% even the cynics liked him, yet bespoke ill luck for him. They 
said he had only a vision and they zi'ere nearly right. But his vision 
Zi'as not of finding riches in city streets, not of zcealth from mines 
of gold or silver or copper glittering in the shade of far zcestenu 
mountains, not of spouting oil fields, not of stocks commoii or pre- 
ferred. It zcas only a }lassochusetts boy's zision of the field of 
opportunity for boys in Maine. He follozced the beckonings of 
that vision. Its trail led to zvonderful success, and the story of his 
foUozving it is a romance in the annals of industrial actiznties in 
Maine. It is a bit of Maine ''History of Our Ozcn Times" tliat I 
knozL' of and myself observed. 

No history ancient or modern has been or ever can be of value, 
except as it is used as guide posts in directing humans dozen the 
avenues of time. Boys of today may be guided to success aivdi 
prosperity b\ heeding this story of Norman Fay of Dexter, Maine: 
for the field for opportunity for the boys in Maine is broader! 
richer and better nozj thin i* zea^ zehen he firs': be'iAd his vision\ 
of it zvhile resting in that quiet little Piscataquis village, near a half 
century ago. 

Selections from Maine Xewspapers: 

Norman H. Fay of Dexter died suddenly at his home on Free street early 
Friday forenoon, June I7. 1919. after but ten minutes acute illness. 

Mr. Fay was born in Upton, Mass , March 9, 1852. He attended school, 
including the high school in his native town and later went to Friends" 



88 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTG^RY 



boarding school in Providence. R. I. He attended Wilbraham Academy, 
Wibraham, Mass.. for some time and at 17 started to learn the business 
in the boot and shoe factory of his father, \V. B. Fay. 

Several years later he went to Hopedale to learn the machinist's trade 
in the Hopedale Works. He then went back and became associated with 
his father who was in business in Worcester. In 1872 Mr. Fay married 
y.i s Ada E. West of Garland and four years later as he was in poor 
health they moved onto a farm in Abbotit, remaining there three years. 

In the spring of 1879. Mr. Fay came to Dexter for the N. Dustin Co. and 
in 1881 he went into partnership with Walter Scott. They started the busi- 
ness in a room 27 by 70 leased of the Dusitin Company. In 1884 the lease 
exptired and the site of the present Fay & Scott plant was purchased. In 
August of that year they moved into the new buildings the shops being 
40 by 80 and the foundry 30 by 100. And from that beginning has been 
built up the grealt business of manufacturing machinery which is sold in 
every part of the world. In 1897 Walter Scott sold his share of the busi- 
ness to Mr. Fay. In igxx) the business was incorporated with Mr. Fay as 
president and up to the time of his death he was active in the administra- 
tion of its affairs. 

* * * The name of Norman H. Fay has long been linked in the minds of 
'^e'.'^Ie, his town and his section with every good movement, with every ideal 
of high citizenship, with generosity, uprightness and fine character. Though 
a man of quiet disposition, reserved, dignified, he was yet a man who won 
lasting friendships, one whose mind and heart seemed ever ready to accept 
real friendship and to give it in refturn. 

* * * Able, energetic, a business man deeply- engrossed in the success 
of his work, Mr. Fay always found time to give his comimunit\'. He served 
in the legislature from 1891 to 1892 and again from 1915 to 1916. In 1917 
he was elected to the governor's council, served in 191 7 and 191 8 and was 
re-elected for the term of 1919-20. He was associated with the Dexter 
Trust and Banking Company and with the Dexter Loan and Building Asso- 
ciation, being president of both associations. Last year Mr. Fay. finding 
tha;t the youth of Dexter had not the proper facilities for obtaining an 
education, he made the cause his own and Dexter became the owner of a 
fine high school building, through the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. Fay. At 
th time of his death he was chairman of the board of selectmen of Dexter. 

Mr. Fay is survived by his wife -ind by a daughter, Mrs. Peter Plouff, 
and one son. Winthrop L. Fay, both of Dexter. 

Mr. Fay as a fraternal society man, had a very wnde acquaintance, being 
not only a 32d degree Mason, but a Shriner, an Odd Fellow and known in 
both orders over a large territor\-. He was one of the most prominent 
members of the Dexter club, and as organizer and during its life one of 
the most active members of the Elkinstown club, one of the principal fac- 
tors in the development of the summer life on Lake Wassookeag. on the 
shore of which he has maintained a commodious cottage for many years. 
Mr. Fay attended and was ever a strong supporter of the Universahst 
church. 



m. 



■m 



STEPHEN ORMAN BROW N 89 



STEPHEN ORMAN BROWN. 

i84i-(9i9. 

By the Editor. 

Stephen Fearscn Brown preceeded the ^Tayos of Foxcroft, as 
one of the founders of the woolen industry in eastern Maine, by 
about seventeen years, the Mayos coming in 1846, and nine years 
later than the Abbotts, who settled in Dexter in 1820. 

^Ir. Brown established himself at Dover, then a part of Penob- 
scot County, in the year 1829. He was the son of Stephen Brown 
of Weare, New Hampshire, and, as Stephen Orman Browii states 
in notes written by him in his lifetime, he came from a family of 
'' clothiers," and adds that : 

" Qothier " meant in those days a cjoth manufacturer, or a man engaged 
in the custom cloth dressing and manufacturing business in a small way. 

In these notes he further says : 

I knew but little of my father's father except that his name was Stephen 
Brown and that he came from Weare, N. H. He married my grandmother, 
Mary Pearson, who also came of a family of clothiers in Byfield, Mass., 
on August 2S, 1803. They moved immediately to Bucksport, Maine, then 
known as " Buckstown," where he went into trade. He branched out into 
the West India trade and failed. I do not know the exact date of his fail- 
ure, but it was near the time of the breaking out of the war of 1812, which 
may have had something to do with it. 

After the breaking up at Bucksport. my grandmother went back to Byfield. 
while her husband went a privateering, and, not long after, died of ship 
fever in Boston. 

Their children, both born in Bucksport. were Cellissa, b Aug. 13, 1804, d. 
March 27, 1831, at Vassalboro; Stephen Pearson, b. Nov. 12, 1807, d. July 
22, 1867, at Dover. 

My mother was born Xancy Perkins Foss, at Meredith, N. H., Jan. 11. 
181 1. She married Stephen Pearson Brown, March 30, 1833, at Dover. 
Maine. She died Nov. 16. 1882. of heart failure, suddenly and painlessly, in 
apparent good health, at Bangor, on her way home from a visit in Boston. 

Her father was James Foss of Meredith, N. H., and her mother was born 
Susan Sinclair. 

Stq>hen Pearson, the father of Stephen Orman Brown, lived 
with his widowed mother in Byheld durin.;^ his boyhood davs and 
attende:] the famous old Dummer Academy. He learned the 
woolen business early in life, bei^inning when only a boy to work 
in the mills at Amesbury, ?yla:^s. 

While there he became ac(juair;ted with Charles Vaughan of 
Hallnwell. Maine, one of the early proprietors of the town of 



90 SPRAGUE'S JOURXAL OF MAIXE HISTORY 



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STEPHEX ORMAX BROWX 



STEPHEN ORMAX BROWN 91 



Dover, and interested in the development of the new town. It was 
this event in his Hfc that led him to settle there. 

His enterprise began in a small way. Little's Genealogical and 
Family History of Maine, (p. 1999) saying that 

* * * in 1837 the firm was manufacturing goods and trucking them to 
Bangor by ox team, whence they were shipped b}- water to Boston and 
Philadelphia. 

Stephen Orman Brown was born in Dover, Elaine, Nov. 21, 1841, 
and was educated in the schools of his native town, at Foxcroft 
Academy and at a commercial school in Boston. \\'hen a boy he 
went into the woolen mill, learned the trade of making cloth in all 
its details and became a successful woolen manufacturer for a life- 
time. 

He was a man of superior intellectual capacity, a lover of books 
and a student of the world's choicest literature. Had his ambition 
been ether than to be a good and useful citizen of his state and his 
community, he might have attained eminence as an author for he 
was endowed with ability for it. 

He was urged by friends at home and abroad to engage in poli- 
tics. Some of his most intimate associates in Maine were active in 
this work. Such men as Blaine, Hale, Thomas B. Reed, ^vlanley 
and Boutelle, beckoned him to tlie arena. His qualifications for 
such a career were ample and fully recognized by political leaders. 
He did yield to such solicitations to the extent of serving as the 
county member of the Republican state committee for a few years 
and as a member of the Elaine senate for two sessions. His per- 
formance of these duties was highly satisfactory to both his con- 
stituency and the party organization. 

Always actuated by a high sense of duty to what he conceived to 
be right, ever fearless in advocating a just cause, his integrity never 
doubted and his popularity with ?11 classes unassailable, it seemed 
regrettable that he should have no desire for political preferment 
or taste for political strife. Undoubtedly his conclusion in this 
regard was a real loss to his party. 

A high type of the noblest State of Elaine manhood, he, in a 
manner, held a unique place in his community. While he possessed 
some of the finest ([ualities of one who may be best described by 
that oft misused exx)ression, an aristocrat, he abhorred anything 
like caste or class and was one of the most democratic of men. 

He w^as a good citizen in the full meaning of that much used 
term, a loyal friend in any exigency and a true and upright man. 



92 . SPRAGL'E'S JOURNAL OF MAIXE HISTORY 



Mr. Liston P. Evans, editor of the Piscataquis Observer, and 
a life long friend of Mr. Brown, recently published in that paper. 
from his own pen, a fine appreciation of him — afterwards reprinted 
for private distribution — in which he said : 

* * * Mr. Brown was a great reader and lover of art His library- 
and pidtures were ahvays a joy to him and his reading- and travels abroad 
had given him a wide knowledge. He was an illustration of what a man 
without the advantages of a college education can become with reading and 
study. 

Some people may have thought that because he had confined himself so 
closely to his office or home. Mr. Brown was not interested in people out- 
side of his immedialte circle, but that was not so ; anything connected with 
his home friends, his " old townies," as he called them, never failed to 
awake in him the greatest interest. The night before the short attack 
which ended two days later in his death, he had his bed, as was his custom, 
moved to the window that he might watch the mill operatives going home 
from work, speaking of those whom he knew as they passed. 

His interest in the people whom he employed is shown by the fact that 
during the business depression of 1893, when so many of the woolen mills 
were closed, he operated his mill at a great financial loss that he might give 
the hands employment. He did not look upon them as servants, but as 
friends, and many of them had been in his employ for a long time. 

Mr. Brown never headed subscription papers, but his money was given 
freely to people to whom illness or irisfortune had come, but ahvays pri- 
vately. Neither did his name appear in connection with the board of trade 
or similar organizations, but b\- enlarging his mill and giving employment 
to so many people, he did more for his town than any other citizen has done. 
The strongest interest in Mr. Brown's life was in connection with the 
mill, an interest which continued after he had ceased to be connected with 
it. He watched the construction of the new dam as if it had been his own 
property and as much as he enjoyed his camp at Sebec lake he was ven,' 
loth to leave the dam last summer to go to it. 

The changes and improvements at the mill during his connection with it 
were made under his personal supervision. He never complained if a job 
done as he had ordered was unsatisfactory but would have the necessary 
changes made. He had a very correct eye and noticed quickly anvthing 
about the mill that was wrong. A man who had done a great deal of work 
for him told me that on one occasion a piece of shafting was hung which 
because of its bad location was known to be a small fraction of an inch 
out of level. The instant Mr. Brown came into the room and looked at the 
job he called attention to the defect. He was ver}- methodical and in the 
mill ofRce ve scrre rote bocks in which he had made a record of every 
improvement in and about the mill during his long connection with it. 'giv- 
ing figures, dates, formulae and ether information which are invaluable. 

Mr. Brown had been a Republican all his life and while never active in 
politics he took a deep interest in the party and its activities. He was a 
mem.bcr of Mosaic lodi/e. F. & A. M.. of Piscataquis Royal Arch cha:)ter 
and of St. John's commundery. 



STEPHEN ORMAX BROWN 93 



He had been very lame from rheumatism for several years and for a 
time before his death was unable to leave the house. His children were 
all with him Ithe last week of his life and he enjoyed their presence very 
much. He did not know that they had come because of his illness but made 
plans for the summer and what he would do when he was out again. 

Mr. Brown is survived by his wife, who was Miss Mary P. Gurney of 
Foxcroft; a son, Stephen P. of New York City; two daughters, Mrs. J. 
Arnold Norcross of New Haven, COnn., and Mrs. Clarence F. Doore of 
Mellrose, Mass.; and a sister, Miss Susan A. Brown of Bangor. 

As the home could not accommodate the large number of friends and 
neighbors who wanted fto attend the funeral it was held in the Congrega- 
tional church, where Mr. Brown had worshipped, Wednesday afternoon, 
under the direction of L. C. Sawyer, who was associated with him in the 
management of the mill and who succeeded him as agent. The large attend- 
ance indicated the esteem in which Mr. Brown was held by the community. 
The service consisted of organ selections by Mrs. Annie B. Clarke, Scrip- 
ture reading by the pastor. Rev. Joha H. Wilkins, and brief remarks and 
a prayer by Rev. George A. Merrill of Taunton, Mass., a former pastor of 
the church and a close friend of Mr. Brown's. Beautiful flowers had been 
sent by the relatives and friends. 

The business places were very generally closed from 2 to 3 o'clock out of 
respect for Mr. Brown. 

The burial was in the family lot in Foxcroft cemetery. The bearers, 
were L. C. Sawyer. W. C. Woodbury, Francis C. Peaks, V. L. Warren, 
J. H. Taylor and A. T. Spaulding. 



Christopher Leavett was the first European who discovered, 
appreciated and wrote about Casco Bay and what is now Portland 
and its harbor. 

He landed at the Isles of Shoals from England in 1623. He 
visited Piscataqua and then sailed with two boats and several men 
to Cape Elizabeth, Casco Bay and on to Boothbay. King James 
had given him six thousand acres of land to be located where he 
might choose east of the Piscataqua. He v/as exploring for a site 
for a city. His first view of the spot where is now the city of Port- 
land convinced him that it was the place he was seeking. In this 
he certainly exhibited sense and good judgment. 

He built a house there, lived in it about a year and then returned 
to England, expecting to bring back a colony to settle at Casco. 
For some reason he never returned. 

He published a narrative of his journey and a description of the 
country entitled, " A voyage into New England, be^^im in 1623 and 
ended in 1624, performed by Christopher Levett, his majesty's 
Woodward of Somertshire. and one of the Council of New Eng- 
land. London, 162S." 



^i-Xi';>'--';?-^ 



94 SPRAGUK'S JOURXAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Documentary 

Ancient Document Relating to the Old Howe Tavern. 
(Contributed by Elizabeth K. Folsom.) 

Exeter, N. H., July ^th, 191^. 

Dear Editor: — In the East Cambridge Court House, recently, I 
was shozi'n the original of the enclosed document, and told that it 
had not, as far as knozcn been in print. 

This, as you zcill see, is the recognisance of Thomas Home of 
Marlborough, Mass., Innkeeper of the so-called Hoz^'e Tavern, 
since made famous by Longfcllozc in his poem Tales of a Wayside 
Inn, 

ELIZABETH K. FOLSOM, 

* * * below ^ 

The scroll reads. - P»y the nume of Howe," 
And over this, no longer bright. 
Though glimmering with a latent light, 
Was hung the sword his graudsire bore. 
In the rebellious days of yore. 

Down there in the Concord tight. - 

(Prelude to Tales of a Wayside Inn.) 

Mddx Memoranda: That on 3-e. Nincth Day of May in ye. year of our 
Lord sixteen hundred & ninety & In ye. second year of ye. Reign of our 
Soveraign Lord & Lady \Vm. & Mar^- by ye. Grace of God of England 
Scotland France and Ireland King and Queen Defenders of ye. Faith 
&c Before ye. County Court at Charlestowne, By adjoummit, from Cam- 
bridge i6th. Aprill last past, Thomas How of Malburrow in ye. County 
beforesaid became bound in ye. Summ of Twenty pounds Current Money 
of New England for wch. he doth acknowledge himself to ow, & stand 
justly indebited to our Soveraign Lord & Lady King Wm. & Queen Mary. 
theire heirs & successors to be Levied on his goods & Chatteles Lands 
& Tenements — The Condition of This Recognizance is such yt. whereas 
ye. said Thomas How above bound is admitted and allowed b}^ ye. said 
County Court to keep a Common Publick house of Entertainment, and 
to use Common selling of wine, Beer Ale Syder Brandy Rum & other 
Liquers for ye. year Ensueing in ye. now Dwelling house of said Thomas 
How If therefore ye. said Tho How During the time aforesaid, shall 
not Pmitt Suffer or have any playing at Cards Dice Tables Bowls Xine- 
pirns Billiards, or any other unlawfull game or games in his said house 
or yard garden or Backside, nor shall Suffer to be or remain in his house 
any Pson or Psons. not being of his own familie on Satturday nights 
after it is dark, or on ye. Sabbath daies or in ye. time of Gods Publick 
Worship therein nor shall entertaine as Lodgers in his house any stran- 
gers, men or women above ye. space of forty eight hours, but such whose 
names and Sirnames he shall deliver to some one of ye. Selectmen or 
Constables of ye. Town, unless they be such as he verry well knoweth,. 



DOCUMEXTARY 95 



and will answer for his or their forth Comeing. Nor shall sell any Wine 
or Liquors in any wise to any Indians or Negroes, nor suffer any Chil- 
dren or servants or any other Pson to remain in his house Tipling or 
Drinking after nine of ye. Clock in 3-e. night time, nor shall buy or Take 
to Pawn an}- stollen goods, nor \\-iIlingly or knowingly harbour in his 
house, Barn stable, or other where any Rogues vagabonds Theives Sturdy 
Beggers masterless men or women, or other Notorious offenders what- 
soever, nor shall Suffer any Pson or Psons whatsoever to sell or utter 
any wine Beer Ale Syder Rum Brandy or other Liquors, By Deputation,. 
or by Coilour of his Licence, Nor shall entertaine any Pson or Psons of 
whom he shall be prohibited by Law, or any one of ye. Magistrates of ye. 
said County as Psons of an Idle Conversation and given to Tipling. 
And shall also keep ye. True Assize & Measure in his Bread & Poitts & 
otherwise in uttering of any wine Beer Ale Syder Rum Brandy or other 
Liquors, and ye. Same sell by Sealed Measure, and in his said house shall 
use and maintain good order and Rule, and is and shall be well provided, 
with sufficient houseing and Two Beds at ye. least for entertainment of 
strangers & Travadlers. And shall attend ye. Laws and orders of Courts 
referring to that Implo\Tnent. Then this sent Recognizance to be void 
or else to stand and be in full power force and virtue. 

In wittness whereof he hath hereunto sett his hand and seals this Day 
& year above written — 

Signed Sealed & Del. • 

In psence of • 

Thomas How (Seal) 

Samll : Phipps " . 

Katharin Phipps 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Middlesex ss. Registry of Probate 

A true copy of a paper on file termed. Recognizance of Thomas How. 

Case no. 12121 — ist Series. 

Thomas How of Marlborough. 
Attest, F. M. Esty Register \ 



RESOLVES PASSED BY THE MASSACHUSETTS LEGISLATURE 
1818-20, RELATING TO MAINE. 

Resolve on the petition of William R. Lowney, in behalf of the town of 
Sebec, in the County of Penobscot. 

June 8th, 1819. 
RESOLVED, For reasons set forth in said petition, that the Secretary 
of the Commonwealth be. and he is hereby authorized and directed to 
deliver to the inhabitants of said Sebec. one bound volume of the Colony 
and Province Laws; the ninth volume of Massachusetts Term Reports; 
the three first volumes of the Statutes of the Commonwealth, and the Laws 



m 



N, 



96 SPRAGUE'S JOL-RNAI. OF MAIXE HISTORY 



i 



r 



and Resolves of the General G^urt, passed in the years one thousand eight 
hundred and thirteen and fourteen, in lieu of those destroyed by the British, 
when at Bangor. 



Resolve on the petition of John Neal and others. 
January 26th, 1820. 

On the petition of John Neal, John Dennis, Jesse Pike, Daniel Ring, 
Junior, Joshua W. Watson, and David C Burr, all of Litchfield, in the 
County of Lincoln, representing that they have been united in matrimony 
with their present wives, viz. : John Xeal with Polly Hutchinson, John 
Dennis with Betsey Walker, Jesse Pike with SaWy True, (since deceased,) 
Daniel Ring, Junior, with Betsey Dennis. Joshua W. Watson with Judith 
Tibbetts, and David C. Burr with Catherine Fuller, having a lawful right 
so to do, and their intentions accordingly having been legally published, 
by the Town Clerk, of said Town of Litchfield, and that they have severally 
been married by Ministers of the Baptist or Methodist order, who were 
regularly ordained, according to the rules of said Societies, as Ministers at 
large; and that doubts have been expressed, respecting the vailidity of the 
said marriages : 

RESOLVED, That the several marriages aforesaid, of the said John 
Neal, John Dennis, Jesse Pike, Daniel Ring, Junior, Joshua W. Watson, and 
David C. Burr, solemnized in manner aforesaid, be, and the same are 
hereby declared to be legal, and valid, to all intents and purposes of mar- 
riages: and the children of the said marriages are hereby declared to be 
legitimate, as if the said marriages had been solemnized by a person legally 
empowered for such purpose. 



Resolve on the petition of the Trustees of Williams College. 

January 27th, 1820. 

RESOLVED. That the Commissioners of the Land Office be, and they 
hereby are authorized and emix)wered, to satisfy a grant of a township of 
land, of the contents of six miles square, made by a resolve of the nine- 
teenth of February, one thousand eight hundred and five, to the President 
and Trustees of Williams College, by locating the same, and conveying to 
said Corporation, Township number three, second range, north of Bing- 
ham's Penobscot purchase, the same being number four, as surveyed by 
Alexander Greenwood: PROVIDED, said grantees, or their assigns, shall 
first pay to said Coinmissioners, the expense of surveying and locating said 
township, and give security to the Commonwealth, in a manner satisfactory 
to said Commissioners, that they will, within one year from the passing of 
this resolve, cut out a road two rods wide, from the termination of the 
road, commonly called the St. John's road, (which has been opened unde- 



K 



DOCUMENTARY c^ 



the direction of said Commissioners, from Penobscot River into township 
number two, tlie first range, to said township, to be conveyed, and clear a 
travelled path therein, of one rod in width; and that within two years, 
they will clear a like road through said township, so to be conveyed, and 
make the necessary causev^^ays and bridges thereon, all in a manner to be 
directed by said Commissioners ; and within three years, will place on said 
township thirty families, as settlers, of the description named in the act. 
for promoting the sale and settlement of the public lands, in the District 
of Maine ; and also, reserving in said township the usual public lots. 



Resolve for Conveying Land to Joseph Treat, on conditions. 
Februar\- 7th, 1820. 
RESOLVED, That the Commissioners of the Land Office be, and they 
hereby are empowered and directed to convey to Joseph Treat, of Bangor, 
in the County of Penobscot, five thousand acres of land, now owned by 
this Commonwealth, on the easterly side of Penobscot River, bounded as 
follows, viz. : beginning in the north or head line of the nine townships, 
formerly purchased of the Indians, where the same strikes the easterly bank 
of Penobscot River; thence extending east on said line, to the westerly 
bank of Cold Stream Pond ; thence northerly by said Pond, until a line 
drawn west, or parallel with the aforesaid line, to Penobsct River ; and then 
down on the easterly side of said river, to the place of beginning, shall con- 
tain five thousand acres ; the same to be laid out under the direction of 
the Commissioners of the Land Office, at the expense of said Treat: PRO- 
VIDED, HOWEVER, that this conveyance be made to said Joseph, on the 
soile condition, that the said Treat shall, for himself, and for. and in behalf 
of Richard Winslow, release and surrender to said Commissioners, all the 
right, title, claim and interest, which they the said Treat and Winslow have, 
or may have, by virtue of any lease or leases from the Penobscot Tribe of 
Indians, to any lands, or timber, or meadow grounds, belonging to the 
Commonwealth: AND, PROVIDED FURTHER, that said Treat execute 
a bond to the Commonwealth, with sufficient sureties, conditioned that, 
within two years from the passing of this resolve, he will failthfully erect 
and put in operation, a good and sufficient saw mill and grist mill, on Cold 
Stream, so called; AND PROVIDED. ALSO, that the reciprocal inter- 
chan'ie of deeds and writings herein mentioned, of the said Treat and said 
Commissioners, be made before the close of the present session of the 
General Court, and not afterwards. 



Resolve on the petition of John Merrill. 

February 22d, 1820. 

RESOLVED, That the Court of Sessions, for the County of Cumberland 

be, and they hereby are authorized 10 adjust the account of John Merrill, 

for services and medicines rendered to prisoners confined in the gaol of 

said county, on criminal prosecutions, in behalf of the Commonwealth. 



98 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



during the years one thousand eight hundred and seventeen, one thousand 
eight hundred and eighteen, and one thousand eight hundred and nineteen, 
and alllow him such sum as may be just and reasonable, to be paid out of 
the treasury of said county. 



Extracts of a Letter from Capt. Samuel Goodwin. 
Frankfort on Kennebeck River May 15, 1754. 

I would further Inform your Excellenc}- that the Indians have not been 
in to hear your first Letter altho desired by Cap. Lithgow sundry times & 
some of their Chiefs he informed Viz Passaguant &c; in my passage to 
Tecounet I met one Indian Canoo with two men & one Woman in it. who 
informed -me, that all the Indians were come from' hunting & were at Nerig- 
wock; I informed them that your Excellency had sent another Letter to the 
Indians to inform that your Excellency was coming down to see them & 
had set the time. & desired them that they would inform all the Rest; but 
they told me that the Indians were at Nerigwock & that I would not go 
there, 'but I told them that your Excellency ordered me up as high as 
Tecounet to see if I could see them &c. Capt John North Informed me 
that he was at Georges about fourteen Days ago, & that Cap Jabez Brad- 
bury told him, that the Indians had told him that the French were building 
a Fort on the Back of Mount Disert Hills which I suppose he has informed 
your Excellency of. 

The Stragling Indians that have been into Richmond Fort last week have 
informed the German Settlers at Frank Fort that the Canada Indians would 
certainly fall on English in two Sabbath days more, & that all the old 
People were to be Killed & the young carried to Cannada, & told them to 
take care of themselves, & they are now all in Garrison, & what to do they 
know not, but intreat your Excellency's favor & protection. 

I am further inform'd by John Howard at Richmond Fort that the 
Indians that were last in, told him, that the Arresigunticook Indians were 
gone to fall on the English at Saco River, or thereabouts. 

And the Indians have killed a hog at frank Fort, for one John Tufts; & 
one Abram Wyman went to Challenge them with it, & one of them dis- 
charged a Gun at him & would have kill'd him but one of them struck the 
Gun aside, & bid him quick walk, or else he would be killed ; this was about 
3 Weeks ago there is none of the Indians that comes in to trade only now 
& then one or two, who are look'd on only as Spies, so that they may have 
the better Advantage of the English: Cap. North gives his Duty to your 
Excellency & is always ready to obey your Commands : all which is humbly 
Submitted. & beg Leave to Subscribe myself Your Excellency's most dutiful, 
most obedient & very humble Servent. 

SAMUEL GOODWIN. 



According to the Reverend Samuel Souther in his address at 
centennial celebration of Fryeburg, Maine. April 6th, 1863. a news- 
paper was published and j)rinterl in Fryeburg as early as 1798-9, 
called " Russell's Ec>o or The North Star." 



DANIEL WEBSTER LETTER 99 



LETTER OF DAXIEL WEBSTER TO THE SECRETARY 

OF THE XAVY UNDER PRESIDENT TAYLOR, 

RELATING TO A }.IAINE MAN. 

(Contributed by Raymond Fellows of Bangor.) 

In a note to the editor Mr. fellozi's says: " The enclosed was 
secured by a Portland soldier, icho in company with a squad of 
other Union men visited the home of the Prestons in Sniithfield^ 
Virginia, during the Ciznl War. 

I am not sure about Lally. but think his home 7i'as in Hallowcll. 
So far as knozcn this zi'as never before published. 

Washington April 5, 1849. 
To the Honble 

Wm. B. Preston ^ 

Sec. of the Navy; 
Sir, - 

I be J to recommend to your favorable consideration Col. F. T. Lally. of 
Maine, a civil Engineer of great merit and ability. 

Col Lally was at the head of the Corps of Civil Engineers of the Ameri- 
can Party in the late joint Commifsion for running and marking the line 
of Boundary under the Treaty of Washington. The Superintendence of 
that Commifsion belonged to the Department of State; & I had conse- 
quently full opportunity of becoming acquainted with the merits & talents 
of the Gentlemen composing it. Col LaKy was regarded, by both the Ameri- 
can &: British commifsioners. as equal, at least, to any officers of either 
Party. 

At the breaking out of the late War with Mexico. Col. Lally was appointed 
a Major, in the 9th Infantry. & for his gallant conduct in the field rec'd 
a Brevet promotion. There is little reason to doubt, that if his political 
sentiments had accorded with those of the late Administration he would 
have been Commifsioner for running the line between the United States & 
Mexico, under the late Treaty 

Col Lally is capable of rendering efficient Service, in any of the Navy 
Yards, or other Stations, in the construction of Docks, Embankments, or 
other works, requiring the Superintendence of an Engineer. Having great 
personal regard for Col Lally. & in the full consciousnefs that the Public 
would derive essential benefit from his employment in its service. I shall 
be quite gratified to hear that he has attained the object of his wishes. 
I have the honor to be, 
with great regard, 

Your Ob. Servant 

DANIEL WEBSTER. 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

PUBLISHED QUARTERLY 



Entered as second class matter at the posi ollice, Dover, Maiut. Dy John 
Francis Sprague, Editor and Pubhsher. 

Terms : For all numbers issued during the year, including an index and 
all special issues, $i.oo. Single copies of current volume, 25 cents; of pre- 
\-ious volumes, 50 cents. Bound volimies $2.00 each. 

Postage prepaid on all items, except bound volumes west of Mississippi 
River. 

Commencing with Vol. 3, the terms will be $1.00 only to subscribers who 
pay in advance, otherwise $1.50. 

This publication will be mailed to subscribers until ordered discontinued. 



OUR MESSAGE TO YOU 

FIRST TEACH THE BOY AND GIRL TO KNOW AND LOVE 
THEIR OWN TOWN, COUNTY AND STATE AND YOU HAVE 
GONE A LONG WAY TOWARD TEACHING THEM TO KNOW 
AND LOVE THEIR COUNTRY. 



ADVANXEMEXT IX MAIXE. 

It is with feelings of gratification that we cbserv^e a real advance- 
ment in public opinion relative to the importance of the study of 
state histor}- in our public schools. 

For the past ten years the writer has advocated this in the press. 
in occasional public addresses, and in the pages of the Journal. 

In volume one (pp. 194-195) the Journal said: 

The 'record of the struggles, the victories and the defeats of the toilers 
and the moilers of today will be either an- inspiration or a warning to those 
who will toil and moil tomorrow. It is inevitable that the storv- of the past 
may, if utilized, serve to light the pathway in making the story- of the 
present. 

If this is a fact regarding history generally, the histon.- of races, nations 
and peoples, it follows logically that it applies with comparative force to the 
historv- of a state, a county, a city or a hamlet, a country town, a remote 
plantation or a backwoods settlement. Then the study of your own local 
histor>- developes and cultivates an interest in the entire history of the evo- 
lution of the world's civilization. 

For trace back as you may the circumstances surrounding any of the first 
settlements in Colonial Maine and within your ken is the fascinating history 
of Europe, and her social, economic, political and religious development 
during the same period of time. 

We behold not only the human ferment of more than two hundred years 
participated in by Catho'-'c. Protestant — followers of Luthtr and Calvin, and 



ADVANCEMENT IN MAINE loi 



are not only in close touch with the intrigues and clash of the old world 
in those days, but we also see much of the lurid tragedy of the red man's 
race and its pathetic fading from off the face of the earth. 

The efforts and failures of his ancestors will create in the citizen not 
only a reverence for them and their achievements, but also a desire and a 
determination to improve upon their methods, to work upon more advanced 
and progressive lines, and to finish in a better fashion what they had begun. 
Such is the beginning of true statesmenship and the formation of the loftiest 
ideals. It helps to evolve righteous government, to lay the foundation for 
true progress, and to produce the highest type of Americanism and good 
citizenship. 

And ever since the above was printed the Journal has, as our 
readers are well aware, endeavored in its feeble way to emphasize 
the ideas therein expressed. Therefore we rejoice at signs of 
progress. 

The work which has been undertaken by the Maine Research 
Club, to publish during the preseni year a school reader written by 
Maine authors about the past history of Alaine for the use of 
Maine scholars in the schools of Maine, is strong evidence that .a 
change for the better along these lines is surely coming. And this 
is strengthened by the fact that, standing behind these patriotic 
Maine women in their laudable eiTort in this behalf is Dr. Augustus 
O. Thomas, the superintendent of schools for the State of Maine. 

In a recent reference to this matter the Lewiston Journal says: 

In discussing this plan and the Research club book now in process of 
printing. Dr. Thomas said, recently : " It is one of the regrettable things 
that there is no really adequate history of Maine in existence. Really," 
went on Dr. Thomas, '"' there is no good published history of the state." 

This plan which the State superintendent has in view is to have pupils 
in the various schools search out. by their own efforts, important historical 
information in their own neighborhoods. He proposes to have the teachers 
assign to these pupils things to look up and write about. This will be a 
part of their regular course of instruction and each child will be ranked 
according to the work accomplished, as in all other studies. 

By having the boys and girls find by their own research and diligent effort 
the story of an old fort, or ancient house where some important event in 
the history of Maine took place, and then write it in their own language, 
from their own viewpoint and according to their own understanding. Dr. 
Thomas feels that they will get a better understanding of the true history 
of the state than in any other way. When these stories have been prepared 
and passed upon, they will be arranged and published in book form for 
school use. 

" It will be a step inspired by and additional to the work which the Maine 
Writer's Research club has undertaken, and as such will be of great value 
to the instructional work of Maine," said Dr. Thomas. 



I02 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Parenthetically we can state that we have confidence that the 
forthcoming volumes of Dr. Hatch's work, now being pubHshed by 
the Lewis Historical Publi^hing Co. of New York, which will be 
a complete history of our state from statehood to the present time, 
will be satisfactory to all who have long felt the need of what Dr. 
Thomas alludes to. 

Apropos hereto we quote from Honorable James Phinney Baxter, 
Maine's eminent historian (Address on Samuel Moody, Portland's 
first settler, June i6, 1916,) as follows: 

I have long contended that the pupil who first learns the history of his 
own town, and its place in the history of his state, is more likely to acquire 
a taste for historic knowledge,, than by the system of study which has so 
long prevailed, and which he too often considers the dryest and the most 
uninteresting of all his studies. This is the fault of the text book whose 
author lacks imagination, and therefore fails to visualize the events of which 
he treats. Were the works of such authors avoided, no matter how high 
-their reputation as scholars, the demand for more interesting books would 
no doubt result in a supply of them. 



"--- A BRAVE ^lAINE IRISHMAN. 

The Honorable Daniel F. Cohalan, Justice of the Supreme Court 
of New York, in a syndicated article in the press of the country, 
entitled " Population of Ireland Ruined," and published in the Bos- 
ton American, July 31, 19 19, says: 

He (the Irishman) was, as historians tell us. the first to raise the banner 
of revolt against England in this country. According to that scholarly 
volume " Hidden Phases of American History," by Michael J. O'Brien, 38 
per cent of the rank and file of Washington's army were Irishmen or sons 
of Irishmen — the most determined, the most unfaltering enemy England 
had in America. 

'There is an exceedingly interesting, highly important — really 
amazing and bordering upon the impossible — chapter in the history 
of Maine, coroborative of Judge Cohalan's contention regarding 
the patriotism of the Irish race in America. 

Every patriotic son or citizen of the old Pine Tree State knows 
or ought to know this epic story by heart. 

And in this day of yearning and striving for a new birth in 
Americanism, it should be recited in every public or private school 
in Maine. 



A BRAVE MAINE IRISHMAN 103 



One of the farthemiost eastern English settlements in eastern 
Maine, in 1775, w^here dwelt quiet and peace loving descendents of 
Pilgrim and Puritan, was ^lachias with its humble homes and 
shops scattered along the green and grassy banks of the charming 
river of that name. 

For several days prior to Sunday June nth, 1775, a British 
armed schooner of one hundred tons, the Margaretta. had been 
anchored and defiantly flying the British flag in ]\Iachias Bay. 

The sight aroused the ire of these back-woodsmen and rekindled 
in their breasts the same fires of patriotism, as, a few days before 
had impelled Paul Revere to carry his immortal message to the 
farmers of Lexington. 

The decision to attempt the capture of the Margaretta was made 
on the eleventh day, and on the morning of the twelfth the O'Briens 
and others sailed down the river. They were in the sloop Unity, 
while Lieutenant Benjamin Foster started from East Machias in 
a schooner, the Falmouth Packet, with a volunteer crew that he 
had gathered that morning, intending to sail down the East Machias 
river and join the Lenity at the " Rim " to participate in the attack. 
It was, however, the misfortune of Lieut. Foster and his crew to 
get aground on their way down the river. Foster immediately 
despatched a messenger in a little fishing skiff to inform the L'nity 
of his inability to reach them. The crew of the Unity, then within 
sight and in pursuit of the British vessel, held a meeting, voted not 
to turn back or await the coming of Foster, and elected Jeremiah 
O'Brien, Captain, and Edmund Stevens, Lieutenant. The Marga- 
retta was manned and officered by men trained to naval servdce, 
commanded by Captain Moore, and having an armament of four (some 
say ten) six-pounders, twenty swivels — (short and thick guns firing a one- 
pound ball, and mounted on swivels placed on the vessel's railing), two 
wall pieces, forty muskets, forty cutlasses, forty pikes, forty boarding axes, 
two boxes of hand-grenades, and ten pairs of pistoils with an ample supply 
of powder and ball. She was manned with two commissioned officers and 
thirty-eight warrant and petty oflficers and men — forty in all.^ 

The Unity had from forty to fifty men, but entirely untrained, 
r.ever having had the slightest military or naval experience. Besides 
their brave hearts and strong arms, the following constituted the 
sum total of their preparedness for inscribing upon the scroll of 
men's great achievements the first chapter in the story of America's 
naval victories : twenty fowling pieces, with three rounds of pow- 



^') Sherman's Life of f'.ipt. .Jeremiah O'Brien, p. .'>4. 



I04 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



der and ball, thirteen hay forks, a number of axes, a small bag of 
bread, a few pieces of pork and a barrel of water ; the last thing 
being to mount an old wallpiece that they had found somewhere in 
the village, on bits of the windlass. With only these unprepared 
raw sons of the woods and the sea coast, and with this crude and 
pitiable outfit. Jeremiah O'Brien in ?^lachias Bay, on the coast of 
Maine, won America's first naval battle — the " Lexington of the 
Seas," first thus named by J. Fennimore Cooper, in his "' History 
of the L'nited States Na\y,'' — and was the first .American to haul 
down the British flag in the w^r of the American Revolution. 

A few years since the writer became interested in this wonderful 
accomplishment of these men of old Machias, examined what 
records and authorities were attainable regarding it and penned a 
brief article (see the Journal, Vol. I, pp. 157- 164- 175- 184) and in 
it made these observations : 

In all the history of war, on land or sea, it is doubtful if there is a record 
of any adventure which exceeds this one for dauntless courage and a bold 
defiance of death. 

Sometime, someone may undertake the task of compling in one work how 
much this American Nation owes the Sons of Ireland. Their name is 
legion and their valiant deeds are inscribed on every page of our country's 
history. That fair " Emerald Isle." ever suffering from the blight of oppres- 
sion,, has given us gallant heroes, brave and worthy, in our every war from 
the village green of Lexington to the tranquil waters of Manila Bay. And 
whenever that grand record is made up no name will receive more honor- 
abl mention than he. who, in the rays of the rising sun of that bright June 
morning, on the waters of Machias River, was made commander of this 
perilous and desperate adventure. 



Monday, May 19, 1919, marked the 25th anniversary of the ordination of 
three Bangor men in the priesthood, Rev. Thomas J. Nelligan, permanent 
rector of St. John's Catholic church; Rev. John W. Houlihan, pastor of 
St. Joseph's church. Deering ; and Rev. Charles Collins, who is in Massa- 
chusetts and who were ordained in Paris May 19, 1894. Rev. Thomas J. 
Nelligan observed his anniversary June 2, 1919. 

(Maine Newspaper.) 

Father Houlihan founded the St. Thomas church in Dover, 
Maine, where the Reverend P. A. Hayes is now the pastor; 
and St. Ann's church in Dexter, Elaine, the Reverend T. C. Maney 
being its present pastor. 

His good work for many years in Piscataquis county and western 
Penobscot, will long be appreciated by all those interested in the 
advancement of community welfare. 



^^.i 



NOTES AND FRAGMENTS 105 

Notes and Fragments 

In the villcLge square in Oakland, Maine, is an old fashioned 
" watering trough " for man and beast. To the weary and thirsty 
autoists on a hot and sultry day it is an exceedingly inviting and 
welcome object, for through it is continuously and generously flow- 
ing the purest of spring water. 

Upon its side is chiseled an inscription as follows : 

Oakland Water Co. 

1898 

W. T. Haines 

Geo. L. Learned 

Promoters 

" W. T. Haines " — the Honorable William Thomas Haines, 
always known to a legion of friends as " Bill " Haines — was the 
son of Thomas J. and Maria L. (Eddy) Haines. He was a direct 
descendant of the eighth generation from Deacon Samuel Haines, 
Who sailed from Bristol, England, in one of Sir Walter Raleigh's 
ships, in 1635. 

Wrecked on the Maine coast, the crew and passengers landed at 
Pemaquid, August 15 of that year. 

Born on a little farm in Levant, Penobscot county, Maine, Aug. 
7, 1854, his parents too poor to render much of any material assist- 
ance to an ambitious youth planning on being Governor of his 
state, he fought his way through gulfs of obstacles in the zones of 
both poverty and politics, finally landing the governorship at the 
election of 19 12, serv'ing two years. 

He had been seated in the chair of the chief executive only a few 
weeks before friend and foe alike discovered that he was himself 
the governor without any assistants and few if any ad\nsers. 

But his name goes into the pages of our history as one of the 
strongest characters who have ever held this high office. 

He was proud of the old Pine Tree State, its history and its 
traditions, and stood as firm as a rock for all that he convieved to 
be for its greatest welfare. He was a good lawyer, had been Attor- 
ney General of Maine, was a business man of marked ability, and 
amassed quite a fortune. 

He died June 4th, 1919. 



m- 



r^. 



io6 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



The Journal gratefully acknowledges receiving from Prof. Sam- 
uel J. Guernsey of Cambridge, I\Iass., an autographed copy of 
Archaeological Explorations in Northeastern .Arizona, (Bulletin 
65, Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of .American Ethnology,) by 
Alfred Vincent Kidder and Samuel J. Guernsey. Published at 
Washington, D. C., 1919. 



At the regular meeting of the " Ladies' Society of Winslow, 
Maine, for the Support of the Gospel," June i/th, 1919, the one 
hundredth anniversary of this organization was observed. 

The meeting was held in the Congregational church which was 
erected 1796, and was an occasion of historical interest and impor- 
tance. The society was established in 18 19. 

The charter members were as follows : 

Ruth Wood, Elizabeth Freeman, Abiel Ware Paine, Hannah Child Swan, 
Keziah Talbot, Lavinia Swan Adams, Susan Dingley Whitman, Ruth Parker 
Howard, Sibyl Parker Pattee, Sarah Swan Rice, Susanna Dingley, Demands 
Hayden Drummond, Sarah Hayden, Nancy Smith, Eunice Haywood Stra- 
ton, Jane Smith, Sarah Keith. 

Mrs. Carrie Stratton Howard, read a valuable historical paper, 
being biographical sketches of these charter members. We take 
therefrom the following: 

Eunice Ha>^vood Stratton came here when she was eight years old. She 
lived on the north side of the Sebasticook river and used to tell her chil- 
dren how she played with little Indians and said it was a wonder she had 
not married one. Instead she married Hesekiah Stratton and went across 
the river to live on the farm that has always been occupied by her family. 
Robert Home is there now, her great, great, grandson. From her are 
descended Jennie Howard, Emily Home. Mildred Paine and Mary Howard. 
Robert Home's little girls are in the sixth generation from her. 

Ellen Garland, Jennie Howard, Ruth Robinson, 3rd, and her granddaughter 
Ruth, are descended from two charter members and Mary Howard from 
three. 



In that well known English literary and historical store house, 
" Notes and Queries," published in London, in one of its numbers 
for July, 1856, a writer contributes an old doggerel (parody on 
Moore's Those Evening Bells) written years before, when an 
income tax even in England was a new idea, and which many 
readers today may appreciate, as follows : 



■m 



NOTES AND FRACxMENTS 107 



That Income Tax ! that Ir.come Tax ! 
How every clause my poor brain racks, 
How dear was that sweet time to me, 
Ere first I heard of Schedule B. 

Those untaxed joys are passed away, 
And many a heart tliat then was gay 
Lies sleeping 'neath the turf in packs. 
And cares not for the Income Tax. 

And so ^twill be when I am gone, 
That " Candid Peel " will still tax on, 
And other bards shall sadly ;»x 
" Why not repeal the Income Tax ? " 



The Barkers of Exeter and Bangor, were one of the notable 
iamilies of Maine, of the same generation as were the Hamlins, the 
W'ai^hburns, and later the Powers. The two most famous Barkers 
were known as " Dave " and " Lew." Noah, a noted land sur- 
veyor was a good second to either. They were intellectual people 
and each one a unique type. 

Lewis was a bright lawyer, a Republican politician who was in 
his prime when that party was born, and for nuany years had a 
national reputation as a brilliant and picturesque stump speaker. 

David was also a lawyer, but won his real fame as a writer of 
verse — a poet loved by the common people, for his simple and fer- 
vent rhyme touched their hearts and won their praise. 

In 1872, David Barker was a member of the Maine House of 
Representatives. In the " Biographical Sketches of the ^lembers 
Elect " for that year, appears the following : 

Barker, David, Exeter, Republican, religious sentiments : " My hope is 
for a better life somewhere, with less friction than here;" lawyer; age 55- 
Born in Exeter, Sept. 9, 1816, where he has ever since lived. We give the 
remainder of his biography in his own words : " You allude to my poems. 
I have no ambition to be remembered in that direction, unless for a few I 
have written, among which are, first, 'The Covered Bridge' through which 
you and I and all other mortals must pass. Second, * The Empty Sleeve,' 
which was wrung from my heart when our country was wading knee-deep 
in blood." 

Xoah Barker of Corinth was a member of the Elaine Senate for 
the years (then annual sessions) 1879 ^.nd 1880. In the Biograph- 
ical Sketches (supra) his record i^ as follows: 



io8 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Barker, Noah, Corinth, (Penobscot County). Independent; no isms in 
religion, " do right and risk the consequences ; " land survej-or and farmer, 
or " own my farm and farming tools ; " married ; age ^2. Born in Exeter, 
then a plantation called Blaisdell town. Educated in the common schools 
and at Hampden and Foxcroft Academies, but mainly at the family fireside. 
For many years a member of the superintending school committee; town 
clerk; selectman; county commissioner, and State Land Agent. Member 
Maine House of Representatives in 1838, 1840 and 1856, and of Senate in 
1879. Was a Democrat till the party leaders were for extending slavery 
into our free territories ; then a Republican. 



Sayings of Subscribers 

Mrs. Georgia Pulsifer Porter, Secretary^ of Esther Eayres Chap- 
ter, D. A. R.. Old Town, Maine: 

Perhaps you would like to know that Esther Eayres Chapter, Daughters 
of the American Revolution of. Orono, Maine, is interested in local history 
and to promote a study of the same this chapter through and by the request 
of its Patriotic Education committee, Mrs. W. J. Morse of Orono and 
Mrs. C. B. Porter of Old Town have offered prizes for the best and second 
best essay written on the subject of the first railroad in the section of these 
two towns — Orono and Old Town — The railroad commonly called the 
Veazie railroad and said to be the second railroad in the United States. 
This offer is made because the members of this Chapter believe a study of 
locaJ history^ will lead to the study of history in a broader sense and thus 
promote the best sort of patriotism and really bring the best patriotic educa- 
tion. These essays will not be asked for until the closing of the schools 
for the Thanksgiving recess — the prizes will be $2.00 for the best essay 
written by the pupils of the Old Town high school and $1.00 for the second 
best in this school also $2.00 for the best essay on this subject in the Orono 
high school, and $1.00 for the second best. The judges will be selected 
by the members of the Esther Eayres Chapter. Perhaps you will be inter- 
ested to know that the Esther Eayres Chapter is named for the first white 
child born in Orono. Date of her birth April 30, 1777- 

It is also expected that this Chapter will later mark some sections where 
this railroad passed in the two places — Old Town and Orono — and thus 
begin its work of calling to public attention the history of which we should 
be proud. 

The majority of the members of the Esther Eayres chapter have beer 
members of D. \. R. chapters for some time but there has not been a chap- 
ter in either of these two towns and now that there is, and a chance for a 
united effort for the study of local history and historical markings it is 
expected much good work in this line will be done. 

I am sending this to you hoping you will deem it of sufficient hi.storica; 
importance to either print it as it is or to make a readable article of it for 
a number of your valuable Journal. 



SAYINGS OF SUBSCRIBERS 109 



Honorable John C. Stewart, YorK Village, Maine: 

In receiving my check in payment for the Journal, the satisfaction is not 
all on your part. If you knew the pleasure and profit I get out of it you 
would know how to value it. 



James W. Sewall, Old Town, Maine: 

Permit me to congratulate the journal on its continued good work. 



Honorable George C. \\ ing, Auburn, Maine : 

I was particularly interested in the last copy of your valuable magazine 
and for fear that I am in arrears, I send you here\vith pay for a year's sub- 
scription and assure you that the State of Maine is greatly indebted to you 
for your researches and accumulation of facts touching the early history 
of the state, and while a great many feel as I do, they may neglect to give 
you the same assurance which I feel you are entitled to receive. Do not be 
discouraged for you are accomplishing much that has hitherto been sadly 
neglected. 



Selden Hinckley Kilgore, Topeka, Kans. : 

I certainly feel that the native sons of Maine should give Sprague's Jour- 
nal strong support, as it is needed to secure and publish many very impor- 
tant facts of Maine history, that might otherwise be neglected until such 
information would be lost to future generations. 

Research into the past history of our country reveals the fact that very 
many events of consequence have never been publishd or only slightly 
referred to. 

Wishing you success in this work, I am proud to subscribe myself a Native 
Son of Maine. 



Honorable Garence Hale, Portland, Maine: 

I congratulate you on making a very valuable work. I preserve the 
volumes of Sprague's Journal with great care. 



From the very beginning the Journal and its work have had many 
staunch friends whose frequent acts of kindness we prize more 
highly than we are able to express in words. Recently it afforded 
the editor immense pleasure to receive the lines following and the 
splendid gift referred to, from one of the best of these — Honorable 
E. C. Carll, Augusta, Maine: 






■^^'^ 



bl»7'i'!^ 



no SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



I remember you once wished for a copy of Hakluyt's Discourse on West- 
ern Planting, Vol. ii, Documentary History of the State of Maine. I am 
reminded of it by seeing a copy advertised by Huston. When the residence 
of the late Mrs. Georgania Staples Davis of Augusta was cleared of its 
contents a lot of books were junked that had belonged to her and to her 
brother, Augusta's beloved Col. Henry G. Staples, whose name is now borne 
by our Sons of Veterans Camp. I picked up a fine copy of Haklujl; in the 
lot, and Mr. O'Connor gave it to me. I now take great pleasure in present- 
ing the book to you. 

In 1584 the brilliant Sir Walter Raleigh was thirty-two years of age, 
related to the Champernouns, a grreat name in early Maine history, was 
well upon his career as a founder of British Colonies. England was at war 
with Spain. Raleigh, learning the military and naval weakness of Spain in 
the New World, advocated attacking her at the source of her great wealth, 
and as a part O'f that policy, the settling of British possessions in America, 
With this policy in view he employed Richard Hakluyt, a preacher at 
Oxford, thirty-one years of age, who had a high reputation as an authority 
in maritime studies, to write a Disco'.irse to Queen Elizabeth, showing why 
the American possessions should be settled. It appears that Elizabeth waj 
close in money matters, and it was difficult to induce her to loosen up. 

If the great people of those early English times can see things as they are 
here today, how they must compliment the author on the wisdom of his 
arguments. 

An interesting thing is the change in the English language. Hakluyt used 
the good English of his day. Note the advice on things an expedition to 
America should provide; these from a list of several pages. 

Hoggs fleshe, barrelled and salted, in great quantitie. 

Befe, barrelled, in lesse quantitie. Passeneape Sede Syders of Ffraunce,. 
Spaine, and England. 
Bores, Sowes. Cockes, Hennes. Graffers for frute trees. 
Mastfves to kill heavie beastes of ravyne and for night watches. 
Men experte in the arte of fortification. 
Capitaines of longe and of greate experience. 
Souldiers well trayned in Ff launders to joyne with the younger. 

How many years, up to our own time, has England had soldiers in- 
Flanders Fields of Poppies. 

All of these things you know, but it interests me to write them. 

I trust you will welcome this book into your well selected and valuable 
historical library. 



Charles F. Marble, Executive Secretary of the National League 
of Patriotic Propagandists, Portland," Maine: 

While I consider any commendation that I may give your Journal of- 
Maine History and your personal efforts in the compilation of that excel- 



SAYINGS OF SUBSCRIBERS iii 



lent publication, a ver\- humble tribute, I am anxious to accord the same to 
you, and it, because I believe such an enterprise to be in direct line with 
the demands of a great national need, a more pronounced and intelligent 
Americanism, an outstanding patriotism and a citizenship convinced of the 
wisdom of democratic government, and that can at all times, give a reason 
for the faith that is in them. This can only come from a somewhat more 
definite knowledge of the history of our country, the testing times that have 
shaped its destiny and, in all, zchat our country means to us. 

To be sure, your educational work is largely confined to the State of 
Maine, but inasmuch as the citizen who is most loyal to his state is the 
citizen who is most loyal to his country, your work is of most vital impor- 
tance. 

I trust such success ma\' follow your eflforts that you may greatly enlarge 
your scope and that your Journal may be officially adopted as a recognized 
authority in the curriculum of the schools. 

I personally welcome j-our Journal as an important factor in the great 
business of elevating the standard of American citizenship and helping to 
make the future of the nation safe by laying the foundation of intelligent 
citizenship in the minds and hearts of the prospective citizens, the students 
of the public schools. 



^liss Elizabeth Mayhew, says the Commercial, who died in Ban- 
gor, November 29th, 191 8, was a descendant of Mary Howard the 
first white child born there. 

It is " an unusual fact " says this writer 

that although Bangor has not been settled quite 150 years, there are few 
descendants of the earliest settlers here. Many of the so-called older fam- 
ilies of Bangor date back only 100 years, and representatives of the earliest 
families, before the Revolution for instance, are rare in this vicinity. 

Miss Mayhew, however, claimed descent from one of the very first set- 
tlers. Her great grandmother, Mary Howard, the first white child born in 
Bangor, then Kadesquit, first saw the light of day here on June 30, 1772. 
That was three years after Jacob Buswell, Bangor's first permanent white 
inhabitant, built his log cabin near the junction of York and Newbury 
streets. Mary Howard's father, Thomas Howard, was one of a party that 
came to Bangor in 1771, numbering Jacob Dennett, Simon Crosby, Thomas, 
John and Hugh Smart, Andrew Webster, Joseph Rose, David Rowell, Solo- 
mon and Silas Harthorn, and Joseph Mansell. 

Thomas Howard, Miss Mayhew's great-great-grandfather, built one of 
the first frame houses in Bangor. It is now standing the oldest house in 
the city. A. H. Thaxter, the Exchange street grain merchant, who now 
owns it, has improved it to siich an extent that the old lines are hardly 
lecognizable, but the nucleus of the original house is still there. 



112 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 




A Colonial Puritan as he appeared in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth 

Centuries. 



.;. Coin and Stamp Collectors .:, 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 

Prices I Pay — of every U. S. Coin 
worth over face — 15 cts. 



WANTED 
Rare Coins, Stamps ;and Curios 



What are your wants? Perhaps I 
can supply them 



Stamp Catalogues and other Philatelic and Numismatic 
literature at publishers prices 

\AJ. B. GOULD 

292 Hammond St. Bangor, Maine 



# 



CONTENTS . 113 



MAINE COAST SCENERY 




F1 



The Pearl House, Orr's Island, Casco Bay, Maine. Made famous by 
Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel ''The Pearl of Orr's Island." 



CONTENTS. 

. PAGE 

The Sewall Monument at Wiscasset 115 

Old Fort Western 119 

The Evolution of the American Postal Service 123 

Roosevelt Day 132 

An Appreciation of Colonel Stanley Plummer 133 

A Genealogy of the Simmons Family 135 

Alphabetical Index of Revolutionary Pensioners in Maine 144 

An Interesting Chapter of Maine History 151 

Old Point 153 

A Visit to an Hstorical Island 154 

Notes on the Hicks Family .- 156 

Editorial 160 

Sayings of Subscribers 162 

Maine. My State 167 

The Oldest Catholic Church in N. E 16S 



54 



YEARS the Insurance Man of Somerset Co. 

Never a Failure—Never a Law Suit— What more do you want? 

(Member Soc. Col. Wars; Sons Am. Rev; Past A. A. G.. G. A. R.) 

CHARLES FOLSOM-JONES, Skowhegan Maine 



We have positive evidence of the reliability of the advertisers on these paKe« 



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Sprague's Journal of Maine History 

Vol. VII NOV. DEC. 1919, JAN. 1920 No. 3 



The Sewall Monument at Wiscas- 

set, Maine 

There has stood for a century and more, in the town of Wlscas- 
set, a monument erected to the memory of the Honorab.e Samuel 
Sewall, once chief justice of the supreme judicial court for the 
commonwealth of ^Massachusetts when the district of Maine was a 
part of that jurisdiction. 

A year or more ago, the Honorable Leslie C. Cornish, chief jus- 
tice of the supreme court of Maine, while presiding at a nisi prius 
term of the court in the historic old Wiscasset Court House, discov- 
ered that this monument had for a long time been sadly neglected. 
He at once took measures to restore and preserve it so that it may 
ever remain as an important historical Xew England landmark 
here in ]Maine. 

The Honorab.e Arthur P. Rugg, chief jutice of the Massachusetts 
supreme court, up-on learning of these facts begged the privilege of 
sharing with him the expense of the restoration of this monument. 
Thus its preservation for future generations is entirely due to the 
patriotic efforts of these gentlemen. 

And we cannot here refrain from adding that Chief Justice 
Cornish is one of the cultured men of Maine who are appre- 
ciative readers of Maine history; who believe that it should 
be taught to the youth of Maine in our public schools; and that the 
state should pursue a broad and liberal policy in encouraging the 
publication of literature relating to it. He appreciates and ever 
encourages all efforts in this direction and his counsel and assist- 
ance to those working in this fie'.d are always inspiring and valuable. 

Samuel Sewall was born in Boston December. 1757, being a 
grandson of Dr. Joseph SewalV a distinguished divine among the 
churches of Xew England. 



ii6 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL O? MAINE HISTORY 

He was prepare I far college at the Dummer school and graduated 
at Harvard in the year 1776. 

He began his professional !ife in the town of Marblehead. and 
continued to practice in the county of Essex until he became known 
as one of the most eminent lawyers at the bar. 

For several years he represented Marblehead in the legislature of 
Massachusetts. 

This period in his life is referred to by Judge Parker in **A Sketch 
of the Character of the late Chief Justice Sewall," published in 
Mass. Law Reports, eleventh vol. p. 556, as follows : 

In times when talents and moral worth were passports to popular favon 
he was chosen, for a succession of years, to represent the town of Marblehead 
in our legislature. There he soon acquired the influence due to his talents. 
It was a time of innovation and visionary experiment. On more than one 
-occasion, when a learned but eccentric statesman attempted to introduce a 
popular but dangerous change into the criminal code of our state, and seemed 
to carry the multitude along with him, the forcible and unanswerable argu- 
ments of Sewall arrested the course of experiment, and preserved things in 
tried and safe channels. 

In a foot note the Judge states that the " learned but eccentric 
statesman " referred to was a IMaine man, John Gardiner of Pow- 
nalboro in Lincoln county. The fact that he was practicing 1 .w 
in that remote town on the lower Kennebec, may emphasize the 
suggestion of eccentricity on his part. William Willis in his '* His- 
tory of the Lawyers and Law Courts of Maine," p. 121, says that 
"it is difTicult to conceive the motive that should have induced him 
to fix his residence there." 

He had not lived there very long before the people of that vicinity 
elected him to represent them in the ^vlassachusetts Legislature. 

At the time referred to by Judge Parker he was one of the Dis- 
trict of Maine representatives from that town. 

Thus it becomes of interest to know more of who and what this 
man was, not on'y because he was from Maine, but also for the 
reason that the story of his legislative controversy with Judge 
Sewall is an interesting side-light on the progress of events and 
changes in public opiTiion in New England during the past century. 

He was the son of Dr. Silvester Gardiner for whom the city of 
Gardiner was named. Dr. Gardiner was Maine's most famous 
loyalists at the time of the revolution, and fled to England where he 
lived until its close. 



THE SEWALL MONUMENT 



117 



Hence John was educated there and had practiced law before 
Lord Mansfield prior to his adventure in Pownaiboro. He was a 
lawyer of ability and a brilliant public speaker. 



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The Sewall Monument, Wiscasset, Maine 



It is interesting to note that his opponents, in their labors in 
*' preserving things in tried and safe channels " unsuccessfully 
opposed Gardiner's efforts in abolishing the law of primogeniture 
according to Willis (supra) p. 122. Another one of his daring 
attempts in his " course of experiment " was a bill to abolish special 
pleadings. In this he was such a long distance in advance of his 
compeers — Willis says forty years — that he was necessarily defeated. 
As he was about a half century ahead of his time in most of these 
matters, his greatest accomplishment was his noted forensic en- 
counter with Mr. Sewall. Both Vv'ere among the intellectual leaders 
of that day. As their points of view regarding such questions were 
entirely opposite, their debates attracted attention throughout New 
England, gave them much fame and, in point of ability, were credit- 
able to both. 



m. 



ii8 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTOiRV 

And yet as much as we may admire Gardiner's ability and fear- 
lessness, it must be admitted that some of his '' law reforms " appear 
impracticable if not dangerous as contended by Judge Parker in his 
sketch ; and some have never been adopted. 

In the year 1797 Mr. Sewall was elected to Congress for the South 
Essex district and re-elected for the next term. 

In the year 1800. while a member of Congress, he was appointed 
to a seat on the bench of the supreme judicial court. In 181 3, he 
succeeded the Honorable Theophulus Parsons as Chief Justice of 
this court. 

He had served in this office but little more than a year, when he 
was stricken by death while holding a nisi priiis term of the court 
at Wiscasset. 

Upon the east side of the monument above referred to is this 
inscription : 

Erected by the members of the bar, practising in the Supreme Judicial 
Court of this Commonwealth, to express their Veneration of the Character 
of the Hon. Samuel Sewall. late Chief Justice of the said Court, who died 
suddenly in this Place on the 8th of June. 1814. Et. 56. 

Upon the north side is the following : 

The remains of Chief Justice Sewall having been here interred, afterwards 
were removed, and deposited in his lamiU- tomb at Marblehead. 



THE LANDING OF THE PILGRIMS. 

Dec. 22, 1620. 

By William Cullex Bry.\xt. 

Wild was the daj-; the wintry sea 

Moaned sadly on New England's strand, 

When first the thoughtful and the free. 
Our fathers, trod the desert land. 

They little thought how pure a light. 

With years, should gather round that day ; 

How love should keep their memories bright. 
How wide a realm their sons should sway. 

Green are their bays ; but greener still 

Shall round their spreading fame be wreathed. 

And regions, now untrod, shall thrill 

With reverence when their names are breathed. 

Till where the sun. with softer fires, 

Looks on the vast Pacific's sleep. 
The children of the Pilgrim sires 

This hallowed day like us shall keep. 



OLD FORT WESTERN 119 



Old Fort Western to be Restored 
by the Patriotic and Generous 
Act of the Honorable Guy 
P. Gannett of Au- 
gusta, Maine 

In recent years we have felt that the people of Maine were sadly 
indifferent to the necessity of preserving sites and places of histori- 
cal note and interest. We have shared with others a fear that this 
indifference was becoming fixed and permanent : that there might 
never be a revival in Maine of the same patriotic attitude towards 
these things that ever animated the greatest and most intellectual 
of our forefathers, of those sturdy men who separated themselves 
from Massachusetts and erected the Pine Tree State. 

Hence it was with much gratification that we learned that Hon. 
Guy P. Gannett of Augusta, member of the Maine Senate, has, in 
a recent letter to Hon. Burleigh Martin, mayor of that city, an- 
nounced his intentions of presenting to Augusta the sum of Sio,ooo, 
for the purpose of restoring Fort Western to what it was when built 
in 1754, and preserving it for all time. 

Senator Gannett makes this gift to his city as a memorial to the 
memory of his mother. He is a direct descendant of Margaret 
Howard Patterson, daughter of Captain James Howard first com- 
mander of this fort. 

The Journal believes this to be one of the most patriotic, com- 
mendable and praiseworthy acts that any citizen of Elaine has ever 
done. 

Fort Western is one of Maine's important historic landmarks. 
And in these days when all the states of the Union vie with each- 
other in calling the attention of travelers and autoists to just such 
attractions as this, its restoration must have a considerable measure 
of value to Augusta and the state at large. 

Fort Western's story is of profound interest and closely identified 
with the fortunes of Plymouth Colony. In the early days of the 
settlement there it was known as Cushnoc. 



I20 SPRAGUE'S JO.L'RXAL OF ^lAIXE HISTORY 

It begins with the year 1625, when Governor Bradford, desirous 
of procuring valuable fur products from the Indians to ship back 
to England for food and suppHes, despatched a squad of Pilgrims 
commanded by Edward \Mnslow with two " shalops which their 
carpenter had built them ye year before,'' laden w^ith corn. '* God 
preserved them and gave them good success, for they brought home 
700 lbs. of beaver, besides some other furs.'' The Augusta histo- 
rians, North and Xash believe that they went as far up the Kenne- 
bec as Cushnoc. for that was for a long period after an English 
trading post. 




Hon. Guy P. Gannett. 

Ffom the Jesuits we get much knowledge of a branch of the Abe- 
nakis nation known as the Kennebec Indians. They were a power- 
ful tribe, but more friendly disposed to the white men, both the 
Jesuits and the English traders, than w-ere other eastern Indians. 

It is well known that Cushnoc, — now Augusta — and from there 
on to Winslow was a favorite resort or resting place for these tribes 
in their journeys to and from the lakes to the ocean. 

In 1646, John Winslow had charge of the Plymouth trading post 
at this place. And here is possible material for an entertaining tale. 

The 29th day of August of that year saw Father Gabriel Druil- 
ettes start from Quebec, carrying only the missal and crucifix and 
a few articles of priestly necessity, with an Indian chief by name 



OLD FORT WESTERN 121 

of Negabamat and two or three other Abenakis who were to be 
his guides, going down rapid rivers, crossing Lake Megantic, wad- 
ing through swamp and logans to the waters of the Kennebec. He 
was to confer with other CathoHc missionaries who were being 
sent forth by New France to christianize unknown savages. Shortly- 
after this he established the Kennebec mission at Old Point, later 
to be succeeded by that remarkable character Sebastian Rale, whose 
career ended in the tragedy of Aug. 23d, 1724, that is a dark chap- 
ter in New England history. He was the first white man who had 
ever entered the Kennebec region from the north. Happily sur- 
prised was he to discover another one at this place. That distin- 
guished Pilgrim at once extended his hospitality to the black robed 
missionary. The comforts of the trader's log house were not luxu- 
rious but far preferable to the squalor of the Indian huts which 
had sheltered him thus far on his journey. 

It was a strangely assorted couple, the sturdy Pilgrim and the 
pious father, each representing two great races, destined for the 
next century to wage an irrepressable conflict, its purpose to be 
no less than a death grapple for the possession of North America. 
For two weeks they lived together as host and guest. As neither 
understood the other's language, the conditions were not favorable 
for intimate and pleasant intercourse, but through the aid of Indian 
interpreters they conversed much together and became warm friends. 

And yet there are other chapters equally as interesting in this 
alluring story of old Fort Western and ancient Cushnoc. 

One of these often told, yet never wearisome, opens on a bright 
morning in September, on (probably) the 25th day, year 1775, five 
months after the battle of Lexington had been fought. It was a 
time of stress and strain all along the Kennebec. The inhabitants 
of its sparse settlements from its mouth to its source were bitterly 
divided in sentiment. Americanism had burst forth on the battle- 
fields of Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill. While most of these 
settlers were in hearty accord with the patriots, there were loyalists 
on the river led by the Reverend Jacob Bailey. He was a man of 
great intellect and power, a natural leader of men and no less zeal- 
ous and determined than were the followers of Washington and the 
Boston leaders. 

All was bustle and activity in and around Fort Western. Every 
man was at his post, every helper busy. General Arnold and his 
troops were there taking their last rest before plunging into the 



"-i^vf-;.'^-;!^:,:;.; 



122 SPRAGUE'S JOURXAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



great northern wilderness on their proud march to invade, conquer 
and capture Quebec. He and his officers and his soldiers must all 
be duly honored, treated and toasted according to the customs of 
the day, for this was the most important point at which they had 
stopped on their way up the river. 

The headquarters was at Esquire Howard's. *' an exceedingly 
hospitable. opulent, polite family." as the old records say. 

On Gen. Arnold's staff was a young man of tine physical propor- 
tions, good to look upon, mentally keen and brilliant with a fasci- 
nating personality. A young Indian girl named Jacataqua. — called 
by Mrs. E. C. Carll in her charming tale in The Trail of the Maine 
Pioneer, '* Queen of the Kennebec '' — a descendant of a noble old 
Sachem who once flourished at Swan Island, was following the 
army. She was comely and attractive and had formed a romantic 
attachment for this youth. These two were despatched to go to 
the woods and kill game for the feast. 

Little cou'd this young man. Aaron Burr, when he went forth on 
that joyful hunt in the Kennebec forests, have realized what a 
strange and paradoxical life fate was preparing for him ; a brave 
soldier, a favorite in the highest social circles, an able lawyer, a 
sagacious politician, a great and honored statesman — United States 
Senator and Vice-President of his government. He was to be all 
these and then — in a duel to kill one of the greatest of great Ameri- 
cans; be accused of and acquitted for the high crime of treason to 
his country ; be mainly right but enough wrong for his real motives 
to be woefully misunderstood ; lor public opinion to finally con- 
demn him to the wretched life of an outcast. 

These young hunters brought in as their trophies, three bears for 
the festive board. These were roasted whole in true frontier fash- 
ion. Other delicious fruits and viands from field and forest were 
added. It was truly a great occasion for Fort Western. Local 
celebrities from other river settlements were invited guests — Wil- 
liam Gardiner of Cobbosseecontee ; Maj. Colburn and Squire Oak- 
man from Gardinerstown ; Maj. Bowman. Col. Gushing, Captain 
Goodwin and Squire Bridge of Pownalborough and others were 
there to drink toasts to their honored guests. 

And these are only fragments of what this spot represents : of 
what to the thoughtful it is a reminder of. 

It is well that it be preserved. 



EVOLUTION OF POSTAL SERVICE 123 



The Evolution of the American 

Postal Service, Something 

About its History 

in Maine 

(ADDRESS OF HON. CARTER B. KEENE. BEFORE THE 
MAINE PRESS ASSOCIATION Al^^PORTLAND, MAINE, 
OCTOBER 10, 1919.) 

— The Hojiorablc Carter B. Keene of the touMi of Freedom in Waldo 
county, Maine, entered the government postal service under the 
first administration of President Cleveland. Since that day politi- 
cal conditions throughout the country have passed through zconder- 
ful changes. Administrations at Washington have come and gone 
but the young man from Waldo county, Maine, remained through 
it all, unmoved and undisturbed. Partisan turmoil never endan- 
gered his standing icith our Uncle Sam. Instead, his efficiency and 
faithfulness in serving the public continually advanced him until he 
becajne Director of the United States Postal System. He zi'as 
appointed to this highly important position idien it zaras established 
by Congress and holds it at the present time. — 

It was a pleasure for me to reinforce Ernest G. Walker last year 
in securing the distinguished speaker who addressed you at Water- 
ville. But it was more through courtesy than necessity that Mr. 
Walker invoked my assistance for he belongs to the resourceful 
group of Washington newspaper men fully capable of accomplishing 
their purposes without help. In passing let me remind you that 
Mr. Walker is a Maine man without reservations or interpretations. 
Embden is his birthplace and the principalship of the Skowhegan 
high school was one of his early activities. He stands among the 
very foremost in his profession in Washington, and has won his 
spurs by push and fair dealing, not by pull or chance. 

While I was gratified that you could have with you last year the 
recognized authority on a subject of special interest to your asso- 
ciation. I was a bit disappointed that the Honorable First Assistant 
Postmaster General did not interpret my secret but unexpressed 
desires by commanding me to accompany him as guide or valet. 
So a few weeks ago when a feeler-invitation came floating down 



124 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF .MAINE HISTORY 



from Skovvhegan, I picked up the message first and suggested to 
Mr. Koons that he go to Portland with me and do the official 
illuminating while I did the home coming stunt. Of course, he 
ratified the proposal, for the charm of October days in Maine and 
the warmth of your former welcome had inclined his ear for an 
encore. But, aside from a perennial hunger to get back to the old 
state on the slightest provocation, I was particularly eager for an 
opportunity to renew acquaintances with the Maine Press survivors 
of 1896. I went with your party on the memorable tour through 
the Aroostook. \\ hat a delightful trip it was ! What a wonderful 
region was unfolded to many of us! And the congeniality of the 
party was equaled only by the sincere hospitality of our northern 
friends. 

Your association in later years has been represented in Washing- 
ton public life by two men of conspicuous ability — Asher C. Hinds 
of Portland and Herbert M. Lord of Rockland. The work of one 
has ended and time is still recording the achievements of the other. 
Maine has been generous in recognizing the real worth of her sons 
and daughters. But I sometimes wonder whether the intellectual 
strength and high character of Asher Hinds are appreciated in the 
State at large as they were in the National Capital. If not, it is 
because self-efTacement, which characterized his life and work, has 
obscured at home the sterling qualities of the editor-statesman. His 
chosen work in W^ashington was fcne alone and only when the 
product of his brain and industry forced him into the light did the 
public appraise his full measure of ability. As a par.iamentarian, 
he was the peer of any man, living or dead, and the wonderful com- 
pilation of parliamentary precedents which bears his name will 
guide Congressional action for all time. In mid-life, his great frame 
and brain broke under self-imposed public duty. Asher Hinds was 
tru'y great. 

The other graduate from your association, Brigadier General Her- 
bert M. Lord, was formerly editor of the Rockland Courier-Gazette. 
You will recall that General Lord came to W'ashington as clerk to 
the Committee on Ways and Means when Governor Dingley held 
its important chairmanship. He was an army paymaster during 
the Spanish-American war and was later transferred to the regular 
army. L'ntiring industry and good down-east judgment singled 
him out for Director of Finance of the War Department. He has 
disbursed billions of dollars for the army. Never in the history of 



!■' :t 



EVOLUTION OF POSTAL SERVICE 12= 



the world have such stupendous sums been placed under the con- 
trol of one man. Promotions came rapidly — and deservedly too — 
until now General Lord enjoys the distinction of being- one of the 
two officers who have been made permanent Brigadier Generals 
since the signing of the armistic. A Distingushed Service Medal 
further attests his fidelity to duty. 

But State pride is luring me from my assigned subject, so I will 
turn to the development of the postal service — the one Government 
enterprise that knocks at ever\- door and touches every phase of 
human interest and activity. Time forbids even a peak to leap over 
the crude systems of early communication in Europe. But out of 
them aH stands forth the fact that postal systems have kept step 
with the march of individual liberty. England instituted her ser- 
vice for the accommodation of royalty and for military advantage. 
The American postal service was established for the people and the 
pursuits of peace. 

" Ship letters." or letters from over-seas, are the first communi- 
cations mentioned in our colonial history. In 1639. the General 
Court of Massachusetts ordered that all " letters from beyond the 
seas " be deposited with Richard Fairbanks of Boston, who was to 
receive one penny each for their delivery. Thus Richard became 
first postmaster of record in America. And since Massachusetts 
and Maine were then one, may v.e not claim that the American 
postal service had its birth in *' Our State ? " But should it be urged 
that Richards narrow functions did not entitle him to the dignity 
and glory of first postmaster, our prestige is not impaired, for the 
first " public '' post in America was established in Boston in 1677, 
when the General Court of Massachusetts commissioned John Hay- 
ward postmaster " to take in and convey letters accoring to their 
directions." 

The first newspaper in the colonies appeared In Boston in 1704. 
John Campbell, a Scotch bookseller, was the publisher, also post- 
master of his city. The following notice appeared in the first 
number : 

All persons in town and countv may have said News Letter weekly, upon 
reasonable terms, agreeing with John Campbell, postmaster, for the same. 

So even in the early days we find the press and the post closely 
allied. Indefinite as were the subscription rates — *' reasonable 
terms " — may we not assume that the literary Scotchman pitched 
4 



125 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAIXE HISTORY 



upon rates fair to the publisher, just to the Government, and rea- 
sonable to the public — a delightful trinity, which some charge has 
been jarred in the shifting events of later years? 

Poorly paid as were postmasters in the colonial days, there came 
to their relief some compensating advantages then that would be 
alluring even in our day. One of the early Philadelphia postmasters 
was Andrew Bradford, publisher of the " Mercury." By a strange 
coincidence the Mercury was delivered by mail, while its competitor, 
Franklin's Philadelphia Gazette, was not. A little later Franklin 
succeeded to the postmastership, and in commenting on his new 
assignment said : 

I accepted it readily and found it of great advantage; for, though the 
salar>' was small, it facilitated the correspondence that improved my news- 
paper, increased the number demanded, as well as the advertisements to be 
inserted, so that it came to afford me a considerable income. 

Benjamin Franklin, Massachusetts born, was the great moving 
genius in our postal growth. Successful administration of the 
Philadelphia post office and his wide reputation for business sagac- 
ity led to his appointment in 1753 as Deputy Postmaster Genera! 
of America. Out of meagre and scattered postal facilities, he 
began the construction of an orderly and co-ordinated service and, 
while the results of his labor appear almost ridiculous when com- 
pared with the undertakings of later years, the fact remains that 
Franklin was the man of vision and force who blazed the way for 
the superb postal privileges we enjoy today. 

Franklin held his commission un';'er British rule until 1774, when 
he " was displaced by a freak of ministers.'' as he described it. 
The Continental Congress soon undertook the management of postal 
affairs and he was the unanimous choice for Postmaster General 
under American authority. The Revolutionary struggle forced 
Franklin into important fields abroad, and out of his memorable 
service in France we sec Lafayette beside \^'ashington at Yorktown 
and Pershing beside Foch at the Marne. The postal service almost 
disappeared during our eight-year conquest for independence. The 
army was its chief patron an 1 the Deputy Postmaster General fol- 
lowed the troops from place to place on foot in heroic effort to 
keep them in touch with home. 

On the adoption of the constitution, the Government took over 
what was left of the Colonial system — 28 post offices, 14 of which 



^- 



llVULLliUA Ut FUbiAL bh^KVlLti 12] 



were in Massachusetts, and a few broken-down mail routes. Sam- 
uel Osgood of Massachusetts, appointed in 17S9. was the first Post- 
master General under our constitutional form of Government. 
New York and Boston were the leading postal centers. But their 
business was amusingly limited. Sebastian Bauman. the first post- 
master of New York under Osgood, kept his office in a grocery store 
and his clerks boarded with him in part payment of their salaries. 
In 181 2 the force of the office \\-as reduced to two clerks because 
of lack of business. New York today has a postal roll of over 
10,000. The postal force of Boston consisted of a postmaster and 
two clerks as late as 181 7. It is now 3;ooo. 

Congress eany contracted the habit of investigating the execu- 
tive departments — a habit which has never entirely disappeared — 
and as the result of one of the first investigations the postal activi- 
ties in our own state are disclosed. Among the mail routes in 
operation in the United States from October 5, 1789. to January 5, 
1790, was one from Portsmouth to Portland and one from Portland 
to Wiscasset. These routes and terminal post offices came down 
from co-onial days. Joseph Barnard was the post-rider from Ports- 
mouth to Portland and $6co per annum was paid him for three 
trips a week in the summer and two in the winter. Wiscasset's 
mail supply was meagre indeed. Richard Kimball was the post- 
rider and made a trip every two weeks for $150 per annum. Port- 
land and Wiscasset were the only post offices in Maine when Samuel 
Osgood began the construction of the greatest postal service in the 
world. Portland was the first office in the State and Samuel Free- 
man, appointed February 16. 1790, first presided over the mails 
under our present form of Government. Ebenezer Whittier was 
appointed postmaster at Wiscasset on the same day. Whether 
these postal pioneers served under the Colonial Government is not 
shown by the records of the Post Office Department. But we do 
know that some postmaster at Portland received $7.22 for his official 
services for the three months ending January 5, 1790, and for that 
period also some postmaster at W'iscasset received the munificent 
salary of thirty-six cents. Bath, Biddeford and Kennebunk were 
added to the Maine |X)st offices in 1791. 

The evolution of the postal service is the interesting story of 
improved transportation and bu.-iness expansion. The post-rider 
of colonial days gave way to the stage coach and the stage coach, 
after stubborn competition, surren^^ered to the trains; then fol- 



128 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



lowed the railway post office and the different systems of individual 
delivery. 

No great postal advance has been promoted that did not encounter 
violent opposition both in Congress and outside, and it has often 
been necessary to launch improvements under the guise of experi- 
ments. Even when the Colonial postal service was taken over and 
the new one instituted, authority was found under the dubious title, 
" An Act for the temporary establishment of a post office." But 
the experiments of today are the settled policies of tomorrow. The 
speeches in Congress in condemnation of many of our indispensable 
postal adjuncts are as amusing today as the lurid forecasts of some 
of our revolutionary fathers in their resistance to the adoption of 
the American Constitution. But great postal reforms have finally 
succeeded and will continue to succeed as public demand and changed 
conditions suggest their necessity. 

Repeated calls for a money order system fell upon indifferent ears 
in Congress until the public, incensed over the distressing losses 
suffered through soldiers of the Civil War trying to send money 
home, spoke in no uncertain terms. A system was authorized in 
1864, and on November ist of that year Augusta, Bangor, Eastport 
and Portland oft'ered the first money order facilities in Maine. 

Rural free delivery was urged also for years before authority for 
the service was granted. The alarming decline in rural life has- 
tened the legislation. The boys and girls were flocking to the cities, 
farms were being abandoned, production was falling oft* and the 
" old folks *' were left behind almost as caretakers among the 
scenes of former thrift and contentment. How well I remember 
the alarm felt in many quarters as the Government was about to 
embark in reckless extravagance. Rural free delivery started as an 
experiment. On October i. 1896, three rural routes were installed 
in West Virginia by Postmaster General William L. Wilson. Maine 
was alive to her opportunity, and on November 23, 1896, three 
Maine routes were authorized ; one from Gorham with John E. 
Manning as carrier, another from Naples, with Benjamin F. Graf- 
fam as carrier, and the third from Sebago Lake with Gilbert E. 
Moulton as carrier. The service spread like wild fire, and miserly 
experimental appropriations quickly gave place to generous allow- 
ances. Additional routes followed closely and today 480 rural free 
delivery carriers are delivering mail at the gates of more than 250,- 
000 patrons in our state. The daily newspaper was useless to the 



EVOLUTION OF POSTAL SERVICE 129 



farmer before rural free delivery. Now it is a necessity. Thou- 
sand's of our Maine farmers get the latest market quotations before 
dinner and are thoroughly informed on the big news of the day. 
Even Babe Ruth's latest prowess at the bat does not escape their 
argus eyes. What wonderful re'ief rural delivery has brought to 
the former isolation of farm life! Approximately 43,000 rural 
routes are in operation in the United States, supplying over one- 
fourth of our entire population with daily mail. Such an enter- 
prise almost defies description. If the daily mileage of rural car- 
riers were reduced to a line, it would extend 1,127.110 miles, a dis- 
tance equal to forty-five times the circumference of the earth. 
Rural free delivery has been the great force in farm life betterment ; 
it has gone much farther than speeding up the mails. In almost 
inevitable sequence it has aroused the public to the advantages of 
good roads, and good roads make the farmer and the consumer 
neighbors. 

But as I look out over prosperous rural Maine, with her mail 
carriers, telephones and improved highways, my mind runs back 
to the old New England neighborhood whose individuality — Ave must 
admit — has faded as modern agencies have made men independent. 
It seems to me that out of the to^'l and sacrifice and dependence of 
those days sprang a comradeship, the old neighborhood spirit, that 
beautifully displayed the real New England heart and life. Who 
among you will write the story of the old New England neighbor- 
hood before the landmarks disappear and while the sweetness yet 
remains ? 

After forty years of desultory effort. Postal Savings gained recog- 
nition in the Act of June 25, i^jio. But the force that brought 
postal savings to the front and liept it there until Congress acted 
was the panic of 1907. when big financial institutions trembled or 
fell and gold ran into hiding. Eight years of practical operation 
has. I hope, fulfilled the prophecies of its advocates. Certainly the 
apprehensions of its opponents hive been dissipated. Six hundred 
thousand depositors are happy in the knowledge that Uncle Sam 
holds $165,000,000 of their savings and will pay back every dollar 
on demand. But the rea^ success of postal savings cannot be meas- 
ured in figures. It reaches much farther, as you will see, when I 
tell you that 90% of these savings stand in the names of people 
born under another flag who through groundless fear will trust 
their savings to the Government and the Government alone. And 
I know, in these restless and anxious days, that the Postal Savings 



ISO SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



System is a wonder tu!Iy comforting and steadying influence. Postal 
savings promotes thrift and economy artd thrift and economy lead 
from the sweatshop to the school, from the alley to the home. The 
banks are the churches of saving; postal savings the Salvation Army 
of thrift. On January 3, 191 1, the postmaster at Rumford opened 
the first postal savings bank in Elaine. 

Parcel post and postal savings ran together for a time in their 
quest for Congressional sanction. I remember that in 1908 the Post- 
master General sent me to Muskogee, Oklahoma, to discuss postal 
savings and parcel post before the Trans-lMississippi Congress in 
session there and, if possible, to get an endorsement of the projects. 
Postal savings had a smooth passage, but parcel post stirred up such 
petulant opposition that it looked as if resolutions of condemnation 
would be adopted. It was urged that parcel post would utterly 
exterminate the small merchants and that "catalogue houses," as 
the large mail order houses were styled, would be supreme. Every- 
body seemed to forget that the mails that go out also come back. 
Parcel post finally won its way and on August 24. 1912, Congress 
gave the Postmaster General authority to go ahead. The following 
January the new service made its bow. It was a success from the 
start. Rates of postage have since been reduced, larger and heavier 
packages are now accepted and a greater indemnity is offered. 
Parcel post fil s a long neglected field in our postal service and its 
possibilities are almost limitless. 

Each mail carrying agency has yielded in turn to the irresistible 
march of inventive genius, and now thousands of letters taken up 
from mother earth into the unmarked highways of the sky are 
driven through space with almost incredible speed. Aerial mail 
is less than two years old. It was started between Washington and 
New York in ill-suited aeroplanes built for war, not for commerce. 
Troubles followed as in the early days of automobile travel. More 
reliab'e machines with greater carrying power have been secured 
and eight mail planes now fly daily, rain or shine, between Wash- 
ington and New Y^ork, New York and Cleveland, and Cleveland and 
Chicago. Each plane carries between I3,cxx) and 15,000 letters. 
The very fastest New York-Chicago train carries the mails between 
those cities in 22 hours. Air mail goes in 9 hours. Five hours is 
the limit of railway speed between Washington and New York — 
aeroplanes carry the mail in half that time. The wonderful prog- 
ress in air navigation the past }car is but a beginning of mechanical 



EVOLUTION OF POSTAL SERVICE 131 



possibilities and I stand with those who believe that the day is at 
hand when business and social mail will take wings between the 
great distributing points of our country. 

In closing let me pay a sincere tribute to the' postmasters of the 
United States and their subordinates, high and humble ? The great 
world war bowed them down with stupendous responsibilities which 
the public little appreciates, and it is a constant source of gratify- 
ing amazement to me that they were able to carry the burden at all 
— that our postal service did not utterly collapse as was virtualK 
the case with every other belligerent nation. Let me take you 
behind the scenes. Constantly increasing mails, with an enormous 
parcel post business of a night's building, found the postal em- 
ployees of the United States up to their efficient physical power in 
April, 191 7. Then came the war, and thousands of virile and 
trained men in our post offices answered the call. Postal experts 
are not born. Their value comes through years of tedious toil, and 
the brightest novice is almost useless for weeks and months. The 
loss of skilled man power was a shock as severe as it was sudden. 
Unprecedented bond sales were launched and thousands upon thou- 
sands of tons of printed matter in furtherance of the loans were 
forced into the mails. Then followed a two billion War Savings 
campaign with its enormous mailings of literature. Xor vras this 
all. More than 80% of all the Var Savings and Thrift stamps sold 
were disposed of by postmasters and their employees. Millions of 
revenue stamps were rushed to our post offices for expeditious sale 
or delivery; car loads of draft questionnaires calling for imme:liate 
deliverv'.were heaped upon the service. Postmasters became recruit- 
ing officers for the Army, the Xavy and the ^larine Corps. In the 
smaller cities and towns, they were required to register alien ene- 
mies and the Department of Labor turned our post offices into effec- 
tive emp'oyment agencies. The Food Administration literally 
deluged the mails with conservation literature; and the volume of 
regular mail kept flowing all the while. With courage and patri- 
otism unsurpassed. 300,000 postal employees of all grades and sta- 
'tions performed their full duty to the public and to the Government. 



^ 



#'- 



132 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Roosevelt Day 



The schools of Maine observed Friday October 24th, 1919, as 
Roosevelt Day in accordance with the following request by State 
Superintendent Thomas : 
Dear Co-lVorkers: 

It is fitting that we observe in our schools Oct. 24 the anniversary of the 
birth of Theodore Roosevelt and that v.e emphasize those qualities of manli- 
ness and strength, sacrifice and courage for which he stands. Teachers in all 
our schools are requested to give over the opening exercises to a program of 
Americanism ; patriotic songs, sa'-ute to the flag, a talk on Roosevelt, a dis- 
cussion of America, the responsibility of the citizen and how we may serve 
our country best. 

As the best type of manhood and of stalwart Americanism Theodore Roose- 
velt stands a monument for all time. It was he who saw the necessity for 
greater civic righteousness and who translated the golden rule into action. 
His wonderful grasp of worJd events and his keen sense of situations warned 
America of impending calamity while the nation was still basking in the 
sunny delusion of eternal peace. His advocacy of preparedness and his doc- 
trine of one hundred per cent Americanism aroused the people to an appre- 
'ciation of the worth of the citizen. 

To the young man he is an ideal; to the seasoned citizen an inspiration; to 
the political crook he was a terror ; to the upright an encouragement : to 
America he is a son who loved his country better than his life. A half hour 
with Roosevelt will be valuable to our young citizens. 

Very sincerely, 

AUGUSTUS O. THOMAS. 



October, 1919. was the 155 anniversary of the birth of Prentiss 
Mellen, the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court of 
Maine. Born in Sterh'ng, ]Mass., October 11, 1764, he was gradu- 
ated at Harvard in 1784, admitted to the bar in 1786, came to Bid- 
deford in 1792, and 14 years later took up his residence in Portland. 
He served on the Executive Council of Massachusetts in 1808. 1809 
and again in 1817. In 1818 he was elected to the Unite:! States 
Senate and served until May, 1820. when Maine having been ad- 
mitted as a separate state he resigned in consequence of this change. 
He was the first Chief Justice of Maine serving from 1820 to 1834 
when he retired having reached the age limit of 70 years. He died 
December 31, 1840, in the house on State street that he built in 1807, 
and which was recent'y purchased by Bishop Walsh and arranged 
as a schoo' for girls. Judge Mellen was for 20 years a trustee of 
Bowdoin College. Both as judge and lawyer he held high rank. 
His son, Grenville Mellen, was a gifted poet. 



COLONEL STANLEY PLUMMER 133 



An Appreciation of Colonel Stanley 

Plummer 

(by senator BERT M. FERNALD.) 

I esteem the privilege afforded me to offer my tribute of love and 
respect to the memory of Colonel Stanley Plummer of Dexter, 
Maine. I knew him well. I had for him such deep affection, such 
keen appreciation, that I feel I can speak of him with knowledge 
and with justice. He was true and loyal. His friendship once 
given, ably and faithfully he fulfilled its demands. And it is with 
a fee'ing of great personal loss that I trace, briefly, the history of 
his career. 

Stanley Plummer was born in Sangerville, Maine, February 25, 
1846. He attended the Dexter public schools, and entered Bow- 
doin College in 1863. After graduation he studied at Albany Law 
School and began the practice of law in Bangor in 1872. In 1874 
he went to Washington, and from 1880 to 1894 was Postmaster of 
the United States Senate. He was a member of Governor Bur- 
leigh's military staff, and from 1899 to 1903 was State Senator. 
In 1903 he married Miss Elizabeth Burbank, of Boston, who sur- 
vives him. He died at Atlantic City, February 12, 191 9. 

So much for mere facts and dates — but how inadequate to express 
a man with the noblest impulses <md with a heart as warm and true 
as ever beat within the human breast. At a casual meeting his 
general bearing was aristocratic and aloof ; but when you knew him 
well, you found Stanley Plummer genial, generous and lovable. 

He was well-equipped for the duties of a statesman. He was a 
ready debater, a good impromptu speaker, and an orator of unusual 
ability. His voice would immediately appeal to his audience. 
Everyone would be impressed with the careful preparation and the 
thorough knowledge which marked his speech, and what he said 
would be accepted as truth without question. 

He had a large circle of acquaintances in both public and private 
life. His scrupulous honesty and his unswerving integrity won for 
him a host of friends. He was the confidant of such men as Blaine 
and Hannibal Hamlin. His position as Postmaster of the U. S. 
Senate also brought him in close touch with the Senators and with 
all public and national affairs. 



154 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

His State recognized his worth and sought him for office. His 
name was mentioned as candidate for Governor. But. modest as 
always, he felt he did not care to make the effort necessary to secure 
the nomination ; and although he would have made Elaine an able 
executive, Colonel PUmimer would not give the matter considera- 
tion. 

In the State Legislature, however, he could always be depended 
upon. He was open and brave. His vision was broad and his 
decision wise. More than a half century ago he was urging upon 
our Maine Legislature adoption of the suffrage amendment. At 
last it has been accomplished. And my satisfaction is tinged with 
regret that the victory did not come in his lifetime. 

He asserted his convictions with courage and frankness and with 
purity of purpose. In this connection I recall most pleasantly a 
little incident which aptly illustrates his generous spirit and his fine 
sense of fairness and fitness. In the Maine Legislature in 1901 
Senator Frye's name was to be presented by Colonel Plummer (who 
was twelve years my senior) and I was to second the nomination. 
A few days in advance, however, Mr. Plummer came to me and 
said he felt that inasmuch as Senator Frye and I were from the 
same county, / ought to present the name and he would second it. 
A little thing — but typical of the thorough gentleman I always found 
him. 

Our close personal friendship ripened and intensified with each 
passing year and continued throughout his life. Often have I been 
a guest in his home and always received a most gracious welcome. 
I was favored to see and to know him intimately and to value his 
sterling qualities. Though retiring and reserved, he loved his fel- 
low men ; and in the warmth of his own fireside he became the 
genial, expansive, entertaining host. 

His home life was ideal. He and his wife were exceptionally 
companionable. Theirs was a spiritual union and a loving devotion 
seldom equalled. Together husband and wife discussed the ques- 
tions of the day, of national and international importance ; and in 
Mrs. Plummer he found a sympathy and an understanding and a 
response that is as enviable as it is rare. 

At his death he left her the sole executrix of his estate. And 
it seems particularly appropriate that the home which afforded them 
so much comfort and happiness should now, through his generosity 
and in honor of his father and mother, be made a mem0ri.1l hos- 
pital affording comfort and relief to humanity. 



^ . 



GENEL\LOGY OF THE SIMMONS FAMILY 



00 



Although he never paraded his religion. Colonel Plummer was 
full of reverence and he lived a Christian life. He sent forth his 
quiet influence ; he left his message to the world ; he was beloved 
by all who knew him. I shall ever hold in high esteem the memory 
of this friend whose nobility of character will be an inspiration 
and whose life is worthy of emulation. 



A Genealogy 

OF A FEW LINES 

OF THE 

SIMMONS FAMILY OF MAINE AND MASSACHUSETTS. 

Descendants of 

MOSES SIMMONS (MOYSES SYMONSON). 

"FORTUNE," 1621. 

(by FREDERICK JOHNSON SIMMONS.) 

MOSES SIMMONS (MOYSES SYMONSON). 

The early records have revealed little regarding the ancestry of 
Moses Simmons (formerly written Moyses Symonson, also Simon- 
son, Symons, Simons), who came in the ship " Fortune'' in 1621. 
Some one has suggested that Moyses Symonson may belong to the 
same family as Samuel Symonson who came to New York in 1640 
and whose ancestors have been traced back two hundred years. 
There appears to be some basis for this Dutch ancestry theory since 
all the early accounts state that Closes Simmons was born in Leyden, 
Holland, of Dutch parents, and Edward Winslow wrote that 
'' Moses Simmons was a chiM of one that was in communion with 
the Dutch Church at Leyden. and as being admitted into Church 
fellowship at Plymouth in New England and his children also to 
Baptism as well as our own." 

The members of the Simonson family in New England soon 
dropped the " on " and some added an "m," giving the name the 
present spelling. This change in spelling together with the fact that 
there arc many of the same name in England has led some to 
believe that the Simmons family is of English origin, possibly con- 
nected with Symonds or Simonds of Dorcet. Somerset, Gloucester, 



'V/: 






136 SPR-\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Norfolk, etc. There was a Roger Simmons, a probable member 
of the Pilgrim Church at Leyden. Holland. His ancestry may 
throw some light on the antecedents of the American Simmons 
family. 

It is known that Moses Simmons came to Plymouth, Mass., in 
the ship " Fortune " in 1621 and had land allotted to him. The 
lot, Mr. Davis has written, was probably either where stands the 
Samoset House, or a lot on Cushman street, Plymouth, Mass. 
" In the division of land made in 1623, he received one acre, beyond 
the first brooke, to the woods westward," and in March 28, 1628, 
he sold one acre of land to Robert Hicks, " lying on the north side 
of the town." In the division of cattle May 22, 1627, the first lot, 
consisting of the " Four black heifers that came in the ' Jacobs,* 
and the two ' sheegoats ' fell to Francis Cooke and his company, 
among whom was Moses Simonson." 

A list of a few of those in the Colony (1633) who paid taxes by 
order of the Court, shows their comparative wealth. ^Ir. William 
Collier's tax was two pounds five shillings, while that of some 
others, Moses Simmons among them, w^as nine shillings each. 
Preceding the list of tax-payers and assessments is the following 
court order (Ply. Col. Rec.) ; "According to an order in Court 
held 2nd of January in the seaventh yeare of the reigne of or 
sovereigne lord, Charles, by the grace of God, King of Engl., Scotl., 
France & Irel., defender of the faith & c, the p'sons heere under 

menconed were rated for publicke use by , to be brought in 

by each p'son as they are heere under written, rated in corne. at 
V. s. p bushell, at or before the last of November next ensuing, to 
such place as shall be heereafter appointed to receive the same. 
And for default heere of, the value to be doubled, and accordingly 
leavied by the publick officer for yt end ''**. The 25 March. 1623, 
(Wynslow Govr) Moses Symons' tax was nine shillings; the same 
the 2^ of March 1634; 7th March 1636-7 (Bradford Govnor), 
Moyses Symonson among the list of freemen. 

The 5th March 1638-9 fPrence Govnor) Plymouth Colony Rec. 
under Presentments by the Grand Enquest. we find the following, 
" John Roe, William Sherman, Moyses Symons p sented for drink- 
ing tobaccoe contrary to order." " Pd. 12^." (Plymouth Court 
Laws) 

" It is enacted by the Court that any p'son or p'sons that shall be found 
smoaking of tobacco on the Lord's day; going to or from the meetinges 



GENEALOGY OF THE SIMMONS FAMILY 137 



within two miles of the meeting house shall pay twelve pence for every such 
defaults to the Collonie's use." 

Moses Simmons was in Duxbury, Mass., in 1637, ^^ he was at 
that time one of a Jury of (12), tvv'elve, " to set forth heigh wages." ^ 
The court order is as follows; 2 May 1637 (Bradford Gou), 

"It was ordered by the Court that a jury should be empanelled to set forth 
the heigh wages about Plymouth, Ducksborrow, and the Eele River, wch was 
accordinge sumoned, and upon the ninth day of May next after they appeared 
before the Gounor and tooke their oathes to lay forth such heigh wages about 
the townes of Plymouth, Ducksborrow. & the Eele River equally & justly, 
Wthout respect of pson, and accordinge as they shall be directed by informa- 
con of others, & as God should direct them in their discretion for the genall 
good of the colony, and with as little pjudice to any man's pticular as may 
be, and to marke the treeys upon said way, and so it to remayne a way for- 
ever." 

John Done Francis Cooke ^ 

Willam Palmer Richard Burnes 

Loue Brewster Moyses Symons 

Experience Mitchell Robte Bartlet 

Phillip Delanoe Richard Higgens 

Thomas Cushman 

In 1638-9 Moses Simmons received a grant of forty (40) acres 
of land in Duxburv* ; in 1643 he was on the list of those able, " to 
bear arms ; " in 1645 ^^'^s one of the 54-6 original proprietors of 
Bridge water. Mass. (Satucket). (Each proprietor had one share 
which included land four (4) miles C' every way where they shall 
set up their centre''). Moses Simmons at an early date sold his 
right in Bridgewater to Nicholas Byram. 

Excerpt of deed-record at State House, Boston and at Plymouth, Mass. 
I, Moses Simons of Duxborrow, in New Plymouth Collonie with the Consent 
of my wife, Sarah, for Valuable Consideration have bargained, sold, etc * "^^ * 
to Nicholas Byram of Weymouth * * * my whole Right of land in Bridge- 
water town * * * etc. 

In 1646 we find Moses Simmons on the list of freemen of Dux- 
bury. (A freeman Jias a right to take part in the elections and' 
other business of the Colony. However church membership was 
a prerequisite for the right until 1686, and thereafter a certificate 
of good moral character from the pastor was required. In 1664 
the Church membership qualification was partially given up.) 



C) The copyist may have erred; high ways probably intended in original 
text. 



Sf 



138 SPR-\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



The colonial records for March 7, 1652 state that Moses Sim- 
mons had one of the thirty-four (34) shares, "of a tract extending 
3 miles E. of the E. part of the river or bay called Acushena, and 
see alonge the sea side to the river called Coaksett lying on the \V. 
side of point prill — , and extending 8 miles into the woods." 

Moses Simmons was a surveyor in EKixbury in 1657 and 1662 ; 
was one of the original purchasers of "Old Dartmouth'' (New 
Bedford) and in 1662 one of the proprietors of Middleborough, 
his lot being the i8th ' bounded with a red oak and a Walnut tree 
Marked ; ' "October 25, 1668, on jury to settle difference between 

t Winslow brothers." 

[ The following excerpts from the early Plymouth Colony, and 

Duxbury records may prove of value in determining the place of 
Moses Simmons' house. 

At a Court of Assistants held the second of January 1636-7 (Pl.y Col. Rec.) 
there was granted to Edmond Chandlor fourty acres of land lying on the 
east side of Moyses Symonson, where Morris formly began to clear for Mr. 
Bowman (This was made voyd &: 60 acres granted afterwards "March 20, 
1636-7 (Bradford Governor)," granted "To Mr. V'incent, hey ground be- 
tweene !Moyses Symons' field and the landes lately given to Edmond Chaund- 
ior, toward that wch is appynted to Colyer; April 2, 1638 (Bradford Gouv- 
enor)" three score acres of landes are granted to Edmond Chandlor. Dux- 
borrow side and to be layd forth by Captain Standish and Mr. Alden, wch 
was accordingly layd forth on the northeast side of the land graunted to 
Moyses Symons, and ranging as his doth in length North by east and south 
and by west from the marked trees;'' February 4. 1638-9 (Prence Goun) 
Mr. Alden, Jonathan Brewster, and Willam Basset are appoynted to lay forth 
Edmond Chaundler's landes, and Moyses Sj-monson's landes. as likewise the 
landes granted to Solomon Lenner ; " On the same date. " Moyses Symons 
is granted forty acrees of land on Duxborrow side, lying next to the garden 
plotts, some comon lands being left betwixt, ranging north and by west, and 
south and by east in breadth, north east and by east, and south west and by 
west from the marked trees, and next to the landes graunted to Edmond 
Chaunlor on the south west sides." 

Dec. I, 1663 Upon complaint of Samuel Chandler, "that the range of the 
land is not sett betwixt Moses Simons and himselfe, the Court have ordered 
Willam Paybody, Phillip DeDlanoy, and Leiftenant Nash to run the range 
of the said land according to their best intelligence and with the best care 
they can;" .\ugust i, 1665 (Prence Gour) "The Major Winslow. .Anthony 
Snow, John Bourne, and Willam Paybody are appointed by the Court to 
rectify a difference and Controversy between Moses Simons and Samuel 
Chandeler, in reference unto bounds of theire lands where they now inhabite 
in Duxburrow." 



%.. 



GENEALOGY OF THE SBIMOXS FAMILY 139 



May I, i656 (Prence Gour) "Whereas by an order of Court bearing date 
of the first of August 1665. Major Winslow, Anthony Snow, John Bourne 
and Willam Pa^-body, were appointed and impowered to issue a difference 
between Moses Simons and Samuel Chandeler in reference to the bounds of 
theire lands where they now dwell ; in order therunto, wee, the above 
named, mett upon the place on the 28th of March 1666, and having seen 
both theme, viewed the bounds on the out sides of both theire lotts, and 
heard what could bee said on both sides, wee judge there is a mistake in 
ranging Edmond Chandeler's land north and by east between Moses Simons 
and him. \rhereas the other ranges on both sides are north and by west, 
wee settled the range between from an old root in the conor of Moses 
Simons his orchyard, north and by west to a little Walnutt above the orch- 
yard, and thence to a stake and heap of stones, and so up to a great blacke 
oak marked on four sides north and by east and south and by west through- 
out. 

In witness whereof we have heerunto sett our hands " Josiah Winslow, 
John Bourne, Anthony Snow and William Paybody " Duxbury records 
Volume, Page 2zs^ under da::e of Juae 5, 1665. 

" We whose names are below written, were empanelled upon a Jury for 
laying forth of a sufficient footway through the land of Moses Simons 
and Samuel Chandler, the which we have done according to our best discre- 
tion and bounded it as follows, that is to say, from the east side of the land 
of Samuel Chandler, unto the west side of the land of Moses Simons, 
marked out as follows, with six small saplings in the land of Samuel Chand- 
ler and so unto four dry stakes in the land of Moses Simons, and so unto 
five green stakes, which reaches the other way. 

I have read the statement that Thomas of Scituate, Mass., whom 
Davis, Barry, Mitchell, and W'insor give as son of Moses Simons, 
was a brother, and that John of Freetown was a cousin, also that 
Moses Simmons was not married in 1627. I have seen no records 
that would verify this statement. But I do believe, after investi- 
gating, that Moses ( i) and Moses. Jr. (2) as given by earlier 
writers are one and the same. Therefore I give here Moses Sim- 
mons who married Sarah (- ) and came in the " Fortune " 

1621 and died ''very aged" in 1689, (Probably 1691 Sept.) as 
an inventory was made Sept. 10, and psented Sept. 15, 1691. 

The will of Moses Simmons follows : 

The last Will and Testament of Moses Simons : I Being aged and full of 
Decaye but in my Right and perfect understanding and not knowing of the 
day of my Death Do will that my Estate shall thus be Disposed of after my 
Decease ; In the name of God amen. 

Item I. I do will and bequeath my Body to the Grave and that it be 
decently Buried and funerall charges defrayed out of my Estate before any 
legacie. And my Soul to God that Gave it me whome I trust hath Re- 
deemed it 



I40 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Item 2. I do will that all my personall Debts be paid out of my personall 
Estate- 
Item 3. I Will and Bequeath to my Daughter Mary the wife of Joseph 
Alden four pounds : 

Item 4. I Will and Bequeath to my son Aaron four pounds : 
Item 5. I do will and Bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth now the wife 
of Richard Dwelley five shillings. 

Item 6. I do will and Bequeath to my Daughter Sarah now the wife of 
James Xash two pounds ten shillings of which the said James hath two 
pounds five shillings in his hands already. 

Item 7. I do will and Bequeath to my son John four pounds. 
Item 8. I do will constitute ordaine & appoint my son John to be exec- 
utor of this my last Will and Testament — So desireing that all my children 
may be at peace after my decease I do to these presents set my hand and 
seal this seventeenth day of June in the year of our Lord God one thousand 
six hundred eighty and nine. 

In the presence of The mark M of 

Thomas Delano Moses Simons (Seal) 

David Alden 
Benjamin Chandler 

David Alden and Thomas Delano two of the witnesses here named made 
oath before the County Court at Plymouth Sept. 15th 1691 That they were 
present and Saw the above named Moses Simons Signe seal and heard him 
declare the above written to be his last Will and Testament and that to the 
best of their judgment he was of Disposing mind and Memory when he so 
did 
■ Attest Saml Sprague Cler 

Inventory of the estate of Closes Simons late of Ehixbury taken 
Sept. 10, 1691, by Thomas Delano and Edward South worth. 
Amount- 53 pounds 11 shillings. Presented at Court by John Sim- 
■mons son of the Deceased Sept. 15, 1691. 

The children of Moses Simmons and Sarah ( ) were: 

/ 

I 

Rebecca Simmons (Eldest daughter) M. (about 1655) John Soul (George). 
Mary Simmons M. (about 1664) Joseph Alden. 
Elizabeth Simmons M. (about 1690) Richard Dwelley. 

Aaron Simmons 

Sarah Simmons M. James Nash. 

Jahn Simjrnons M. Nov. 16, 1669, Mercv Pabodie. 

Note— 16-/ 2> ('Winslow Gov) Ply. Co!. Rec. Richard Sutton of 
Roxberr}', made a complaint against a Moses Symons and wife 



*f 



GENEALOGY OF THE SHLMONS FAMILY 141 



Sarah for not allowing their daughter Elizabeth to marry him 
(Elizabeth having promised). The Court let Moses Symons pay 
Sutton 3^ for time spent around the premises and Elizabeth and 
Sutton were released from their engagement. 

June 2, 1662, Moses Simonson had land (accomodation) (be- 
cause having one of the first children borne of this government) 
from land purchased by Major Winslow and Captaine South worth. 

Second Generation. 

21 2 

Rebecca Simmons (Moses) called "Eldest daughter" married John Soule 
I 
(George). 

Plymouth Record of Deeds 1674 * *^ * 

" Moses Simons of Duxburrow * * * yoeman * * * jn consideration of 
a marriage beertofore consumated ; between John Soule of Duxburrow 
aforesaid and my eldest Daughter Rebeckah ; have Given * * * and for- 
ever quite Claimed * * * unto the said John Soule etc * * * all my Rights 
etc * * * of and unto all my purchased Lands at Namaskett ; and places 
(adjacent Granted by the Court of New Plymouth unto the firstComers, 
whereof I. the said Moses Simons ame one. as by the Records appeer." 
Date of Deed is Dec. 30, 1674. 

3 5 3 3 

The children were: Benjamin, Joseph, Josiah, Zachariahe. 

3 
Moses Soule M. Mercy Southworth, 2nd Sarah Chandler. 

3 
James Soule, 

3 
John Soule M. Martha Tinkham. He died May 19, 1747. 

3 2 I 

Aaron Soule (John, George) married Mary Wadsworth, who died May 
9, 1741, aged 7^- and is buried at Pembroke, Mass. 

I 3 

John Simmons (2) (Moses), married 16 Nov. 1669, Mercy Pabodie 

(William, John.) She was born Jan. 2, 1649. The first mention I find of 
John Simmons is in the Plymouth Colony Rec. under date of July 5, 1666, 
(Prence Gour) and is as follows: " Att this Court, Edward Land and 
John Cooper, and John Simons for prophane and abusive carriages each 
towards other, on the Lord's day, att the meeting house at Duxiborrow, 
were sentenced to pay each of them, a fine of ten shillinges to the use of 
the countrey; the said John Cooper, being most faulty was adjudged worthy 
of Corporal! punishment; but forasmuch as in some sort hee tooke to the 
evill with some manifestation of sorrow, the aforesaid fine of ten shillinges 
was accepted for satisfaction for this time." 



^ 



€^ 



142 SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



A few years after John Simmons' marriage to Mercy Pabodie, the daugh- 
ter of William Pak)die, who was town clerk of Duxbury from 1642 to 1683, 
we find ontHe' Col. Rec. under datet of July 7, 1674 (Winslow Gov) that, 
" John Simmons is graunted liberty by the Court, and with the Consent alsoe 
of the propfiators of Pocassett. to erect an house there, on condition hee 
keep a sufficient ferry there ; and likewise to keep an ordinan.' for the enter- 
tainment of travellers and strangers, soe as hee keep good orders and pre- 
vent abuses that may be occationed thereby." The Court under date of 
Nov. I, 1676 ordered a ferry to be built at Pocasset. It was to be laid forth 
by Mr. Xath'l Thomas, William Peabody and Capt. Church and John Sim- 
mons was allowed to keep the ferry for five years. Some, however, used 
their own or other's boats between ferry points and therefore John Sim- 
mons was given authority by the Court 1677 to seize all boats attempting 
to cross and to fine users, one-half of fine to go to colony, the other half 
to John Simmons. In 1676 John Simmons and Capt. Benj. Church. " leas- 
sers " at Pocassett by authority of the Court, but we find under date of 
July 7, 1682 (Hinckley Gov.) (probably after the five years lease limit) that 
" Att this Court the lycence graunted to John Simons to keep an ordinary 
is.called in." 

^ In 1678 John Simmons was constable of Duxbury and Winsor says, "This 
was an office of high trust and responsibility, and none were elected to it, 
but men of good standing." Methinks John had learned, since his youthful 
days, when in 1666 he was presented before Court and fined ten shillings 
for " Profane and abusive carriages," at Duxbury meeting house, the use- 
ful lesson that it is right and indeed wise to check as well as bridle one's 
tongue. Possibly the association with buch a responsible man as his father- 
in-law Wilham Pabodie. may have furthered his civic understanding. John 
Simmons was chosen " Suruerghor " of Duxbury, June 2, 1685 (Huckley 
Gov.). 

Duxbur>' Records under date May 24, 1686, " At a Town Meeting held in 
Duxborough Maj- 24th, 1686, The town granted to John Simons 4 or 5 
acres of land, or thereabout, lying between his father's land, and William 
Thomas's land." 

Recorded by 

ALEXANDER STANDISH. Town Clerk. 
Same date. According to a grant of land by the town, given to John Sim- 
mons at the head of his land, to run his lines until he meets 
with the land of Mr. William. Thomas, it was accordingly done 
by us, from his corner marks on the South West side, which 
was a white oak. to a white oak tree, to a swamp, and by the 
said swamp to the land of William Thomas on the North East 
side, by the line of said Simone's land, until we came to the 
land of William Thomas returned by us. 
THOMAS DELANO 
JOHN SOULE 
ALEXANDER STANDISH, Town Clerk. 



' 



GENEALOGY OF THE SIMMONS FAMILY 143; 



" Att this meeting ^lay ;>ist, 1688 the town granted that the two acres of 
meadow, formerly called Moses Simonson's, and lying below James Thomas 
is upon the South river, that it shall be laid forth and recorded to John 
Simonson " Dux. Rec : 28 May 1689," John Simonson * * * to be their sur- 
veyors for this year;" "and the town chose for the Court of Assistants, 
John Simonson and Joseph Turner to serve on the Petty jur>-" (1690); 
also "of John Simonson and Samuel Seabury to serve as petty Jurors, at the 
Quatter Session; 7 march 1709-10. "At a Town Meeting in Duxborough 
March 7th, Elnathan Westor, Joseph Peterson. John Simons. Senr, Thomas 
Dilonoe Senr, Joseph Kein Junr. Mr. Edward Southworth and Samuel 
Chandler entered their protest against all the acts made at a Town Meeting 
in Duxborrough Jany. 30th, 1709-10 for dividing the town's Commons, the 
said meeting being continued b}- adjournment till the 7th of March above 
Said. 

pr 

SAMUEL S PRAGUE, 

Town Clerk. 

About the time of John Simmons' m.arriage to Mercy Paybody, his father 
1 
Moses Simmons deeded to him some of his homestead. (1669 Prence Govr) 
as follows: (Records at State House, Boston and at Plymouth). 

To all people to whom these p'sents shall come Moses Simons of Duxbur- 
row in the Jurisdiction of New Plymouth in New England Plantor sendeth 
Greeting, Know yea that the said Moses Simons for and in Consideration 
of the tone and naturall affection and for other valuable causes and con- 
siderations him thereunto especally moueing hath given graunted enfeofe'l 
and confermed and by these p'snts doih give — graunt enforfe and conferme 
unto John Simons his true and naturall son all that his dwelling house out 
houses and buildings land meddow and upland orchyards and gardens sittuate 
in Duxburrow aforesaid whether obtained by free graunt or purchased of 
other p'sons lying in Duxburrow to the land of Edmond Chandeler in the 
South and to the Garden Plotts in the North containing forty acrees more 
or lesse of Upland; three acrees of meddow more or lesse with two acrees 
of meddow more or lesse att little wood Island in the great Marsh with 
all his Right, etc., etc. 

John Simons may record gift of deed, — " but the said John Simons shall 
not enter upon the p'mises or any p'te or p'sell whatsoever until the death 
of his father Moses Simons." In Witness etc., etc. 

Signed, sealed and delivered in the p'sents of us 

JOHN SOULE MOSES SIMONS 

JONATHAN ALDEN 

This deed was acknowledged by Moses Simons Senrs' the 27th of the 
2cond Month 1669 before mee 

JOHN ALDEN, Assistant 

Edmond Chand>r was indebted to Moses Simons in 1662; Sam- 
uel Chandler's estate in 1683 to John and Moses Simons. 

(To be continued) 



^.v 



w^ 



^, 



'%.';:^j^>:l r-::-/. ;?^:if^*-| :r^^ 



144 SPR-\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

An Alphabetical Index of Revolu- 
tionary Pensioners Living 
in Maine 

(Compiled by Charles A. Flagg, Librarian, Bangor 
(Maine) Public Library.) 

(Continued from page 39.) 

This index began in Vol. V, No. 4, Nov., Dec, 1917; Jan., 1918. In that 
number may be found an introduction and explanation of sources and abbre- 
viations. 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. Age. County. 



'35d Gage, Amos N. H. line Private 

I 
'35d Gage, DanieL . 



74 



•40 

*40 Gage, Louis 

'3oc Gaitskill, William . 



N. H Sergeant . . i73 or 

i - I 74 
i 79 
: ' 81 

Mass. line Private ... 70 



'35d Gale, Daniel 

'35d Gamage, Joshua. . . 

'3od Gammon, David . . 

'3od Gammon, Joseph. . 

'35d Gammon, Joshua. . 

'40 Gammon, Joshua. . 

'35d Gammon, Moses . . 

'35d Gammon, Samuel . 

'40 Gammond, Joseph. 



Mass. line Private . 

Mass. state. . . . Sergeant 

Mass. mil Private . 

Mass. state. . . . Private . 

Mass. mil Private . 



Remarks. 



Oxford 
Oxford 



Oxford . . . 
Oxford . . . 
Kennebec 



73 Somerset . . . 

79'Oxford. 

790xford. 

73 Oxford 

I 
71* Penobscot. 
78, Cumber land 



Mass. line Pvt.&Serg. 84 Oxford. 

Mass. line Private ... 79 Oxford. 

76, Oxford. 



'3oc 
'35c 
'3oc 

'40 



Gardiner, Charles . . Mass. line Private ... 61 Lincoln. . . . 

Gardiner, Elijah. . . . .Mass. line Bomb'dier 82 Washington 

Gardiner, John Cont. navy. . . . Seaman. . . 75 Oxford 

I 
Gardner, John 79 Oxford 



'35d Gardner, Jonathan . Mass. line Private 

'40 Gardner, Sarah 

'35c Garland, James .... Mass. line Private 

'35c Garnett, Daniel. . . . Mass. line Private 

'35c Gitehell, Benjamin. Mass. line Private 

'40 Gatchell. William 



'35d Gattchell, Nathaniel Mass. mil. 



Private 



'35d Gattchell, William. . Mass. mil Private 



'40 Gawen, Mary 

'35c Gedding, Samuel. , 
'35d Genthner, Andrew 



N. H. line Private 

Mass. mil Private 



40 Gentner, .Vrulrev 

'35c George, Francis. . . . Mass. line Private 

'40 George, Francis 

'40 Georfje, M <ir jarel ... 

'20 George, Thomas. . . . N. H. line Private 

'35c George, Thomas. . . . Mass. line Private 



74 Oxford. 

73 Oxford 

83 Penobscot. 
69 Washington 

68 Cumberland 

84 Cumberland 

I 

79 Cumberland 



1 
77. Cumberland 

73 York 

74 Oxford 

76 Lincoln .... 
81 Lincoln. . . . 
76 Kennebec . . 
77i Kennebec . . 
78lLincoln. . . . 



('20,'31b).d. Aug. 

29, 1833. 
C:0). 

Res. Bethel. 
Res. Waterford. 
('20) d. July 29, 
1820. 

(•20). 



Same as G a m- 
mond? 

iRes. Cape Eliza- 
i beth. 
('20, also '35c). 

Res. Norway. 
I Same as Gam- 
! mon, J.? 

(•20)d. in 1824. 

('20). 

Same as Gardner, 
J.? 

Res. Oxford. 

Same as Gardi- 
ner, J.? 

Res. Buckfield. 

('20) d. Oct. 19, 
1819. 

('20) d. Jan. 5, 
1827. 

Res. Brunswick. 
S ime as Gatt- 
chell, W. 

d. Jan. 12, 1833. 
See also Gett- 
chell, Gitchel & 
Gaitskill. 

S rn<? as Gatcheil, 
W. 

Res. Wells. 

('20). 

Same as following. 

Res. Waldoboro. 

('20). 

Res. Leeds. 

iRes. Thomaston. 



80 Penobscot. 



REVOLUTIONARY PENSIONERS IN MAINE 



145 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. Age. 



County. 



Remarks. 



•35d 



'40 
'35c 



'40 

•Sod 

'35d 

'35d 

'35d 

•40 

•35c 

'35d 

•35d 

'40 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

•35c 

•35c 

'40 

'3oc 

'35c 

'3od 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 

'3od 

'40 



'35d 

'40 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

'40 



'35d 

'35c 

'40 

'20 

'3.5d 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 
'35c 

[40 
'35c 



'40 
•20 
'35c 



Gerrish, Timothy. . . Mass. state. 



Getchell, Sarah 

Getchell, Seth Mass. line . 



Pvt.& Sea- 
man. 



Private 



Gettchell. Joseoh. . Mass. state. . . Pvt. of art. 

Gettchell. Nathaniel Mass. mil Private . . . 

Gibbs. Elisha Mass. line iPrivate . . . 

Gibbs, Pelatiah .... Mass. line Private . . . 



I Private 
i Private 



Gibson, James Mass. line. . 

Gibson, John Mass. mil. . . 

Gidding, Samuel. . . See Gedding.. . . j 

Gilbert, Samuel. . . . Mass. line Private 

Gilbert. Samuel .... 1 

Gilbreth, Benjamin I 

Gilchrist, Samuel. . . R. I. line Private 

Giles, John Ma.ss. line Private 

Giles, Joseph X. H. line Private 

I 

Gilford, John Jr. . . . Mass. line IPrivate 

Gilford, John I 

Gilkev, James Mass. line Private 



70 York. 

84 Washington 
SO Kennebec . . 



86 Kennebec . . 
77 Washington. 
72 Waldo. 
81 Penobscot. 
76 Oxford. 

83 Oxford 

81 Penobscot. 
71 Washington. 



75 Oxford. 
78 Oxford . . . 
56 Kennebec 
80 Lincoln. . 

76 York 

77 York 



Gillman, Ezekiel. . 
GillTatrick, James.. 
Gillpatiick, Joseph 



X. H. line Private . . . 

M ss. li'-e iPrivate . . . 

Mass. line [Private . . . 

Gillpatrick, Joshua . Mass. mil iPrivate . . . 



Gillpatrick. X'th'iel Mass. 

Gilman, Da\-id 

Gilman, Jonathan. . X. H. 
Gilman.Peter widow. X. H. 

Gilman, Peter Mass. 

Gilman, Sarah 



line iPrivate 

I 



line iPrivate 

line Private 



70 York 

76 York 

— York 

89 Somerset. 

75 Yok. . . . 
70 York.... 

77 York.... 

76 York.... 



Res. Machias. 

I "20^ See ako 
Gaitskill, Gat- 
chell and Git- 
chel. 

Res. Waterville. 



Res. Livermore. 



Res. Buckfield. 
Res. Augusta. 
-■20! . 
d. in 1825. 
.«'20) d. Sept. 3, 
' 1S23. 

,Same as Guilford. 
Res. HoUis. 
('20). 



mil. 



Private 



Gilmore, Samuel . . . Mass. line iPrivate 



JGilpatrick, Joshua 

|GiIpatrick, X'th'iel Mass. line Private . . 

Ginings, Eliphatet . . ! 

jGitchel, Xathaniel | 



73 York. 
75 Penobscot 
84 Waldo. 
83 Lincoln. 
80 Somerset. 
82 Kennebec 



69 Penobscot 
77 Penobscot 
82 York 



Given, John 

Glass, Consider. . 
Glass, Consider. . 

Glass, John 

Gledden, Andrew 
Glidden, Arnold. 
Glidden, Arnold. . 
Glidden, Gideon. 



Glines, Israel. . . . 
Goddard, Josiah. 

Godding, Samuel. 
Coding, Spencer., 



Mass. line. 
Mass. line . 



Pvt. ASerg. 
Private . . . 



SOor 
81 
72 
81 



Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 



Private. 
Pvt.&Serg. 
Private . . . 



Lincoln . . 
Franklin 
Waldo . . 



Cumberland 



Penobscot. 
Piscataquis 



X. H. line Private 



Mass. mil. 
ilass. line. 



Private . 
Private . 



84 Waldo. 
79 Penobscot . . 
87 Penobscot . . 
79 Kennebec . . 

81 Oxford. 

59; Lincoln. . . . 



•35d GofF, James. 



Mass. line. 
Mass. line . 



Gold, Xoah M 

Goldthwait, Philip 



Mass. line. 
Mass. line . 



Private . . . 

'Pvt.. Corp. 
i & Serg. 



Private . 
Private . 



80| Cumberland 
67 1 Kennebec . . 



74 ^Cumberland 
80 Cumberland 



67 



'3oe Goldthwait, Philip . 2d dragoons . . . Dragoon 

I. ! 

'40 Goldthwait, Tim'thy 



78 



York. 
York. 



Kennebec 



"■'•20). 
t"20, "31 b). 
Res. Kennebunk. 
Same as Gilpat- 
• rick, J. 

Res. Xewburg. 



Res. Water\-ille. 
See also Gill- 
man. 

i'20). 

Res. Brewer. 
■.Res. Lyman. Same 
1 as Gillpatrick, J. 
•("20 Gillpatrick). 

Res. Farniington. 

Res. Xorthport. 
j See also Gaits- 
j kill, Gatchell & 
1 Getchell. 
,('20). 

^■'20). 
Res. Guilford. 



r20). 

Res. Howland. 
("20). See also 
I Gledden. 

!('20) d. June 5, 

1821. 
.Res. Poland. 
('20^ d. April 4, 
I 1819. 

.;('20). 

.Res. Minot. 
Same as Gould. 
iC20 '31b Gold- 
i thwait '29). 
d. Nov. 25, 1832.- 
I M. Goldthwait, 
I widow. See also 
1 Zouldthwait. 
(*20). Res. Au- 
1 gusta. 



146 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



f I 

Rank. 'Age.' County. 



Remarks. 



'35d Gol dt h w a i t h e. 

Timothy 

*3od Gooch, Jedediah . . . 

'3oc Goodale, Zachariah. 
'3od Goodenow, John . . . 
'40 Goodin, John 



'40 Goodmon, John . 
'35c Goodridge, Benj . 



'3od 

'35d 

•40 

'3oc 

'35d 

•40 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 

'35c 

'40 

'35e 



Mass. hne Private . . . 

Mass. mil Pvt. rf art. 

Mass. line Private . . . 

Mass. line Private . . . 

X. H. line Private . . . 



72 Kennebec 



81 York. 



92 York. . 
82 Oxford. 
77 Oxford , 



Mass. line Private 



89 Oxford . 
76 York. . 



'3oc Goodwin, Aaron. . . . jCont. navy .... Mariner. 

'35d Goodwin, Adam. . . . Mass, line Private 

'35d Goodwin, Aniaziah .;N. H. line Private 

'40 Goodwin, Amaziah . 

'3od Goodwin, .\nios. . . . 'Mass. mil Private 

'35d Goodwin, Benjamin. Mass. state 

'35c Goodwin, Benjamin. ^lass. line Private 

MO Goniwin, Eunice j 

'35c Goodwin, George. . . Mass. line Private 

'40 Goodwin, George. . . ! 

'35c Goodwin, Jacob. . . . I Mass. line Private 



73 York 

76 York 

75 York. 

77 York 

79 York. 

80 York. 

66 York 

72 York 

75 Kennebec 
77 Franklin . 
80 Lincoln . . 



Goodwin, John 'Mass. mil Private . 

Goodwin, Joseph. . . Mass. mil Private . 

Goodwin, i) am 

Goodwin, Paul ^Mass. line Private . 

Goodwin, Reuben . . Mass. line Private . 



68 Oxford . . . 
82 Somerset. 

76 York 

87 York 

72 York 



Mass. line Private . . 

Mass. line Corporal . 



Goodwin, Reuben 
Goodwin, Richard 
Good>rin, Ru'fi ... 

Goodwin, Simeon. . . iMass. line Private 

Googins, David. . . . ]X. H. mil Private 

Googins, Stephen. . . Mass, line Private 



iGookin, Daniel N. H. line Lieutenant 



79 York 

60 York 

SO Cumberland 

74 York 

71 York 

74! York. 

80, York 

86lYork 

— York 



'40 Goold, Alexander. 



88 



York. 



'35c Goold, Daniel Mass. line Private ... 76 York. 



'40 Goold, John . 



'35d Goold, Joseph Mass. line Private . 

'31b Gorden, Joseph Private . 

'40 Gordin, Josiah ' 

'35c Gordon, Benjamin. . R. I. line Private . 

'35c Gordon, Caleb Mass. line Private . 



'20 

'35c 

'35e 

•40 

'35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'35c 

•40 

'20 

'35d 

'35d 
•40 
'35d 
•35c 



Gordon, James. . . 
Goidon, James. . . 
Gordon, Joseph. . 



X. H. line Private 

Mass. line iPrivate 

X. H. line. .. 
2d regt. 



Gordon, Joseph. ... X". H. line Piivate 

Gordon, Josiah Mass. line iPvt. of art. 

Gore, Jacob Mass. line 'Private . . . 

Gorham, Josiah .... Mass. line 'Fifer 

Goss, Ebenezer H.. . X'. H Surgeon. . . 

Gould, Alexander . . Cont. navy. . . .[Mariner & 

seaman. 
Gould, Daniel Mass. line Private . . . 



85 York 

83 Cumberland 

83 Franklin .. . 

77 Waldo 

68 Kennebec . . 



86 Kennebec. 
— Waldo. 



81 Waldo. . . . 
61 Hancock. . . . | 
77 Kennebec . . . j 
70 Washington. | 

74 Lincoln | 

80 Lincoln I 



('31bGoldthwaite) 

(•20) d. Aug. 22, 

1832. 
d. Sept. 2, 1825. 

Res. Hebron. 
Same as Good- 
win, J. 

Res. Hiram. 

( '20) d. Sept. 4, 
1832. 

d. Sept. 2S, 1827. 

('20, 31b). 

Res. Lyman. 



(•20, '31b). 

Res. Sanford. 

('20). 

Res. Avon. 

Transf. from Mid- 
dlesex Co., 
Mass., 1832. 

Same as Goodin? 

Res. Lebanon. 

(-20). 

('20, 35c. Reuben, 

jr.). 
Res. Lebanon. 
('20). ^ . , 

Res. Lebanon. 

("20). 

,C20). 
Res. Saco. 
iC29) d. Sept. 24, 

1831. Abigail 
i Gookii. widow. 
Res. Elliot (^20, 

mariner ship, 

"Raleigh") 

Same as Gould, 

A. 
Also given Gould. 

('20) d. Dec. 

31, 1825. 
Res. Elliot. Same 

as Gould, J. 

Same as Gordon.J? 
Res. Industiy. 
('20). 

('20) d. July 8, 
1833. 



82 York. 



Gould, Daniel Mass. mil iPvt. of art 

Gould, Jabez Mass. line i Private . . . 

I 



80 Oxford i 

86 Oxford j 

68 Kennebec . . . '; 
80 Kennebec . 



'35d Gould, Jesse . 



Mass. mil. 



Pvt. of art.' 78 Kenn2bec 



Res. Belfast. 
('20, '29 Corp.). 
Same as Gordin, J? 

('20). . 

Res. Edgecomb. 
Same as Gross. 
('31b) Same as 

Goold, A. 
See also Goold. 
Res. Rumford. 
(•20). 
('20) d. Jan. 28, 

1»25. 



REVOLUTIOXARY PENSIONERS IN MAINE 



14: 



List. 



Ser\-ice. 



Rank. Age. County. 



Remarks. 



35c jGoiJd, John 'Mass. line Piivate 

35c Gould, Jonas ;Mass. line Private 



'40 
'40 



'35c 
'3oc 



'35c 
'40 



'20 

'40 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

•40 

'35d 

'40 

^3oc 

'40 

'35c 

'31a 
'40 
'40 
'35c 



'20 
'35c 



Mass. line Private 

Mass. line iPrivate 



Gould. Lev-i. 
Gould, Lucy. 



Gould, Moiiah. . 
Gould, Noah M . 



Gould, Silas Conn, line 

Gould. Silas. 

Gouldthwait, Eliza- See Zouldthwait 

beth Elizabeth .... 

Gove, Jacob Mass 

Gore, L'^is 

Gore, Martha 

Gowell, Benjamin . . Mass. mil 

Gowell, .^u.su/i 

Grace, tliildah ■ . . •• 

Grace, John Mass. state. . . . 



Corporal 



Private 



Giace, Patrick Mass. line. 

Graffnm, barah 

Giaffham, Enoch. . . Mass. line. 



Graff om, Uriah. 
Granger, Daniel. 
Grant, Abigail. . . 
Grant, Edmund. 



X. H. line. 



Grant, Edwaid X. H 

Grant, John Mass. line. 



SOA'ork 

65 Somerset . 



54 Penobscot 
79 Somerset . 



— Somerset . 
2 Kennebec 



75 Kennebec 
83 Franklin . 



Private 
Private 



Private 



Private 
Private 



Private 



Private. 
Quarter- 
master. 



70 York 

69 Washington 

84 York 

— York 

78 Lincoln .... 

73 York. 

79 York 

62 Lincoln .... 
81 Cumberland 

74 Cumbeiland 



78 Washington 

94 York 

80 York 



('20). Same as 

Goold,J. 
('20) d. June 22, 

1819. 
Res. Charleston. 
Res. Xorridge- 

wock. 
('20)d. June.lS27. 
d Sept. 1, 1830. 

Same as Geld. 
■('20^. 
Res. Wilton. 



Same as Gore? 

Res. Limington. 

Res. Lubec. 

(•31cV 

Res. Lebanon. 

Res. Bath. 

Res. Saco. 

(•20, '31b). 

Res. Brunswick. 

(•20) d. Aug. 28, 
1827. 

Deserter. 

Res. Eastport. 

Res. York. 

Transf. fiom Es- 
sex Co., Mass., 
1819. 



80 York ('20) d. Xov.1825 



'35r 


Giant, Joshua 


Mass 


line 


Private . . . 


89 York 


(•20). 


'35c 


Grant, Maitin 


Mass. 


line 


Private . . . 


86 Lincoln 


('20). 


'35d 


Grant, Peter 


Mass 


line 


Private . . . 


77 York. 




3od 


Grant. Sd. s 


Miss. 


md 


Piivate ... 


81 York. 




40d 










.^6 Vcik 


RfS. Lyman. 




'3oc 


Grant, ThoT.a-^ . . . 


Mass. 


li.-ie 


Scrg am . . 


75 Lincoln 


CO! d.i- 1827. 


'. 5c 


Grirt, Willi m.. . . 


X. H. 


!i.:e 


Private . . . 


80 Waldo. 


r20) d. in 1825. 


'35d 


Grant, William 


X. H. 


line 


Private . . . 


7S York. 


1 


'3.5c 


Graves, Samuel. . . . 


X. H. 


line 


Private . . . 


SO Lincoln .... 


{'20>. 


'3oc 


Gray, Aaron 


Mass. 


line 


Private . . . 


87 York 


f'20). 


'35d 


Giav, Alexander . . . 


Mass. 


mil 


Pvt. of ait. 


83 Kennebec. 


1 


'35c 


Gray, John 


Mass. 


line 


Private . . . 


73 Lincoln .... 


('20) d. Dec. 2o, 
t 1825. 
('20. Greeley). 


'3.=)d 


Gieely, Xoah 


X. H. 


line 


Private . . 


74 Kennebec . . 


'35c 


Gieen, Benjamin. . . 


Mass. 


line 


Private . . . 


79 Cumberland 


("20) d. Aug. 4. 
1824. 


'35d 


Gre€^, Daniel 


Mass. 


line 


Piivate . . . 


78 Cumberland 


d. Jan. 20, 18.33. 


'35c 


Green, Daniel 


Mass. 


line 


Private . . . 


70 Kennebec . . 


(■20). 


':ioc 


Green, Jonathan . . . 


Mass. 


line 


Private . . . 


73 Waldo 


(•20). 


'3oc 


Green, Joseph 


Cont. 


navy .... 


Mids'pm'n 


8.3 Lincoln .... 


('20 mariner, ship 
1 "Ranger") d. 
, May 28, 1822. 


'3.5r 


Greenlaw, John. . . . 


Mass 


line 


Piivite . . . 


70 Oxford 


("20). 


'40 










74 Oxford 

74 Lincoln. . . . 


Res Brownfield. 


'35c 


Greenleaf, Benjamir 


Mass 


line 


Private . . . 


1-20). 


'40 


Greenleaf, Daniel. . 








80 Lincoln. . . . 
80 Oxford 


Res. ^ iscasset. 


'35c 


Mass 


line 


Private . . . 


.:-20). 


'3.5c 


Greenleaf, Enoch. . 


Mass 


line 


Private . . . 


81 Lincoln. . . . 


('20). 


'3.5d 


Greenleaf, John . . . 


Mass 


line 


Private . . . 


79 Somerset . . . 


('20, '31b). 


'40 










84 Somerset . . . 
64 .Somerset . . . 


Res Starks. 


•3.5c 


Gieenough.Jonathar 


Mass 


line 


Private . . . 


d. Sept. 25, 1818. 


'3.5c 


Gieer, James 


X. H 


line 


Private . . . 


— Waldo. 




'40 










81 Waldo 

82 Waldo. 


Res. Belmont. 


'35d 


Giegg, David 


Mass 


state. . . . 


Corp. & 
Serg. 


1 


•40 


Gregory, Luther . . . 






60 Waldo 


Res. Montville. 


'35c 


Gr indie, William. . 


R. I. 


line 


Private . . . 


71 Hancock. . . 


("20) d. Jan. 31, 
, 1820. 


'35d 


Giinnell. Baile.v . . . 


R. L 


state 


Pvt., Corp. 
& Serg. 


74 Lincoln. 


1 
! 


■3.5d 


Giinnell, Rovall.. . 


R. L 


mil 


Private . . . 


79 Lincoln. 


1 


'35d 


Gloat, William. . . . 


Mass 


line 


Private . . . 


80 Waldo. 

1 


1 



:m 



148 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. 'Age.; County, 



Remarks. 



'35d 

•40 

'35d 

•35c 

•20 

'40 

'20 

'20 

•3od 

•3od 

•35d 

'40 

'35c 

•35d 

'40 
'35c 



'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

'40 

•35d 

'35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 

•40 



Gross, Benjamin. . . . Mass. line Private . 

Gross, Benjamin 

Gross, David \Tass. mil Private . 

Gross, Ebenezer H.. X. H. line Surgeon. 

Grouse, George Mass Private. 

Grorer, Elizabeth 

Guilford, John, 1st . Mass Private . 

Guilford, John, Sr . . Mass Private . 

Gunnison, Josiah. . . Mass. state. . . . Piivate . 
Guiney, Eliab Mass. line Private . 

Gurney, Jacob Mass. line Private . 



75 Hancock . . . 
f 5 Hancock. . . 
68 Cumberland 
80 Oxford 



85 Franklin . 



Gurney, Jonathan. 
Gurney, Lemuel. . 



Gurney, Samuel. 
Gustin, Thomas. 



Mass. line Private 



74 Vork. 

77 Cumberland 



— Oxford. 
76 Oxford 

— Oxford . 



r20). 

Res. Bucksport. 

Same as Gos-s. 

Res. Weld. 
Same as Gilford. 



(•20) d. 
1818. 



Nov. 5, 



Mass. mil. 



Pvt. & ma- 
rine. 



Mass. line Private 



'35c Hackett, Elijah. . 

'35c Hackett, Ezekiel. 

•35c ; Hackett, Judah . . 

'20 Hagens, Edmund. 



Mass. line Private. 

Mass. line Private. 

X. H. line Private. 

Mass Private. 



•35d Hager, Ezekiel Mass. mil Private. 

'35c Haines, Samuel. . . . Mass. line Private. 



70 Cumberland. 

76 Cumberland 
78 Cumberland 

69 Cumberland 
72 Kennebec . . 
62 Somerset. . . . 



77 Lincoln. 
81 Kennebec 



Hall, 
Hall, 
Hall 
Hall, 
Hall, 
Hall, 
Hall 
\Hall. 
'35d Hall 

'40 

'35d Hall 
'40 iHall 



Haines, Simeon. ... N. H. line Private. j ' 

Halbrook, David ... | j 75, Waldo . 



Hale, Benjamin. 
Hale, Benjamin . 
Hale, Israel. . . . 



Mass. line Private. 



Mf 



line Private. 



Hale, Oliver ... 

Haley, Joseph Mass. mil Private. 

Haley, Richard Mass. line Private. 



7l'Cumberland 

77, Oxford 

751 Oxford 

80i Oxford 

79;0.xford 

75 York. 
88iYork 



Res. Hebron. 
('20) d. June 25, 
1818. 

Res. Cumberland. 
('20) d. Sept. 4, 

1818. 
f20). 

('20 Hacket) 
i"20, '31b Hacket) 
Same as Higgins 

and Hugens? 
fi. ^far. '7. 1S33. 
('20^d Dec. 29, 

1821. See also- 

Haynes. 

Res. Prospect. 
I Same as Hol- 
1 brook, D.? 
:('20, '31b). 
J Res. Waterford. 
!('20, 'Sib) 

Res. Waterford. 
IRes. Waterford. 



Cahdn Mass. mil Pvt.& Serg. 

Charles Mass. line Private 

Charles 

David Mass. state. . . . P\'t.&Serg. 

Eli 'i^cth ; 

Enoch Mass. mil Private. . . . : 

Enoch Mass. line Private. . . .; 

Hannah . . . ! 

Isaac Mass. mil Private. . . .\ 



Mass. line Pvt.& Corp, 



'35c 
'35c 



Hall, 
Hall. 
Hall, 
Hall. 



•35d 

'20 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'35c Hall. 

'35d iHall, 

'35d JHall, 

'40 I Hall, 

'35c Hall, 



Hall, 
Hall, 



Isaac . . . 
Isaac ... 

Jabez Mass. line Private . . . . 1 

Job Mass. line Private j 

John Mass. mil Surg's m'te 

Joseph X. H Private. 

Joseph Mass. line Private 

Levi Mass. line 1 Private i 



'35c 
'40 
'35c 
'35d 

'40 
'35c 



Luther. . . 
X'oah .... 

Oliver 

Rhodu 

William Mass. line 



Mass. line Private : 

Mass. state. . . . Lt.& Corp. 
Mass. mil Private 



Private . 



75! Kennebec. 
75!Cumberland 
851 Cumberland 
81 Vork. 

70 r-umber'and 
81 Somerset ... 

74 Oxford. 

77 Kennebec . . 
87 Lincoln. 
94 Lincoln. . . . 
77 Waldo. 

86 Waldo 

68 Kennebec . . 
76 Kennebec . . 

80 Kennebec. 

71 Kennebec. 
76 Lincoln. . . . 
— Lincoln .... 
60 Cumberland 
92 Hancock. 
73 Oxford. 

70 Waldo 

75 Lincoln ... 



('20) d. 
1829. 



Jan. 25» 



('20) 

Res. Baldwin. 

Res. Brunswick. 

I ('20) 

Res. China. 

Res. Georgetown. 

Res. Knox. 

("20) 

('20) d. May 22, 
I 1823. 



Hall, William Mass. line. .... Private. 



64 York. 



Hallet. Elisha. 
Hallet, Salomon. 



Mass. line. 
Mass. mil. 



Halloway, William. 



]40 Halto'LPll, Mary. 
'35c Ham, John 
'40 I Ham, John . 



82 Kennebec 
Private. . . . ' 66 Kennebec. 
Pvt.& Mas. 66 Kennebec 
at arms. & 80 

■ j 86 Kennebec 

.Mass. line Sergeant.. . 84 Kennebec 



I 85 Kennebec 
70 Kenn(4.)ec 
81 Kennebec 



N. H. line Private. 



('20) 

Res. Washington. 
'('20) d. Xov. 1826 



Res. Belfast. 
('20) d. July 31, 
: 1819. 

d. July 31, 1819. 
Res. Waterville. 

i('20, '31b Hallett) 

Res Waterville 
,('20)d. May 10, 
j 1K.31. 
I Res. Windsor. 
'('20) 

Res. Leeds. 



REVOLUTIOXARY PEXSIOXERS IX MAIXE 149 



List. 



Name. 



Ser^-ice. 



Rank. 



Remarks. 



'35d 
'40 
•35d 
'3oc 

'35c 

•35d 

•40 

'20 

'40 

•35c 

'35d 

'40 

'20 

•3oc 

'20 

'20 

'40 

'35d 

'35c 

•35d 

•35d 

'20 

'3oc 

•35c 

•35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

•3oc 



Ham. Nathaniel. . . . Mass. line Private. 



Hamblin, \merica. . Mass. line Private. 

Hamhlin. William. . Conn, line Private. 



Hames, Simeon .... 
; Hamilton, John .... 
(Hamilton. John ... 
j Hamilton, Jonathan 
'Hamilton, Jonathan 
i Hamilton. Ric^^ard . 
I Hamilton, William . 

Hamlin, .\merica. . . 

Hamlin. T'rince 

; Hamlin. Snh 

; Hamlin, William. . . 
JHammon, Josiah . . 
i Hammond, Moses. . 
; Hammond, Paulipus 

Hammond, Roger .. 
! Hammonds, Edmo'd 
i Hancock, John Lane 
I Hancock, Nathan . . 
'Hancock, William. . 

Hands, James 

; Handy. Benjamin . . 

Handy, Elnathan. . . 

Ifand'l, Luru 

Haney, Daniel 

Haney, Daniel 

Hankerson, William. 



N. H. line. 
Mass. mil . 



Private. 
Private. 



Mass Private. 



N. H. line. 
Mass. line. 



Private. . . 
Private. . . 



Mass 

Mass. line. 

Ma.ss 

Conn 



Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 



79:Cumberland . 

85 Cumberland . ^es. Prunswick. 

72 Oxford Simeas Hamlin..\ 

73 Lincoln Sime as Hamlin. 

W 
79 Waldo. 

74 York. 

75 A'ork Res. Waterbor'h. 

85 Vork Res. N. Berwick. 

74 Waldo ( "20) 

72 Cumberland . ( '20, '31b) 

78 Cumberland . Res. N. Yarmouth 

Same as Hamblin. 

77 Cumberland . ( "20) 



::i 



Mass. line. . 
iNIass. line . . 
Mass. state. 
Mass. state. 

R. I 

Mass. line . . 
Mass. line. . 
Mass. line . . 
Mass. state. 
Mass. line. . 

Mass. line. . 

R. L line' ! 



Private 
Private 
Private. 
Private 
Private. j 

Fifer I 

Private ' 

Private. . . . i 
Marine. . . . ' 
Private. . . . ' 

Private. ... 



I 7 



'35c Hanne well, William. Cent, navy 



Private. 
Marine. 



79 Penobscot . 
2 Hancock. 

73 Kennebec . 

74 York. 
83 York. 



64 Lincoln .... 

73 York 

63 Cumberland 

74 Oxford. 

73 Hancock . . . 
77 Franklin. . . 
79 Cumberland 
S6 Oxford .... 
70 Kennebec . 



S ime as Hambli.n 
Res. Corinna. 

('20) 



,('20) d. Sept. 1823 

' t '20) 

d. Oct. 6, 1825 
I 

I ( '20) 
iRes. Berlin. 



'20 Hans, James Mass Private. 

'35c Hans, William Mass. line Private. 



'35c 

'35d 

'35d 

•40 

'35c 

'40 



Hanscom, Gideon . . 
Hanscom,Hum :hre . 
Hanscom, Nathan. . 
Hanscom, Nnthan. 
Hanscom, Re iben . 
Hanscom, Robert. . . 



;> T^ass. line Private. . . . 

Mass. line Pvt.& Corp 

Mass. mil Pvt. of art. 

Mass. line Private. . . . 



'3 Somerset . 



73 Cumberland 

69 York. 

82 Cumberland 
84 Kennebec. 
93 Franklin. . . 

66 York 

77 York 



'35c Hanscomb, John 1st. Mass. line Private. 

'35c Hanscomb, John 2d. Mass. line Private. 

'35c I Hanscomb, Nathan 1 Mass. line Private. 



77 York... 
70 Lincoln . 
73 YoTA . . . 



•40 
'3oc 



HailSL-omb. Uriah . 
Hansicum, Robert. 



Mass. line Private. 



59 York. 
73 York 



'35c Hanson, Jonathan. 

[40 llardr , I h-jp 

'35c Harding, lja\-id . . 



'35c 

'35d 

;35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'3.5d 

'40 

'35d 



'35d 
'35c 



Harding, Hezekiah 

Harding, S?th 

HarJis-j I, Ste hen. 
riardison, Ste.ihen. 
Hardy, William . . 
Haikinrss, Eli-a'ieih 
Harlow, josiah. . . . 
Harlow. Nathaniel 
Harlow, Sylvanus. . 



Mass. line Private. . . . 

Mass. line Private. . . . 

Mass. line Lieut nant. 

Mass. mil ^rivate. . . . 

Mass. line Private. . . . 

Mass. line Private. . . . 

Mass. line Private. . . . 



Mass. line Private. 

Mass. Ime .... Private. 
Mass. mil Private. 



Harman, Pelatiah . Mass line Private. 



Harman. Thomas 
Harman, William. 



Mass. line Private. 

Mass. line Fifer. . . 



64 York 

83 Waldo 

96 Cumberland 

SO Cumberland 
80 Waldo. 
70 Waldo. 
69 York 

79 Kennebec . . 

76 Waldo 

74 Lincoln .... 

80 Penobscot . . 
72 Penobscot. 
79 Penobscot. . 
62 Sti afford Co. 

N. H. 



78 Oxford 

70 Cumberland 



I Res. Greenwood. 
('20) d. March 3, 

1830. 
d. .-Vug. 23, 1820. 

Same as Hunne- 

well 

('20) d. Se;3t. 8, 

1831. 
('20; d. in 1S25. 



Res. .\von. 
•r'20) 
Res. Kennebunk- 

port. Same as 

Hansicum? 
:('20)d. in 1S27. 
('20) 
(•20) d. April 1, 

i830. 
Res. Lyman. 
Same as Hanscom. 

R.? 
('20, '31b) 
Res. L'nitv. 
('20) d. March 1, 

1828. 
d. May 1, 1825. 



]35c 'Harmon, ,\bner. . . .Mass. line Ser-major 

'35d Harmon, Joel Mass. mil Private. . . 



78 York. 
72 York. 



('20, ^Ib) 

(•20) 

Res. Camden. 

120) d in 1825. 

C'20) 

Res. Plymouth. 

Paid at Portland 
agencv. .\ppar- 
I ently same as 
' Harmon, P 

('20; ('31b Har- 
i mon) 

Same as Harmon, 
W.? 

(•20) 



m- 



I50 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. 



Age. 



County. 



Remarks. 



'35c 
•3oc 

•3oc 
'20 

'40 
'35c 
'35d 
'35c 



•35c 

'40 

'35c 

•35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'40 

'35d. 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

•35c 



•35d 

'40 
'40 
'31a 



'35d 
'35d 
•40 
•40 



•35c 

•35c 

•20 

'35c 

•35c 

'40 

'o5e 



'35d 
'35d 
'35c 

'40 
•35d 
•40 
'35c 

■35d 

'35c 

'35d 

•35d 

'40 

'35c 

•40 

'35d 

'3od 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 



Harmon, Tosiah . . 
Harnioa, Pelatiah 



Harmon, Samuel . 
Harmon, William. 



Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 



Musician. 
Private. . 



71 Waldo. 
62 Oxford. 



Mass. line Corporal 

Mass Fifer... . 



82 Penobscot . 



Harmon, William 

Harriman. .Toab . . . . Mass. line. . . . Private. 

Harrinian, Simon.. . Mass. mil Private. 

Harrington, Abiel. . . M.-^ss. line Private. 



'35c Harris, Charles Mass. line Private. 



Harris, John Mass. line Private. 

Harris, John 

Hart, Jacob Mass. line Private. 



Hart. James Mass. line. 

Hart, John N. H. line. 

Hart, John. 2d Conn. line. 

Hart, John 

Hartwell, Edward. . Mass. line Private. 



I.ieut r.s 
Private. 
Private. 



Hartwell. Oliver 
Hartwell, Oliver 
Harvest, John A. . . . Mass. line 



Mas.s. line Private. 

Private. 



7? Cumberland 
74 Kennebec . . 
70 Penobscot. 
74 Kennebec . . 

74 Kennebec . . 

5^ Lincoln. 

75 Lincoln . . . 
7'6 Penobscot . 



78 \'ork 

7U Penobscot. 
69 Somerset . . 
7e i^is?ataqui3 
86 Keniebec. 
93 Somerset, . . 

79 Penobs:ot . 

80 Penobscot . 
78 Waldo. . . . 



Harvey, James >T. H. line Pvt.& Corp 72 Penobscot. 

or74 

78 Penobscot . 

Harvey, Libby ' ' 76 York 

Harvey, Thomas. . . Private '< 



Harvey, William. . . Mass. line Pvt.&Serg.; 74 i'ork 

Hasey, Ebenezer. . . Mass. mil Private....' 76 Penobscot 

Hasgatt, Davis , ! 89 Hancock . . 

Haskell, Josiah i i 80 Lincoln . . 



Has-iell, Stephen . 

'Haskell, Stephen. 
Haskell, WaVd. . 
Haskpll. William. 
Hask 11. Josiah.., 
flask- id, Marij. . . 
Hastings, John'. . 



Mass. line Private. 



line . 



Private. . 



M ss lia" Private. 

-\jass. line Private. 

Mass. line Private. 

Mass. liai 9th Captain, 
itgt 1 

mil. 



Hasty, David Mass. mil Private. . . 

Hasty, Samuel Mass. mil. . . ,. Pvt.o: Serg. 

Hasty, VVilLam Mass. line Lieut a .t 

Hatch, Ann 

Hatch, David Mass. mil Private. . . . 

Hatch, David 

Hatch, Lliakim .... Ma.ss. line Private. . . . 

Hatch, Elihu Ma,ss. mil Private 

Hatch, Elijah Aiass. line Private. . . . 

Hatch, Ezekiel Mass. state .... Private. . . . 

Hatch, Philip Mass. mil Jr'hvate 

Hatch, Philip 

Hatch, Samuel Mass. line Private 



76 Oxford 

65 Cumberland 

61 Kennebec. . 
73 Lin<"oln ... 

83 Waldo 

— Hancock.. . . 



72 Cumberland 

91 York. 

78 Cumberland 



84 Oxford . . . 
70 York. 

79 York 

5/ Somerset. 



(•20) 

('20") Same as 

Harman. 
("20. Harman) 
('31b) S.\me as 

Harman. W.? 
Res. Standish. 
('20) 

(•20) See also Her- 

rington. 
('20. 31b) d.July 

1, 1832. 

Res. Bowdoin. 
('20) d. Nov. 4, 

1533. 
('20. d. May 1825. 
('20) 

d. Jan. 7, 1S26. 
Res. Atkinson. 

Res. St. Albans. 
CiiO) 

Res. Stetson. 
Trans. from Pro\'i- 
; dence Co., R. I., 
; 1^33. 



Res. Bradford. 
Res. Limington. 
Did not serve 9 
! mo8. on Cont. 

estab. 
('20, 31b) 
See also Hersey. 
Res. Mt. Desert. 
('20) Res. Thom- 
, aston. Same as 
• HaskilL.I. 
('20t d. Dec. 3. 
I 1833. 
.'d. Dec. 3, 1833. 

!('20, '31b) 
. Same as Haskell, J 
'Res. Knox. 
.1^2 J fra isf. to 
Middlesex Co., 
Mass. 



Hatch, Samuel Mass. mil Private. . . . 

Hatch, Sylvanus . . . Ma-ss. line Private. . . . 

Hatch, Walter Mass, mil Corp.of -rt 



Hatch, Zaccheus . . . Mass. line Private. . . . 

Hathaway, Epnraim Mass. line Private & 

.\rtiricer 

Hathorn, N'athaniel. Mass. state. . . . Private 

iiavenor, CnarL's. . . Mass. line Private. . . . 



80 Kennebec. 

7o iork 

79 )l ork. 
78 Lincoln. 
86 Lincoln .... 
77 Cumberland 
84 Cumberland 
76 \ ork. 

74 Waldo. 

75 Waldo. 

a-Z Waldo 

h-i Lincoln .... 
7/ Oxford 

73 Lincoln. 
75 Lincoln .... 



'('20, '28) d. Dec. 
I 23. 1831. 
: Res. Fryeburg. 

:Res. Wells. 

i('20) d. Dec. 14,. 

I 1&29. 

•(•20) 



Res. Bristol. 

'('20) 
Res. Minot. 



Res. Belfast, 
d. Apr. 23. 1833. 
'('20, '31b) 



Same as Heavenor 
i Heavner and 
! Hevenor. 



A CHAPTER OF MAINE HISTORY 151 

An Interesting- Chapter of Maine 

History 

(by ROBERT H. GARDINER.) 

The State of Maine reaHzes the dignity of reaching the age of 
one hundred years, and steps are being taken to celebrate this event. 
In 1820 the State was admitted to the Union, having hitherto been 
under the pohtical control of Massachusetts. An appropriaion 
of public funds has been made to provide such festivities as will 
mark the centenary of the State in the memory of its people. Like 
other celebrations of its kind, further information bearing on the 
subject is eagerly sought and welcomed. We are aware that 1S20 
is not the ultimate date boundary of the historical past of our State, 
but going back to origins, we find renewed interest in early discov- 
eries, settlements, and institutions and bring to light much that is 
forgotten. 

The Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Maine, under the leader- 
ship of Bishop Brewster, is also making preparation for the cele- 
bration of its own one hundredth anniversar\- this year. Follow- 
ing the precedent of the early c'ays of the Republic when the 
Church took on its external organization soon after the foundation 
of the Nation, the Diocese of Maine was organized immediately 
after Maine became a State. 

It will be seen that the venerab'e Episcopal Church was the 
institution that accompanie:' the Eng'ish discoveries, adventures. 
and commercial enterprises in the earliest days on these western 
shores, in the hope perhaps of giving a touch of idealism to the 
practical dreams of that age. The English discoveries under John 
and Sebastian Cabot in 1497 sealed the English c'aim to the terri- 
tory from the Gulf of St. Lawrence to Florida. Upon the French 
intrusion into the land of Evangeline in Xova Scotia, the Govern- 
ment sent Captain George Weymouth in 1605 to investigate, and 
landing" on ^lonhegan Island, ofif the coast of Maine, he set up a 
cross in token of the sovereignty of James the First. After kid- 
napping five Indians, who became of great service, he sailed later 
for home. The Plymouth Company was formed on account of the 
attractive reports submitted and the Virginia Colony was also 
organized. These two companies v/ere granted rights to the whole 
Atlantic coast. Chief Just'ce Popham and Sir Ferdinand Gorges 



,152 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

were the leaders of the Plymouth Company. In 1607 " The Gift 
of God '' and the '* Mary and John " sailed for the Maine coast 
for the purpose of planting a colony. After touching at Monhe- 
gan Island they landed on the shore for a religious service, when 
the Rev. Richard Seymour, a Church of England clergyman, used 
the prayer book and preached a sermon. This was the first service 
in the English tongue in New England. The so-called Popham 
colony then established was short-lived, but later attempts suc- 
ceeded. By a new grant from the King, Sir Ferdinand Gorges 
became Governor General in 1635, and in 1639 he was given the 
proprietorship of the territory extending from the Piscataqua 
river to the Penobscot and one hundred and twenty miles inland. 
He made it his chief business to inculcate a religious influence in 
the colony, and required the baptism of children in the Church. 
The character of this doughty knight was evinced when some 
years later, at seventy years of age. Sir Ferdinand Gorges fought 
for Charles First at the siege of Bristol and died two years before 
his royal master. 

It is curious to note from a historical standpoint that the reli- 
igious origins of the State of Maine ante-dated the Puritan settle- 
ment in Massachusetts, and were from an independent source, and 
that source was the Church of England. Hence from the earliest 
days the Episcopal Church has been linked with the history of 
Maine. 

The special exercises commemorating the founding of the 
Diccese in 1820 will be held in Christ Church, Gardiner, Maine, 
on May 31st and June ist, 1520. 

The committee in charge are : Mr. Robert H. Gardiner, Chair- 
man ; Reverend Canon R. W. Plant, and Mr. Josiah S. Maxcy of 
Gardiner; Reverend E. A. Pressey, Mr. Charles F. Flagg, IMr. 
Sidney St. F. Thaxter. Mr. Frederick H. Gabbi, Mrs. Herbert Pay- 
son, Miss Mary M. Burgess and M'ss Marguerite r)gden of Port- 
land; President K. C. M. SiKs of Brunsw'ck ; and Mr. D. M. 
Bates of Lewiitcn. 



OLD POINT 153 



Old Point 

Madison, Me., Nov. 25, 1919. 

To the Editor of Spraguc's Journal of Maine History: 

My attention has been called to the fact that you have been, and 
still are a student of the history of Old Point and Father Raise. 

There is one point which has always been misunderstood. Old 
Point is not. and never has been in the town of Norridgewcck. It 
is in Madison. It is situated upon what was originally known as 
the *' mi'_e and a half strip." 

This was a strip of land one and one-half miles in width, as the 
name implies, extending from the Kennebec river, I think across 
the entire territory formerly known locally as " Arcadia."' I am 
not positive as to its eastern boundary. 

This seems to have been a sort of '' left over," at the time of 
the original survey. If I remember correctly it was the northern 
boundary of that portion of Maine known as *' The Kennebec Pur- 
chase." 

It has been a long time since I looked up the facts of this, but I 
am positive regarding the first statement I have made. I suppose 
the mistake has arisen from the fact that the falls at Madison were 
formerly known as Norridgewcck Falls, and the Indians at Old 
Point were commonly cal'ed the Norridgewock Indians. 

I think it would be well to have this corrected, and the Journal 
you publish seems to be the best organ through which to do it. It 
is without question, the most authentic publicaion of Maine history 
avai ab e. ^ 

Trusting you will give this matter your attention, I am, 

Sincerely yours, 

UNA MOORE McKENNEY. 

All historians writing about this matter, have apparently assumed that, 
as the church and mission were at ancient Xanrantsouak, afterwards becom- 
ing changed to Norridgewock, they must have been within the limits of the 
present town of Norridgewock. While this was the fact at one period, 
later a change in ownership of the territory known as Old Point, took place 
and, as our correspondent states, is now within the present town of Madison. 

J. W. Hanson in his " History of the Old Towns of Xorridgewock and 
Canaan," (Boston, 1859) p. 58, says: 

The territory of Old Point has been suffered to pass from the old town 
of Xorridgewock. and it is now in the town of Madison. It is ver>- singular 
that the proposition was allowed to prevail. There ought to have been an 
universal outcry on the part of the people of Xorridgewock against the 
movement. — Editor. 









.^;l^ 



^^^:tf-^ 



^..>r!l:i'^ ii^ 



KAll 



J' 

I 154 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



A Visit to an Historical Island 

(by marguerite ogden.) 

Noticing various allusions in the newspapers to the Centenary of 
the State and of the Episcopal Diocese of Maine which are to take 
p'ace early next summer. I venture to think that your readers might 
be interested in what I learned on a trip made last fall to Rich- 
mond's Island in the company of one of the descendants of Robert 
Jordan. 

Richmond's Island is a bleak knoll lying off the southerly side 
of Cape Elizabeth. It is about three miles in circumference, con- 
taining about two hundred acres and at low tide is connected with 
the mainland by a sand bar. The island is now owned by Mr. 
Sprague of Boston who was most kind in allowing the caretaker of 
his house to do everything possible to speed us on our pilgrimage. 

The first inhabitant of the island, we are told, was Walter Bag- 
nail in 1628 whose sole object in life was to amass a large fortune 
by driving hard bargains with the Indians. They shewed their 
resentment of this treatment by murdering him in 1631 and steal- 
ing, as was supposed, all his accumulated wealth. In 1855, how- 
ever, a resident of the island, while plowing, turned up a stone pot 
containing gold and silver coins of the reigns of Queen Elizabeth, 
James the First and Charles the First. From the dates on these 
pieces it has been inferred that they were buried a short time before 
Bagnall's death. 

- The island was later granted to Robert Trelawney and AIos.es 
Goodyeare, merchants of Plymouth, England, and with it w^as in- 
cluded all of the present town of Cape Elizabeth. John Winter 
was appointed their agent, and appears from the records to have 
been an able, industrious, and successful merchant. He lived on 
Richmond's Island and employed over sixty men in the fisheries 
and fur trade. As early as 1637 the Rev. Richard Gibson, an 
Episcopal minister, was settled ever the island and the records 
imply that there may have been an Episcopal Church built there, 
too, as there is mention in an inventory, of vessels for the Com- 
munion Service and the minister's bedding. 

Tradition has it that Cape Elizabeth might now be peopled largely 
with Gibsons instead of Jordans if the Rev. Richard would have 
consented to marry Winter's only daughter. Apparently he re- 



H^^ 



A VISIT TO AX HISTORICAL ISLAND 155 



fused to accept her hand and fortune, which was a large one for 
those days, and returned to England heart free. 

He was succeeded by the Rev. Robert Jordan who came over at 
the instance of Robert Trelawney to take pastoral care of the set- 
tlement. He straightway married Miss Winter and at the death 
of her father became the manager and possessor of his estate. He 
was a man of decided character, good judgment, fearless and up- 
right. He was much respected in the community and was elected 
one of the Commissioners of the settlement. He incurred the 
censure of the Massachusetts government by administering the 
rites of the Episcopal Church and was imprisoned for baptising 
children. The font which he used is now in the rooms of the His- 
torical Societ}' in Portland. 

As time went on. he built a house on the mainland which we 
imagined was near the mouth of the Spurwink river. It was 
burned by the Indians in King Philip's war and Air. Jordan and his 
family fled for their lives to Newcastle, X. H. He died at the age 
of 68 years, leaving as a monument to posterity six sons whose 
descendants still perpetuate his name. 



Gardixer, Dec. 15, 1919. 
Editor Sprague's Journal: ' 

On page 99 of your last Journal is a letter of E>aniel Webster 
recommending the appointment of Col. F. T. Lally as an engineer 
and the comment is made that possibly his home was in Hallowell. 

Co*. Lally married a daughter of George Evans of Gardiner, one 
of the brainiest men who ever represented Maine in the United 
States senate. Col. Lally built one of the finest homes in Gardiner, 
w^hich was occupied by himself and Mr. Evans, and has since been 
known as the Lally house. 

This house was in that part of Gardiner that afterward became 
a portion of the town of Farmingdale, lying between Gardiner and 
Hallowe'l. 

Mr. Evans was an intimate friend of Daniel Webster when they 
served together in the senate. 

J. S. MAXCY. 



156 SPR-\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Notes on the Hicks Family 

(by CHARLES M. STARBIRD, DANVILLE^ MAIXE.) 

These notes have been compiled with httle attention to a care- 
tully connected history. The genealogy- of the Hicks Family pre- 
sents many difficulties due to the lack of family registers and those 
records often handed down by past generations. Moreover, there 
is a missing link in the chain connecting the fami'y in Maine with 
the original immigrant of that name. It is the hope of the com- 
pi'er that someone having additional information will communicate 
with him. 

The founder of the Hicks family in America was Robert Hicks 
w^ho came to the Plymouth Colony in the ship " Fortune " in 1621. 
He is mentioned in 1618 as a leather dresser in London, or rather 
Bermondsey Street, Southwark. Robert Hicks attained a position 
of wealth and influence among the colonists. He was a witness to 
many early deeds and other documents recorded in the early Ply- 
mouth records. It is probable that he was a close friend of Miles 
Standish. He was owner of considerable land about the colony 
and is mentioned as " merchant of Plymouth.*' Mr. Hicks had a 
wife, Margaret, who came to America in the ship '* Ann " in 1623 
with her four children. The will of Robert Hicks drawn up 28 
May, 1645, was witnessed by Nathaniel Souther and attested by 
'Governor John Winthrop. He died 24 May, 1647. The inventory- 
of his estate was drawn up 5 July. 1647, ^^^ the amount of the 
property i 39: 13 s. The will of Mrs. Hicks is recorded 8 JuH\ 
1665. The inventory of her estate was made 5 March, 1665, ^Y 
Capt. Southworth and John Morton. The amount was £ 53 : 
12 s: 6 d. The children of Robert and Margaret were: 

I. Ephriam m. 19 Sept., 1657, Elizabeth, daughter of John Howiand. He 
died 12 December, 1657. 

II. Samuel 

III. Lj'dia m. Edward Bangs. 

IV. Pheobe m. about 1635, George Watson. 

The first mention of the family in Maine is Richard Hickes of 
Cape Porpus or of Kennebunk Port. He is noted in a list of tax 
payers of 1660- 1. He was on the jury from Kennebunkport in 
1661 and in i6fS was a constable there. With his wife Susanna. 
he made oath to a clause of the will of Peter Turbot, 19 October, 
1669. 



NOTES ON THE HICKS FAMILY 157 



The next appearing in Maine is Dennis. He bought land at Kit- 
tery Point in 1689. His wife was probably Sarah Deering. daughter 
of Roger Deering, one of the most influential settlers of Kittery. 
Whether or not Dennis was the son of Richard is uncertain. He 
purchased land of Benjamin Woodbridge of Plymouth, New Hamp- 
shire, by deeds dated 28 February. 1689 and again 17 June. 1691. 

JOHN HIX. 

Dennis was probably the father of John Hix — or Hicks — later 
a prominent citizen of Kittery. In the folios of the York County 
Deeds appear several depositions of 1727 in regard to the ownership 
of a house and some land occupied by Sarah Hix and her son John. 
The land appears to have be'onged to Joan Crafts Deering. wife of 
Roger Deering and mother of ^Irs. Hicks. There are several deeds 
recorded in York county in which the name John Hix appears. He 
is mentioned as a ship-carpenter and a resident of Kittery. The 
deeds recorded are : 

Roger Bearing, Shipwright, of Scarborough to John Hix, 20 acres of land 
at Kittery 12 January, 1719-20. 

John Woodman, Yoeman of York to John Hix, 20 acres of land in York 
2 November, 1721. 

John Main Yoeman of York to John Hix Yoeman of Kittery, land in 
York 14 May, 1723. 

John Hix to Samuel Ford of Kittery, 20 acres land 21 May, 1723. 

Charles Trafton of York to John Hicks of Kittery 14 Ma}^ 1723. 

Withers Berry of Kittery to John Hicks of Kittery, land in Kittery 10 July. 
1/29- 

Bray Bearing Fisherman of Kittery to John Hicks, 20 acres of land in 
Kittery 7 April, 1728. 

John Hix to Joshua White, Cooper of Kittery, land in Kittery 11 March, 
1733. 

John married Elizabeth, daughter of James Davis of Oyster 
River. Their intention was published 13 November. 1725. In 1739 
he was living near Braveboat Harbor in York. He died before 1754 
and his widow died at the age of 79. They had one son, Joseph, 
and a daughter, Sarah, who married Paul Pinkham. 

JOSEPH HICKS. 

He was probably also son of Dennis and married Sarah, daughter 
of James Davis of Oyster River. They lived at Madbury, New 
Hampshire with the following children : 



-^^iS" 



^ 



I 158 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



r 



f 



i 



I. Sarah b. 22 May, 1721. 

II. John b. 20 October. 1723. 

III. Mary b. i January. 1725. 

IV. Hepzibah bapt. 6 April, 1729. 

V. EHzabeth bapt. 31 July, 1729. 

VI. Joseph bapt. 22 May, 1746. 



NATHANIEL HICKS. 

Probably another son of Dennis. He was in Kittery early in 
the i/Oo's. He married 171 2. Martha Foye. daughter of James 
Foye of Kittery. He was a carpenter and also lived in Kittery. 
Several York deeds make mention of his name. He was engaged 
in the expedition against Louisburg in Major Cutt's company. His 
will was recorded 11 April, 1768. The issue of Nathaniel and 
Martha was : . ^ 



I. Lemuel (see below). 

II. Sarah bapt. 26 April, 1724; m. Samuel Billings and d. before 1764,. 
•leaving a daughter Eunice. 

III. Joseph bapt. 18 July, 1725; m. Happy Proctor of Falmouth. Their 
intention was published i October, 174S. He d. before 1764, leaving a son 
William who was taxed in 1777. William was among a number of men who 
received a grant of land between Nova Scotia and New Hampshire in 1764 
from the General Court of Massachusetts. 

IV. Martha bapt. ic August, 1729- 

V. Elizabeth bapt. 6 September. 1731. 



LEMUEL HICKS. 

Lemuel, son of Nathanie.. came from Kittery to Falmouth in 
1730 and married Hannah Giddings, September 16, 1739. Her 
father came from Gloucester. Mass. She was killed by lightning 
Ju'y 31. 1748, with one child. Parson Smith wrote in his Journal 
un'er that date says: 

The lightning killed Mrs. Hicks and her child. Mr. Giddings was much 
burnt and near dead. None escaped unhurt but a little child which by cry- 
ing brought in the people, who found Mrs. Hicks and three of her children. 
prostrate on the hearth, and Mrs. Giddings appeared dead. 

Two children of Lemuel and Hannah survived: 

Sarah b. July 12. 1745; d. in 1836. 

Joseph b. May 28, 1748; d. November 4, 1846. 



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NOTES OX THE HICKS FA^[ILY 159 



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Lemuel married as his second wife, Martha Cox, June 13, 
They lived at Bishop's Corner, W'estbrook. and their children were 

I. Lemuel Jr. (See below.) 

II. Hannah b. 1754; d. July 26. 1838. 

III. Samuel b. July 5, 1755 ; d. August 20, 1834. He enlisted in the Con- 
tinental Army May 16. 1775. Was a private in Capt. John Brackett's Com- 
pany, Col. Edmund Phinney's Regt. 

IV. Martha '^ - % 

V. James b. April 18, 1759. (See below). 



LEMUEL HICKS, Jr. 

He moved from Falmouth and settled in the north part of Gor- 
ham, Maine, in the Xason district so called. He married Mary^ 
daughter of Lemuel Rich. Their intention w^as published April 20, 
lyyi. They had two children: 

I. Elizabeth b. April 9, 1774; m. Herman M. Brown, December 20, 1802. 

II. Lemuel b. May 9, 1776. 

(To be continued) ^ 



The first number of the next and eighth volume of the Journal — 
May, June, July — wqll be issued as a special IMaine Centennial num- 
ber. The four regular quarterly numbers w^ill also be published. 
That volume will thus contain five, instead of the usual four, ptirts. 
A more extended notice of this will appear in our next issue. 



One more institution, says the Portland Sunday Telegram, has 
gone by the boards. 

One other thing, held dear — and necessary — by our grandfathers^ 
has passed completely. 

It is the hitching post, that once fringed every village square. 
Along with the passing of Dobbin in the cities, w^here speed is a 
necessary adjunct to business and pleasure, the rural districts, like- 
wise, have forsaken their horse-drawn vehicles. 



SPR AGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

PUBLISHED QUARTERLY 



Entered as second class matter at the post office, Dover, Maine, by John 
Francis Sprague, Editor and Publisher. 

Terms: For all numbers issued during the year, including an index and 
all special issues, $i.oo. Single copies of current volume, 25 cents; of pre- 
vious volumes, 50 cents. Bound volumes $2.00 each. 

Postage prepaid on all items, except bound volumes west of Mississippi 
River. 

Commencing with Vol. 3, the terms will be $1.00 only to subscribers who 
pay in advance, otherwise $1.50. 

This publication will be mailed to subscribers until ordered discontinued. 



OUR MESSAGE TO YOU 

FIRST TEACH THE BOY AND GIRL TO KNOW AND LOVE 
THEIR OWN TOWN, COUNTY AND STATE AND YOU HAVE 
GONE A LONG WAY TOWARD TEACHING THEM TO KNOW 
AND LOVE THEIR COUNTRY. 



" IS NOW ACCOMPLISHED." 

We have before us a letter from one of the town superintendents 
of schools in Elaine. We withhold his name as it is a personal 
letter and evidently his desire for us so to do. In it he says : 
f I have read the eloquent words of Dr. Thomas, Maine's able State Super- 

^ intendent of Schools, in his address in Portland, recently, in which he states 

that the slogan in our schools for 1920, will be "Study Maine," and also his 
just praise of the new and valuable school book. ''Maine, My State;" and 
his further statement that there will be a demand for Sprague's Journal of 
Maine History and that " it is a valuable contribution and will be of special 
help." I have just run through the Journal indexes, vols. 1-6, and find, 
besides several references to the subject, twelve leading editorial articles in 
which you have, during that time, strongly urged the school officers of the 
state to adopt this stud}- or give it necessary attention. I want to personally 
congratulate you upon the fact that what you have for so long a time con- 
tended for is now accomplished. 

While we are grateful for words like the above, we must in justice 
affirm that it is the patriotic members of the Maine Writers' Re- 
search Club of Maine to whom is due by far the greater amount of 
|; credit. Whenever any of us have in the past suggested the import- 

ance of this matter to leading educators of our state, the invariable 
reply has been, '' we have no school readers or text-books for this 
purpose ; furnish the necessary books and advancement will be 
made." Thus it has been, while the rest of us have talked and 
talked, the women went to work and produced the book that was 
demanded. 



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EDITORIAL i6i 



" EVERY FOOT OF SOIL IS HISTORIC GROUND." 
(Biddaford (Maine) Journal.) 

Maine and York county in general and Biddeford and Saco in particular 
should find the current issue of Sprague's Journal of Maine History of more 
than passing interest because of the comprehensive and well-written article 
on Sir William Pepperrell contained therein. This article is a condensed 
summary of practically all available information on this subject and con- 
stitutes a valuable foot note to the history- of Maine and York county. 
Accompanying the text are portraits of Colonel William Pepperrell, the 
first of the family in America, and his wife, Margery (Bray) Pepperrell, and 
their illustrious son, Sir W^illiam Pepperrell. and his wife, Mary (Hirst) 
Pepperrell. Other articles and matter in this issue make it one to be treas- 
ured by all who have any interest in the history of a region where every 
foot of soil is historic ground. 

(Old Town Enterprise.) 

Sprague's Journal of Maine History comes to our desk this week full of 
interesting reading as usual. Editor Sprague wants reinforcements along' 
subscription lines. It is published quarterly and is well worth the money. 
It deserves all the good things said about it. 

HATCH'S HISTORY OF MAINE. 

Dr. Louis C Hatch of Bangor, Maine, is the editor-in-chief of 
a complete history of Maine from 1820 to the present time, which 
has just been issued from the press of the American Historical 
Society of Xew York. It is in three volumes, containing 936 pages^ 
including the index. 

The associate editors are Lucilius Alonzo Emery, LLD., Clar- 
ence Hale, L. L. D., John Francis Sprague, George Colby Chase,. 
D. D., Charles Allcott Flagg, A. M., B. L. S., Harold Marsh SewalU 
A. B., L. L. B., Arthur Jeremiah Roberts, M. A., William Farrand 
Livingston, A. B., Edgar Crosby Smith, Augustus Freedom Moul- 
ton, A. M., John Fairfield Lynch, Fanny Hardy Eckstorm, G. W. 
Stephens, Wilmot Brookings Mitchell, Edwin Carey Whittemore, 
Louise Wheeler Bartlett. 

One of the most interesting and valuable chapters in the work is 
"The Indians of Elaine" by Mrs. Eckstorm. 

It is the first and only political history of Maine as a state that 
has ever been published ; and now that state history is to become 
a part of the course of study in our public schools, it will be inval- 
uable to students as it is in all of the larger and many of the smaller 
Maine libraries. 



• 



H' 



I 162 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



\ Williamson's history is the story of Maine as a province and as a 

<listrict — 1604 to 1820 — which, with Hatch's work, gives a full out- 
line of the history of the Pine Tree State. 

Dr. Louis Qinton Hatch, the author of the history, is a native of 
i Bangor. He is a graduate of Bowdoin in the class of 1895. He 

f received the degree of A. B. in 1896, A. M. in 1897, PhD. in 1899, 

^- all from Harvard university. He was engaged in historical research 

I at Harvard from 1899 to 1905 and he has writen extensively largely 

I upon historical matters. 



I Sayings of Subscribers 

I' Hon. James Phinney Baxter. ^^laine's most famous historian and 

V Avell known author: 

t I have read your article in the last number of your Journal, and consider 

I such articles as very useful to the reading public. It is written in an inter- 

I esting manner ,and I trust will be widely read. A large percentage of the 

I people know nothing about historical literature, and are prejudiced against 

I reading many of the treatises which are preferred by more advanced stu- 

t^' ^ents of history ; therefore I am always interested in seeing such articles as 

'^ I yours which can be read at a sitting, and interest the reader, and this arti- 

p' cle on Pepperrell I think will. I hope you will write articles of a similar 

nature for the soil of history is hard to cultivate, and requires patient and 

persistent effort. 



Hon. Ira G. Hersey, Member of Congress from Maine : 
Your magazine I find is a valuable contribution to the literature of Maine 
and for the preservation of historical data, and I do think that your sub- 
scription is too small and if you could induce yourself $2.co per year I 
helieve your subscribers would gladly pay it. 



Honorable Leslie C. Cornish. Chief Justice of the Supreme Judi- 
cial Court, Augusta, Maine : 

The quarterU' visit of this magazine is watched for with interest. Your 
work for Maine is appreciated by all those who have a love for the past. 

In your last issue I read the copy of letter from Daniel Webster to Col. 
Lally. There was a note stating that it was thought that Col. Lally lived in 
Gardiner. Let me say that he lived in Farmingdale, close by Gardiner: 
that he married the daughter of Hon. Geo. Evans and after his death the 
family moved to Augusta. They were living here when I came to Augusta 



SAYIXGS OF SUBSCRIBERS 163 



and the oldest daughter married General Frank H. Phipps. who was at that 
time stationed at the Kennebec Arsenal with the rank of Major. 



Frank McGouldrick. President of the Maine Teachers' Associa- 
tion. Bar Harbor, Maine : 

The teaching of Maine histor}- in our schools has been sadly neglected in 
man}' places in our state, but I am glad to note that unusual interest is 
being awakened this year. 

I have always advocated that our boys and girls should have an opportu- 
nity to gain a thorough knowledge of the subject and that material contain- 
ing Maine historical facts should be placed at their disposal. To all educa- 
tors of the Pine Tree State who are not familiar with Sprague's Journal of 
Maine History, I recommend that they secure a few copies for examination 
at an early date as I am sure they wi^I find that the Journal contains many 
articles of interest and value to the student of Maine history. 



S. Percy Crosby, St. Paul. Minn.: -^ " 

I hope to live five years longer, and hope you will also, — and as many 
more years as you want to, — so I enclose my check for $5.00 to pay my sub- 
scription to the Journal until April, 1924. 

I continue to read the Journal with unabated interest and shall always be 
interested in matters pertaining to the old Pine Tree State. 



Hon. Josiah S. ^laxcy. Gardiner, Me. : 

You are doing a fine work in preserving in permanent form important 
historical events of this state. Your biographical sketches of some of our 
famous men of past days are especially interesting to me. 



Rev. William H. Gould, Arlington, ^Nlass. : 

I wish to express to you my appreciation and enjoyment of every number 
of Sprague's Journal w^hich comes to me. 



George \V. Adams, Dorchester. Mass. : 

I read the Journal with a great deal of pleasure. They grow better and 
better. The last one to my mind was best of all. 

Those of us residing outside of our dear old native state, appreciate the 
wonderful work you are doing for us and for generations to come after us. 



Fred W. Brown. Belfast, Maine: 

You are doing a valuable work for the State of Maine. The Journal de- 
serves more support from the peop'e of Maine. 



V 



i64 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Mr. Glen C. Aver. Dexter, Maine : 

I wish to say that I am very much pleased with your work, and the sub- 
jects published are very interesting. 



Hon. Charles E. Oak, Bangor, Jvlaine : 

Your Journal is all good, and a lot of it is excellent. 



Captain Daniel I. Gould, Bangor, Maine : 

Enclosed please find check for paj^ment of the Journal. Let me say that 
I am only too glad to send it, if by doing so I in a small way assist in the 
continuance of its publication. I think without doubt it is the best publi- 
cation in the state and I read every' issue with even increasing interest. You 
[ certainly deserve a lot of credit for the hard work that you are putting in 

I- and the excellency of your Journal. It should and no doubt will place your 

I name high among writers of Maine history. 



Reverend George W. Hinckley, founder of the Good Will Home 
for boys, one of Maine's best educational institutions, Hinckley,^ 
Maine : 

Perhaps I ought to tell you that your article on Mr. Fay in the last issue 
of the Journal furnished me with material for m.y sermon to the boys in the 
chapel last Sunday P. ^NI. 

He saw the vision and followed the trail. I don't think you intend the 
Journal as a basis for theological treatises and I fear there was not much 
theology in my discourse : but it surely was a sermon and some of the boys 
thanked me for it. 



Mark A. Barwise, Esq., Bangor. Maine:* 

You are doing a vtvy remarkable work and one which will grow in value 
as the decades go on. Future generations will be more expressive of their 
appreciation than we are of your own times. 



Charles B. Pineo, Bar Harbor, Elaine : 

You are piiblishing a very interesting and instructive magazine invaluable 
to the young and teaching us old fellows very much. 



William W. Fellows, Bangor, Maine : 

We must have your Journal as long as it is published. 



F. H. Bishop. Drew. Maine: 
The greatest magazine that I know of. 



SAYINGS OF SUBSCRIBERS 165 

William P. Marden, Recorder of the Millinocket (Maine) Munic- 
ipal Court: 

I send you two years subscription in place of one as I think every sub- 
scriber should see that he does his part to aid you in the good work you are 
doing. 



Hon. Fred Emery Beane, Judge of the Kennebec Superior Court, 
Hallowell, Maine: 

To demonstrate that I like the Journal and to make sure I shall not inad- 
vertantly neglect a renewal, I enclose my check for five dollars. Kindly 
extend my subscription to April, 1924. 



Albert M. Card, Head Tide, Maine: 

The Journal is one of the most useful educators now published in Maine. 
Each issue brings before the public some new historical facts never before 
published regarding Maine history. I am very much interested in your good 
work. 



Hon. Peter Charles Keegan, \^an Buren, Maine : 
I wish to send personal regards and my expression of thorough apprecia- 
tion of the good -work you are doing for the present as well as future gen- 
erations, in the publication of Sprague's Journal of Maine History. 



Mrs. Elizabeth K. Folsom, the Exeter (N. H.) historian: 
* * * Am thoroughly enjoying the magazine. 



Newell White, Thorndike, Maine : 

I prize the Journal highly and wish it might be made a monthly, with a 
corresponding increase in the subscription rates. 



Prof. William Otis Sawtelle, Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. : 
I look forward eagerly to each new number of the Journal. 



Dr. N. H. Crosby, Milo, Me. : 

Yours is a very valuable Journal. I trust you may live many years more 
to publish it. . 



Mrs. Rose B. Parker, Winthrop, Maine : 
Long live Sprague's Journal of Maine History! 



^0r7.-'::: -'.^* 



•V- 



i66 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



C. H. Robinson. Portland, Maine : 
You ought to charge $1.50. at least, for your magazine. 



William H. Rowe, Yarmouth : 

As I have told 3'ou before I look forward to the coming of the Journal 
with great pleasure and enjoy it all even the advertisements and am glad that 
I have had the good fortune to become prsonally acquainted with its editor. 



George E. Hathaway, Gardiner, Me. : - 

The Journal grows more interesting to me with each issue and do not 
wish to miss a single copy. 



Mrs. Mary Drake Jenne, Etna, ^le. : 

I also wish to tell you how much we appreciate the Journal, it is a valu- 
able magazine, we eagerly welcome every issue, and read it from beginning 
to end. You are doing much for the people, and children of today, and still 
more for coming generations, who will prize the knowledge concerning the 
grand old "Pine Tree State," which you are so accurately giving. I trust 
you may be blest with good health and many years to still continue your 
valuable and helpful w^ork. Maine, and Maine people need never take a 
second place among the peoples of the world, and to have the history lost 
that you are so carefully gathering up, would be deplorable. Go on, and 
may the unseen ones from higher life, still guide your pen and bless each 
passing day to your highest good. Sincerely and gratefully a learner from — 
Sprague's Journal of Maine History. 



Hon. O. B. Clason, Gardiner, Maine: 

Sprague's Journal is always a welcome visitor and contains a fund of 
information. 



Hon. Howard Pierce, Mars Hill, Maine : 

I enjoy the Journal verv' much and hope it may continue as valuable in 
the future as it has in the past.. 



After a suspension of about two and one-half years, we are 
pleased to again welcome to the editor's table the Maine Catholic 
Historical Magazine. This is the first number of the eighth vol- 
ume, the last number of the seventh volume having been issued in 
April, 1917. This publication is of much value and interest to all 
who are interested in every phase of Maine history, and must be 
of inestimable worth to members of the Catholic denomination. It 
is an important contribution to the literature of our state. 



MAINE, MY STATE ' 167 



Maine, My State 



Maine having as a province, as a district and as a state, the most 
ancient and interesting history of any of the states of the American 
Union, it is eminently proper and important that its wonderful story 
should ever be read and recited in the public schools by the youth 
of our state. It has been little less than a crime to neglect this 
for so long a time. The first step in a new departure in this direc- 
tion has been taken by the Maine Writers Research Club, com- 
posed of some of the foremost literary women in Maine in the 
production of this excellent book, ably supported by Dr. Thomas, 
Elaine's State Superintendent of vSchools, in indorsing it and plac- 
ing it in the schools of the state. 

The book which they have published under the above title, de- 
signed for a school reader, is one of the most interesting and valua- 
ble Elaine items that has appeared for many years. It is an honor 
alike to its authors and to the state. 

It has been heartily endorsed by Gov. Milliken and Dr. Thomas 
as follows : 

STATE OF MAINE. 

— - Office of the Governor, 

Augusta, Nov 17, 19 19. ' 
Dear Miss Ding ley: 

Not in a long time has a hook engaged my interest to the extent that 
"'Maine My State" has in the past fezv days. I feel that the Maine Writers' 
Research Club should he congratulated by every citizen of the State upon 
their success in publishing this most attractive volume. Not only are the 
articles extremely readable but they give a zvealth of information not ordi- 
narily available. 

In issuing this book, the Maine Writers' Research Club have done a 
worth-ivhile job. 

Very truly yours, 

CARL E. MILLIKEN. 



State Superintendent of Public Schools, 

State House, Augusta, Oct. 11, T919. 
My dear Miss Dingley: 

The handsome little volume of " Maine, My State" has just arrived. This 
is indeed an achievement, and I am vi/riting to congratulate you and the 
members of the Club on this excellent service to the schools of the State. It 
comes in fine with the centennial program. 

Very sincerely, 

AUGUSTUS O. THOMAS. 



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i68 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

The Oldest Catholic Church 
New England 



in 



The History of The Catholic Church in The New England States 
(Dr. Byrne, chief editor, Boston, 1899) P- 55^' says: 

The parish of Whitefield and Damariscotta, Maine, has the distinction of 
being the oldest in New England with the exception of the Cathedral parish 
of Boston, and, while granting senioritj' as a parish to Boston, Damariscotta 
can still lay just claim to the most venerable church now standing in New 
England. 

St. Patrick's church was built in 1803, the expense being in great 
part defrayed by James Kavanagh and Matthew Cottrill. It was 
dedicated July 17, 1808. It was in the home of the latter that Mass 
was said in Damariscotta, about 1794-5, by Bishop Carroll of Balti- 
more. 






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Damariscotta Catholic Church. 



CONTENTS. 



169 



MAINE INLAND SCENERY 







Umsaskis Lake. Allegash Waters. 
Taken before the raising of Long Lake dam had devastated the forestry. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 



James Sullivan , , . 171 

Maine Lauds East of the Kennebec 188 

William Gilley, Early Settler of Mt. Desert li>2 

Sir FerdinaniJo Gorg^es 194 

A Genealogy of the Simmons Family ly8 

Notes on the Hicks P'amily 210 

The Sonir of the Koa<l 213 

Alphabetical Index of Revolutionary Pensioners of Maine :il4 

Editorial 227 

Notes and Fragments 229 

William Edward Gould 2:*>;) 

Saj-ings of Subscribers 2."5i5 

The Man for the Place 



54 



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CHARLES FOlSOM-JONES, Skowhegan Maine 



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Sprague's Journal of Maine History 

Vol. VII FEBRUARY iMARCH APRIL 1920 No. 4 



James Sullivan 

(by JOHN FRANCIS S PRAGUE.) 

There appears to be ample authority to substantiate the claim 
that the Sullivans of Maine descended from the O'Sullivans of 
ancient Ireland. 

They were a powerful sept, who dwelt in the southerly part of 
Ireland and are now extensively multiplied on both sides of the 
Atlantic. 

Many of them have acquired fame in all fields of American 
activities. 

In common with other Milesian families, they trace their origin 
to a remote period in Irish history. 

The bards and chieftains of the ancient Irish preserved their 
national annals from the beginning of organized government under 
the sons of Heber down to the days of anarchy and confusion 
resulting from English invasion. 

Irish historians assert that it is a v»'ell authenticated fact that 
under Queen Elizabeth, one measure adopted for the more perfect 
subjection of Ireland was an order to collect from the national 
and private repositories these records, that by gradually, weaken- 
ing, through their destruction, the spirit of clanship, the land 
might become an easier prey to the spoiler. 

Fortunately, however, this order was only partially obeyed and 
in many of the ancient chronicles, or psalters which escaped this 
authorized vandalism, frequent mention is made of the O'SuUivans 
and their chieftains. 

For centuries prior to 1170 when the English invasion first 
began upon its shores, Ireland had been as highly civilized as any 
pa It of western Europe. 

During those times and to a more recent date the O'Sullivans, 
who were hereditary- princes, possessed large tracts of lands in the 
Province of Munster. and along the shores of the Bay of Bantry 
and around the beautiful and celebrated Lakes of Killarnev. 



172 SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

Their chieftains exercised an independent sovereignty and their 
domains for a long time remaining unmolested by the invaders they 
lived more peaceful lives than some of the neighboring clans. 

But the power of the conquerors increased with each successive 
century until the brave O'Sullivans early in the seventeenth cen- 
tur>' were with the rest of the Irish nation prostrated by ruin and 
devastation. 

To follow the vicissitudes of this once powerful c!an to the time 
v/hen John Sullivan left Limerick in Ireland and sailed for Amer- 
ica would be a recital of one of the darkest chapters in the history 
of Great Britain. This was in the year 1723. Exactly what his 
destination was is not now know^n. The ship in which he sailed 
was driven by adverse winds on to the Maine coast and he landed 
in York. 

On this stormy voyage was the beginning of an interesting 
romance. On the vessel was a pretty and attractive child named 
Margery Brown, then only nine years of age. The circumstances 
of her parents emigrating to America may never be known as it 
appears that they were lost at sea. 

John Sullivan, when far advanced in years, wrote out and left 
with his family the following statement: 

I am the son of Major Philip O'Sullivan, of Ardea, in the county of 
Kerry. His father was Owen O'Sullivan, original descendant from the 
second son of Daniel O'Sullivan, called lord of Bearehaven. He married 
Mary, daughter of Colonel Owen McSweeney of Musgrey. and sister to 
Captain Edmond McSweeney, a noted man for anecdotes and witt\' savings. 
I have heard that my grandfather had four countesses for his mother and 
grandmothers. How true it was, or who they were, I know not. My 
father died of an ulcer raised in his breast, occasioned by a wound he 
received in France, in a duel with a French officer. They were all a short- 
lived family; they either died in their bloom, or went out of the country. 
I never heard that any of the men-kind arrived at sixty, and do not remem- 
ber but one alive when I left home. My mother's name was Joan McCar- 
thy, daughter of Dermod McCarthy of Killoween. She had three brothers 
and one sister. Her mother's name I forget, but that she was daughter to 
McCarthy Reagh, of Carbery. Her oldest brother, Col. Florence, alias 
McFinnin, and his two brothers. Captain Charles and Captain Owen, went 
in the defence of the nation against Orange. Owen was killed in the 
battle of Aughrim. Florence had a son, who retains the title of McFinnin. 
Charles I just remember. He had a charge of powder in his face at the 
siege of Cork. He left tv/o sons, Derby and Owen. Derby married with 
Ellena Sullivan, of the Sullivans of Bannane. His brother Owen married 
Honora Mahony, daughter of Dennis Mahony, of Drommore, in the bar- 
ony of Dunkerron, and also died in the prime of life, much lamented. 



W' 



m. 



JAMES SULLIVAN. 173 



They were short-lived on both sides ; but the brevity of their lives, to 
my great grief and sorrow, is added to the length of mine. My mother's 
sister was married to Dermod, eldest son of Daniel O'SuUivan, lord of 
Dunkerron. Her son Cornelius, as I understand, was with the Pretender 
in Scotland, in the year 1745. This is all that I can say about my origin. 

It is a well authenticated tradition that he left his home by rea- 
son of his mother violently opposing his union with a certain young 
lady that he was deeply attached to. 

Although his mother was a woman of wealth and high standing 
in Limerick he was nearly penniless when he left home and entered 
into an agreement with the master of the vessel to work for him 
after his arrival to pay 'his passage to America. Unaccustomed to 
labor he applied to Parson ]Moody, of York, whom he had been 
informed was a man of benevolence, for aid. The interview 
resulted in his obtaining a loan of money from Moody and can- 
celing his obligation to the captain. 

John was well educated and under the advice of Parson Moody 
and some of his friends he opened a school at Berwick and became 
a successful school teacher in York County. 

He sympathized with his little friend, Margery, who had been 
indentured in accordance with the colonial custom of providing 
for distressed children. As soon as his earnings would permit he 
redeemed her from indenture and adotped her and brought her up 
and educated her as his own child. When she had reached the 
period of maidenhood she is said to have possessed unusual charms 
and attractions. 

One day, while drawing water with the old well-sweep, a young 
man, clad in city attire, came by and engaged her in conversation. 
Fascinated by her charms, 'he then and there proposed marriage. 
She referred him to her father. The lover stated his case to Mr. 
Sullivan. He consulted ^largery who frankly admitted that she 
♦had been a little coquettish with the good looking youth, but much 
to his joy, she assured liim that she had no thought of anything 
serious. But the circumstance revealed to him his own sentiment 
towards her, which he had discovered was other than paternal. 
Her foster father made known his love. It was mutual, and 
although he was twenty years her senior, so far as any records or 
evidence of the matter is now accessible it was a happy union. 

He soon after purchased a farm in Berwick, to which he devoted 
his attention when not engaged in teaching. Much of the time he 
had two schools under his charge. 



174 SPR.AGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

He has been described as *'a marked man in his personal appear- 
ance, of great natural abilities and mental cultivation." 

He was reared in the faith of the Catholic church. Amory' 
asserts that he did not attend religious services in the neighbor- 
hood where there were only Protestant churches, and for that 
reason " it has been conjectured Master Sullivan kept steadfast 
to the faith of his childhood." 

He lived to the venerable age of 105 years and was beloved and 
respected by all who knew him. 

Writers have portrayed his wife as an excellent woman of great 
energy- and firmness of character. 

Amory (supra) says: '' Her sons very probably inherited largely 
from her the ambition and industry that made them useful and dis- 
tinguished." 

James, the fourth son of John Sullivan, was born in Berwick, 
Maine, April 22, 1744. 

As a boy he worked on his father's farm attending to duties 
common to such a life, w^hich then included a constant watchful- 
ness to guard against the predatory forays of the Indians. 

His father designed to rear him for military service but an 
accident which happened to him when a lad changed the course of 
his life. This was the complicated fracture of one of his legs 
while felling a tree. 

His foot, while pressed upon a branch to secure better play for 
his axe, accidentally slipping, the bent tree sprang into place. 
James was thrown down, and his leg, caught in the c'ett, was 
badly broken. The usual version of the story adds that, while 
thus prostrate, he cut his limb free with his axe. and, dragging 
himself along the ground to the stone-drag, contrived to work his 
way on to it, and drive the oxen home, the distance of a mile, to 
his father's house. This accident led to a long illness, and the 
consequence was lameness for life.* 

John Sullivan, Jr., the oldest brother of James was a lawyer of 
ability in Durham, New Hampshire. He was a revolutionary gen- 
eral of renown, prominent in the Continental Congress, once gov- 
ernor of his state, and was a man highly respected and honored 
at home and throughout the country. 



(*) Amory's Life of James Sullivan (Boston, 1859). 
(») lb. p. 21. 



:© 



JAMES SULLIVAN. 



175 



About 1764 James entered his office as a student at law. While 
living there he became acquainted with Hatty Odiorne, daughter 
of William Odiorne a ship builder, and also commissioner under 
the royal government. He was married to Miss Odiorne Feb. 22, 
1768. As soon as he had completed his course of legal studies he 
v/erLt to Georgetown in his native state and commenced the practice 
of law. It was only a small village with poor business prospects. 

It is related that some one asked him why he had chosen such a 
place for the beginning of his legal career. His answer was that 
wishing to break into the world somewhere, he had concluded to 
assail it at its weakest point. 




The old Pownalboro Court House. Dresden, Maine, where James Sullivan 

tried his first law case. John Adams and other eminent Boston 

lawyers of Revolutionary times frequently advocated causes 

within its walls. 

(Presented to the Journal by Frank C. Deering of Saco, Maine.) 



Not far above, on the bank of the Kennebec river in what is now 
the town of Dresden is still standing an ancient building, long since 
used for other purposes, which was then the court house for the 
county of Lincoln. It had been erected some years earlier by the 
Plymouth Company, who were proprietors of extensive tracts of 
land on the Kennebec, under the supervision of Dr. Sylvester Gar- 
diner. Within its walls have been heard the eloquent voices of 
James Otis, John Adams, the Quincys, the Sewalls and other emi- 
nent lawyers of those days. It was here that James Sullivan 
argued his first case before a jury. 



\:-. 



176 SPR-\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



He did not however long remain at Georgetown. Biddeford 
and Pepperrellborough, now Saco, were more promising towns for 
a young lawyer and thither he removed locating in Biddeford. 

" Riding the circuits " of the courts was then the universal 
custom. Through this system unknown to any one of this or even 
the past generation in Maine, the attorneys of Boston and other 
large towns in the province held the professional business of Maine 
towns; for when riding these circuits they not only attended to 
the litigation where they had been retained, but secured new cases 
at the same time. In other words the Boston lawyers by its means 
held what was practically a monopoly of the desirable law practice 
in Maine. It was naturally the smaller class of business and law 
cases that fell to the local professionals. Yet it appears that young 
SulHvan was making progress, acquiring an enviable reputation 
as an advocate and building up a good practice. 

But for some years prior to the revolution litigation throughout 
die Colonies almost ceased. This was caused by the universal 
opposition to the measures of the mother government. Men whose 
■minds were on problems which were to change the history of the 
world for centuries lost interest in disputes with their neighbors. 
Business generally was paralyzed and none suffered -more than the 
lawyers. The courts were virtually suspended. 

Through his family he owned real estate in what is now the town 
of Limerick. The gloom which political eruptions cast over others 
did not affect him. He laid aside quill, paper and wafers, and 
took instead ax, shovel and plow, and joined the settlers who had 
started to build a new town in York County. He labored on his 
land during the week returning every Saturday on horseback, a 
distance of thirty miles, to his home and law office in Biddeford. 
He was popular with these settlers who named their town Limerick 
in honor of his father who was bom in Limerick, in Ireland. 

John Adams who frequently attended the courts at Saco formed 
Sullivan's acquaintance. He and other leading lawyers on the 
eastern circuit were pleased with him and kind in their attentions 
to him. 

Mr. Adams mentions in his diary under the date of July, 1770,. 
a visit made to the house of Mr. Sullivan. He was in company 
with Farnham, Winthrop, and David Sewall ; the latter after- 
wards an associate with Sullivan on the supreme bench. Farnham 
and Sewall started somewhat earlier than their companions, that 



:«#: 



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JAMES SULLIVAN. 



^77 



they might order dinner ait Allen's Tavern, at the Bidd^ford 
Bridge; and towards noon Adams and Winthrop joined them at 
the dwelling of James Sullivan. After refreshing themselves with 
punch, then the usual beverage, they all adjourned to the tavern 
to dine ; and, when they had finished their repast, Sullivan pro- 
posed to the party a visit to an ancient crone in the neighborhood, 
who, from her great age and accurate memory of things long past, 
was one of the wonders of that part of the country. She was one 
hundred and fifteen years of age, having been born in 1655, near 
Derry, in Ireland. She remembered events in the reign of Charles 
the Second, having lived under seven English monarchs. ^ 




Former residence of James Sullivan, corner Main and High Streets, 
Biddef ord, Maine, 



In a letter to his wife, dated York, 29th June, 1774, Mr. Adams 
makes further mention of both John and James Sullivan: 

There is very little business here, and David Sewall, David Wyer, John 
Sullivan and James Sullivan and Theophilus Bradbury are the lawyers who 
attend the inferior courts, and, consequently, conduct the causes at the 
superior. 

I find that the country is the sitaution to make estates by the law. John 
Sullivan, who is placed at Durham, in New Hampshire, is younger, both in 
years and practice, than I am. He began with nothing, but is now said to 



(') lb. 433. 



^ 



■/■i^iTit*-; '\ 



178 SPIL\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



be worth ten thousand pounds, lawful money : his brother James has five or 
six, or perhaps seven, thousand pounds, consisting in houses and lands, notes 
and mortgages. He has a fine stream of water, with an excellent corn-mill, 
saw-mill, fulling-mill, sc\-the-mill and others, in all, six mills, which are both 
his delight and his profit. As he has earned cash in his business at the bar, 
he has taken opportunities to purchase farms of his neighbors, who wanted 
to sell and move out further into the woods, at an advantageous rate, and in 
this way has been growing rich. Under the smiles and auspices of Governor 
Wentworth, he has been promoted in the civil and military way, so that he is 
treated with great respect in this neighborhood. 

James Sullivan, brother of the other, who studied law under him, without 
an academical education (and John was in the same case), is fixed at Saco, 
alias Biddeford. in our province. He began with neither learning, books, 
estates, nor anything but his head and hands, and is now a very popular law- 
yer, and growing rich very fast, purchasing great farms, and is a justice of 
the peace and a member of the General Court. 

Sentiment in Elaine towns like Biddeford and Pepperrellbo rough 
began ear'y to formulate against the policy of Great Britain to 
arbitrarially govern the colonies through a parliament in which 
they were not represented. A study of such of the old records of 
these towns of that period which are now extant disclose the grad- 
ual yet steady growth of the spirit of American independence. 

The New England town meeting was then and is today die forum 
of a real democracy. Each is a small republic in itself. It was 
the one .American institution that first demonstrated to the world 
that man was capable of self government. It was that net work 
of the committees of safety organized in the beginning by Samuel 
Adams and his associates, and who were elected in town meetings 
in which every voter was a sovereign, that gave cohesive strength 
to the patriots. 

As early as 1774 James Sullivan embraced the cause of American 
independence and his ability and popularity made him a power of 
strength in the movement with the inhabitants of the Maine settle- 
ments. 

In the spring of that year he was elected a representative to the 
General Court. On the ist day of June the tyranical and hated 
Boston Port Bill went into effect. Samuel Adams and James 
Warren were the recognized leaders of the court which had con- 
vened at Salem. Upon the standing committee on the state of the 
province were four men whose loyalty was distrusted by Adams 
and Warren. They selected a few men whom they believed were 
true for conference, and Sullivan was one of these. For three 
nights they met in secrecy and devised measures for future opera- 



JAMES SULLIVAN. 179 

tion. The third evening a plan was matured for the initiation of 
a general congress for the continent to meet the following Septem- 
ber at Philadelphia. The delegates were selected, funds provided, 
and letters prepared to the other colonies requesting cooperation. 
James Sullivan was one of these delegates. Behind closed doors, 
Samuel Adams having a key to it safe in his own pocket the report 
was accepted, although the messenger of Governor Gage was then 
reading outside on the stair case the proclamation dissolving the 
court. 

After Mr. Sullivan's return to his home on the 30th day of July, 
a spirited town meeting was held in Biddeford, fully endorsing 
the course of their representative and adopting resolutions that 
placed them in entire accord with the patriots of the colonies. 

On September ist, 1774. Governor Gage issued his precept for 
the General Court to convene at Salem on the fifth day of October. 
Sensing the strong sentiment for resistance that was daily increas- 
ing among all classes of the people, on the twenty-eighth day of 
September he made proclamation postponing it indefinitely. The 
delegates many of them not hearing this had arrived and came 
together. They waited a day for the governor to appear before 
them which he did not do. They then resolved themselves into 
a Provincial Congress, choosing John Hancock president and Benj. 
Lincoln clerk. This was the beginning of the Continental Con- 
gress of which Mr. Sullivan was an active and influential member. 

On the twenty-second day of December he was moderator of a 
town meeting in Biddeford, and was chosen a member of the com- 
mittee of' .Safety and Inspection and empowered to correspond 
with other ^Maine towns. Because of his lameness he could not, 
like his brothers, take part in the military resistance of the coun- 
try-. But the effect of his voice and pen in behalf of liberty was 
felt not only in Maine but throughout the colonies. 

The second session of the Continental Congress convened Feb. 
I, 1775, at the meeting house in Cambridge. A committee of its 
members was appointed to publish in a pamphlet the doings of the 
late Congress, and to prepare an address to the inhabitants. Mr. 
Sullivan had a place on that committee and wrote a report and 
address. 

Through his efforts the Congress passed measures for the pro- 
tection of the settlements in eastern Maine and he was appointed 
to consider the expediency of enlisting Indians for the war. 



m 



i8o SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



He issued the following letter to the eastern tribes : 

Friends and Good Brothers : We, the delegates of the Colony of the Mas- 
sachusetts Ba}-, being come together in congress to consider what may be 
best for you and ourselves to do to get rid of the slavery designed to be 
brought upon us. have thought it cur duty to write you the following letter : 

Brothers: The great wickedness of such as should be our friends, but 
are our enemies, we mean the ministry of Great Britain, has laid deep plots' 
to take away our liberty and your liberty. They want to get all our money; 
make us pay it to them, when they never earned it ; to make you and us 
their servants ; and let us have nothing to eat, drink, or wear, but what 
they say we shall ; and prevent us from having guns and powder to use, 
and kill our deer, and wolves, and other game, or to get skins and fur to 
trade with us for what you want ; but we hope soon to be able to supply 
you with both gims and powder of our own making. 

We have petitioned to England for you and us, and told them plainly we 
want nothing but our own, and do not want to hurt them; but they will 
not hear us. and have sent over great ships, and their men, with guns, to 
make us give up, and kill us, and have killed some of our men; but we 
have driven them back and beat them, and killed a great many of their men. 

The Englishmen of all the colonies, from Nova Scotia to Georgia, have 
firmly resolved to stand together and oppose them. Our liberty- and your 
liberty is the same ; we are brothers, and what is for our good is for j'our 
good; and we, by standing together, shall make those wicked men afraid, 
and overcome them, and all be free men. Captain Goldthwait has given up 
Fort Pownall into the hands of our enemies ; we are angry at it, and we 
hear you arc angry with him, and we do not wonder at it. We want to 
know what you, our good brothers, want from us of clothing, or warlike 
stores, and we will supply you as fast as we can. We will do all for you 
we can, and fight to save you, any time, and hope that none of your men, 
or the Indians in Canada, will join with our enemies. You may have a 
great deal of influence over them. Our good brothers, the Indians at Stock- 
bridge, all join with us, and some of their men have enlisted as soldiers, 
and we have given them that enlisted, each one, a blanket and a ribbon, and 
they will be paid when they are from home in the service; and, if any of 
you are willing to enlist, we will do the same for you. 

Brothers : We beseech that God who lives above, and that does what is 
right here below, to be your friend and bless you, and to prevent the designs 
of those wicked men from hurting you or us. 

By this means, Indians from the Penobscot tribe and from other 
parts of Maine were soldiers in this war. 

He drafted the act passed by the Massachusetts General Court 
Nov. II, 1775, for fitting out armed vessels to protect the sea coast; 
authorizing the issue of letters of marque and reprisal, erecting 
courts for the condemnation of prizes. 

John Adams in a letter to Elbridge Gerry under date of April 
10, 1810, mentions it as one of the most important documents in 



®- 



JAMES SULLIVAN. i8i 



history as it was the first actual avowal by any deliberative body 
in America of intended offensive hostilities to be found in Lhe 
annals of the revolution. ' 

All accessible sources of information of the revolutionary period 
whether in books of history or in oM documents and records attest 
to the fact that from the first to last. James SulHvan stood h'.j.i in 
the confidence of the leaders in that great struggle and was admitted 
to their most intimate councils. And none were more fearless and 
active in the cause then was he. 

He served on the general Committee of Safety from its incep- 
Itjon until the close of the war. It is related by Colonel Paul 
Revere, that, in the winter of 1774-5, he w^as one of thirty patriots 
Who formed a committee for the purpose of watching the British 
soldiers, and learning of their intended movements. When they 
met each member swore on the Bible not to reveal any of their 
transactions but to Warren, Hancock, Adams, Church and one or 
two others. ^ 

It was largely through his eflforts that the Judas of their little 
iband, Dr. Benjamin Church was detected in revealing their secrets 
to Governor Gage and summary punishment therefore adminis- 
tered to him. 

He had great influence with the council and always exerted it 
whenever necessary in aid of Maine interests. 

When Captain Mowatt reduced Falmouth to ashes, his power 
at the seat of government was a, great blessing to its distressed 
and homeless inhabitants. It was also largely through his efforts 
that immediate action was taken by the council to more safely 
fortify and protect that port. 

Three admiralty judges were appointed under the act above 
referred to. These were : Nathan Gushing, for the southern ; 
Timothy Pickering for the central and Mr. Sullivan for the eastern 
district. 

As we trace his career from 1774 to the close of the Revolution 
we see General Washington ever placing the utmost confidence in 
his integrity, his ability and his devotion to the cause of freedom 
and seeking his counsel. 

About eighteen months after he had taken his seat in the Pro- 
vincial Congress he was appointed by the Council, it being then 



(*) lb. p. 62. 
C) lb. p. 57. 



t'^ 



# 



'# 



i82 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



clothed with executive as well as legislative powers, to a seat on 
the bench of the Superior Court of Judicature. This was the 
highest or supreme court of the province. His letter of acceptance 
dated March 2^, 1776, was as follows: 

I am informed b}' the secretary that the honorable Council have appointed 
me a justice of the Supreme Court, and that they request my answer thereto. 
Since the appointment forbids my saying that I am entirely incapable of 
transacting the business incident to that office, I beg leave to acquaint you 
that I shall cheerfully accept of. and studiously endeavor to qualify myself 
for, the honorable and important seat assigned me. The present relaxations 
of government, and the many difficulties in straightening the reins thereof 
at this critical juncture, would be ver>' discouraging, were it not for the 
great abilities of the honorable gentlemen I am to sit with. This appoint- 
ment is the reason of my begging to resign the office of judge of the mari- 
time court for the eastern district of this colony, to which some time ago 
I had the honor of being appointed. 

His associates were William Cushing, afterwards appointed to 
the Supreme Court of the United States under the federal consti- 
tution, Jedediah Foster, Nathan Peaslee Sargent and David Sewall 
— It was a high honor for this young man who had not completed 
his thirty-second year. Yet it required courage to serve in that 
capacity. Some writer has said that those early judges " sat with 
halters around their necks." 

These builders of a new government called themselves patriots 
and the world has ever since known them by that name, but the 
British government hailed them as rebels. And had the rebellion 
proven a failure the members -of the highest court in rebeldom 
would undoubtedly have been among the first to mount the scafifold. 

The first problem that confronted the court was how to quickly 
assemble a law library for their use the possession of which was 
an absolute necessity. They could not very well order one from 
London. The lawyers of the colony who had turned their backs 
upon the patriots and remained loyal to the crown were of the high 
class of attorneys who owned valuable libraries. They had fled, 
many of them going to England and in their haste had left 
their law books behind. These were promptly confiscated and 
purchased from the new government by the new court. 

Eben Sullivan the younger brother of James as well as his older 
brother John, one of the famous generals of the Revolution was 
now captain of a company that he had raised at Berwick of which 
Nathan Lord was lieutenant. This company had been in the 
engagement at Bunker's Hill. He was in the Canadian ex;)edition 



JAMES SULLIVAN. 



183 



and was at one time taken prisoner by the Indians of Canada, held 
as prisoner for some time and experienced suffering and cruelty 
at their hands but finally escaped. 

As the problems of war times multiplied and perplexities became 
more complex his judicial duties increased and he began to realize 
that it was necessary for him to reside nearer the seat of govern- 
ment. He loved the neighborhood of his nativity. In Biddeford 
and Pepperrellborough he had trusted and tried friends always 
devoted to his interests. He loved them and loved the grand ocean 
side where he had grown from boyhood to mature manhood; and 
the old fishing and hunting grounds of his youth were dear to him. 




Law Office of James Sullivan, Sullivan Street, Biddeford, Maine, where he 
practiced law prior to and during the Revolution. 



But feeling that duty called him to make this sacrifice, in February, 
1778, he sold his house at Biddeford to Joseph Morrill and moved 
to Groton, in the county of Middlesex. A few years later he 
settled in Boston which was his home during the remainder of his 
life. 

Having no written constitution they then did things which would 
today seem strange to us. The people of Biddeford and Pepper- 
2 



i84 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



rellborough reposed such confidence in him — and there being then 
no organic law to prevent a member of the court from sitting in 
the Legislature, that after this change of abode he was re-elected 
as their representative for 1778-9. 

When the question of changing their form of government by 
adopting a constitution entirely independent of their charter was 
agitated by the colony, he was chosen to represent Groton in a 
constitutional convention and took a leading part in all of its 
deliberations. 

At this period of our history England had not abolished the 
slave trade and black men were bought and sold like cattle in all 
of the colonies including the District of Maine. From the ddLwn 
of our political emancipation the glaring inconsistency^ of this con- 
dition with our pretensions to equality and freedom was apparent 
to many. 

James Sullivan was one of the earliest to call public attention to 
it. The bliack man was then as he has ever since been in all of our 
wars, loyal to his oppressors. A black man was one of the victims 
of the Boston massacre in 1770; and the shot which killed ^lajor 
Pitcairn at Bunker's Hill is said to have been fired by a black slave 
owned by one of the patriots. 

- Judge Sullivan improved every opportunity in his judicial capac- 
ity, as a legislator and as a publicist to put an end to the slave 
traffic. 

The name of John Quincy Adams shines forth in glorious splen- 
dor as the first great American to make a successful fight in Con- 
gress in the Anti Slavery cause, when he contended for the right 
cf petition. We are however proud of the fact that a Maine man, 
James Sullivan, was his predecessor in this crusade. The differ- 
ence was that fate gave Mr. Adams the opportunity to be with the 
immortals in the struggle. 

In 1775 he was sent on a difficult commission to Ticonderoga in 
company with W. Spooner and J. Foster, for whose ser^'ices the 
Provincial Congress passed a vote of thanks. 

On the fourth of July, 1782, Samuel Adam^, Nathaniel Gorham, 
William Phillips, James Sullivan. George Cabot, Stephen Higginson 
and Leonard Jarvis. were appointed by resolve, to consider — 

What measures were to be taken to reduce the expenses of government, 
show the best method of supplying the public treasury, and reforming the 
state of the finances. 



■^ 






JAMES SULLIVAN. 185 

Towards the end of 1784 he was present at the Congress, then 
sitting at Trenton, as commissioner for prosecuting the claim of 
Massachusetts to the western lands. 

He resigned his seat on the bench and returned to the practice 
of the law in Boston, but yet was never entirely disengaged from 
public and political affairs. 

In 1788 he was appointed judge of probate for Suffolk County. 

In 1790 he resigned this office and became Attorney General. 

Our forefathers' interest in preserving a history of their state 
and country was great. It was so in the early days of Maine and 
remained so until recent years. Then the most eminent citizens 
holding the most honorable positions, governors, federal senators, 
congressmen, etc., were the founders of our historical societies. 
How regrettable it is that many at least of Maine's leading men 
of this day and generation view this subject from such an angle 
of cold indifference as they do. 

James Sullivan was one of the organizers of the Massachusetts 
Historical Society and its first president. In 1792 this Society 
celebrated the third centennial anniversary of the discovery of 
America by Columbus. Jeremy Belknap delivered the address at 
its meeting at Brattle Street church. Dr. Thacher offered prayer. 
That evening Hancock and Adams, the governor and lieutenant 
governor, with the council dined with Mr. Sullivan, its president, 
whose residence was in Bowdoin square. 

The government at Washington, May 31. 1796, appointed him 
as agent for the United States, to maintain their interests before 
the Board of Commissioners, who were to decide what river was 
the river St. Croix, according to the fifth article of the treaty of 
amity, commerce and navigation, with Great Britain. In the 
instructions from the government to Judge Sullivan accompanying 
this notice appears the following: 

Your researches as the historian of the district of Maine, your reputation 
as a lawyer, and your official employment as the attorney-general of Massa- 
chusetts, the state directly and most materially interested in the event, 
have designated you as the agent of the United States to manage their claim 
of boundary where their territory joins that of his Britannic Majesty, in 
his province of New Brunswick, formerly a part of his province of Nova 
Scotia. 

The decision of this commission as to what was the true St. 
Croix river occasioned much discussion at the time and has ever 
since been a fertile theme of controversy among historians. The 
late Honorable Israel Washburn (Me. Hist. Soc. Coll., Vol. S, 



i86 SPrL\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

pp. 3-103) attacked it severely claiming that the findings of the 
commission were wrong and that the State of Elaine thereby lost 
a valuable territory which rightfully belonged to it. 

The writer has given the subject considerable study and is now 
of the opinion it was a correct decision. 

Politically Judge Sullivan stood with Washington and Adams, 
and was in accord with most of the federalist policies but later 
was more closely allied with the Republicans. He never was how- 
ever as far as we can understand in s>Tnpathy with the sedition 
laws enacted and supported by the Federalists. And yet as attor- 
ney general it devolved upon him in 1799 to prosecute one Abijah 
A.dams for libeling the Legislature. 

Sullivan prosecuted and he was indicted at common law, con- 
victed and sentenced to imprisonment. 

As a writer for newspapers and periodicals his record as an 
earnest advocate for freedom of the press is clear and certain. In 
that time the troubles in France had an abiding influence upon 
American politics. 

Sullivan's, entire political career evidences the fact that he was a 
friend to France. His enemies accused him of taking this position 
because he was of Irish descent and France was then assisting Irish 
rebels. 

Undoubtedly there was some truth in this. At least we do not 
find anything to show a desire on his part to deny it. 

At the close of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth 
centuries the powerful Federalist party was disintegrating. It had 
served the country well during the construction days. But later 
its policies were un-American and it was doomed to fall. Judge 
Sullivan was twice the Republican candidate for governor and was 
elected in 1807. Both campaigns were bitter and acrimonious. — 
What we would today term ''dirty politics" prevailed to the limit. 

His administration though brief was wise and statesmanlike and 
never assailed by his enemies. His love for the people of Maine 
was exemplified by his persistent efforts to secure for them the 
Betterment xA-ct, or Squatter law. It was finally carried through 
the legislature under the leadership of William King of Bath, as 
proposed by Governor Sullivan. 

He was re-elected governor in 1709 and died December 4th of 
that year. James had four brothers, Benjamin, an of^cer in the 
British Navy who was lost at sea before the Revolution ; Daniel 
who was a captain in the Revolutionar}^ War and the founder of 



H •^v 



JAMES SULLIVAN. 187 

the towTi of Sullivan in the State of Maine; John, already men- 
tioned, who was a major general in the Continental army and Gov- 
ernor of New Hampshire ; and Ebenezer, an officer in the Revo- 
lution and a lawyer in Berwick, Maine. He had one sister, Mary, 
who married Theophilus Hardy. 

As an author, writer and historian he will be best remembered 
by his " History of the District of Maine," published in Boston 
in 1795, and the first history of Maine to be published. 

This was followed by " A History of the Land Titles in Massa- 
chusetts." The early volumes of the Collections of the Massachu- 
setts Historical Society contain others of his writings which are 
valuable contributions to our colonial history. 

His death was mourned by the entire commonwealth. Resolves 
relating to his record as a public man were passed by the Legisla- 
ture and an address of condolence signed by the President of the 
Senate and Speaker of the House was sent to his widow, Martha 
Sullivan. The Rev. ^Ir. Buckmore delivered a funeral sermon in 
which he said: 

This is not the place to detail to you minutely the progress of his eleva- 
tion, from the time when he first drew the observation of his country. 
every step is marked with labor and with vigor; with increasing confidence 
in the public, and with unabated zeal and acti\nty in the man. There is 
hardly a station of trust, of toil, or of dignity, in the commonwealth, where 
his name does not appear, though now only as a part of former records; 
and, in the regions of science and literature, where we should least expect 
them, we find the most frequent traces of his efforts, and of his indefatigable 
industry'. 

Samuel L. Knapp at that time wrote of him : 

Our country has a property in the characters of its great men. They shed 
a glory over its annals, and are bright examples for future citizens. Other 
nations, too, may enjoy their light. The flame of liberty has been caught 
from the patriots of Greece and Rome by men who were not born in those 
lands, while the descendants of those patriots have forgottn the fame of 
their ancestors. And should it happen, contrary to all our prayers and all 
our trusts, that the inhabitants of this country, at some period hereafter, 
should lose the freedom and the spirit of their fathers, the history of our 
Adamses, our Warrens and our Sullivans, shall wake the courage of patriots 
on distant shores, and teach them to triumph over oppression. 

James Winthrop said : 

As governor he was remarkably successful in mitigating the severity of 
the political parties which divided the state, and their leaders generally and 
sincerely regretted his death. * * * and was buried with the honors 
conferred on his exalted station, and which were acknowledged to belong 
to his distinguished merit. 



:;:Tr^^^3Y; 



■^: 



i88 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

Maine Lands East of the Kennebec River 

(by EDGAR CROSBY SMITH.) 

Note. — The follozcing article is an extract from Chapter II of 
the History of DoTcr and Foxcroft, Maine, zMch history is being 
prepared by Judge SniitJi. As tJiis part of the history is applicable 
to all that section of the State of Maine z^'JiicJi lies east of the Ken- 
nebec river, -tcr are permitted by the author to give an adz'ance 
publication of this article. — Editor. 

The basis of the titles to the soil of the towns of Dover and 
Foxcroft is in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

It will be of interest to sketch briefly the manner in which Massa- 
chusetts finally obtained complete and unquestioned ownership 
and sovereignty over that part of Maine that lies east of the rivcF 
Kennebec ; that region which for many years had been debatable 
ground, claimed both by England and France and over which both 
exercised acts of jurisdiction. 

Prior to 1691 the territory which that year was consolidated 
under one general government as the Province of Massachusetts 
Bay in New England, had been split up into numerous colonies, 
grants and patents. The Colony of Massachusetts Bay, the Colony 
of New Plymouth, Gorges' Province of Main, the Sagadahock 
Patent, the Plymouth or Kennebec Purchase and the Duke of 
York's (aftenvard King James II) grant, being the principal ones. 
The grant to the Duke of York included all the lands between the 
Kennebec and St. Croix rivers, but he exercised but little sover- 
eignty over his domain, the title to the whole of it east of the 
Penobscot being disputed by the French who occasionally enlarged 
their claims so as to cover the lands between the Penobscot and 
Kennebec rivers. 

The bounds of neither of the colonies or grants were definite 
and constant disputes arose as to the bounds and jurisdiction. 

In 1684 the Plymouth and Massachusetts charters, together with 
those of other colonics, were annulled by King Charles II after 
a long quarrel with the colonists. James II became king of Eng- 
land in 1685 and from then until the accession of William and 
Mary the afifairs of New England were administered by a royal 
governor and captain general, Edmund Andros. The state of 
affairs in Massachusetts during the whole period of Andros*" 
administration bordered upon revolution. 



EASTERN MAINE LANDS. 189 

In 1688 James was driven from the English throne and William 
and Mary became the rulers of England. At this turn of affairs 
in the home government the people of New England, as a whole, 
were highly gratified although some of the inhabitants of Maine 
were not unfavorable to King James and the Andros administra- 
tion. 

Steps were at once taken by the colonists to secure the restora- 
tion of their ancient charters. The Duke of York, now the deposed 
monarch James II, as may be supposed, had little voice in the dis- 
position of his domains east of the Kennebec. 

While King William was most favorably inclined towards his 
people of the new world, yet withal, he was well informed as to 
their past troubles, conflicting grants, disputed jurisdictions and 
the other difficulties that had been experienced. So, in his wis- 
dom, he decided to consolidate several of the colonies into one 
province, their affairs to be administered by a royal governor 
appointed by the crown and a legislative body to be elected by the 
people. 

The old Massachusetts Bay Colony being the largest, most vig- 
orous and aggressive, the king, on October 7, 1691, granted to it 
a new charter uniting with it the Plymouth Colony of the Pilgrims, 
using the following words : 

alsoe to the end Our good Subjects within Our Collony of New Plymouth 
in New England aforesaid ma\- be brought vnder such a forme of Govern- 
ment as may put them in better Condicon of defence and considering aswell 
the granting vnto them as vnto Our Subjects in the said Collony of the 
Massachusetts Bay Our Royall Charter with reasonable Powers and Privi- 
ledges will much tend not only to the safety but to the Flourishing estate 
of Our Subjects in the said parts of New England and alsoe to the advance- 
ing of the ends for which the said Plantancons were at first encouraged of 
Our especiall Grace certaine knowledge and meer Mocon have willed and 
ordeyned and Wee doe by these presents for vs Our Heires and Successors 
Will and Ordeyne that the Territories and Collneyes comonly called or 
known by the Names of the Collony of the Massachusetts Bay and Collony 
of New Plymouth the Province of Main the Territorie called Accadia or 
Nova Scotia and all that Tract of Land lying betweene the said Territories 
of Nova Scotia and the said Province of Maine be Erected Vnited and 
Incorporated And Wee doe by these presents Vnite Erect and Incorporate 
the same into one reall Province by the Name of Our Province of the 
Massachusetts Bay in New England. 

That part of the territory described by the words, '' all that 
Tract of Land lying betweene the said Territoritories of Nova 
Scotia and the said Province of Main." is that part of the present 



I90 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

State of Maine lying between the Kennebec and St. Croix rivers. 
This charter was the first title Massachusetts had to the lands in 
which are located the towns of Dover and Foxcroft. 

In regard to this particular territory the charter placed a restric- 
tion that did not apply to any of the other lands in the province. 
In the language of the charter it was this : 

And soe Neverthelesse and it is Our Royall Will and Pleasure That noe 
Grant or Grants of any Lands lying or extending from the River Sagadehock 
to the Gulph of St. Lawrence and Canada Rivers and to the Main Sea 
Northward and Eastward to be made or passed by the Governor and Gen- 
erall Assembly of our said Province be of any force validity or Effect 
vntill Wee Our Heires and Successors shall have Signified Our or their 
Approbacon of the same. 

The reason for his embargo on making grants being extended 
to this territory is obvious. Nearly all of it was claimed by France 
and parts of it actually occupied by French settlers. For the 
Massachusetts Bay province to have an unrestricted right to make 
grants of any or all parts of this disputed ground might lead to 
international complications, and even to war between England and 
France. 

It lacked only three years of three quarters of a century before 
the title was finally quieted in 1763 by the victory of English arms 
over the French and the ceding to England of all French claims to 
this and all other dominions in this section of the continent. After 
1763 the restriction was not removed and the Massachusetts prov- 
ince did not attempt to dispose of land or promote settlements in 
this region except in rare instances, such as at Machias in 1770 and 
a few other conditional grants in the St. Croix locality. 

The successful termination of the American Revolution- created 
a new situation and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, by vir- 
tue of the treaty of 1783, became the absolute owner in fee of all 
the lands she had previously held under her provincial charter. 
This opened up the central and eastern parts of the District of 
Maine to settlements for good titles could now be acquired by 
settlers and purchasers. 

For three years Massachusetts confided the guardianship of her 
public lands to " The Primary Committee." This committee 
experienced much difficulty with trespassers and succeeded in mak- 
ing little or no progress towards quieting titles or promoting set- 
tlements and sales of land, and in 1783 resigned their trust of the 
lands eastward of the Kennebec. In October, 1783, by authority 



EASTERN MAINE LANDS. 191 



of the General Court, a new committee was appointed which was 
styled " The Committee for the Sale of Eastern Lands." The 
new committee was invested with more ample powers than the 
former and it was under its direction and supervision that order 
was brought out of a chaotic situation regarding to the title to 
the lands east of the Kennebec river. 

The state recognized the great value of its possessions in eastern 
Maine and under the able administration of the Eastern Lands 
committee it was enabled to establish a source of revenue from 
them and at the saine time promote settlement. In fact, in the 
first instance, the settlement of the new country was the principal 
object of the government, as is shown by the conditions embodied 
in all the early deeds to purchasers of townships ; these conditions 
required the actual settlement of a certain number of families 
within a specified number of years. 

A land ofifice was established, a state surveyor appointed and 
surveys and lotting of townships were carried forward in a 
methodical and expeditious manner. 



Some Maine postmasters in 1820 were : Augusta, Robert C. 
Vose; Bangor, William D. Williamson; Bath, David Stinson; 
Belfast, Benjamin Whittier ; Brewer, Charles Rice; Eastport, 
John Bur j in; Gardiner, Seth Gay; Ellsworth, F. J. W^hiting; 
Hallowell, Joshua Wingate. 



At one of the recent meetings of the Maine Centennial Com- 
mittee in Portland a proposition for an all-summer exposition of 
Maine's resources, scenic attractions, and other possibilities to be 
held at the Exposition Building in this city was proposed by Gov- 
ernor Carl E. Milliken. It is expected that the plan will be adopted 
and that such an affair will be held. Governor Milliken also sug- 
gested that one of the features be motion pictures, covering 
Maine's industries, principal scenic gems, as well as the institu- 
tions of the State. 



192 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAIXE HISTORY. 

William Gilley, an Early Settler of Mount 

Desert Island 

(by prof. WILLIAM OTIS SAWTELLE. ) 

Among those early settlers who under the Bernard Grant were 
living on Mount Desert Island prior to the year 1784, was one 
Williajii Gilly, born in England, which country he is said to have 
left at the age of seven years. In a!l of the published histories 
relating to this part of the country Gilly is mentioned as a settler 
at Norwood's Cove and no mention is made of any date earlier 
than the above. Ajn item of local historical interest is contained 
in a " Declaration " of this early settler and progenitor of all the 
Gilleys in this vicinity. 

He married Eunice Bunker and they were the parents of several 
children among whom was William who married Hannah Lurvey. 
William and Hannah Lurvey Gilley moved to Bakers Island as 
early as 1806 or 7 and were the first settlers on the Island. They 
were the parents of John Gilley about whom President Eliot of 
-Harvard wrote.^ 

The following relating to William Gilley is from the Documen- 
tary History of Maine (Baxter Ms.) Vol. XV, p. 90: 

The Declaration of William Gilley of Cranberry Island the Mass State 
Fisherman, That sometime in the month of April past the Ship of War 
called the Scarborough Belonging to the British King Commanded by Cap- 
tain Mowat Came into the Harbor of said Island and anchored there — 
That said William was on board the said ship and had considerable conver- 
sation with said Mowat, some particulars he remembers as follows — The 
said Mowat asked if the inhabitants of said Island had taken up arms. It 
was answered No. The said Mowat then said that he was not come to 
molest but to protect them and if they would not disturb his boats in pro- 
curing wood and water that he would not hurt them but if otherwise that he 
was determined to level every house on the Island. Mcwat then asked if 
the Inhabitants up Frenchman's Bay had not chiefly taken up arms. Said 
William answered that he knowed nothing c:bout it. Mowat then said that 
he knowed several that had and asked said William if he was not a Pilot up 
Frenchmans Bay and whether he would not undertake to carry up the ship. 



C) Prof. Sawtelle refers to the first volume in the " True American 
Types " series, entitled John Gilley, by Cha"les VV. Eliot and published 
by the American Unitarian Association of Boston in 1904. Another one 
of this series which relates to Maine is " David Libby, Penobscot Woods- 
man and River-Driver," by Fannie Hardy Eckstorm. They are all delight- 
ful books and of historical value. — Editor. 



WILLIA^I GILLEY. 193 



Said William Answered that he was not a Pilot nor could he undertake it. 
— Said Mowat then asked if said William was acquainted with Colonel 
Jones who lived up there. It was answered in the affirmative. Mowat said 
that he wanted to see him very much, as he had received an invitation from 
Col. Jones when at Halifax to pay a visit and that the said Colonel Jones 
had promised to procure him several head of cattle which were to be drove 
down to some certain point (which the Declarant forgets the name of) 
where Boats were to be sent By the man of War to receive them. That 
the said Mowat through out many threats against many of the settlements 
particularly' Machias. asking if those Rebels did not think hanging too good 
for them, that if he went there he would utterly destroy them — Said Mowat 
appeared to be very well acquainted with the Situation and Circumstances 
of the difFt. settlements mentioning the different quantity of Lumber which 
was in several Harbours and told of many matters which happened in differ- 
ent parts He further said that news had come from Philadelphia Being in 
possession of the Britains and that the Inhabitants to the Southward were 
laying down their arms — That Boston would soon be in possession of the 
Kings troops, and that the Frigates which were there he wanted to see, 
would rejoice of having an Oppt of attacking them both together, — He fur- 
ther said That the Greyhound and Diamond which were seen sometime ago 
before Newbury were cruising for Captain Manley and McNiel — several 
other matters were spoken of which the subscriber does not remember. 

his 
^ WILLIAM X GILLY 

Marl: 
Witnesses . 

Jno Long 
William Maxwell 

J Allen ■ .' 

Cranberry Island May 10, 1777. 



1816. June 20 — The first act of the General Court passed for the 
separation of Maine from Massachusetts. 
Convention at Brunswick, last Monday of September. 

1819. June 19 — Second Separation Act passed. 

4th Monday of July, Yeas and Nays taken in towns on the 
question of Separation and found to stand thus, Yeas, 
17,091 ; Nays, 7,182. 

2nd Monday October. Convention met, and before they 

separated formed a Constitution. 

1820. Maine an independent state after 15th of March. 



\ 



194 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

Sir Ferdinando Gorges 

(by ERNEST A. PRESSEY.) 

The founders of nations and communities are of more than pass- 
ing interest, and yet how many people could name the founder 
of the State of Maine? Perhaps multitudes have never heard of 
him, much less the details of the notable accomplishment of his 
romantic life. 

An elaborate celebration of the centennial of the State of Elaine 
is contemplated for this year. Much will be said and done com- 
memorating the event of a new star admitted among the galaxy 
in the banner of the Union in 1820, and of the centennial of the 
Episcopal Diocese of Maine. No doubt men of Elaine who have 
ranked high in the councils of the nation, men of leadership in all 
branches of human activity will be applauded. Elaine can well be 
proud of her poets, statesmen, diplomats and men of affairs, but 
the full story of the history of the state will not be told unless 
something is said of the founder. Sir Ferdinando Gorges. 

For the many interesting facts in the life of this remarkable 
man which should be known to all our citizens, we are indebted 
to local historians, — the Honorable James P. Baxter, and the Hon- 
orable Augustus Moulton. 

The Gorges family was an ancient one, claiming to have come 
to England with William the Conqueror. It was during the stir- 
ring days of Queen Elizabeth that our hero was born in London, 
about 1566. Men in those days could do many things, write verses, 
shine' at court, sail ships, fight duels, vanquish enemies, or seek 
adventure overseas. Records show Gorges as a captain of troops 
which Queen Elizabeth sent to Holland in 1587 to assist William 
the Silent against Spain. We w^ould expect to find him sharing 
in the events of the memorable year 1588, when the so-called 
"Invincbile Armada" was defeated. But Gorges was a prisoner 
in France at that time. After an exchange of prisoners he was 
again in the field the next year, and was wounded at the siege of 
Paris. By these and other records of military service on the con- 
tinent, we are enabled to note that the founder of Maine was a man 
filled with the spirit of the days of Good Queen Bess of honored 
memory. 

Spain made further plans to invade England after the crushing 
defeat of the Armada, and it was expected that Plymouth would 



SIR FERDIXANDO GORGES. 195 

be the point of attack. Gorges took charge of the erection of the 
defences there and when in 1596 these were completed he was made 
commander of the fortifications. In the long war with Spain, 
Gorges was among the most active in the defence of England. He 
also accompained Sir Walter Raleigh in an attack against the 
enemy and shared in the disastrous outcome. 

In these eighteen years of warfare with Spain, England developed 
many daring and adventurous spirits by land and sea. It was 
not the temper of that age to allow Spain to remain in possession 
of the new western continent. In 1603 Henry the Fourth of 
France gave a charter to a colonization company under De Monts, 
which, by the way, established its first settlement on St. Croix 
Island in Elaine in 1604. By this act France set aside the Spanish 
c'laim to the American continent as a papal gift, and Englishmen 
trained in those stormy days could not be expected to do less. So 
Captain George Weymouth in 1605 explored the coast of North 
Virginia, as the northern shore including Maine, was then called, 
and set up a cross on Monhegan Island in token of sovereignty. 
He selected the mouth of the Kennebec as a good place to found 
a permanent colony. His report was so enthusiastically received 
that in 1606 two companies were formed under one Executive 
Council to forward the enterprise. Sir Ferdinando Gorges, the 
Commander of Plymouth, together with Sir John Foipham. the 
Chief Justice of England, took a leading part in the company, with a 
special interest in the North Virginia branch. With great prompt- 
ness Sir Ferdinando sent the experienced navigator Captain Chal- 
lons to the coast of Maine. By misfortune he fell in with the 
Spaniards in the West Indies and was taken prisoner. Sir John 
Popham, a little later, sent Martin Pring, another noted explorer, 
with another ship in support of the first, who not finding it returned 
to Plymouth, with a still more favorable report of the possibility 
for a settlement at the mouth of the Kennebec. W^e can see that 
if no misadventure had occurred the laurels for first settlement 
would have fallen to Maine in 1606 instead of the distinction fall- 
ing to South Virginia for the London Company's successful colony 
at Jamestown in 1607. 

In any case, Sir Ferdinando Gorges was the promoter by which 
results were obtained. The story of the arrival of the '* Gift of 
God " and the " Mary and John " with one hundred and twenty 
settlers at Sagadahock off where is now Seguin Light. August 19, 



ii'i:}l' 



196 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

1607, and the settlement of the Popham colony and its subsequent 
failure from the death of Governor Popham, the severity of the 
climate, mismanagement, and the hostility of the Indians need not 
be told here. Let it suffice to say. that the doughty knight, the 
founder of Maine, so long as he lived gave most unstintedly of 
wealth, energy-, and zeal for the great object of his life, the coloni- 
zation and the christianization of New England, — a name which 
John Smith in the later employ of Gorges, applied to the territor\\ 
As time advanced the remnant of the abandoned Sagadahock set- 
tlement who were scattered in that region had their numbers sup- 
plemented by those seeking the fishing and trading opportunities 
which the new world offered. Gorges was so earnest in his settle- 
ment scheme that he employed Captain John Smith who had so 
much experience at Jamestown, but repeated shipping disasters 
and the misfortunes of war prevented him from reaching his post 
in Maine. Gorges sent out Richard Vines in 161 4, who spent a 
winter at the mouth of the Saco River. 

Although failing in the success that attended the efforts of the 
South Virginia company, the interest of Gorges in English settle- 
ment was such that he greatly assisted the Jamestown colony with 
his ships. He, likewise, won the gratitude of the Pilgrims when 
they landed on the Massachusetts coast as trespassers, promising 
them " Such freedom and liberty as might stand to their liking.'^ 
He secured a grant for their benefit, and also assisted the Puri- 
tans to secure from the King the charter for the Massachusetts 
Bay Colony in 1628. This reflects great credit upon him when 
^ve realize that Gorges was in the midst of the trouble which was 
brewing at home. The King and the Parliament were at odds. 
Gorges' star was to rise or set with the fortunes of the King. 

In 1635 the Plymouth company surrendered its charter and was 
converted into a crown colony with Sir Ferdinando Gorges as 
Governor General. It was the intention to revoke the charter of 
Massachusetts, but the vacillating King had so much to deal with 
at home that the task of coercion of an overseas colony was 
impossib!e. The next year Gorges set up his government and gen- 
eral court at Saco, and his nephew was appointed governor. A 
modification was made in the plan in 1639, when King Charles 
the First gave letters patent to Gorges m.aking him a feudal lord 
over ■ the Province of Maine after the medieval fashion. This 
presented the curious spectacle of two types of colonial states 



SIR FERDIXANDO GORGES. 197 



growing up side by side, the Puritan state of Massachusetts and 
the Palatine of Maine. Over the latter Sir Ferdinando Gorges 
exercised royal authority and the Church of England was supreme. 
The capital was incorporated in 1641 under the name of Gorgeana, 
now York Harbor. This was the first incorporated city in 
America, with mayor, aldermen, and councilmen. It was expected 
to be the seat of the Bishop of the Church of England. But the 
days of Cromwell and the Long Parliament changed the quality 
of Gorges' dream. The civil conflict was already begun. Sir 
Alexander Rigby, a member of the Long Parliament had previ- 
ously bought an old charter of an earlier date and had no difficulty 
in dispossessing Gorges from his title to Maine. 

The Revolution had now destroyed all that Sir Ferdinando 
Gorges had planned and labored for, for more than forty years, 
and ^lassachusetts took military possession. He insisted to the 
last on his rights and left the Province to his eldest son. He died 
in 1647, aged eighty-two years. He was vindicated in his claim, 
however, for after the Restoration Charles the Second expelled 
the authorities of Massachusetts from Maine. 

In 1677 a decision of the Privy Council sustained the original 
title of Sir Ferdinando Gorges and Massachusetts obtained per- 
mission to drive a wise bargain and bought out the heirs of the 
old feudal lord for the small sum of tw^elve hundred and fifty 
pounds. 

It is interesting to see the different origins of the two states — 
Maine and Massachusetts : the Founder of Maine, the Tudor 
courtier and Stuart cavalier, with dauntless courage pursuing his 
quest to found a state, the stern Puritan, the founder of Massa- 
chusetts. Both are types of medieval Eng'and, and we honor 
both. But both have long since vanished from the scene. Each 
making his contribution to the modern Anglo-Saxon state, which 
the Restoration ushered in with its further specialized form in 
the great x\merican Commonwealth. But Sir Ferdinando Gorges, 
the royalist and English Churchman, the Founder of Maine, has 
the first and most necessary place for which we should revere his 
memory. 



198 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

A Genealogy of a Few Lines of the Simmons 
Family of Maine and Massachusetts, De- 
scendents of Moses Simmons (Moses Sy- 
monson). "Fortune" 1621. 

(by Frederick johnson simmons.) 
(Continued from page 143) 

WILL OF MERCY £IMMONS. 
1728 

The last will and testament of the widdo mercy Simons of Duxborough — 
I, being sick and weak and not knowing the day of my death yet being of 
sound mind and memory do thus will my estate to be disposed of my Soul 
i give to god my body i comitt to the Earth and will that my Debts and 
funeral charges be payed before any legacy. 

I do give to my son John Simons five shiling in silver mony and all my 
sheep — 

to my son william I give one shiling in silver money — 
to my son Isaac I give five shilings in silver mony — 
to beniamen Simons I give five shilings in silver money 
to Joseph Simons I give five shilings in silver money 
to Joshua Simons I give five shilings in silver money 

to my Daughter ^artha I give five shilings in silver money and my Riding 
gown and best pettecoat and whood and Scarf and red Silk neck cloath 
to my Daughter Rebecah I give five shilings in silver money and my best 
Riding whood — 

to my son moses I give my bed and beding belonging to itt and my cow and 
all the money not disposed of — 

the rest of my Estate if any there be I give to my children equaly betwext 
them 

I doe constitute and appint my Sons John and moses to be Executors of 
this my last will and testament and So Desiring to live and Dy in peace I 
dow hereunto Set my hand and Seal this 26th day of September in the year 
1728 

in presence of 

John Chandler ' Mercy Simons 

John fullarton her X mark (Seal) 

philip Dilano 

November the 8: 1728 

The above named Johm Chandler John ffullerton and Phillip Dilano 
made oath that they saw the above Mercy Simons signe seal and heard her 
declar the above written Instrument to be her last Will and Testament and 
that they at the same time in the presence of the Testator set to their hands 



# 



GENEALOGY OF THE SIMMONS FAMILY. 199 



as Witnesses : and that at the same time according to the best of their 
obsenations she then was of a sound and disposing mind and memory- 
according to the best of their observation. 

Before Isaac Winslow Judge of Probate 
ESTATE OF JOHN SIMONS 

1715 
Pl>Tn SS. on the nth day of Februar>- Annoq Dom. 1715/16 The Settlemt 
of the estate both real & personal of John Simmons late of Duxbcrough 
in the County of Plymouth deed, to and amongst his widdow & Childrean 
by mutual agreement amongst themselves in manner & form following that 
is to say That Mercy his relict widdow shall have one third part of all the 
deceased his goods & Chattells & debts to her own proper use & dispose 
forever, & one third part of the sd. deceased's Lands dureing her life in full 
of her part of the sd. Deceaseds Estate. 

That Moses the youngest son of the sd. deceased shall have all the Lands 
both houses homlands meadows and all Other Parcells of what kind, nature 
or name whatsoever to him & his heirs & assigns for ever and also his 
mothers thirds of the afforesd. Lands after her decease to him & his heirs 
for ever — And also all the Other two thirds of Goods Chattells & Debts 
of his sd. fathers Estate he paying & Satisfying all Just debts due from 
the sd. Estate. And also he the said Moses his Executors or administrators 
therefore paying to his Six brothers namely John, William, Isaac, Benjamin, 
Joseph & Joshua & his two Sisters Namely Martha the wife of Samuel 
West & Rebeckah the wife of Constant Southworth the sum of two hundred 
pounds, what any of them may have had already of their fathers Estate 
in his life time to be recon'd a part of the sd. two hundred pounds, & so the 
same to be equally divided to all the said sons and daughters the eldest son 
John to have a double portion thereof. In Witness whereof the Persons 
above named have hereunto set thir hands & Seals the day and year above 
written ' 

Witness 

Elizabeth ' Thomas 
Ellisa Wade 

Mercy Simons (X — her mark) (Seal) 
Joseph Simons (Seal) 
Joshua Simons (Seal) 
Samuel West 

Martha West (X— her mark) (Seal) 
Constant (X) Southworth (Seal) 
Rebeckah Southworth 
Moses Simons (Seal) 
John Simmons (Seal) 
William Simons (Seal) 
Isaac Simons (Seal) 
Benj. Simons (Seal) 
Memorandum that On the nth & 13th days of February Annoq Domini 
1715/16 the within named Mercy Simons, John Simons, William Simons, 



,\, 



200 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



Isaac Simons, Benjamin Simons, Joseph Simons, Joshua Simons, & Samuel 
West & Martha, his wife acknowledged the within written Instrument to 
be their free act & Deed 

before me 

Nathaniel Thomas Judge of probates. 
And on March the fifth, 1715/16 

Constant Southworth & Rebeckah his wife acknowledged the Same before 
me Nathaniel Thomas Judge of probates. 

Children of John and Mercy (Paybody) Simmons were: 

3 

John Simmons born Feb. 22, 1670. 
William Simmons born Sept. 24, 1672 

3 
Isaac Simmons bom Jan. 28, 1674 

3 

Martha Simmons born Nov. 17, 1677 

3 ^^ ^ — 

Benjamin Simmons born about 1678 

3 
Joseph Simmons born- 1683 _ 

3 
Rebecca Simmons m. Feb 19, 1714/15 Constant Southworth. 

3 

Joshua Simmons born 

3 ' ■ '■ 

Moses Simmons born Dec. 5, 1690/1 

THIRD GENERATION. 

3 2 I 

Joseph Simmons (John, Moses) was born in 1683 ^^^^ ^^^^ i^ 
Duxbury, Mass., his birthplace May 20, 1761, Aet. 78 years. He 

3 

married Feb. 8, 1709-10 Mary Weston, daughter of Jane ( ) 

2 I 

and Elnathan Weston (Edmond). The following excerpt from 
the Plymouth County record of deeds may give some idea of the 
locations of the Joseph Simmons homestead: 

(June 2, 1742) Our farm and Parcell of upland Swampy Land and fresh 
Meadow that we have in Township of Duxborrough afores' at a certain 
place known & called by the name of North Hill, partly the sd .A.lice Barne's 
right and partly our sister Sarah Barne's right, derived from our Grand- 
father Benjamin Bartlett deceased who had it from Mr. \Vm. Callyare by 
a deed dated June 28, 1666, with other Lands not sold Joseph Simmon's land 
lying on the Northerly side and James Glass's on the Eastward side and 



GENEALOGY OF THE SIMMONS FAMILY. 201 



Christopher Walsworth land on the Southerly Side & Westerly Katherine 
White's Common Lot & on the North Westerly Nathaniel Brewsters Mical 
Soule's land, or however the sd. granted Premises are bounded, containing 
by Estimation One Hundred acres more or less. 

Joseph Simmons and his brother John had rights in the Dux- 
hury and Pembroke Commons as appears from the following 
from the Duxbury and Pembroke Town Records under date of 
23 July 1722 : 

A Mutual agreement between Joseph Soule, John Simons and Joseph 
Simons, all of Duxborrough in the County of Plymouth in the Province 
of Massachusetts Bay in New England, yoeman is as followeth, viz. 

We the said Joseph Soule, John Simons and Joseph Simons, being owners 
and proprietors of the fourteenth lot in the salt meadows in the second 
division of the Commns which belonged to the towns of Duxborrough and 
Pembroke in the County above said viz. the said Joseph Soule being owner 
of three fifths parts, or shares, thereof, and the said John Simons and 
Joseph Simons being owners of one fifth part or share there of each of 
them said lot lyeth in the township of Duxborrough above said, 
and was laid out Anno Domini 1712, and as yet hath laid undiveded among 
them, therefore they, towit, the said Joseph Soule, John Simons and 
Joseph Simons, that each of them might know his own respective part or 
proportion therein, have agreeded upon a division thereof as followeth, viz, 
that the said Joseph Soule shall have for his said threefifths shares etc. etc. 

. . , and that the said 

Joseph Simons shall have for his said share in said fourteenth lot, this par- 
cel bounded as followeth, viz. Beginning at the stake at the North west 
end of the last mentioned part of said meadow laid to said Joseph Soule, 
standing by Elnathans river, and thence running up stream as the river 
goeth, till it comes to a guzzle, and bounded by that guzzle till it comes to 
a stake at the head thereof, and hence east southeast to a stake and thence 
the same course unto the river, and so by said river down stream, to Joseph 
Soules' last mentioned piece of Meadow, and that the said John Simons 

shall have for his sd. share etc., etc., 

we do mutually agree shall stand and 

remain as a firm and full settlement and division of the above said four- 
teenth lot in the said salt meadows, for us, our heirs and assigns, forever, 



In witness whereof we have here unto set our hands and seals the twenty 
third day of July in the year our Lord, One thousand Seven Hundred 
and twenty-two, 1722. 

Joseph Soule (S) 

Joseph Simons (S) 
John Simons (S) 

Signed Sealed and Delivered in Presence of 

Josiah Delanoe 
Cornelius Soule. 



202 SPIL\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



At a Town meeting in Duxborough, upon the 25th day of August, Anno 

Domini 1740 

The town also voted that Joseph Simons should improve their salt meadow 
this year, he allowing the town one half of the hay when it was stacked. 

Mary (Weston) Simons, the wife of Joseph Simons, was men- 
tioned in her father's will as following: 

Elnathan Weston's will — 19 Apr. 1728 — To my Daughter Mary the wife 
of Joseph Simmons threepounds 

The children of Joseph and Mary (Weston) Simmons were: 

4 

Nathaniel Simmons, B March 24, 1710-11. 

4 

Rebeckah Simmons, B Apr. 7, 1713; M. Reuben Patterson. 

4 

Sarah Simmons, B March 24, 1718; D. Mch. 1740. 

4 

Jedediah Simmons, B June 11, 1725. ^ "^ 

The will of Joseph Simmons : 

In the Name of God Amen, The 14th day of March in ye year of our Lord 
^754 I Joseph Simmons of Duxborough in the County of Plymouth yoeman 
being Very weekly in body but of perfect mind and memory Thanks be 
given to God therefor Calling unto mind the Mortallity of my bodey and 
Knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die I Do make and ordain 
this my Last will & Testament that is To Saj' — first of all I Give and Recom- 
mend my Soul into the hands of God that gave it and my body I Recom- 
mend to ye Earth to be buried in Decent Christian manner at the Discretion 
of my Executor nothing Doubting but at the general Resurection I shall 
Receive ye Same again by the mightly Power of God and as Touching such 
worldly Estate wherewith it hath Pleased God to Bless me with in this Life, 
I give & Demise in the following manner & form — 

Imprims. I Give & bequeath to Mary my Dearly beloved wife, i cow & 
Six Sheep and the Improvement of Half of my orchard her Life time & I 
also give To Mary my wife the one half of my indore movables to Dispose 
of as She Pleases. 

Item I give & bequeath To my Eldest Son Nathl. Simmons the one' 
half of Lands & Tenaments by him firmly to be Possessed & injoyed Like- 
wise one bed bandogs & my warming Pan & my biggest Pewter Plater & 
half of my wareing close and half of my out doar movables besides what he 
has had in my Life Time obligeing him to Pay one half of my funeral 
Charges & I also constitute and make & ordain my Eldest Son Nathl. Sim- 
mons my Soule Executor of this my last will and Testament. 

Item' — I Give & bequeath unto my well beloved Sone Jedediah Simmons 
ye one half of my Lands & Tenaments by him firmly to be Possessed & 
Injoyed Likewise My gun & My Loom & half of my wearing apparril & 
half of my out doar moveables besides what he has had in my Life Time 
obligeing him To Pay half of my Debts & funeral Charges. 



#'■ 



t^^ 



GENEALOGY OF THE SIMMONS FAMILY. 203 



Item I give unto my well beloved Daughter Rebeckah Peterson my best 
bed only Reserving it To her mother Mar}- Simmons her life & I give To my 
Daughter the one half of my indore movables. 

Item I also Give To my wife Mary above mentioned ye one half of my 
Dwelling house her life Time I Do also my Two Sons above mentioned, 
Nath'el & Jedediah oblige them To Winter & Summer theirs mothers one 
Cow & Six sheep and finde her as much fire wood at her Dore as She Shall 
need for To Burn. 

Item I Give to my Grandson Joseph Simmons my Sea Chest what I 
have here given to my Daughter abve mentioned to wit my best bed & half 
my In doar movables is besides what She has already had and I also give 
To my Daughter ye beding that belongs to my best bed with the bed I Do 
hereby Verrefy Disallow Revoke & Disanul all & every other former Testa- 
ments & wills Legacies & bequesths & Executors by me in any ways before 
mentioned willed and bequeathed Ratifying & Confirming this & no other 
to my last will & Testament. 

In witness whereof I have hereunto Set my hand & Seal the Day & year 
above written 

Signed Sealed Pronounced Joseph Simmons (Seal) 

& Declared By the Said 

Joseph Simmons as his Last "^ 

Will & Testament in the _ 

Presence of us the Sub- 
scribers ' 
Saml Weston 
Elnathan Weston 
Judah Delino 
Plymouth Ss June i 1761 This will haveing been Exhibited for Probate by 
the Executor therein named Elnathan Weston & Judah Delino made oath 
that they saw the said Joseph Simmons Sign, Seal and Deliver and him 
Declare this Instrument to be his last Will and Testament and that they 
Together with Saml Weston who is Since Deceased in his Presence Sub- 
scribed as witnesses at the same Time and that According to the best of 
their Judgments he was then of Sound mind 

Jno Cushing Judge of Probt. 
321 

Moses Simmons (John, Moses) was born in Duxbury, Mass., 
about Dec. 5, 1690, and died there June 21, 1761, Aet. 702-3 years. 
He married in Duxbury March 26, 17 18, Rachel Sam (p) son, 
daughter of Caleb and Mercy (Standish) Sam (p) son, and grand- 
daughter of Alexander and Sarah (Alden) Standish, and great 
granddaughter of Capt. Myles Standish. 

2 

By the settlement of the estate of his father John Simmons, 
3 
Closes Simmons was given the home place of his parents — " all the 
ands both houses homlands meadows " etc. 



1 



'^:r^m 






\ 



204 SFRAGUK'S JOURNAL OF MAIAE HliSTORY. 



On Aug. 2 ,1742, the town of Duxbury voted that 
Moses Simons should ditch the town's meadow, and bring in his bill 
to said town; 18 May 1747 The said Town voted that Mr. Moses Simons 
should take special care that all abstructions shall forthwith be removed on 
Southworth's Mill river, and convenient passage opened, so that alewives 
may run into the mill pond, also to keep all persons from catching any of 
the said fish, on Mondays Tuesdays and Saturday in each respective week 
until the loth of next June. 

Moses Simmons was one of the signers to an agreement to pay Rev. John 
Robinson his yearly salary' in 1737. 

3 

The children of Moses and Rachel ( Sam (p) son) Simmons were 

born in Duxbury and were: 

4 
Mercy Simmons, b. 18 May 1720; d, 21 Sept. 1788 Waldoboro, Maine. 

4 

Ichabod Simmons, b. 18 Oct. 1722; d. Feb. 1798. 

4 
Lydia Simmons, b. 10 Apr. 1724 

4 
Noah Simmons, b. 31 Aug. 1728; d. 28 Feb. 1737. 

4 

Deborah Simmons, b. 12 Jan. 1732. 

4 
William Simmons, b. 28 Aug. 1736. 

- 4 - 

Anna Simmons, b. 4 Sept. 1739. 

4 

Dorithy Simmons, b. 2 March 1741, 

4 ■■ - 

Lemuel Simmons, b. 14 Feb. 1743. 

• 4 

Abrigail Simmons, b. 10 May 1745. 

The Last Will and Testament of Moses Simons of Duxborough in the 
County of Plymouth in the province of the Massachusetts bay in New- 
england yoeman. I the said Moses Simons Being under Many Bodily Infirm- 
ities yet of perfect Mind and Memory thanks be Given to Almighty God 
therefor Calling to Minde the Mortality of My Body & Knowing that It is 
Appointed for all men once to Die So upon serious Consideration Make & 
ordain these Presents to be my Last will & Testament to Remain firm & 
Inviolable forever That is to Say. 

First of all I Give & Recomend my Soul into the hands of God that Gave 
It & my Body I Recomend to the Earth to be buried in decent Christian 
manor at the Discretion of my Executrix herein After Named. Nothing 
Doubting but at the General Resurection I shall receive the same Again by 
the Almighty Power of God and as Touching Such Worldly Estate Where- 



GENEALOGY Oh THE iSlMMOxXb FAMILY. 20= 



with It hath pleased God to Bless me in this Life I Give Demise and Dis- 
pose of the Same In the Following manor »& forme — 

Impr — I Give & Bequeath unto my Dear & Loving Wife Rachel Simons 
the one half of the Improvement of all my Real Estate Excepting What Is 
herein Given to my son Ichabod Simons During her Natural Life & the 
one half of mj- Movable Estate after the Debts & Legaces have been paid 
out of the Same th one half that Remains — 

Item I Give and Bequeath untomy eldest son Ichabod Simons a Peace of 
my land at the Northwest End of my farme on Which I now Dwell Near 
ten acres Already set off. 

Item — I Give & Bequeath unto my son William Simons the one half of 
my home farme & Real Estate Excepting what Is Given to my Son Ichabod 
Simons above & the one half of all my Movable Estate After ye Debts 
funeral Charges & legacies are paid out of the same the one half that 
Remains. 

Item — I Give & Bequeath unto my Daughter Mercy Simons Wife to Nathl 
Simons two Shillings by Reason she hath had her portion already. 

Item I Give &; Bequeath unto my Daughter Lydia Delano Wife to Judah 
Delano two shilings & four pence together with what she hath already had — 

Item I Give 8c Bequeath unto my Daughter Deborah Weston Wife to Jacob 
Weston two shillings by Reason she hath had her portion Already — 

Item I Give & bequeath unto my Daughter Anna Simons four pounds — 

Item I Give & bequeath unto my son William Simons. Above Named the 
Remaind of my Real Estate & home farme at his Mothers Decease — 

Lastly my Will is that My Wife Rachel Simons and my son William 
Simons be the Sole Executrix & Executor to this my Last Will thus Hoping 
that this my Last will be Kept & performed according to the trew intent 
& meaning thereof 

In witness Thereof I the said Moses Simons have hereunto Sett my hand 
& Seal this tenth Day of April one thousand Seven hundred fifty & Eight — 
175^- 

. Moses Simons (Seal) 
Signed, Sealed & Declaired by 
the Afore Named Moses Simons 

to be his Last Will and — 

Testament in presence of 
John Chandler ye 3d. 
Ruth Fullarton 

Jona Peterson "' 

Duxborough february ye 24th 1761 Observe that the two words that are 
Erased in the thirty Eight Line of this testament Is Done by my order 

Moses Simons 
In presents of 
Samuel Delano 
Jona. Peterson 

A true copy of the Will of Moses Simons, recorded Plymouth County 
Probate Records, Vol. 16, Page 208. 



#^ 



(^f;"'i'r' 



206 bFKAGUbiS JOLRNAL OF MAIAE HISTORY 



FOURTH GENERATIONS. 

4 321 

Nathaniel Simmons (Joseph, John, Moses), the son of Joseph 
I 
and Mary (Weston) Simmons, was born in Duxbury, Mass., March 
24, 1710-11 and died at Waldoboro, Maine, Jan. 4th, 1789. In the 
so-called Slaigo yard on the old Simmons estate at Waldoboro, 
Maine, are two handsome (if I may use such an adjective in this 
connection) and well-preserved slate grave stones to the memory 

4 
of Nathaniel Simmons and his wife Mercy. They read as follows : 

In Memory of 

Deac. Nathaniel Simmons 

formerly of Duxbury 

Who died Jan. Ye 4th, 1789 

Aged TJ years, 8 mos., 26 days. 

In Memory of 

Mercy Simmons 

Wife of Nathaniel Simmons 

Who died Sept. Ye 21, 1788 

Aged 68 years, 3 mos., 23 days. 

^^ 4 

Nathaniel Simmons married his cousin Mercy Simmons, the 
daughter of Moses and Rachel (Sampson) Simmons. From Dux- 
bury, Mass., Records we find, " June 12th Anno 1739 Nath'l 
Simons and Mercy Simons, both of Duxborough were Joyned 
together in Marriage pr me Edward Arnold Justice of Ye Peace." 

4 

Nathaniel Simmons was a deacon in the First church in Duxbury 
and the records of the births of most of his children may be seen 
on the parish books. From the parish records we find that at 
public sale at the meeting house in Duxbury, June 10, 1754, for 
" Corner Pew on Mens side Nathaniel Simmons " paid twelve 
pounds. At Duxbury town meeting Dec. 3. 1753; the Town sold 
Nathaniel Simmons their salt hay, that part of it that belongs to 
the town, for 6£ to be paid in a year." May 27, 1754; the town 
sold the white pine timber that was got for a new meeting house 
to Nathaniel Simmons 4^ 13.04 in lawful money." 

From 1758 to 1760 the selectmen of Duxbury were ''Briggs 
Alden, Wait Wadsworth, Dea. Nathaniel Simmons." 



m 



'.! Xl\ 



VJlJ-,i> JJ^r-\.J-,VyVJ i \^L lli-JL- wJi-^i-AYAV^^N O X^~V->i.Al_. X . 



-W 



4 

After 1765 we find Nathaniel Simmons rapidly disposing of his 
considerable property in LXixbury. 22 October 1765, he and his 
brother Jedidiah sold to Joshua Stanford for Sixteen Pounds, '* A 
certain piece or Parcel of wood Land that we have in the Town- 
ship of Duxborough aforesaid Said Wood Land is a Part of the 
thirteenth & Sixteenth Lots of L'pland in the second Division of 
the commons of said Duxborough & Pembroke " (From deed 
of Nathaniel & Jedidiah Simmons). 

The bounds of above were named by giving range of Capt. Wait 
Wadsworth Eliphaz Prior's Josha Chandler's land also " high 
way that leadeth from South River to the Meeting House '' (Ply. 
Co. Deeds Bk. 52 Pg. 37) 

4 

Under same date as above, I find that Nathaniel Simmons sold 
to Briggs Alden of Duxborough, for thirty-nine pounds, seventeen 
shillings and four pence, 

A certain piece of Salt marsh laying in the Town of Duxborough and 
being the whole of the above said Nath'I Simmons Right in a certain Island 
called Long Island and also a certain piece of Cedar Swamp laying in the 
Township of Duxbury and is bounded as followeth Beginning at a Black 
Oak Tree with Stones about it and is the most Northeast Corner Bound of 
Glasses Ten Acre lot which is the Southeast Corner Bound of said Cedar 
Sw^amp Thence Ranging Northerly To a Red Oak Standing on the edge of 
the Upland and is Bounded Between Benja. Chandler and Thomas Hunt 
Thence Westerly to the land of Judah Delano's Thence Southerly By the 
land of Said Delanos to the Upland of Nath'l Simmons' and so on b}- the 
upland of Nath'l Simmons' to Glasses Ten acre lot first mentioned. Thence 
by said Ten acre lot To the Black oak first mentioned (Ply Co. deeds Bk. 
51- Pc- J2) 

4 

July 7, 1766, Nathaniel Simmons sold his homestead farm to 
Judah Delano for three hundred pounds described as follows : 

All my Homestead Farm with all my Right Title & Interest in it together 
with my Cedar Swamp laying in North Hill Marsh with some skirts of 
Upland adjoyning thereunto, also a small piece of Wood Land laying at a 
place called Stanford's Neck. Reference may be had to the Records of 
Nathaniel Simmons' Deeds for the Bounds of said Lands, Together with 
all my Buildings and Fences 

and Mercy Simmons wife to Nathaniel 

Simmons doth by these Presents relinquish and give up all her Right of 
Dower or Power of Thirds therein. The deed is signed by Nathaniel 
Simmons and by Mercy Simmons his wife. 



May 8, 1767 sold to Joshua Cushman of Duxbury for seven 
pounds thirteen shilHngs, & four pence seven acres of land near 
the land of Phinehas Sprague and Thomas Hunt and '* Cedar 
Swamp." The land was a part of the 19th lot in the 2nd division 
of the Common of the upland belonging to the Township of Dux- 
bury and Pembroke. 

In 1767 Nathaniel Simmons moved his family to Pembroke, 
probably to that part of old Pembroke that is now near or in the 
tow^n of Hanson, Mass. On the 22 October 1767 he speaks of 
himself as from Pembroke. Mass.. when he deeded his last bit of 
property in Duxbury to Xathan Soul for forty pounds. The prop- 
erty consisted of four acres more or less of salt marsh, located 
near the meadows of Nathan Soul and Benjamin Southworth. 
The land was once owned by Nathaniel Brewster and was bought 
by Nathaniel Simmons from Joseph Brewster. 

I believe that Nathaniel Simmons did not reside in Pembroke 
or that part of Pembroke now Hanson for more than three years 
as he sold on Sept. 3, 1770 to Blaney Phillips of Pembroke, (Blaney 
Phillips once lived in Hanson. Mass., then Pembroke, ^lass., on 
the site of the house owned (1912) by Richard Everson) for two 
hundred twenty-six Pounds thirteen shillings and four pence, 

A certain Tract of Land Situate in Pembroke aforesaid containing by- 
estimation forty one acres Viz : beginning at the 

.North West Corner of John Bonney's Land which he bought of Elijah 
.Faxon, Thence running North ten degrees West about fifty seven Rods 
to stake and stones in the Range of Deacon Phillip's Lands, Thence North 
seventy-eight degrees West about sixty two Rods to the North East Corner 
of the abovesaid Blaney Phillips's Pasture. Thence south nine Degrees 
West fifty five Rods & Eleven Feet to a stake and stones, Thence South 
sixteen Degrees East fifty three Rods to the Land which Gideon Bisbe 
deceased dyed seized of. Thence south Seventy four degrees East forty 
six Rods to Jabesh Cole's Land, Thence North fifteen degrees East Seven- 
teen Rods, Thence North twenty-two degrees and a half East thirty nine 
Rods to the first mentioned Corner Bounds — It being the whole of that 
which we now call the Great Pasture, which I the said Nathaniel Simmons 
bought of Josiah Keen Esqr. And also a drift Way through the Land 
Jesse Thomas bought of John Gould where the same shall be most con- 
venient and least prejudicial to pass and repass to and from the highway 
through convenient Barrs. (Ply. Co., Deeds Bk. 58 Pg. 119) 

The deed was signed by Nathaniel and wife Mercy Simmons. 
It was witnessed by his daughter Dorothy Simmons and by Jacob 
Reed. 

Between 1770 and 1773 Nathaniel Simmons had moved his 
family to Waldoboro. Maine, for he speaks of himself as from 



# 



vj-C-iNJZi.x^i^wvjr 1 Kjr irarL c»i^m^mv_7i\ J5 r."\..MiJL,i . ^uy 



Waldoborough, Lincoln Co., on 13 Sept., 1773 when he deeded 
his remaining property in Pembroke to Elijah Damon of Ply- 
mouth, Mass., for£i33.6.o8. 

All that my Farm of Upland, Buildings, Fences, Orchards, Swamp- 
Land, Wood Land, that I have in the township of Pembroke 

& it is all the Real Estate that I now do own in said 

Pembroke, & it is the Easterly part of the Farm that I bought of Josiah 
Keen Esq's & is Bounded as follows namely Beginning at the North West 
Corner of John Bonney's land and which said Bonney bought of Elijah 
Faxon, Thence running South Seventy five Degrees East ninety-seven Rods 
& half to the highway near the House of John Bonney; Thence Northerly 
partly by the Highway & partly by Josiah Cushing's Land Sixty-three Rods 
& crosses the Highway to the Eastwards to a stake & Stones for a corner, 
which is the North East Corner of the Land, which the said John Bonney 
formerly bought of Solomon Levitt and is the North East corner of the 
Farm that I here do now sell ; Thence North Seventy eight Degrees West 
by the Land of Josiah Gushing to the High Way & crosses the High Way; 
Thence the same course Seventy eight Degrees West from North by Wil- 
liam Phillips about one hundred and Seven Rods to a Stake & Stones 
for a corner which is the North East Corner of the Land that I the said 
Nath'l Simmons sold to Blanay Phillips and ranges North ten Degrees 
West from the comer of John Bonney's Land which is the North West 
Corner here first mentioned. Thence by the Land of Blany Phillips South 
Ten Degrees East about fifty seven Rods more or less to the corner first 
here mentioned — The whole contains about thirty six Acres & half 

The deed was signed by Nathaniel Simmons and wife Mercy, 
both of Waldoboro, Me., Lincoln Co., Witnessed by his son-in- 
law John Hunt and by Paul Cash. 

(To be continued) 



Advertisement in a Hallowe!! newspaper, the " American Advo- 
cate and Kennebec Advertiser,'' under date of Saturday, August 
22, i8t8. 

JAMAICA RUM 

For Sale. 

15 Hhds. high proof 

Jamaica Rum, of superior quality, for cash or liberal credit, 

on undoubted notes. 

WANTED, 

7000 Hhd. shooks, yellow ash or white oak, to be got to particular 

dimensions. 

WM. OLIVER VAUtmAN. 
HalloweH, Aug. 22, 1818. 



2IO SFRAGLK'S JOUKXAL OF AL\1AE HISTORY. 

Notes on the Hicks Family 

(by CHARLES M. STARBIRD, DANVILLE, MAINE.) 

(Concluded from page 159) 
Mr. Hicks married second, Mrs. Susanna (Frost) Frost, Novem- 
berr 5, 1778. She was the widow of Benjamin Frost. Their 
children were : 

I. Hannah, b. March 4, 1781 ; m. January 28, 1807, William Wood. 

II. Ephraim, b. March 23, 1783; m. Rachel Morton, July 10, 1804. 
They lived in the Nason district. Mr. Hicks d. December 14, 1835; his 
widow m. 2d, Edward Harmon of Gray. The children of Ephraim and 
Rachel were: 

1. Ebenezer, b. May 26, 1805, m. Susan Parker, Dec. 11, 1825; d. May 
21, 1844. She d. Sept. 5, 1873. 

2. Lemuel, b. May 26, 1805; m. Esther Files of Thomdike. 

3. Susan, b. Dec. 27, 1807; m. Isaac Flood, April i, 1837. 

4. Dilla, b. Dec. 27. 1807; m. Edmund Flood, Sept. 11, 1831. 

5. Martha, b. July 5, 1810; m. Chas. H. Anderson of Windham, 
February 15, 1829. 

6. Eliza, b. January 9, 1820; m. — Cole of Windham. 

III. Nathaniel, b. September 27, 1784; m. Lucy Ward, pub. December 
12, 1812. They lived near his brother Lemuel in Gorham. Naihaniel d. 
February 17, 1870; his wife d. February 28, 1837. Their children were: 

1. Mark m. Sally Hooper who d. July 27, 1895. 

2. Isaac m. in Norway and d. there. 

3. Mary Ann d. unmarried January 9, 1888, aged 62. She lived in 
Windham. 

4. Joseph d. August 23, 1821. 

JAMES HICKS. 

James, son of Lemuel, Sr., married a Leighton or a Hall, but 
probably Abigail Hall, July 15, 1779. He first built a log cabin 
in Falmouth. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, a pri- 
vate in Capt. Joseph Pride's Company in a detachment of Cumber- 
land County Militia commanded by Nathaniel Jordan. Esq. He 
enlisted October i, 1779, served in the Eastern part of Maine and 
was discharged in October 23, 1779, after losing a leg. His chil- 
dren were : 

I. George b. February i, 1780; d. September 21, 1879. 

IL Dorothy b. June 18. 1781. 

III. Samuel b. July 8. 1783; d. November 30, 1856. (See below). 

IV. Sarah b. January 15. 1785. 

V. Esther b. December 18. 1786: d. March 22, 1787. 

VI. Esther (2) b. January 2, 1789; d. Februar>^ 6, 1801. 



''S hrm 



NOTES ON THE HICKS FAMILY. 211 



VII. Eunice b. May 2, 1791. 

VIII. Hannah b. April 19. 1793; m. probably, Samuel Berry. 

IX. Martha b. December 29. 1794; d. November 12, 1797. 

X. Elizabeth b. November i, 1796. 

XI. Cyrus b. February 21, 1798; d. November 14, 1876. He m. a Miss 
Hadlock of West Falmouth and had five children: Charles, Albert, 
Neal, Levi W. and Abigail. He held a large tract of land on Hurricane 
Hill in Falmouth which is now occupied by his son, Levi W. Hicks. 

XII. Martha (2) b. June 3, 1800. 




Leonard Hicks, 1820-1887 

XIII. Manj b. March 30, 1802. 

XIV. Susan b. March 2, 1804. 

XV. Andrew b. January 10, 1807. 

SAMUEL HICKS. 

Samuel Hicks, son of James, married first. Abigail Winslow of 
West Falmouth. She was born January, 1787 and died February 
22, 1834. He built a tavern in Falmouth, now known as the 
Washburn Tavern, and for many years did a prosperous business. 
Samuel and Abigail had eleven children : 

I. Phebe W. b. February 21, 1808; m. Asa Reed; d. October 20, 1879. 

II. Winslow b. March 7, 1809. (See below.) 

III. James b. April 21, 181 1. (See be^ow.) 

IV. Lydia b. November 20, 1813; m. James Anderson; d. August, 1879. 

V. Henry b. September 23, 1815; d. January 15, 1867. 

VI. Martha b. December 19, 1817; m. John Anderson; d. April 14, 1880. 



'■r ",-.i;0. ,-n,^'i,. 



212 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



VII. Leonard b. January 2, 1820. (See below.) 

VIII. Alfred b. October 2, 1821 ; d. July 12, 1890. 

IX. Adeline b. September 5, 1823; m. Rufus Lane. 

X. Dolly b. July 15. 1826; d. 1844. 

XL Albion b. September 2."], 1828; m. Eliza Houston. 



WINSLOW HICKS. 

Winslow, son of Samuel and Abigail, born March 7, 1809; 
married at Gray, May 24, 1832, Emeline Libby. She was born 
at Gray, August 9, 18 14. He was a prominent farmer of Danville 
and served as selectman in i860. He died August 30, 1873. His 
children were : 

I. Edwin b. October 2&, 1832. He was killed in an accident on the Isth- 
mus ef Panama. One of his sons, Hon. Alfred T. Hicks is now Post- 
master at Auburn, Maine, and has been an active worker in the Democratic 
party. He is a member of Wills and Hicks, jewellers. 

II. Henry F. b. August 19, 1834. He liv^d on his father's farm until 
his death. 

III. Martha b. June 11, 1836; m. June 1859, Mr. Slocum of Winsor, 
Connecticut. 

IV. Samuel b. November 2Z, 1838; m. Mrs. Elizabeth Townsend. He 
was a prominent farmer of New Gloucester. 

V. Hannah b. January 16, 1841. 

VI. Mary S. b. June 15, 1843. 

VII. James P. b. March 18, 1845; d. at Danville, October i, 1848. 

VIII. Sarah J. b. June 14, 1847; d. September 26, 1848. 

IX. Conant S. b. May 2},, 185 1. He was twice married, his first wife 
being Miss Lena S. Merrill and his second, Mrs. x\ngie Towle. He was 
engaged in the milk business and lived on the Hotel Road, Auburn, until 
his death in 1917. 

X. John A. b. May 31, 1855. John A., is a farmer and carpenter residing 
in Auburn, 

XI. Emma b. May 31, 1855. 

JAMES HICKS. 

James, son of Samuel and Abigail, married Lavina Leighton at 
Falmouth, April 8, 1838. She was born at Famlouth, March 31, 
181 5. Mr. Hicks was a farmer in Danville for many years. His 
children were : 

1. Charles H. b. March 29, 1839; m. February, 1866, Julia L. K. Lovejoy 
and 2nd Miss Abby Bla'lr. 

II Dolly J. b. June 10. 1844; d. unmarried. 



"t;;- 1=?"^?% 



M'^'- ., r- k 



THE SOXG OF THE ROAD. 213 



LEONARD HICKS. 

He w-as the third son of Samuel to settle in Danville where he 
moved in 1840 and took up a farm of 100 acres. He commenced 
the brick business before 1855 with Rufus Lane. In 1866 he was 
sent to the Elaine Legislature as a delegate to oppose the annexa- 
tion of Danville to Auburn. He was a member of the Auburn 
city council for several years. Politically he was an unswerving 
Democrat. Mr. Hicks married Elmira Austin who was born at 
Gray, September i, 1818. He died in 1887 and Mrs. Hicks in 
1895. They had one child : 

1. Francena b. April 22, 1846. She was educated in the Lewiston Falls 
Academy and m. December, 1865, Charles E. Robinson of Danville. She 
d. in 1906. 



THE SONG OF THE ROAD. 

(by HELEN E. PREXTISS) 

The author penned these lines after an auto ride over that wilder- 
ness highway, knozvn locally as the '' old New England road,'' from 
Blanchurd to Bingham, in the State of Maine. — Editor. 

I am humble and lowly. I sing my song 
To the humming of motors, and pounding of hoofs 
And I lead the way as men hurry along 
Through the countryside, to the busy town — 
The place of traffic and windows and roofs. 

■ I am young, I am old; I am narrow, I'm wide; 
I am rocky and rough, and I try men's souls, 
I lead the way up a mountain side 
I twist and I turn ; I seem to hide. 
And men curse me, — or praise me. — but pay my tolls. 

My gown is sober, of dun and dove. 

Yet the lovers of beauty oft find me a boon. 

I echo the songs of the birds above; 

I'm a friend of maidens and men in love — 

My shadows in league with the wise old moon. 

So I sing to myself as I lead the way, 
Though my place is low, yet I serve men's need. 
I bear fresh loads of the fragrant hay, — 
•And the well loved dead that ye lay away. 
Have men business or pleasure, — I lead, — I lead. 

Greenville, Me., August, 1919. 



%> 



214 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

An Alphabetical Index of Revolutionary Pen- 
sioners Living in Maine 

(Compiled by Charles A. Flagg, Librarian, Bangor 
(Maine) Public Library.) 

(Continued from page 15c) 

This index began in Vol. V, No. 4, Nov., Dec, 1917 ; Jan., 1918. In that 
number may be found an introduction and explanation of sources and abbre- 
viations. 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. iAge.' County. 



Remarks* 



*35d Hawawas, Nicholas. Mass. state. . . . j Lieutenant. 

'35d Hawes, Abijah Mass. state. . . . j Private 

'35c Hawes, Jonathan. . . Mass. line Private 



*35c Haws, Joseph Mass. line . 

*40 Haws, Joseph 

'40 Hayden, Jonathan. 



Private . 



Major. 



'35c Hayden, Josiah. . . . Mass. line. 

'35d Haydon, Jonathan . Mass. mil Private, . . . i 

'35d Hayens, Walter .... Mass. mil Private. ... 

'40 Hayes, Amos M . . . . ; ; 



•35d Hayford, William 

•40 ; 

'35c ; Haynes, Ephraim 



Mass. mil Private 

Mass. line Private 



90i Washington. 

82 Lincoln. 

76 Kennebec . . . 

79 Cumberland 
87 Cumberland 

77 Somerset. . . , 

83 Kennebec . . . 

71 Kennebec . . 

79 York. 

85 Cumberland 



72 Oxford. 
78 Oxford . . 
93 Hancock. 



(•20) d. Nov. 10, 
1823. 

("20, Hawes) 
Res. Minot. 
Res. :Madison. 
Same as Haydon? 
('20) d. Sept. 2, 

1818. 
Same as Hayden? 

Res. N. Yarmouth 
Same as Hays» 
A. M. 



'35c Haynes, James Mass. line Private. . 

'35c Haynes, Parley Mass. line Drummer 

'40 I Haynes, Simeon. 

•35d iHays, Amos M.. 



67 Lincoln . . 
77 Hancock. 
82 Waldo . . 



Mass. line . 



Private ! 79 Cumberland 



'35d JHayward, Edward.. Mass. mil Private.. 

*35c ; Hay ward, Isaiah . . . Mass. line Private. . 

'40 Hayward, Susanna 

'40 Hazen, Hann 

'35c Hazen, Jacob Ma.s8. line Private. . 

'40 



'35c Head, James Mass. line Private. . . 

'35d Head, James Mass. mil Private. . . 



73 Kennebec. 
79 Kennebec . . 
65 Kennebec . . 
65 Kennebec . . 
72 Cumberland 
78 Cumberland 

85 York 

75 Oxford 



•40 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

•20 

•35d 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 

'35d 

'20 

'35d 

'40 

•20 

'35 a 

'40 



Head, James W 

Head Moses N. H. line Private 

Heald, Oliver Mass. line Corporal . . 

Heald, Thomas Mass. mil Private. . . . 

Healey, Eli p h a z Mass. line Private. . . . , 

widow 

Heall. Levi ' 

Heard, James Mass Private 

Heard, Tri.stram ... N. H. state. . . . Corporal . . 
Hearl, John Mass. mil Private 



Res. Hartford. 
('20) See also 

Haines. 
('20) d.June]1824 
('20, Perley) 
Res. Swanville 

See" also Hayens 
Same as Hayes, A. 
I M. 

' ( '20) 

Res. Sidney. 

Res. Gardiner. 

(•20) 

Res. Bridgton. 
.d. March 31, 1832. 

Reported dead in 
: 1835. 

Res. Warren. 

('20) 



Hearsay, James .... Mass. line Pvt.& Corp 

& Serg. ' 

Hearsay, Noah Mass. state. . . . Private. ... 

Hearsa.j-, Zadock. . . Mass. mil Private. . . . 

Heath, Benjamin. . . Penn. Private. 

Heath, Isaac Mass. mil Private . . . . , 



74 Lincoln . . . 
72 Penobscot. 
77 Somerset . . 
70 Kennebec. 
80 Lincoln. 



83 Lincoln Res. Nobleboro'h. 

Same as Head? 

86 Somerset. 
79 Y'ork. 

85 York Res. S. Berwick. 

76 Oxford Same as Hursey. 



71 Lincoln. 
S3 Washington 



Same as Hersey. 



; Heath, Richard. 
Heath, William. 



Mass Private. 

N. H. Scam- Private. 
m..ii 9 regt. . . 



77 Lincoln. 

83 Lincoln Res. Whitefield. 



('20, '31b, '3.56) 

76 Hancock Res.JMt. Desert. 



m. 



REVOLUTIONARY PEXSIOXERS IX MAIXE. 



215 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. 



lAge.i County. 



Remar'cs. 



'35d iHeavenor, Charles. . Mass. line. 



Private . 



'40 'Heavner, Charles. 



'35c 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

•40 

'35d 

•40 

•35d 

'20 

•40 



'40 
•20 
•35c 
•40 



•35d 

•40 

•40 

•35d 

•20 

•35d 

•35c 



'35c Hebberd, John Mass. line. 



•35d 

'35d 

•40 

'20 

'35c 

'35d 

•35d 

'40 

'40 

'40 

•35d 



'35c 

•35d 

'35c 

'40 

'35d 

'20 

•35c 



Helm ershausen. Conn, line . 
i Henr>' F. 

Hemmenwrey, Asa. . Mass.mil. 
Henderson, Benj m'n Mass. mil. 



Private. 



Private. 



76 Oxford. 



I 
84 Lincoln . 



Fifer. . . . 
Sergeant 



Henick, Sarah 

Herrick, Jacob Mass. state. 

Herrick, Oliver 

Herring. Daniel. . . . Mass. mil. . 

Herrington, Joseph . R. I 

Hersey, Zadok. . . 



, Private. 
I Private. 



'40 -Hersom, Samuel. 



Heselton, Elizabeth. . 

Hevenor, Charles. . . Mass . 

He\dt, William X. (H?) line. 

Heyer, Cornelius ... 



•35c Hibbert, Jonathan. . Penn. line. 

'35d Hicks, Samuel Mass. line. 

'40 Higgins, Edmund . . ; 



Higgins, Philip Mass. mil. 

'■ Higgins, Walter j 

Hilhorn, Lucy > 

Hilborn, Robert. . . ilass. line. 

Hill. Daniel 

Hill, Daniel Mass. line. 

Hill, Jeremiah Mass. line . 



'40 Hill, Noah. 



'40 

'35c 

'35d 

'20 

'35d 

•35c 
•35d 



Hill, Rebecca I 

Hill. Samuel Cont. na\-y , 

Hilton, Dudley Mass. mil. . 

Hilton, Ebenezer, 2d Mass 

Hilton, Ebenezer. . . Mass. line. 



75 Lincoln Same as Havenor, 

Hevenor <fe 
Heavner. 

81 j Lincoln Res. Waldoboro. 

Same as prece- 
ding.? 
(*20) d. Feb. 27, 
1820. See abo 
Hibbert. 
('20> d. July 2, 
i 1831. 
71 Kennebec. 
78 Lincoln. 

86 Lincoln Res. Webster. 

j i 76 Cumberland . Res. Portland. 

IPvt.&Lieut 76 Cumberland . d. Dec. 16, 1832. 

! 57 Lincoln Res. Lewiston. 

96 Penobscot. 

88 Washington . Res. Pembroke. 

Same as Hear- 
say. See also 
Hasey, Hursey. 

77;York Res. Lebanon. 

' Same as Hcrsum? 

85' Kennebec . . . Res. Winthrop. 



75 Lincoln d. April 27, 1826. 

88 Lincoln Res. Waldoboro . 

See also Hyer. 

See also Hebberd. 
("20, 'Sib, '35c) 
Res. Scarborough. 
1 1 Same as Hagens 

f I and Hugens? 

75 Lincoln. 

75 York . . Res. Limington. 

89 Cumberland . Res. Minot. 
.d. Jan. S, 1834. 
Ship "Ranger" . . 
(,'20. '31b) 
('20) d. June 11, 

1 ; 1820. 

50 York Res. Hollis. 

to60| i 

76 York Res. EUiot. 

63 York id. June 4, 1824. . 

81 York. I 



' Private. 
: Private . 



; Private . . 
I Corporal 



! Private. 



Pvt. of art. 
Mariner. . . 
Ens.& Serg 
Captain. . . 



79 Somerset . . . . 

80 Cumberiand 
83 Cumberland 



94 Cumberland 



'9 Cumberland 
'2 York 



Marine. 
Private. 

Private ^. !('31b) 

Private. 



Hilton, Ebenezer. 
Hilton, Edward. . 



Mass. line . 
Mass. line. 



Private . 
Private. 



•31a Hilton, Isaac ' Seaman. 



Hilton, Isaac Mass. line . 

Hilton, Joseph Mass. line. 



Dr. & Mi 

Private. . 



Hilton, Morral R.I 

Hilton, Morrill Mass. line. 

Hilton, William, Ist. Mass. line. 
Hilton, William, 2d. Mass. line. 

Hilton, William 

Hilton, William H 

Hinckley, Edith... 

Hinckley, Nehemiah Mass. line. 



Private. 
Private .... 
Private. ... 
Pvt. & Mar 



70 York d. July 23, 1832. 

or68 I 

66 Somerset ('20 Ebenezer 1st) 

69. York ('20, 'Slb^d. Apr. 

! 27, 1833. 
.! Served less than 9 

j months. 
73 Cumberland .; 

81 York r20, '31b) 

85i York Res. Wells. 



'3la Hind, Joshua. 



Hinds, Benjamin. . . Mass. line. 

Hinds, Ximrod Mass. mil. 

Hinfis, Samuel Mass. line. 



Private . 



Private 

Private 

Private 



79 Lincoln. 

75 Somerset . . . 
75 Somerset . . . 
81 Somerset . . . 

80 Somerset . . . 
74 Hancock. . . 
71 Hancock. . . 



Hine, Richard Mass. line. 

Hinkley, Nehemiah. Mass 

Hobbey, William. . . Mass. line. 



r20, '31b) 
('20. '31b) 
Res. Solon. 
Res. Cornville. 
Res. Bluehill. 
Same as Hinkley, 

i I ; N. 

Private ........ [Served only 8 

i I ! months. 

79 Somerset . . . . ( "20) 
76 Somerset. 

75 Lincoln ("20) 

i 80 Lincoln Res. St. George. 

78 Oxford ;('20) 

;&87| ' 

Private ;....! Same as Hinckley, 

i I i X. 

Sergeant.. 65 Cumberland .('20 Hobby) d. 
j i j .Mar. 10, 1831. 



Pvt.&Sorg. 



2i6 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



List. 



Na-we. 



Service. 



Rank. 



Age. County. 



Remarks. 



•40 
•35d 
•40 
•35c 

'35c 
•40 



'35c 

'40 
'3oc 
•40 
'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'20 

'40 



'35c 
•35d 
'40 



'35d 

'35c 

'40 

•35d 
•35d 
•35d 
'35c 

•35c 



'40 

'35c 

'35c 

•361 

'40 

'35.C 



'401 
'35c 



'35d 

'40 

'35d 

•35c 

'40 

'35d 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 

•40 

'35d 

'35c 

'35c 



Hobbs, Abigail ! 

Hobbs, Josiah : Mass. line . 



Hobbs, Morrell ; Alass. line . 

Hobson, "William ... Mass. line . 
Hodgdon, Caleb. . . . ; 



Mass. 



Hodgdon, Jeremiah. Mass. line. 



Hodgdon, Stephen. 

Hodges, Ezra 

Hade/kins, Abigail . 
Hodkins, Thomas, Mass. 

2d. I 

Hodgman, John . . . . j Mass. 

Hodkins , Thomas, . i Mass . 

1st. I 

Hodsdon, Benjamin.; Mass 



line, 
line, 
line, 
line. 



•35c ■ Hodsdon, Samuel. . . ; N. H. line . 



line, 
mil. 



Hodsdon, Stephen. 

Hody, Josiah j Mass. 

Hoffses, Margaret. 



Sergeant 



Private . 
Private. 



I 77 



Private . . 



Private . . 
Private . . 
Private. . . 
Sergeant . 
Private... 



721 York 

71 1 Cumberland 
77} Cumberland 
81 j Cumberland 

97|York 

87 Lincoln .... 



87 



Oxford . 



••| 



Oxford 

Kennebec . . 
80: Lincoln. . . . 
84!Oxford 



Private . . . 



Private . . . 
Private 



Lincoln . 
Lincoln . 



Mar. 7, 



Cumberland 
York 



761 Oxford.. . 
72 'S omerset. 
88 Walio 



Hogdon, Caleb Mass. 

Hogsdon, Benjamin jMass. 

Hoit, Nathaniel . . . . j 

Holbrook, David. . . 'N. H. 



mil. 
line. 



Private. 
! Private . 



76| Lincoln. ... 
77i Cumberland 



Holbrook, John. 
Holbrook, Peter. 
Holbrook, Silas. 



Mass. 
Mass 
Mass 



mil. . 
state, 
mil. . 
line. . 



Holden, Daniel Mass. line. 



I Private. 
! Private. 

Private . 

Private . 

Private. 



Holden, Daniel. . . 

Holden, John Mass. line Private. 

Holden, Samuel. . . . Mass. line : Private. 



Holland, Joseph. 



Mass. line 



Holland, Park iMass. line . 



P\'t.& Corp 



Lieut -nan t 



Holland, Park 

Hollis, Stephen Mass. line 'Private. 



Hollo way See Hallo way.. . 

Holman, Stephen. . . Mass. mil Private 

Holmes, Gersham 

Holmes, Gershom . . Mass. mil Private. . . . 



Holmes, Jonathan. . Mass. line Private. 



Holmes, Mercy . . . . : : 

Holmes, Thomas. . . Mass. state. . . . Private. 
Holt, Darius Mass. line Private. 



; Holt, John Mass. line . 



Private . 



Holt, Jonathan Mass. line Pvt.&Serg. 

Holt, L'jlia 

Holt, William Mass. line Private 

Holt, William Mass. line Fifer 

Honnewell, Thomas. Mass. line Private 



'35c Hood, Daniel Mass. line Private. 



97 



Penobscot . . . 

Penobscot . . . 
Lincoln. 
Somerset. 
Cumberland. 

Oxford 



Oxford 

Cumberland 
Penobscot. . 
Kennebec. 
Kennebec . . 
Penobscot . . 



Penobscot . . 
Kennebec . . 



Res. Welb. 
I ( -20) 

Res. Falmouth. 
!C20) d.. Oct. 20, 
I 1826. 

('20)d. S^pt.,1827 
Res. Westport . 

Same as Hogs- 
don. C? 
('20 Hogdon) d. 

Aug. 24, 1S23. 
Res. Gilead. 
(•20) 

Res. Bath. 
('20) d. Feb. 25, 

1821. 
f'20) d. Feb. 24. 

1834. 
('20) d. 

1827. 
Same as Hogsdon, 

B. 
Res. Falmouth. 
('20) d. Aug. 31, 

1825. 
'('20) 

Res. Waldoboro. 

See also Hoof- 

ses. 
Same as Hodgdon, 

C? 
Same as Hodsdon, 

B. 
Res. Edinburg. 

See also Hoyt. 
Same asHalbrook? 



K'20) d. Sept. 16, 
i 1828. 

I ('20) ( '29 bomb, r- 
d i e r . 'cbe 

I Crane's ?.it.) 

:Res. Sweden. 
;('20) 
,('20) 

'Res. Vienna. 
('20, '28, '29) Re- 
linquished act of 
1818 for that of 
1828. ('35e, oth 
regt.) 
Res. Eddington. 
('20) ('31b, Hol- 
! les) 



Somerset. 

Cumberland 

Cumberland 

Oxford 



Oxford . . . 
Kennebec. 
Oxford . . . 
Oxford . . . 
Oxford . . . 



Somerset. , 
Oxford . . . . 
Penobscot. 

Oxford 

Somerset. 



Lincoln. 



Res. ^liaot. 

Same as prece- 
ding. 

(-20) ('29 Serg.) 
( ..5e, 5th regt.) 

Res. Hartford. 

('20) 

Res. Norway. 
(.'20) d. July 16, 
I 1830. 

d. Dec. 12, 1832. 
Res. Bethel. 

r20) d. Sept., 1827. 

d. April 22. 1829- 
i See also Hunne 
1 well. 



REVOLUTIOXARY PENSIOXERS IN MAINE. 



217 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. Age. County. 



Remarks. 



*35c Hood, Robert 

'35d Hoofses, Christian . 

'35c Hooper, Casper. . . 



'35d 
'40 
'40 
'35c 

'35c 

'40 

•20 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

•40 

•35d 

'40 

'35c 
'35c 



Hooper, Da\'id. . . 

Hooper, Rachael. . . 
Hork-ins, Martha. , 
Hopkins, Solomon. 



Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 



Private. 



84 



Cont. na\'y. 



Private 

1 

Mariner. . . 74 



' 65 
&80 



Mass. mil Private 



Somerset. 
Lincoln. . 

Somerset . 



Cont. navy. 



Hopkins, Solomon. . Mass. line. 
Hopkins, § olomon . 
Hopkins, Theophilus;Mas3. . . . 
Hopkinson, Caleb ..Mass. mil 



Private. 
Private . 



90 Cumberland 
891 Cumberland 

69 Waldo 

82 York 



Private. 
Private . 



York. 
York. 



Horn, Benjamin. 
Horn, Daniel. . . 



N. H.line. 
N. H. line . 



Private. , 
Private. . 



Cont. navy. 



Horn, Jonathan. 

Horn, Jonathan. 

Hornden, Richard. .JMass. mil, 

Horsaw, Jonathan. . 



Marine. . . . 
Lieutenant . 



87 York. 

941 York 

SI York. 
791 York. 

881 York 

70 Somerset . 

85 York 

80 Lincoln. 
83iYork 



Horsom, Benjamin .{Mass. line. 
Horsom, Jacob IN. H. line. 



Private . 
Private. 



801 York. 
87: York. 



('20) d. Jan. 29, 

1826. 
("20) d. Feb. 19. 

1833. See also 

HofFses. 
('20. ship "War- 
i ren") d. Sept. 

1822. 

Res. Freeport. 
Res. Camden. 
('20, ship "Ran- 
' ger"). 
("20) d.Mar.,lS32 
Res. Biddeford. 



Res, Limington. 



Res. Acton. 

('20, ship "Dean") 

Res. Shapleigh. 

Res. Berwick. 

Same as Hosum? 
('20 Horsum) 
'20 Horsum.^ d. 
Aug. 8. 1823. 



•35d 
•35d 

•35d 

•35d 

•35c 

'20 

'35c 

'40 


Horsum, David .... 
Horsum, Samuel . . . 

Hosmer, Daniel. . . . 
Hosum. Jonathan . . 
Houghton. Jonathan 
House, Nathaniel . . 
House, Nathaniel. . . 
House Thomas . . . 


N. H. state 

N. H. state 

Mass. line 

Mass. state 

Mass. line 

Mass 

Cont. navy. . . . 


Pvt.& Mar. 
Pvt. & Sea- 
man. 
Corporal . . 

Private 

Private 

Private. 
Mariner. . . 


74' York 

74; York. 

86 Kennebec. 

76 York 

74; Oxford 

78 Kennebec. 
65 Cumberland 

81 Waldo 

82 Oxford. 

79 Oxford 

81 Oxford 

89 Oxford 

70 Somerset. 

77 Franklin . . . 
70 Oxford 

81 'Franklin .. . 
89 Lincoln. . . . 

87 Cumberland. 

82 Somerset. 

72 Penobscot . . 

73 Lincoln. 

77 Kennebec . . 

84 i Cumberland 

1 

72 York 

73 Kennebec. 

73 York. 

7S York 

69 Oxford. 

75 Oxford 

85 Penobscot . . 

74 York. 

87 Kennebec . . 

81 York 

86; York 

74 Lincoln. 

80 Lincoln .... 
79 York. 

74 York. 
73 Lincoln. 

i 


('20. '31b) 

Same as Hersom? 

Same as Horsaw? 
(■20) 

Res. Brunswick, 


'35d 

'35d 
'35d 
'40 


Houston, Samuel . . . 

Howard, Amos 

Howard, Joseph. . . . 
Howard, Joseph. . . . 
Howard. Samuel . . . 
Howard, Uriah 


N. H.line 

N. H. Une 

Mass. line 


Pvt.& Corp 
of art. 

Private 

Private. . . ; 


('20, '31b) 

r'20) 

Re3. Brownfield. 


'35c 
'35d 
'40 


Mass. line 

N.H. state.... 


Private 

Private 


('20) 

Res. PhUlips. 


'35c 
'40 


Howe, Jacob 

Howe, \torij 


Mass. line 


Private 


(•20) d. Jan. 30, 

18.30. 
Res. Temple. 


'35c 
'35d 


Howe, William 

Howell, Silas 


Mass. line 

Mass. line 

Mass. mil 

Mass. mil 

Mass, line 


Private 

Private 

Private 

Private.... 
Private 


r20) d. Dec. 1827. 


•35d 
'35d 
•35d 
'40 


Howes, Lemuel 

Howes, S ylvanus . . . 
Howland, Abraham 
Hows Sylvenus . 


Same as Hows? 
Res. Vassalboro- 


'35c 

'35c 

'35d 
•35d 
'40 


Hoj-t, John 

Hubbard, Daniel. . . 

Hubbard, Francis . . 
Hubbard, Jonathan. 


Mass. line 

Mass. line 

Mass. mil 

Mass. mil 


Private 

Private.... 

Private 

Private.... 


ugh. Same as 
Howes, S? 
.('20, Hoit) d. Feb. 

1 6, 1829. See 
also Hoit. 

1('20) d. Feb. 2., 

i 1825. 

' Res \cton 


'35d 
'40 


Hubbard. Levi 


Mass. line 


Private 


Res. Paris. 


'40 

'35d 

•35c 

•35d 

'40 


Hubbard, Mehitable . 
Hubbard, Richard. . 
Hudson, Timothy . . 
Huff. Daniel 


Mass. state. . . . 

R. I. line 

Mass. mU 


Private 

Private 

Private 


Res. Corinna. 

(•20) 
U"20) 
i Res Kennebunk- 


•35c 
'40 


Huff, Daniel 


Mass, line 


Private 


j port. 

! 

'■ Res Edgecomb. 


■35d 
'35d 
'35d 


Huff, Israel 

Huff. John 

Huff, Moses 


Mass. mil 

Mass. mil 

Mass. mil 


Private 

Private. . . . 
Pvt. & Sea- 
man. 


i 
i 

! 



2i8 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. Age. County 



Remarks. 



•40 
•35<i 



Hugens, Edmund. . . Mass. line , Private. 



•35c Hull, John X. H. line , 

•35c Humewell, Richard. Mass. line. 



'35c Humphrev, Jesse. . . Mass. line. 
•20 Hunewell, Richard . N. Y 



•40 



•20 
'20 



•20 
'35c 
•3od 
•35c 



Private 

I Lieutenant, 



Private 

Lieutenant. 



Hunnevcell, Abig il 

Hunnewell, Thomas. Mass. 
Hunnewell, William 



Hunsuim, Robert. . . Mass 

Hunt, Ichabod Mass. line. . 

Hunt, John Conn, state 

Hunt, Oliver ^lass. line . . 



Private. 
Mariner. 



Mass. mil. 



'40 ; Hunter, Thomas 
•35d Hunter, William 

•40 Hunter, William 

|20 Huntoon, Jonathan. Mass 
Hursey, James 



•40 



•35c 
•40 



Hurton, John j 

Huston, John, Jr . . . Mass. line . 
Hutchciis, Abigail 



'35c Hutcheons, Simeon . Mass. line. . 

•35c Hutchings, Benj'm'n Cont. navy 

'35c j Hutchings, Eastman Mass. line. . 

'35c Hutchings, John ... N. H. line. . 

'35d Hutchings, Thomas. ^lass. mil.. 

'40 Hutchings, William •. . 



Private. 

Private 

Private. . . . 
Lieutenant, 



Private . . . 
Private. 



Private., 



Private. . 

Marine. . 

Sergeant 
I Private . . 

' Private . . 



•35c !Hutchins, Enoch. . . Mass. line Sergeant 



'35c Hutchins, Joseph. . . Mass. line. . 

'35c Hutchins, Levi Mass. line. . 

'35d Hutchins, Moses. . . Mass. state. 

'35c Hutchins, Nathaniel N. H. line. . 



Private . . 
Private. . 
Private. . 
Captain . 



'20 Hutchins, S imeon . . Mass 

•35d Hutchins, William. . Mass. state. 



•35d 

•40 

'35d 

•40 

•35c 

'35c 
•35c 

•35c 
•35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 

'35c 



Hutchinson, Asa. ... N. H. mil , 

Hutchinson, Asa 

Hutchinson, I.srael. . N. H. line. 

Hutchinson, Mary 

Hutchinson, Nehe- N. H. line. 

miah. 
Hutchinson, Samuel. Mass. line. 
Hutchinson, Stephen Mass. line. 

Hutehkins, Edmund N. H. line. 
Hyer, Conrad Mass. line. 



Private. 
Private. 
Private. 



Ingalls, Nathan. . 
Intjalls, Hhehe. . . . 
Ingalls, Phineas. . 



Mass. mil. 
Mass. line . 



Pvt. of art, 

Sergeant . . 

Private 

Private. . . . 

Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 

Private. . . . 



Artificer. 



Ingbe, Ebenezer. . . . Mass. line. 
Ingersoll, Nathaniel Mass. mil. 

Widow of. 
Ingerson, Richard. . N. H. line. 



Private. 
Private. 



Private. 



76 Lincoln .... 
75 Cumberland 

I 
79 Washington. 
66 Cumberiand 



82 Lincoln .... 
78 Cumberland 



I Res. Edgecomb. 
Same as Hagens 
and Higgins? 

d. May 14, 1823. 
I Same as Huna- 
I well? 
d. June, 1831. 
Same as Hume- 
\ well? 

Res. Standish See 
1 also Honnewell. 

! 

I Ship "Hancock" 
I Same as Hanne- 
well? 



63 Kennebec . . . : ('20, 31b) 

76 Penobscot. . . ' 

67 Cumberland . ('20) d. March 24, 

1822. 
69 Kennebec . . . Res. Clinton Gore. 
67 Lincoln. 
76 Lincoln Res. Topsham. 



82 Oxford. 



771 York. 



York. 
York. 



York... 
Lincoln , 



York. 
Kennebec 



Lincoln. 
Hancock . 



Res. Sumnerr— ^ 
j Same as Hear- 
! say. 

Res. Sanford. 
\ S ame as Huston 
(•20) 
Res. Waterboro- 

ugh. 
Same as Hutchins, 

S. 
('20 ship "Han- 
cock") 



('20) d. 
i 1824. 



Sept. 5, 



York. 



Oxford . 
York.. 
Oxford. 
Oxford . 



Hancock. . 

Kennebec. 
Kennebec . 
Kennebec . 
Kennebec . 
Lincoln . . . 



Lincoln . . . . , 
Cumberland 



York... 
Lincoln . 



Cumberland 
Hancock. . . 
Cumberland 
Cumberland 
Washington 
Cumberland 



75 York. 



Res. Penobscot. 
Same as Hutch- 
ins, W. 

('20Enock) d Feb. 
1832. 

(•20) 

('20) 

('20. '28, '29) Re- 
linquished act 
of 1818 for 1828. 
('3oe, d. Jan. 10 
1832.) 

Same as Hutche- 

! ons, S. 

Same as Hutch- 

j ings, W. 

JRes. Favette. 
i('20, '31b) 
I Res. Litchfield, 
j ('20, private) 

!C20) 

i('20, Hutchison) 
i d. Dec. 9, 1826. 
d. Mar. 1, 1825. 
I ('20) See also 
j Heyer. 

Res. Mercer. 

Res. Bri<lgton. 
Sariio as Inglee? 
April 20, 1831. 

iC20). 



REVOLUTIONARY PENSIONERS IN MAINE. 



219 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. Age. County. 



Remarks. 



*3od Ingham, Daniel. . . Mass. state. 

'35c Ingham, David Conn. line. . 

'35c Inghram. David. . . . Conn. line. . 

'40 Inglee, Ebenezer 



; Private. . 
j Private. . 
Private. . 



Ingraham. Job. . . . 

Ireland, Joel 

Irish, Isaac 

Irish, Thomas 

Jack, Robert 

Jackman, Richard . 



Mass. mil i Private. 



Mass. mil . 
Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 



'3od 

•40 

'35d 

'35d 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'35c Jackson, Barnabas . Mass. line ^Private. . . 

'35d Jackson, Bart hoi- Mass. mil Private. . . 



Private . . . . ! 
Px-t. <•(. Serg 
Private. . . . , 
Private .... I 



'35c 

'35d 
'35d 
'35d 
'35c 
'35c 
'35c 
'35d 
'35d 



omew. 
Jackson, Eli . 



Mass. line i Private. 



74 Kennebec. 

75 York 

78 Kennebec. 

76 Washington . 

79 Lincoln. 

49 Oxford 

71 Cumberland 
95 Cumberland 

79 Lincoln 

75 Kennebec . 

84 Kennebec . . . 
— Somerset . . . . 

85 Lincoln. 

69 Cumberland 



(20). 

Res. Machias. 
Same as Ingbe? 

Res. Canton, 
d. Feb. 10, 1834. 
d. .\ug. 16. 1832. 
(20) d.Julv 9,1831 
(20). 

Res. Fayette. 
(20) d. Jan. 2, 
I 18x9. 



Jackson, Enoch. . . . 

Jackson, Isaac 

Jackson, John 

Jackson, Joseph .... 
Jackson, Joseph, 2d. 
Jackson, Nathaniel . 
Jackson, Samuel. . . . 
Jackson, Thomas. . . 



Mass. mil. 
Mass. mil. 
Mass. mil. 
Mass. line. 
X. H. line. 
Mass. line. 
Mass. mil 
Mass. line. 



'35c ; Jacobs, George. ... Mass. line. 



'40 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'40 

'35d 

'40 I : 

'35c : Jenkins, John iCont. navy 



Jacobs, He riheth. . . 

Jacobs, John Mass. line. 

Jacobs, John 

James, John Mass. line. 

jJaques, Richard. ... X. H. line. 



\Jay, Lydia 

Je*Terd, Samuel M. 



P\'t. & Mar 80 

Private.... 76 

Private 71 

Private....; 81 

Private ^ 75 

Private 65 

Private .... 70 

Serg.& Qtr- 82 

master. 

Lieutenant ■ 80 



I 85 

Private....: 77 

I j 85 

I Private. 
Private. 



('20 Eli) d. Nov. 

30, 1S25. 
d. Dec. 20, 1833. 



Mass. state. . 



80 
77 

I 1 85 

I 92 

I Private. '..'.' 71 



77 



Somerset . . 
Oxford. 
Kennebec . 

Oxford I ('20) 

Lincoln I('20>. 

Oxford 1('20, '31b). 

Oxford. ! 

Kennebec... ('20) d. Aug. 6, 
1833. 
('20, '2S) d. 
4, 1831. 

York Res. Sanford. 

Kennebec . . .K'20^. 
Kennebec . . .JRes. Mt. Vernon, 
Kennebec . . . I ('20). 
Hancock. . . .|('20 Jacques). 
Hancock. . . .IRes. Ca.^tine. 

York 'Res. S. Berwick. 

York. j 

York Res. Wells. 



York. 



d. Aug. 15, 1833. 



June 



; Marine 



York. 



'20 
'35d 
'40 
'35d 

'35c 
'35c 

•40 
'35c 



•35d 

'35c 

'40 

•35d 

•35d 

•35d 

•35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'40 

'20 

'35c 

•40 
'35c 
•35c 



Jenkins, Josiah Mass .... 

Jenkins, Lemuel. . . . Mass. line 

Jenkins, Lemuel. ... 

Jenkins, Samuel. . . . Mass. line 

Jennings, Eliphalet 
Jennison, Samuel. . . 
i 

i Jepson, Bradbury T 
I Jewell, John, 1st ... 
I 
j Jewell, John 2d. . . . 

Jewell. Samuel 
Jewet, Mo.ses 
Jeu-ett, Mary. 
Jewitt, David 
Jewitt, John 
Jewitt, X'oah 
Johnson, Andrew. . 

Johnson, .\sa 

Johnson, Benjamin 



Captain...! 76 
Pvt. & Sap.j 72 
j 76 

Sergeant . . i 76 



Lincoln. . 
Kennebec 
Oxford. 




d. Mar. 1827. 

Same as Junkins 
!('2S). 

('20, '35c). 
•Res. Clinton. 

('20) d. Xov. 15, 



Johnson, Benjamin 
; Johnson, Daniel. . . 



'35d Johnson, Joseph. . . . Mas 

•40 Johnson, JoscDh 

'35c i Johnson, Xathan. . . Mass. line 



1832. 
('20). 

('20) d. Sept. 1, 
1826. 

Lincoln Res. Lewiston. 

York. ... ..('20) d. Apr. 22, 

': l831. 

Yorko r Oxford d. Aug. 5, 1827. 



Res. St. Albans. 



('20). 
Cumberland . d. Xov. 16, 1833. 
Waldo. 
Waldo Res. Knox. 



(•20) d. Dec. 27, 

1832. 
Rea. Be!f;'.st. 

. ('20, '28) d. June 

i 1830. 
.('20) d. Dec. 17, 

I 1832. 

.Res. Poland. 
.,('20) d. Oct. 30, 

i 1831. 
. !('20) d. Oct. 22, 

j 1818. 



220 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



List. 



Name. 



Sendee. 



Rank. 



Age. 



County. 



Remarks. 



•35c 
•35d 



I I 
Johnson, William. . . Mass. line Private 



Mass. mil. 
Mass. mil. 



Johnston, David 
'35d jJohnston, James 



'35d I Johnston, John. . 

'40 ' 

'3od : Johnston, John Cont. navy. 

'40 \Johnstoiie, Ruth .... 

'35c jJohonnet, Gabriel .. Mass. line. . 



N. Y. state. 



Private. ... 
Seaman & 
i MatroSvS. 
Private 



82 York ('20) d. April 10. 

' 1830. 

77 Cumberland . 
75 Cumberland . 



'35c Jones, Amos Mass. line. 

'40 



Serg.& Mar 
Lieut. Col. 
Private 



'35<1 I Jones, Cornelius. . . . Mass. state. 
'40 



'35c j Jones, Da%'id Mass. line . 

'40 \Jones, Elizabeth. 

'35d I Jones, Isaac Mass. mil. 

'35c Jones, James Mass. line. 

'35c Jones, John Mass. line. 

'35d Jones, John Mass. mil . 

'35d I Jones, Joshua Mass. line. 

'35c Jones, I.azarus Mass. line. 

Jones, Mehdable. . . . i 

Jones, Samuel .Mass. line . 



P\'t. & Sea. 
Surgeon. . . 



Private. . 
Private. . 

Corporal 
Private. . 
Private. . 
Private. . 



'40 
•35c 

'35d 

'35c 

•40 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'35c ! Jordan, Abner Mass. line Private. 



Jones, Silvester ;Mass. state. 

Jones, Solomon Mass. line . . 



Jones, Sylvester . . . . ; 

Jones, Thomas, 2d .X. H. line. 

Jones, Thomas Mass. line. 

Jones, Thomas 



Private. 
Private . , 
Private . 



92 Washington. 
97 Washington. . 
76 Penobscot. 
88 Penobscot . . 

76 Penobscot . . . 

72 Waldo. 

78 Waldo 

72 0.xford. 

77 Oxford 

86 Cumberland 

79 Cumberland 
77 Lincoln. 

64 Kennebec . . 



84 Lincoln 

78 Cumberland 
76 Cumberland 
80 Somerset . . . . 
75 Kennebec . . 
78 Kennebec . . . 

74 Kennebec . . 



Private 

Private . . . . 



'35c 'Jordan, Abrahr.m.. . Mass. line. 
'35c Jordan, David Mass. line. 



'35c I Jordan, 

'35c 1 Jordan, 

•35c 'Jordan, 

'35c .Jordan, 

•20 1 Jordan, 

'40 'Jordan, 

*35d Jordan, 

'35d Jordan, 

'35c Jordan, 

'40 Jordan. 



Da\-id ']Mass. line. 

Elijah Mass. line. 



Hezekiah . 
Humphrey 



Mass. line . 
'Mass. line. 



(Private. . . 
j Private. . . 



[Private. 
i Private . 



i Private. . 
; Private. .. 



I 
65 Cumberland 

79, Kennebec . . 
96 Waldo. 
70 
62 

58 



Ignatius 

Joanna 

John- Mass. mil . 

Samuel. . . . Mass. mil. 
Thomas. . . . Mass. line 
Timothy ... 



Mass i Private. 



York 

Washington 
Lincoln. . . . 



Cumberland 
Oxford 



Oxford . . . 
Kennebec 



Cumberland 
Cumberland 



Private 

Private 

Private 



76 Cumberland 
86jCumberland 
78 1 Cumberland 
68 Cumberland 
74 Oxford 



•40 'Jordon, David 



•35d Josselyn, Nathaniel . Mass. state. 
'35c Jotham, Calvin. . . . Mass. line. . 
'35c Jotham, Luther. . . . Mass. line. . 



Hannah 

Benj., wid-Mass. line . 



Private. 
Private. 
Private. 



Oxford. 



80 Cumberiand 
74 1 Kennebec . . 
83 Kennebec . . 



Private. 



N. H. line Private. 



'40 J our dan, 

'35d Judkins, 

j ow. 

'35c Judkins, Jacob. 

'35c |Judkin.«, . 

•35c iJudkin.s, 

'40 ;Judkjns, 

'20 Judkins, 

'35c Judkins, 

'35c iJumper, 

'40 ; 

•20 Junkins, John ! Mariner 



Jonathan. . N. H. line. 

I'hilip X. H. line. 

Philip 

Samuel X. H 

Samuel Mass. line. 

Daniel. . . . Mass. line. 



Private. 
Private . 



Private. 
Private. 
Private. 



•35c 
•35c 



Kavan, James Mass. line. 

Keath, Cornelius. . . Mass. line. 



' Private . . 
Private.. 



Waldo 

Kennebec . . 



Kennebec 



Res. Perry. 

Res. Milford. 
('20 Johonnot^. d, 
Oct. 9, 1820. 

Res. Unity. 

Res. Turner. 
('20. '31 b.). 
Res. N. Yarmouth 

(•20) d. Jan. 26, 

1829. 
('20)d. June, 1824 

('20). 

(■20). 

Res. Gardiner. 

('20) d. Sept. 1, 

1832. 
Same as Jones, 

Sylvester. 
('20) d. June 4, 

1821. 
. ,Res. Fayette. 

, ('20). 

. Res. Pembroke. 

. ('20) d. Sept. 22 

I 1820. See also 

1 Jourdan. 
. ('20). 

Same as Jordon, 

; David. 
(•20). 
('20) d. Dec. 26, 

: 1827. 
. ('20) Jordon. 
. ('20 '31 b.) d. Oct 

I 13. 1833. 

t 

. Res. Danville. 
. d. Nov. 25, 1833. 

'. ('20, '31 b.) 

Res. Xorway. See 

also Jourdan. 

. Res. Albany. Same 

i as Jordan, Da- 

\ -vid. 

." ('20). 

. r'20) d. June 22, 

1832. 
. Res. Monroe. 
. d. Dec. 20, 1833. 



('20) d. Sept. 2, 
1822. 
Kennebec. 

Somerset ('20). 

Somerset .... Res. Cambridge. 



Kennebec. 

Cumberland 

Cumberland 



('20). 

Res. Harrison. 
Ship ''Ranger" 
j Same as J e n- 
I kin.s, J.? 
68 Cumberland . d. Feb. 22. 1823. 

77 Lincoln |d. Jan. 9. 1830. 

I 1 Same as Keith? 






■■#: 



REVOLUTIONARY PENSIONERS IN MAINE. 221 




'40 

'3oc 

•35d 

'40 

'35d 

•40 

•35c 

•3oc 

•20 

•3oc 



Keen, 


Isaac 


j 




i 


Keen, 
Keen. 


James 

John 


. . Mass 
..Mass. 


line 

state 


Private 

Private 


Keen, 


Meshack. . 


. . Mass. 


line 


Private 



iKeene, Isaac Mass. line. 

! 

Keene, William. . . . Mass. line. 

Keith, Cornelius. . . . Mass 

Keith, James Mass. line. 



'40i iKeler, Henrv 

•40' Keller, David 

•3oc jKelley, Joseph Mass. line. 

'35c iKelley, Joshua. . : . . Mass. line. 



40 IKeUey, Sarah 

35c iKelley, William. ... N. H. line. 
35c iKellock, David Mass. line. 



Private. 

Private. 
Private. 
Major. . 



Kennebec . 

Oxford 

Oxford. 

Oxford 

Oxford 

Oxford .... 
Kennebec . 



SO Lincoln . 



77 Washington 



5c Kellock, Matthew . . Mass. line . 



'35d 

'40 

•31b 

•35d 

•35c 

•20 

•40 

•35d 

'40 

•20 



Kellogg, Elijah Mass. line. 



Kellogg, Joseph . . . . | 

Kelly, Stephen Mass. mil . . 

Kemp, Ebenezer. . . . Mass. line. . 

Kench, Thomas .... Mass 

Kendall, Ahirail. . . . i 

Kendall, Chever. . . . Mass. state. 

Kendall, Mary : 

Kendall, William. . . Mass 



Private 

Private 



Private. . 
Private. . 



Mariner. . 



Musician & 
D'm maj. 



'40 IKeniston, David 



•31a Kennard, Timothy ' 

I I 

'35d Kennard, Timothv . Mass. line. 

|3oc : Kennedy, James N. H. line. 

'35c ; Kenney, Israel Mass. line . 

•35c Kenney, Thomas ... Mass. line . 
•35c Kenniston, Da\'id . . N*. H. line. 



Private. 
Private. 
Private . 
Private . 



P\'t.& Serg. 



Private 

Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 



Private 

Private 



^35d Kent, John Mass. mil . 

'40 Keyes, •Jemima 

|3od Keys, Ebenezer. . . . Mass. line. 

•35c Kezer, David Mas.s. line. 

'35c Kilborn, John Mass. line . 



P\-t.& Corp 



Private. 
Private. 
Private. 



'40 

•35c 

'35e 

•20 

'35c 

'40 

•35c 

•40 

'35c 

'35c 



Kilborn, John 

, Kilburn, John ..-..,. Mass. line . 

.tvilburn, John .'"Mass. line. 

■id regt. . . . 

Kilegore, John Mass 

Kilgore, James Mass. line. 



Private . . 
Sergeant 

Corporal. 
Private. . 



Kilgore, John Mass. line Private. 



Kilgore, Joseph. . . . Mass. line. 
Kilgore, Trueworthy Mass. line. 



Private. 
Private . 



Hancock. 

Lincoln . 
Kennebec 
Oxford . . . 



Kennebec 
Kennebec 
Lincoln. . 



92 Lincoln 

72 Cumberland 



Res. Clinton. 
(•20). 

Res. Turner. 

(•20, Mehach) 

Res. Sumner. 

('20). Same as 
' Keen, Isaac? 

('20, '31 b>. 

See also Keath. 

('20, '2S) d. May 
I 14, 1829. 

Res. Castine. 

Res. St. George 

('20 Kellv). 

('20 Kelly) d. in 
I 1822. 

Res. Monmouth. 

('20 Kellv) 

('20) See also Kol- 
1 lock. 

I ('20 Frigate Bos- 
i ton) d. March, 
I 1825. 

('20, '31b). 



79 Cumberland . Res. Portland. 



92, Waldo 

84 Cumberland 

74 Somerset . . . 

79 Waldo. 

76 YorK 



Private .... — 



82 



Private — 



Lincoln . 



78 York. 
70 Lincoln. 
— Hancock . 



64 'Kennebec 
59 Lincoln. . 



79 Kennebec. 
75 Franklin . . . 

70 Oxford 

74 Washington 

80 York 



See also Kelley. 

('20). 

Same as Kinch? 

Res. Fairfield. 

Res. Limington. 

Same as Kindall, 

i W.? 

Res Boothbay. 
Same as Ken- 
niston? 

Rejected as serv- 
ing six months 
only. 

('20) d. in 1825. 
,('20) d. Mar. 5, 
I 1*20. See also 
I Kinney. 

d. .\pril 11, 1825. 

Same as Keniston"' 
j See also Kiner- 
I son. 



85 Cumberland 
64 Cumberland 
— Cumberland 



Res. Jav. 
('20 Keves). 
(•20). 
('20 & '31 b 

bourn). 
Res. Bndgton. 

,('29 Killburn) 



Kil- 



'40 jKimbal, Nathaniel 



35c Kimball, .\braham . [Mass, line Private. 

•35d Kimball, Benjamin ..Mass. line Private. 

'35c Kimball, David. . . . Mass. line Private. 

'35c Kimball, Hezekiah .iMass. line Private. 



'35c Kimball, Joseph. . . .LMass. line Private. 



76 Oxford :('20). 

82 Oxford Res. Lovell. 

68 Oxford. 

— Oxford Res. Xewry. 

71 Lincoln (20 Killgore). 

71 Hancock. ... ('20 Kilgour) d. 
i Mar. 4, IHMY. 

83 Kennebec . . . Res. Winthrop. 

; I Same as Kim- 

I ball, Nathaniel. 

73! York !('20) d. Feb. 13, 

I I 1829. 

83 York ('20 •31b). 

70 Somerset. ... ('20). 

79 York ('20 Hezediah) d. 

I Jan. 1^28. 
76 Oxford ('20). 



■'^^■ 



'J;- iV>' 



■ y ■ ,■•■;, ..•^>. 



222 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



J 



List. 


NA3CE. 


Service. 


j Rank. 


Age.! County. 


1 

1 Remarks. 

i 


•40 


Kimball, Joseph. . . 




!. 


1 
81 Cumberland 


Res. Bridgton. 


'35c 


Kimball, Moses. . . 


. N. H. line 


Private. . . . 


85 Oxford 


("20). 


'35c 


Kimball, Nathan. . 


. Mass. line 


Corporal . . 


; 84 York 


(■20). 


•35d 


Kimball, Nathaniel 

1 


. Mass. line 


Pvt.& Serg. 


77 Kennebec . . . 


Same a.-; Kinibal, 
Nathaniel. 


'35d 


Kimball, Simeon. . 


. Mass. mil. ... . 


Private.... 


74 Kennebec. 




'35c 


Kincade, Reuben. . 


. Mass. line 


Private 


75 Lincoln. 




•40 


Kincaid, John 






' 78 Kennebec . . . 


Res. Augusta. 


'35c 


Kinch, Thomas. . . 


. Mass. line 


Private.... 


87 Hancock. . . . 


('20) d. Jan. 17. 
1831. Same as 
Kench. 


'35c 


Kindall, William. . 


. Mass. line 


Private 


59 Somerset . . . . 


Same as Kendall. 


•35c 


Kinerson, John. . . . 


. Mass. line 


Private 


75 Oxford 


(•20) d. Nov. 1, 
1833. See also 
Kenniston. 


•35c 


King, Ichabod. . . . 


. Mass. line 


Private.... 


75 Cumberland . 


('20). 


'40 


King, Mary 






70 Cumberland 


Res. Minot. 


'35c 


Kingsburv, John . . 


Mass. line 


Private 


67 York 


('20. '31b^. 


'35d 


Kingsley, Azel .... 


Mass. line 


Private & 

Fifer. 
Pvt.& Serg. 


72 Cumberland . 


Same as Kinsley? 


•35d 


Kingsley, Daniel.. . 


Mass. line 


76 Cumberland . 


Same as Kinsley? 


'353 


Kinnaston, Daniel. 


N. H. line 


Corporal . . 


— Lincoln 


('29). Same as 
Keniston and 
Kenniston? 


•35d 


Kinney, Abijah . . . 
Kinney, Abijah . . . 


'Mass mil 


Private 


73 Lincoln 


Spp ali^n TCpnnpv 


•40 






85 Lincoln 


Res. Boothbav. 


•35d 


Kinnev, Benjamin. 


Mass. line 


Private.... 


77 Lincoln. 




'35d 


Kinnev, Samuel . . . 


Mass. mU 


Private 


79 Lincoln. 




'40 


Kinsley, Azael. . . . 






79 Cumberiand . 


Res. Minot. Same 












as Kingsley. 


'40 


Kinslev, Daniel . . . 







82 Cumberland . 

■ 


('20 Sergeant). 
Res. Minot. 


•35c 


Kitfield, William. . 


Mass. line 


Private 


77 Hancock 


('20). 


'35d 


Knapp, Joseph. . . . 


Mass. line 


Private.... 


71 Kennebec. 




-m 


Kneeland, Adam. . 


Mass. mil 


Private 


81 Cumberland . 




Knight, Abraham . 


N. H. line 


Private 


73 Cumberland . 


('20). 


'40 


Knight, Daniel. . . 






74 Cumberland . 
74 Oxford 


Re* Poland 


'35c 


Mass. line 


Private 


('20). 


'40 








81 Oxford 


Res. Norway. 
Res. Elliot. 


•40 


Kni'jhi, Elizabeth. . 






79, York 


'35c 


Knight, Jacob 


Ma.ss. line 


Private 


77 Cumberland . 




'40 


Knight, John 






83 Cumberland . 


Res. Falmouth. 


'31a 




Private 


— 




Rejected as serv- 














ing 8 months 
only, 
d. June 28, 1832. 


'35d 


Knight, John 


Mass. line 


Private & 


87: Cumberland . 








Drum. 






'35c 


Knight, John 


Mass. line. .... 


Private 


75 Cumberland . 




'40 








83 Cumberland . 


Res. Otisfield. 


'35c 


Knight, Jonathan, 2d Mass. line 


Private 


76 Cumberland . 




'35<i 


Knight, Jonathan . 


-Mass. line 


Private 


72 Cumberiand . 


('20). 


'35d ' 


Knight, Jonathan . 


Mass. line 


Private 


72 York 


('20 '31b). 


'40 








77 York 


Res. Waterbo- 








rough. 


'35c 


Knight, Joseph, 1st 


Mass. line 


Private.... 


79 York 


('20). 


'35c 


Knight, Joseph, 2d 


Mass. line 


Private 


78 Oxford 


('20). 


'35d 


Knight, Mark 


Mass. mil 


Private 


77 Cumberiand . 




'35c 


Knight, Zarhariah. 


Mass. line 


Private 


78 Cumberland . 


d. Dec. 1, 1828. 


'35d 


Know-les, Ezekiel. . 


N. H. line 


Private. . . . 


83 Kennebec . . . 


d. Oct. 15, 1832. 1 


^35c 


Knowles, Isaac. . . . 


Mass. line 


Private 


80 Kennebec . . . 


r20) d. Mar. 3, ' 
1822. 


1794 


Knowles, John .... 


Stickney'sregt. 


Private . . 







Res. Steriing. Me. 
Wounded at 












i 








Bennington, i 














1777. 


'35d 


Knowles, John .... 


Mass. mil 


Private 


82 Somerset. 


1 


'40* 
'35e 








84 Kennebec . . . 
— Waldo 


Res. Litchfield. 


Knowles, Simon. . . 


Dearborn's regt 


Private 


(•29 from N. H. 
'31 b). 

^•20) 


'35c 


Knowles, Simon. . . 


N. H. line 


Private. . . . 


62 Hancock. . . . 


•35c 


Knowlton, .\braham .Mass. line 


Private 


75, York 


(•20). d. Jan. 12, 










1 


1S30. 


•35c 


Knowlton, Andrew 


Mass. line 


Private 


82 Lincoln 


r20). 1 


•40, 








89, Lincoln 


Res Nobl>bo- 




i 




rough. 


•40 


Knowlton f'OTcas 






69 York 

84 Kennebec . . . 


Res. Elliot. 


'35d 


Knowlton, Joseph . . 


-Mass. line 


Private 


('20, '3 lb). 






Mass. state 


Sergeant. 


1 




'40J 


Knowlton, Joseph . . 






90 Waldo 


Res. Liberty. 


'35^ 


Knowlton, Thomas. 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


68 Kennebec. 




•35c ; 

j 


Knox, David 


Mass. line 


Private 


72^ York 

j 


('20) d. Sept. 1. 
1830. 



REVOLUTIONARY PENSIONERS IN MAINE 



222, 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Remarks. 



'35c 
•35d 
'Sod 

•35c 
•40 

•40 
•35c 

'35c 

'35c 



Knox, John [Mass. line. 

Kollock, Ebenezer . . Mass. mil. 



Lachanie, Antoine. 



'Lake, John. . 
Lamb, James. 



jLamb, James . 
Lammas, Dyre 



Mass. state. 
Mass. line . . 



Private \ 

Private j 

Private &i 

Mariner.! 

Private....! 



77 York ('20) d. Sept, 1821. 

72 Cumberland . See also Kellock. 
S3 Penobscot. 



Cont. na\'y 

Lamont, John I Mass. line . 

I 

Lampson, William. . JMass. line. 



'35d Lancaster, Ezekiel. . Mass. state. 

'35d Lancaster, John. . . . Mass. mil. . 

'40 Lancaster, John .... 

'35c Lancaster, Joseph. . Mass. line. . 

'40 Lancaster, Joseph . . 

'40 1 Lanceu, Eli'obth. . .[ 

'35d Lancy, Samuel Mass. mil. . 

•35c Landerkin, Daniel. . Cont. nav\-. 



Mariner. 
Captain. 
Private. . 



P\^.& Corp 
Private 



SI Lincoln. . . 
79 Kennebec . 



69 Kennebec . 
SI Somerset. . 



83 Lincoln. 
73 Lincoln. 



Private. 



'40 

'3oc 

'35d 



Private . . 
Mariner. 



75 Kennebec. 

73 Lincoln. 

78 Kennebec . . 
77 Lincoln .... 
83 Cumberland 

74 Somerset . . . 

75 Somerset. 
76. Lincoln. . . . 



Landerkin, Daniel. . i 

Lane, Francis Mass. line. 

Lane, Isaac iMass. mil. 



'35c Lane, Jabez JMass. line. . 

'35d Lane, Samuel 'Mass. mil. . 

'35d ; Lang, John N. H. mil . . 

'31b ILangley, Asa 

'35d iLanglty, Eli iMass. mil. . 

'40 i ' Lanson, Martha. ... I 

'35c I Lara, James iMass. line. . 

'40 \Larbree, Mary 

'40 JLaria, James : 

'40 ! Lai rabe, Jacob j 

'35c iLarrabee, Isaac. . . . Mass. line. . 

'35d jLarrabee, Jacob. . . . .Mass. mil. , 

'35d Larrabee, Jonathan. Mass. mil. . 

'35d . Larrabee, Samuel ... Mass. mil . . 

'35d Larrabee, Stephen. . ^Mass. state. 

'35c Larry, Michael Penn. line. . 

'35c Lasdell, Asa Mass. line. . 

'40 ' 



; Private . 
Private 
Fifer. 
Captain. 

Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 



90 Lincoln. 
73 Oxford . 
71 York. 



('20). d. in 1S23. 

Res. Leeds. Same 
as Lumb? 

Res. Clinton. 

('20, ship *• War- 
ren"). 

('20) d. Feb. 23, 
1827. 

('20) d. Oct. 8, 
1823. See also 
Lanson. 



Res. Augusta. 

('20). 

Res. Durham. 

Res. Palmyra. 

('20 ship "Bos- 
ton"). 
Res. Boothbav. 
('20) d. Dec, 1829. 



Private 



Private 

Private .... 

P\-t.&Corp 

Private 

Private. ... 

Private 

Private , 



81; York ('20, '28) d. Oct. 

I 25, 1825. 

72 Cumberland . 
81 Waldo d. June 26, 1833. 



73 Cumberland 

80 Waldo 

77 Cumberland 
78; Kennebec . . . 

85 Oxford 

76 Cumberland 
79 Cumberland 
72 Cumberland 



'35c 
•40 

'35d 

'35d 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

•35c 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 

'35d 

'35d 

'35c 

'40J 

'35i 

'35c 

•35c 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

•40 



L,asseu, Asa 

Lassell, Cabel 


xMass. 


line 


Private 


Lathrop, George 

Lathrop, Joseph. . . . 
Laughton, James. . . 
Lawrence, Amos. . . . 


Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass 


state 

line 

mil 

line 


Pvt. of art. 

Private 

Sergeant . . 
Private 



86 Cumberland 
So York. 
79 Kennebec. 
SO Kennebec. 

72 Waldo 

78, Waldo 



73 York. 
79 York. 



LawTcnce, Isaac. . . . Mass. line I Private. 



Lawrence, Isaac. . . . Mass. state. 



Lawrence, John. . . , Mass. line. 
Lawrence, John. . . . Mass. line. 
Lawrence, Rogers . . Mass. mil. . 
Lawrence, William . Cont. navy 

Lawyer, Luke \ 

Layton, Ephraim. . . Mass. mil ; Private. 

Leach, Benjamin. . . N. H. line Private. 

Leach, George Mass. line Private. 



j Private 

'Private. . . . 

! Private 

|Pvt.&Mar. 
! Mariner. . . 



Leach, John Mass. line. . 

Leach, John 

Leach, Mark Mass. line. . 

Leadbetter, Increase Cont. navy. 



Leadbetter, Increase 
Leaher, Peter 



lee Lehr 



Matross. 
Private. . 
Mariner. 



69 Kennebec. 
79 Oxford. 

91 Lincoln 

79 Lincoln. 

86 Lincoln 

75 Penobscot . . . 
81 Penobscot . . . 
75 Penobscot . . . 

78 Cumberland 
— Cumberland. 

92 Hancock. 

87 Lincoln. 

80 Somerset. . . . 

69 Kennebec. 
80 York. 

78 Cumberland 
83 Cumberland 
77 Kennebec. 
S3 Piscataquis . 

79 Cumberland 

70 Kennebec . . . 
90 Kennebec, 



Res. Liberty. 
('20). 

Res. Wales. 
Res. Turner. 
Res. Danville. 
('20). 

Same as Larabee 
J. 



(•20). 

Res. Burnham. 

Same as LasdeU. 
('20). 
Res. Waterbo- 

rough. 



d. June 20, 1833. 

Res. Warren. 
'('20 Lawrence). 
Res. Newport. 
20 d. June 20, 

1833. 
('20, '31b). 



Res. Starks. 
Same as Leighton. 

('20). 

Res. Danville. 

Res. Sangerville. 

('20). d. Jan. 23, 
j 1822. 

'('20 ship "Bos- 
i ton"). 

Res. Leeds. 



224 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAIXE HISTORY. 



List. 


Name. 


Service. 


Rank. 


Age. County. 


Remarks. 


•35c 


Leatherhcad, Robert 
alias Bell. 


Cont. na\->'. . . . 


Musician. . 


78 Somerset 

! 


1 
('20 mariner ship 
"Alliance"). 


•3oc 


Leathers, Enoch. . . . 


Mass. line 


Private.... 


71 Penobscot. 




'40 


Leathers, Enoch 






79 Piscataquis . . 


('20). Res. San- 


•3oc 


Leathers, Levi 


N. H. line 


Private 


73 Lincoln 


ger\-ille. 
(•20). 


'40 


Leathhead Robert.. 






81 Somerset. . . . 


Res. .\nson. Same 
as Ltathfihead. 










'35c 


Leaver, William .... 


N. H. line 


Private 


74 York 


(•20). 


'35c 


Leavett, Edward . . . 


N. H.line 


Private 


60 Somerset .... 


('20 -29 
sergeant of inf.) 


'35c 


Leav.tt, Nathaniel. 


N. H. line 


Lieutenant 


69 York 


('20) Leavitt) 1 
d. Feb. 1825. 


•40 


Leavitt, Betsey 






72 York 


Res. Sanford. 


'35e 


Lea\'itt, Edmund. . . 


N. H. line, 2d. 
regiment. 


Sergeant . . 


So merset 


d. July 27, 1831. 


'35d 


Lea\-itt, Joseph. . . . 


R. Mine 


Pvt.drCorp. 


85 Kennebec . . . 


('31b). 


'40 


Leat itt, yfarrj 






79 York 


Res. Limerick. 


'35d 


Leavitt, William. . . 


N. H.line 


Private 


8.3 York 


(•20 '31b). 


'3od 


Lee, William 


Mass. state. . . . 


Lieutenant 


81 Lincoln. 




'35c 


Leeman, Daniel. . . . 


Mass. line 


Private 


74 Washington. 




'35d 


Leeman, Samuel 


Mass. mil 


Private 


70 Lincoln 


d. Apr. 30, 1833. 


'35d 


Legro, David 


Mass. mil 


Private 


74 York. 




'35c 


Legrow, Joseph .... 


Mass. line 


Private 


72 Hancock 


('20 Legro) d. Feb. 
25, 1832. 


•35c 


Lehr, Peter 


Mass. line 


Private 


64 Lincoln 


d. in 1822. 


'40 


Leighton, Ephraim . 






72 Kennebec . . . 


Res. Augusta. 












Same as Layton. 


•35d 


Leighton, Joseph . . . 


Mass. mil 


Private 


80 Washington. 




•35d 


Leighton, Robert. . . 


Mass. mil 


Private 


77 Cumberland . 




'35c 


Leighton, Tobias. . . 


Mass. line 


Private 


79 Somerset .... 


('20) d. in 1822. 


'35c 


Leissner, George . . . 


Mass. line 


Sergeant . . 


75 Lincoln 


(•20). 


•35d 


Leland, Henrv 


Mass. line 


Private 


74 Penobscot. 




•35c 


Leland, Joseph 


Mass. line 


Lieutenant 


62 York 


(•20, '29) (35e,8th 
regiment.) 


'40 


Lemnt, Thomas. . . 






81 Lincoln 

75 Lincoln. 


Res. Bath. 


•35d 


Lemoat, David 


Mass. mil 


Private 




•35d 


Lemoat, Thomas . . 


Mass. line 


Private 


75 Lincoln. 


Same as Lenient? 


'35d 


Lnnell. Samuel. . . . 


Mass. mil 


Private 


72 Cumberland . 




•35d 


Leonard, Caleb 


Mass. mil 


Private .... 


75 Kennebec. 




'40 








80 Kennebec . . . 
86 Somerset 


Res A\ indsor. 


'40 


Lerrv DaAnd 






Res Starks. 


'20 


Lervev, Jacob 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


Same as Lurvey. 


'40 


Levering, Nathaniel. 






77 Kennebec . . . 

i 


Res. "Winthrop. 








Same as Lover- 


'35c 


Lewis, Abijah 


Mass. lin» 


Private. 


74 Oxfoid 


'£0 d.Jur.e 1831. 


'35d 


Lewis, Archelaus . . . 


Mass. mil ..... 


Lieutenant 


81 Cumberland . 




'35d 


Lewis, Joseph 


Mass. line 


Private 


70 York 


('20). 


•35c 


Lewis, Nathan 


Mass. line 


Private 


63 Cumberland . 


('20). 

d. Dec. 5, 1822. 


'35d 


Lewis, William 


Mass. mil 


Sergeant . . 


7^ Lincoln. 




•35d 


Libbee, Robert 


Mass. line 


Private 


77 Cumberland . 


('20). 


'35e 


Libhey, Benjamin, 2d 


Cont. navy .... 


Mariner. . . 


76 K<nntb.= c. . . 


('20 Benjamin 2d; 
ship "Ranger"). 


'35d 


Libbev, David 


Mass. state 


Pvt. of art. 


79 Washington. 




•35c 


Libb:y, Ezirah 


Mass. line 


Private 


o^'York 


('20 Eznah). 


'35d 


Libbey, James 


Mass. line 


Private 


72 York 


d. June 22, 1832. 


•35c 


Libbev, James 


Mass. line 


Private 


71 Cumberland . 


('20 Libby) d. 
May, 1828. 


'35d 


Libbey, Joseph 


Mass. line 


Private 


80 Washington. 




'35d 


Libbey, Josiah 


Mass. state. . . . 


Pvt. of art. 


79 Washington. 




'35c 


Libbey, Nathan. . . 


Mass. line 


Private 


89 Cumberland . 


d. Apr. 14, 1823. 


•35c 


Libbey, Reuben. . . . 


Ma.ss. line 


Private 


83 Cumberland . 


('20 Libby) d. m 

1822. 
('20 Richard H. 


'35c 


Libbey, Richard M . 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


61 Cumberland . 












Libby) d. .Mar. 












27, 1«20. 


•35c 


Libbey, Samuel .... 


Cont. nsLvy .... 


Mariner. . . 


69 York 


('20 ship "Ran- 
ger") d. Jan. 14, 
1829. 


'35c 


Libbey, Simeon .... 


Ma.s3. line 


Corporal . . 


63 Cumberland . 


('20 & '31b, Lib- 
by). 
('20) d. .Mar. 1. 


'35c 


Libb?y, Solomon. . . 


Mass. line 


Private 


76 York 


. 










1831. 


•40 


Libby, Abiqail 







78 Cumberland . 


Res Scarborough. 


'40 


Libby, Abifjail 






77 Cumberland . 


Res. Scarborough. 


•40 


Libby, Abi'i'til . . 






76 Cuniberland . 
70 Lincoln 


Res. Scarborough. 


'35c 


Libby, Benjamin, 1st 


Mass. line 


Private 


d. .\ui?. 10, IKii. 


'40 


Libby, Doroth'j . . . 






78 Cumberland . 
73 Cunibf-rland . 




'35d 


Libby, Edward .... 


Mass. line 


Private 


(•20). 


•40 


Libby, Edward 






70to Cumberland . 
80 


Res. Gorham. 



REVOLUTIONARY PENSIONERS IN MAINE. 



225 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. 'Age 



County. 



Remarks. 



'35d 

•35d 

'35d 

•35d 

•35d 

•40 

'20 

•35d 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

•35d 

'40 



Libby, Fliakim Mass. line. . 

Libby, Francis Mass. line . . 

Libb.v, George Mass. state. 

Libby, Harvey .Mass. line. . 

Libby, Isaac \ Mass. mil . . 

Libby, Joseph 

Libby, Jotham Mass. line. . 

Libby, Mark ;Mass. line. . 



Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 
Private. 



Private. 
Private. 



Libby, Nathaniel. . . iMass. line. 



Libby, Robert Mass. mil . 

Libby, Robert I 



Private. 
I*rivate. 



'35d Libby. Seth Mass. mil. 

'40 ; Libby, Theophilus. .1 

'3oc Libby, Thomas ' Mass. line , 

'35d Libby, William ,Mass. line, 

'35d Libby. Zebulon Mass. line . 

'35c ;Lilley, Benjamin. . .Mass. line. 



'31b ;Lincken, Joseph. . . . | 

'35c Lincoln, Da%-id |N. Y. line. 

'35c Lincoln, Elisha iMass. line. 

'35c iLincoln, John Mass. line. 

'40 I Lincoln, Loved 

'35d I Lincoln. Royall .... Mass. mil . 



Private . 



Private. . 
Private . . 

I 

Private. . 
: Private. 
! 

I Private. 
Private. . 
Private. . 
Private . . 



'35d ; Lincoln, Sherman . . !Mass. mil. 
'40 ; I 



Bomb'd'r 

& Sea'n. 
Private 



'35c i Lindsay, James. . . . iMass. line, 

•40 ■ 



'35c iLinn, John ]Mas8. line. 



'40 Linn, Joseph ! 

'35c Linnekin, Joseph ... Mass. line . 

'40 Linnen, Thomas. . . . i 

'35c Linscott, Theodore .Mass. line. 

'35c Litchfield, Noah . . . Mass. line. 



Private. 
I Private. 



Private . 



I Private. 
1 Private. 



. I 89 Cumberland 

.i 83 York 

. ; 74 York. 

. SO York 

. I 70 York. 

i 92 Washington . 

S4 Cumberland 

90 Cumberland 
, 71 York 

77 York 

: 73 York. 

i 79 Cumberland 

I ' 

79 Cumberland 
, 47 Cumberland 

65 Cumberland 

SO York 

;or84i 

77 Cumberland 
I 75 Lincoln 

' I 

75 'Lincoln. 

64 Somerset . . . . 

75 Cumberland , 

, 82 Lincoln 

' 79 York. 

72 Kennebec. 
j 83 Kennebec . . . 
j 79 Kennebec . . . 
I 84 Kennebec . . . 
i 70 Kennebec . . . 

I 55 Kennebec . . . 

67 Lincoln 

! 79 Lincoln 

■ 71 York 

74 Hancock. . . . 



I ('20). 

I ('20, '31 b). 
Res. Harrington. 



Res. Scarborough. 
('20 '31b). 
iRes. Limerick. 

jRes. Sebago. 

I Same as Libbee? 

Res. Dan\ille. 
('20 Libbey). 
;('20, '31b). 

k'20). 

('20) d. Jac. 31. 
1828. 



i('20)d.M?y3.l824 
('20). 
Res. Lewiston. 



28, 



'40 ; Little, John. 



84 Lincoln . 



'35c ' Littlefield, Abraham Mass. line | Private. . . . i 71 York. 



'35d 

'35d 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 

•40 

'35c 

'35c 
'35c 

•40 
'35c 
•40 
'35c 

'40 
'35c 
'40 
'35c 

'40 

'35d 

•40 

•3od 

•40 

'3.3d 

'35d 
'35d 
'40 
•35c 



Littlefield, 

1st. 
Littlefield 

min, 2d 
Littlefield, 
Littlefield 
Litthfidd, 
Littlefield, 
Littlefield, 
LittUfidd, 
Littlefield. 

Littlefield. 
Littlefield. 



BenjaminMass. state. 
Ben j a-' Mass. state. 



Private I 90 York. 

Private....! 76 York. 



Daniel . . 
, David . . 

Dorothy . . 
Elijah. . . 
Ephraim. 
Joanna . . • 
Joel ; 



Mass. line. 
Mass. line . 



j Private. 
I Private. 



Mass. mil. 
Mass. mil. 



Mass. line. 



Johnson. 
Jotham. . 



Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 



Littlefield, Miriam 

Littlefield, Moses. . . Mass. line. 

Littlefield, Moses 

Littlefield. Noah M. Mass. line. 



Littlefidd, Susannah 

Littlefield, Timothy Mass. line. 

Littlefield, Timothy 

Lombard, Butler. . . Mass. line. 



Private . . . , 
Private 



Private. 



Private. . 
Private. . 



76 York 

73 York. 

92 York 

77 Cumberland 
82 York. 

72 York 

72 York 



60 York. 
87 York. 



! 85 York 

Private i SO Waldo. 

1 85 Penobscot . . 

Lieut. Col.i 84 York 



i Private. 



Lombard, Jedediah 

Lombard, John. . . . Mass. mil 



Private. 



Private . 



Lombard, John Mass. line Private. .. 

'• Lombard. John | 

Xbnibard, Nathaniel N. H. line. 

Lombard, Thomas.. Mass. mil. 
Lombard, Thomas. . .Mass. mil. 

Lomjfell'jw. Manj ) 

! Longfellow, Samuel. N. H. line Private. 



Sergeant 
j Coip. 

Private. . 
'Private. . 



81 York. 
72 Kennebec. 
81 Kennebec . . 
70 Somerset ... 

81 Cumberland 
77 Cumberland 

80to Cumberland 

90 

70 Oxford. 

76 Cumberland 

76 Somerset . . . , 



7i Lincoln, 
72 Oxford. 
81 Waldo. 
78 Waldo . 



Res. China. 
•('20 Lindsey). 

Res. Leeds. 
.('20) d. Apr. 
i 1834. 

Res. Windsor. 
i('20Linekin). 

Res. Georgetown. 
I ('20). 

iC20 Linchfield) d. 
I Nov. 17. 1S27. 
iRea. Bristol. See 
also Lvttle. 

(•20) d.'Julv 20, 
1831. 



('20). 

Res. Kennebunk. 



Res. Lyman. 
jTra'd- from Mass. 
I '8 0. 

('20. '31 b). 

('20 ) d. Mar. 7. 
1834. 

Res. Wells. 

Res. Dixmont. 
("20) d. Oct. 25, 
• 1821. 



Res. Waterville. 
('20) d. March, 

1820. 
Res. Standish. 

Res. Gorham. 



Res. Otisfield. 
('31 b) Same as 
Lumbard. 



Rrs. Palermo. 
(•20). d. Feb. 3. 
; 1834 . 



226 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



Liat. 



Name. 



Service. 



! ! 

Rank. ! Age. 



County. 



Remarks. 



'35d Longley, Asa ' Mass. line . 

'40 



Private. 



'3oc Longlej-, Jonathan . i Mass. line Private. . . . 

'35c Longley, Zachariah . ; Mass. line Private 



'29 Loomis, Joseph Conn 

'35c Loomis, Roger R. L line. . 

'40 Lord, Ahiqail : 

'3.5c Lord, Benjamin. . . . Mass. line. 

'40 Lord, Damir.icus ... 

'35c Lord, Daniel Mass. line. 

'3oc Lord, Daniel, 2d .... ^ Mass. line . 

'35c Lord, Daniel. 3d . . .iX. H. line. 

'35d Lord, Dominicus . . . ; Mass. mil . 



Dragoon 
Private. . 



Private . 



Lord, Elias I Mass. line . 

Lord, Elisha 'Mass. line. 

Lord, Elizaheth i , 

Lord, Hnnnnh ' 



'35c 
'35c 
'40 
'40 

'35d Lord, Irhabod ;Mass. line. 

'35c I Lord, James I Mass. line . 

'35d ! Lord, James ! Mass. mil . 

'28 iLord, James Mass 

'35c ' Lord, Joseph N. H. line . 

'35d Lord, Nathan Mass. line. 



Private . 
Private. 



I Private, 
i Private. 



'Private 

[Private. . . 



Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Private . . . . 
Lieutenant 
Private. . . . 
i Private. . . . 



72 Somerset 
78 Somerset , 
72 Oxford.. 



78l Penobscot. 



64 Kennebec 
70 Oxford . . . 
80 Oxford . . . 

79 York 

76 Hancock. 
75 York 



70 I York. 
72, York. 



75 Kennebec 

56' York 

78iYork 

77 York 

79 York 

93 Lincoln. . 
71 Kennebec. 



57 York. 
77 York. 



'35<i Lord, Richard ; Mass. line i Private ' 77 York. 



'35d Lord, Samuel. . . . 

'40 

'40 Lord, Wentworth. 



iN. H. state. 



i Private 



'35c Lord, Wintworth. . . I Mass. line Private. 



74 York. 
80 York. 
84 York. 

78 York. 



'35d Lothrop, Daniel. . . .Mass. mil. 

'35d Lothrop, Jacob Mass. mil. 

'20 Loud, Benjamin . . . Mass. line. 

'3oc Loveland, James. . . Conn. line. 

1 ! 

'35c Lovell, Josiah Mass. line. 

'35d Lovering, Nathaniel. Mass. mil. 

'35c Low, P'ezaleel Mass. line . 

'35c I Low, John \ Mass. line . 

'40 1 Low, Mary | 

'35c Low, Phineas 1 Mass. line . 



Serg. & Lt.l 

Private ; 

Private. i 
Private j 

Private 

Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Captain. . . 



'35d 

'40 

'35<i 

'35c 

'35e 

'35d 

'40 

'3.nc 

'35c 

'40 

'35d 

'35c 

'40 



Low, Robert iMass. mil. . 

Low, Robert 

Lowe, Jonathan. . . . Mass. line. . 
Lowell, Benjamin . . Mass. line. . 
Lowell, Benjamin Crane's art. 

Lowell, John Mass. line . . 

Lowell, John 

Lowell, Paul Mass. line. 

Lowell, Thomas. . . .;Mass. line. . 



Private. 
Private . 



88 Kennebec. 
72 Oxford 

68 Somerset . . . 

62 Cumberland 
72 Kennebec . . 
70 Somerset . . . 

75 York 

80 Lincoln. . . . 
64 York 



Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Matross. . . 
Private ' 



Private ! 

Private. . . .' 



^ Luce, Seth Mass. line . 

Luce, Shubael Mass. line . 

Lufkin, Beijamm 



Private. . . , 
Private. . . , 



'35d iLumb, James Mass. mil. 

'35c iLumbard, Caleb Mass. line. 



Private 

Private 



'40 \Lumhard, Hannah 

'20 iLumbard, Nathaniel Mass 

'35d Lunt, Amos .Mass. line. 



•35c Lunt, Daniel N. H. line. 

'35d Lunt, Daniel Mass. mil. 

'40 , 

'35c ,Lunt, Daniel Mass. line. 

'40 Lunt, John 



Sergeant . . 
Sergeant & 
Ens. 

Private 

Pvt.&Serg. 



Captain. 



'35d iLupkin, Benjamin.. . Mass. mil Private... 

'35c Lurvey, Jacob .Mass. line Private. . . 

'35d Lydstow, William . . Mass. mil Private. . . 

'35d 'Lyttle, John Mass. mil [Private... 



74 Kennebec. 

80 Oxford 

76 Kennebec . . 

— Hancock. . . 

— Hancock. 

76 Lincoln. 

83 Kennebec . . 

75 Oxford 

74 Penobscot . . 
78 Penobscot . . 
82 Lincoln. 

77 Kennebec . . 
78, Oxford 



("20). 

Res. Palmvra. 

(•20) d. March, 

1833. 
('20) d. June 28, 

1825. 

('20) d. Sept. 1822 

Res. Paris. 

d. Nov. 15, 1829. 

Res. Kennebunk. 

('20). 

('20) d. Dec. 15, 

1833. 
(•20). 
Sjme as Lord, 

Daminicus. 
('20). 
('20).. 

Res. Lyman. 
Res. Limerick. 
('20, '31 b). 
d. Feb. 13, 1830. 

(•20). 

(•20, '31b). 

('20, '31b) d. 

Nov. 26. 1833. 
(•20, •31b) d. 

Aug. 25, 1833. 

Res. Berwick. 

Res. Parsonsfield. 
(•20). 

Same as preced- 
ing. 

d. Aug. 2, 1833. 

(•20) d. March, 

1827. 
('20). 

Same as Levering. 
(•20). 
(•20). 
Res. Bath. 
(•20) d. March, 

1824. 

Res. Livermpre. 
(•20 «fe "Sib Low). 

('20). 



74 Kennebec 
69 Oxford.. . 



68 Oxford. 



Res. Gardiner. 

('20). 

(•20). 

Res. Dixmont. 

r20, '31b). 

Res. R o X b u ry. 

Same as Lupkin, 

B. 
Same as Lamb. 
(■20) d. Apr. 19, 

1833. See also 

Lombard. 
Res. Turner. 



81 Cumberland.! ('20). 



84 York 

72 Cumberland 
78 Cumberland 
68 Cumberland 
— Cumberland 



72 Oxford. . . . 
5S Hancock. 
79 Kennebec. 
78 Kennebec 

i 



'('20). 

Res. Falmouth. 
('20). 

Res. New Glouces- 
i ter. 
Same a-, Lufkin B. 



Same as Little, J? 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

•PUBLISHED QUARTERLY 

Entered as second class matter at the post office, Dover, Maine, by John 
Francis Sprague, Editor and Publisher. 

Terms : For all numbers issued during the year, including an index and 
all special issues, $i.oo. Single copies of current volume, 25 cents; of pre- 
vious volumes, 50 cents. Bound volumes $2.00 each. 

Postage prepaid on all items, except bound volumes west of Mississippi 
River. 

Commencing with Vol. 3, the terms will be $1.00 only to subscribers who 
pay in advance, otherwise $1.50. 

This publication will be mailed to subscribers until ordered discontinued. 



OUR iMESSAGE TO YOU 

FIRST TEACH THE BOY AND GIRL TO KNOW AND LOVE 
THEIR OWN TOWN, COUNTY AND STATE AND YOU HAVE 
GONE A LONG WAY TOWARD TEACHING THEM TO KNOW 
AND LOVE THEIR COUNTRY. 



OUR SPECIAL CENTENNIAL NUMBER. 

The first number of the next and eighth volume of the 
Journal will be a special Maine Centennial edition. It 
will be commemorative of the separation of the District of 
Maine from the jurisdiction of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, its change from a district to a sovereign 
state, and its admission into the Federal Union of states. 

We design to have this one contain more pages of text 
than have any of the preceding issues. It will be well 
illustrated, and we shall endeavor to make it attractive and 
interesting to all; one that may be of such value that all 
readers will desire to preserve it among their choice items 
of Maine history. 

This will be mailed free to the Journal subscribers. 
Later the four regular quarterly numbers will be issued, 
thus making a volume of five instead of the usual four 
numbers. 

The patronage kindly extended to the Journal by the 
Maine Centennial Committee, made it possible for us to 
do this for our subscribers. 



y;;ff .: .^' 



:fK^-\V i yt 



■'>'n 



228 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



It will be out in June next, in season for circulation at 
the great Maine Centennial celebration which, as we are 
now informed, will be held in Portland the latter part of 
that month. If that event should be deferred for a time, 
the date of its issuance will be changed accordingly. 



By reason of a lack of space several important contributions 
recently received are withheld from publication in this issue. 

Among such is an article of much interest by Mr. Charles E. 
Waterman, on Franklin Pierce and the State of Maine. These 
will all appear in later numbers. 

This issue is the last one of the seventh volume of the Journal. 
As usual it contains a complete index to this volume. 



A VALUABLE WORK. 



(Waterville Sentinel.) 

A good work is being done so modestly that it hardly gets the 
recognition it deserves. This is the publication of Sprague'? Jour- 
nal of Maine History by John F. Sprague of Dover. For years 
he has been engaged in clearing up obscure points in the history of 
the state, publishing old and well nigh forgotten documents and 
records and gradually compiling a file of magazines that will be 
invaluable in the years to come to those delving into the history 
of Maine. 

That this work is appreciated is shown by the growing circula- 
tion of the Journal. In nearly every issue there are facts and 
articles that call attention to interesting state matters about which 
little has been known. All the information is gathered with great 
care and its accuracy can be relied upon. There is little enough 
literature on Maine and the systematic and painstaking gathering 
of so much material by this publication renders a very important 
service to the people of the state. 



NOTES AND FRAGMENTS. 229 



Notes and Fragments 

The following residents of ^Maine were members of the Massa- 
chusetts Historical Societ\' in the year 1798: 

David Sewall, York ; Daniel Davis, Jun., Portland ; William 
Dundridge Peck, Kittery; Rev. Alden Bradford, Po\\Tialborough. 



The following is from the Brunswick Telegram of August 27, 
1869, and republished in a recent issue of the Brunswick Record: 

When it was decided to make a present to Professor Packard, Henry 
W. Longfellow, perhaps the most distinguished graduate of Bowdoin, 
was in Italy, and the letter which was sent to him did not reach him in 
season for a reply at Commencement. His answer has just been received 
by Mr. Chandler, in Boston, and is sent to us by him to be handed to 
Professor Packard. Previous to doing this, we take the liberty of printing 
an epistle, so characteristic and so honorable to the v^riter and his old 
teacher. 

Edinburgh, Aug. 8th, 1869. 
My Dear Mr. Chandler; 

In reply to your letter, I beg you to put me down on the subscription 
for Mr. Packard, for any reasonable sum you may think fit, not higher 
than the others, but as high as any one. 

I am much obliged to you for writing me, as I should not like to be left 
out of such a subscription. I remain, in great haste, and with great regard, 

Yours truly, 

HENRY W. LONGFELLOW. 



Gov. Milliken will send an invitation to Maine's Centennial cele- 
bration to every Alaine-born citizen living out of the State whose 
address can be obtained. So if you have any Elaine friends or 
relatives in other states, send their name and address to the Cen- 
tennial committee headquarters at City Hall, Portland, and the 
committee will do the rest. Over 2(X),ooo sons and daughters of 
Maine are now living outside of the State, a great many of whom 
are leaders in the afifairs of the nation from the sections in which 
they now reside. 



.iS::!'"!.- '"' o.s /■'/ v';H'V!3yi 



230 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



William Edw ard Gould 

(by UDA L. COBB.) 

Reference has heretofore been made in the Journal, (voh 7, 
p. 56) to the late William Edward Gould of Boston. Mass. 

Mrs. Lida L. Cobb of that city contributed to the Journal 
additional data regarding him as follows : 

Mr. Gould was born in Portland, Txlaine, June 19, 1837, ^^^ 
died in Boston, Mass.. April 15, 1919. The following is from the 
Boston Transcript: 

He was of ^Mayflower ancestn- and the eldest son of Edward Gould and 
Althea Chase Gould of Portland, Me. His life, until recent years, was 




William Edward Gould. 



passed in that place, where when a young man he was organist of the Third 
Parish Church. 

When twenty-one years old he was appointed cashier of the first National 
Bank of Portland, which institution he built up to be a leading bank in 
Maine. His interest in music continued and he was for some j-ears presi- 
dent of the Haydn Society of Portland. He also led an amateur orchestra 
and choral society, which met in his residence in Deering. He founded 
and was the first executive officer of the Portland Society of Art. In work 
in behalf of charity he aided foreign and domestic missions and struggling 
churches. He founded the Wood fords Congregational Church, and often 



PATRIOTIC-HISTORIC SOCIETIES IN MAINE. 231 



occupied pulpits in Maine. The Church Society at Ligonia was his especial 
charge for years. 

Since his retirement from active business genealogy had been Mr. Gould's 
special interest, and he was a frequent contributor to the genealogical 
columns of the Transcript. He was editor of the Chase Chronicle the 
organ of the Chase-Chace Family Association. The April, 1919, number 
was his last literary contribution. He wrote the history of the Gould, 
Chase and Maynard families, and presented extra-illustrated copies to the 
Maine Historical Society, the New England Historic-Genealogical Society 
and to the Gorham (Me.) Historical Society. 

He was the author of five volumes on genealogical subjects, and 
was an authority on the Chase line. 

He was also a close student of New England history, especially 
of the colonial period in Maine. 

On April 27, 1859, Air. Gould was married to Emma Maynard 
Dow, second daughter of Hon. Neal Dow of Portland, the '* father 
of prohibition." Airs. Gould died on Feb. 22 last. They had 
five children, of whom two survive — Alice Maynard Gould, now 
the wife of Everett W. Pattison, an attorney of St. Louis, Mo., 
and Neal Dow Gould of Portland. 



PATRIOTIC-HISTORIC SOCIETIES IN MAINE. 

M«ilitary Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, 
Commandery of the State of Maine — Commander, Major Henry 
S. Barrage, Portland ; Recorder, Major Abner O. Shaw. 

Grand Army of the Republic, Dep>artment of Maine— Com- 
mander, George W. Goulding, Oakland ; Assistant Adjutant and 
Quartermaster General, F. A. Alotley, Portland. 

American Legion, Maine Branch — -Commander, Col. Albert 
Greenlaw, E^astport ; Adjutant, James L. Boyle, Waterville. 

Sons of Veterans, U. S- A., Maine Di\nsion — Commander, Wil- 
liam E. Southard, Bangor; Secretary and Treasurer, Edward K. 
Gould, Rockland. 



2^ SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



Daughters of Veterans — President, Mrs. Carrie M. Ripley, East 
Corinth; Secretary, Miss Marion A. Ripley, Bangor. 

Maine Division Sons of Veterans Auxiliary — President, Mrs. 
Florence Robinson. Bath ; Secretary, Mrs. ^lary Pratt, Bath. 

Union Veterans' Union, Department of Maine— Commander, 
O. F. Glidden, National Soldiers' Home ; Adjutant General, J. \V. 
P. Johnson, Gardiner. 

Maine Society of the Sons of the American Revolution — Presi- 
dent, William K. Sanderson, Portland ; Secretary, Francis L. Lit- 
tlefield, Portland. 

Society of American Wars of the United States, Commandery 
of the State of Maine — Commander, x\rchie Lee Talbot, Lewiston ; 
Recorder, . 

D. A. R., State Council of the Daughters of the American Revo- 
lution — State Regent, Mrs. Lucy Woodhull Hazlett, Bangor ; Rec. 
Secretary, Maud M. Merrick, Waterville. 

National Roosevelt Memorial Association — Chairman, Halbert 
P. Gardner, Portland ; Executive Sec, Harrie B. Coe, Portland. 

Society of Colonial Wars — Secretary, Walter E. Ehvell, Port- 
land. 

Society of Mayflower Descendants in the State of Maine — Sec- 
retary, Harlan Turner, Portland. 

State of Maine Daughters of 1812 — ^Secretary, Mrs. William 
Knowlton, Portland. 

The Journal desires to publish in each issue a complete list of 
the patriotic-historic societies in Maine with the names and post 
office addresses of the president and secretary of each. We are 
well aware that the foregoing is incomplete and not entirely accu- 
rate. We hope our readers will kindly co-operate with us in this 
matter, and send us corrections and additions from time to time. 



■KU'n/,, 



:,;■':;»;■:, 'ji:l J i ■■.:''■,. 



:)J -^O '^hu-i 



SAYINGS OF SUBSCRIBERS. 233 



Sayings of Subscribers 



Mrs. J. M. Prentiss, Greenville, Me. : 

I enjoy everj' number of the Journal, and save them all for future refer- 
ence. 



Dr. G. L. Crockett, Rockland, Me. : 
The Journal ought to be in ever\' family in Maine. 



C. O. Purington, Bowdoinham, Me. : 
My appreciation of the Journal increases with every copy received. 



Norman Wallace Lermond, Thomaston, Me. : 

The Journal is a valuable and most interesting publication. I do nol 
want to miss a number from now on. 



M. T. Goodell, Cumberland Mills, Me. : 

Have enjoyed your magazine very much indeed. We need to know 
more about the State of Maine. 



Hon. Fred W. Bunker, North Anson, Ale. : 

I enjoy reading your Journal very much indeed. It is certainly appre- 
ciated by all who are interested in Maine history. May you live many more 
years to carry on this work. 



,:,Coin and Stamp Collectors ... 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 

Prices I Pay— of every U. S. Coin 
worth over face — 15 cts. 



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:;'-^:r^'i„- >;■■ ll ,l'">":fMl 



1 1 . r^-i 



234 SPIL\GUE'S JOURXAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 
THE PILGRIMS IN MAINE. 

(by archie lee TALBOT.) 

The following are some of the points of interest to be remem- 
bered and considered by citizens of Elaine: 

First — That the Pilg-rim Trading-Post at Koussinoc (Augusta) 
was a permanent establishment, maintained '' both summer and 
winter," the old records tell us, for a period of more than thirty- 
five years, under the residential management of the ablest men of 
Plymouth Colony. 

Second — That the supplies of beavers and other furs obtained at 
Koussinoc paid the London debt, and firmly established the Colony 
at Plymouth. 

Third — ^That the present property owners at Augusta, and all the 
territory embraced in the original patent to Governor William 
Bradford, hold their estates through titles acquired and trans- 
mitted by the Pilgrims. 

Fourth — That Governor Edw^ard Winslow, the first comer and 
founder of the Pilgrim Trading-Post, was the first to open the 
lands of the Kennebec valley to white settlers, and the men of Ply- 
mouth who followed him, and dwelt at Koussinoc, were the orig- 
inal settlers of Augusta. 

Fifth — That Maine is the only State, beside Massachusetts, that 
can contribute a chapter to the history of the Pilgrims ; Maine is 
the only other state in which the Pilgrims of the Mayflower dwelt 
and labored for the upbuilding of their Colony. Maine is the only 
other State in which a large number of property owners hold their 
estates through a succession of titles derived directly from the 
Pilgrims. 

Sixth — That Maine is the only State in the Union whose State 
House stands upon land once owned by the Pilgrims, and the title 
to which is derived directly from the Pilgrims. 

Seventh— That loving memories for three hundred years have 
enshrined Plymouth Rock, while not one thought has been given to 
the abode of the Pilgrims of the Mayflower for nearly forty years 
on the shores of the Kennebec whose bounteous stores saved Ply- 
mouth Colony in the time of her vital need. 



■■Jiilui ] 



■•:>^1 ;■,•:. 









^:V.^i.^'\^.';: \f 



^7«/.Cr:!«^; 



::-, ■srtjfii:^* , -.7^ 



INDEX. 



235 



INDEX— Vol. VII 



176, 

179, 
206, 



Abbot, Jacob 

toTvu of 
Acadia 
Adams, Abijah 

George W. 

John 

letters of 

John Quiucy 

Laviuia Swan 

Samuel 178, 

Advance in Maine 
Alden. Mr. 

Brings 

Davia 

John 

Jonathan 

Joseph 

Mary 
Algier Rose, ship 
Alphabetical index of Revolu- 
tionary Pensioners in 
Maine 35, 

American postal service, evolu- 
tion of 
Anderson, Charles H, 

James 

John 
Andrews, Mark 

Andros, Sir Edmund 8,9, 

Andrus. Silas 
Annapolis 

Arnold, Benedict, at Fort West- 
ern 121, 
Arrowsic Island 
Arj-, Hannah 
Ashurst. Sir Henry 
Atkinson barn-raising, an 
At wood, Jesse 
Auburn semi-centennial 
Augusta, early 120 
Austin, Elmira 
Ayer. Glen C. 

Dr. Moses 



51 

86 

65 

186 

I6;i 

ISO 
177 
184 
106 
184 
100 
138 
207 
140 
143 
14:i 
140 
140 



144. 214 

123 
210 
211 
211 

26 

188 



65 

122 

28 

21 

10 

48 

21 

85 

122 

213 

164 

25 



B 



Bagnall, Walter li>4 

Bailey, Rev. Jacob 121 

Baker, Joseph 20 

Bangor Com'mercial 48, 111 

first settler 111 

first white child 111 

Public Library 35,144,214 

some early settlers of 111 

Bangs. Edward 1^6 

Barker. David 45. 107 

Lewis 107 

Noah 107, 108 

Barn raising in Atkinson 48 

Barnard. Joseph 127 

Barrv's History of Mass. 8 

Bartlet, Robert 137 

Bartlett. Louise Wheeler 101 

Malachi 85 

Moses H. 82,83 

Barwise, Mark A. 164 

Bassett. William 138 

Baxter, Jnuies Phinney 102,162,194 

Manuscripts 192 

Baunnin. Sebastian 127 

Beal, E. F. 85 

Bean. Capt. 33 



Colby 
Beane, Fred Emery 
Belcher, Governor 
Bennett, Anthony 
John 

Nathaniel 
Berlin, Me., voters in 1S31 
Berry. Samuel 
Biddeford Journal, the 

town meetings 
Billings. Samuel 
Bishop. F. H. 
Blackmau. Benjamin 
Blagden. Charles 
Blair. Abby 
Bodwell, Capt. Bailey 
Bonighton. Richard 
Boston, Early postmaster 

Massacre 

Port Bill 

Transcript, the 
Bounty on Indian scalps 
Bourne. John 
Bowdoin College 
Bowman. Jonathan 
Boy on Pulpit Rock, the 
Brackett. Capt. John 
Bradbury. Capt. Jabez 

Theo|>hilus 
Bradford. Rev, Alden 

Andrew 

Governor 
Bradle.v. Samuel 
Bradstreet. Col. Dudley 
Brave Maine Irishman, A 
Bray. John 

Margery 
Breach of Promise case, a Colo 

nial 
Brewer. John 

Josiah 

Town of. Deed 
Brewster, Bishop 

Jonathan 

Joseph 

Love 

Nathaniel 
Bridge, Edmund 
Brooks, George 
Brown, Caroline Farrar 

Cellissa 

Daniel 

Fred W. 

Levi 

Margery 

Mary P. Gurney 

Mary Pearson 

Nanc-.v P. Foss 

Stephen 

Stephen O., a sketch 

Stephen P. 

Susan A. 

Dr, Thomas H. 
Browne, Charles Farrar, a sketch 

Cyrus 
Browsings by the editor in his 

library 
Brunswick Record, the 

Telegram, tlie 
Bucksjtort, Town of 
Bucks town. Town of 
Bunker. Eunice 

Hill. Battle of 

Fred W. 
P.url>aiik. Elizabeth 
Burnes. Richard 
Burr. A iron, at Fort Western 

David C. 
Barrage, Dr. Henry S. 



165 

65 

25,26 

26 

26 

42 

211 

161 

179 

158 

164 

62 

20 

212 

84,85 

23 

125 

184 

178 

230 

47 

138, 139 

52, 133 

34 

78 

159 

98 

177 

229 

126 

120 

- 54 

70 

102 

60 

60,63 

140 

20 

20 

20 

151 

138 

208 

137 

208 

34 

21 

40 

89 

40,41 

16:5 

40,41 

171, 173 

93 



89 

89 

89,93 

93 



41 
40 
41 

49 
22I> 
229 



192 

23 

233 

133 

137 

122 

96 

rO, 231 



^'i3-' 



^*; 



236 SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



Busrwell, Jacob 
Buxton, William 
Byram, Nicholas 



lU 

Si 

137 



78 

84 

168 



Cabot, Greorge 




184 


John 




151 


Sebastian 




151 


Callahan. Charles 




34 


Came. Samuel 




65 


Campbell, John 




11>5 


Thomas 




20 


Cape Breton 




65 


Elizabeth 




93,154 


Card, Albert M. 




165 


Carll, E. C. 




100 


Mrs. E. C. 




22, 122 


Carroll. Bishop 




168 


Casco Bay 




03, ll:i 


Cash, Paul 




200 


Catholic Church, oldest in 


New 




England 




168 


Historical Magazine. Maine 


166 


Cemetery, Eastern at Portland 


70. 81 


oldest stone 




80 


Western of Portland 




81 


Centennial Episcopal Church in 




Maine 




151, 1^ 


Maine 81, 151, 154, 159, 101 


104, 220 


Chandler, Benjamin 




140 


Edmond 


138, 


130, 14:; 


John 




108, 205 


Joshua 




208 


Samuel 


138, 


130, 143 


Sarah 




141 


Charter of William and Mary 


10, l:.' 


Charters, Early New Engla 


nd 


7 


Chase Chronicle, the 




230 


George Colby 




161 


Christ Church. Gardiner 




152 


Church, Capt. Benjamin 




142 


Dr. Benjamin 




181 


Maj. 




17 


Circuit riding 




170 


City, first in America 




107 


Clason, O. B. 




166 


Cleeve, George 




79,80 


Cobb. Herbert Gray 




78 


Lida L. 




230 


William L. 




78 


Cohalan, Daniel F. 




102 


Cole, Benjamin 




23 


H. G. 




83 


Henry 




21 


Collier, William 




136 


Collins, Rev. Charles 




104 


Colton. John 






Committee of Safety, the g 


eneral 181 


Congregational Church at 


Nor- 




way. Me. 




82. 83 


Continental Congress, the 




170. 181 


Cook, W. Burt 




42 


Cook. Francis 




136, 137 


Cooper. John 




141 


Cornish, Leslie C. 




115, 162 


Cottrill. Mathew 




168 


Council for New England, 


the 


7 


Cox. Martlia 




159 


Crocker. John 




20 


Crockett. Dr. G. L. 




233 


Crosby, Dr. N. H. 




165 


S. Percy 




48, 163 


Simon 




111 


Cummings, Jonathan 




26,83 


Carwin. Judge Samuel 




74 


Cushlng, Judge Nathan 




181 


Judge William 




182 


Cushman, Joshua 




208 


Thomas 




137 


Cushnoc 


119, 


120. 121 



Daggett. Windsor P. 
Dale, Joseph 

Damariscotta Catholic Church 
D. A. R., Esther Eayers Chap- 
ter 
Davis, Daniel, Jr. 

Elizabeth 

Georgauia Staples 

James 

Sarah 
Deering, Joan Crafts 

Roger 

Sarah 
Delano, Samuel 

Thomas 
Delanoe, Philip 
Dellno, Judah 

Lydia 
DeMonts' Colony 
Dennett. Jacob 
Dennis. Betsy 

John 
Dexter, tirst woolen mill 
Diugle.v. Governor 

Susanna 
Doaue, Oliver 
Documentary 
Done. John 

Doore, Mrs. Clarence F. 
Dover, tirst woolen mill 

town of 
Dow. Emma Maynard 

Neal 
Downs. Ephraim 
Dresden, town of 
Druilettes, Fr. Gabriel, at 

Cushnoc 
Drummoud. Demands H. 
Duchambou, Commander 
Duke of York's patent 
Dunlap. Robert P. 
Duxbury. early records 138. 130, 142 

Dwelley, Elizabeth 140 

Richard 140 

D.ver, James 54 

Thomas F. .54 



Eastern Cemetery, Portland 79. 81 

Lands Committee 191 

Eckstorm, Fannie Hardy 161. 103 

Editorial 40, 100, 160. 227 



108 

229 

157 

110 

157 

157 

157 

157 

157 

205 

140, 142, 14.3 

137, 138, 108 

203, 205, 207 

205 

195 

111 

96 

96 

89 

124 

106 

21 

20-23, 94-00 

137 

03 

SO 

188,100 

231 

231 

21 

175 

120 

106 
69 

8.9 
•» 



Edwards, Jonathan 




49,76 


Emerson. Ralph W^aldo 




50 


Emery, James 




33 


John 




21 


Lucillius A. 




161 


Episcopal Church Centennial 




Committee 




152 


at Richmond's Island 




154 


in ilaine 


151. 


15t, 104 


Esther Eayers Chapter, D. 


A. R 


lOS 


Evans. George 




155, 162 


Liston P. 




92 


William A. 




82 



Fairbanks. Richard 125 

Falmouth, burning of 181 

Packet, schooner 103 

Fay. Ada E. West 88 

Norman H.. an appreciation S6 

obituaries 87-88 



% 



INDEX. 



237 



& Scott 


88 


W. B. 


88 


Wintbrop L. 


88 


Fe<ieralist partj-, the 


186 


Fellow:?, Kaymoiul 


;>o 


William W. 


164 


Fernahl. Bert M. 


i;;:i 


Fields. Capt. Thomas 


54 


Files. Esther 


210 


Fla??, Charles A. 35, 144, 


161, 214 


Fliut. John K. 


55 


Flood, Edmuud 


210 


Isaac 


210 


Fluker. Lucy 


74 


Thomas 


74 


Folsom. Elizabeth K. 


94,165 


Fort Powual 


77,180 


Richmond 


98 


Western, Benedict Arnold at 


121 


sketch 


120-122 


to be restored 


119 


Fortune, ship, of 1621 135, 136, 


150, 108 


Foss, James 


89 


Nancy Perkins 


89 


Susan 


89 


Foster. Lt. Benjamin 


103 


Judge Jedediah 


182 


Fowler, Simeon 


20 


Foxcroft Academy, students in 




1840 


45 


and Dover Congregational 




Church 


54 


town of 


188, 190 


Foye, James 


158 


Martha 


158 


Franklin, Benjamin 


120 


Freeman. Elizabeth 


106 


Samuel 


21,127 


French. Ebenezer 


54 



Goody ea re. Moses 






154 


Goold, William 






27 


Gorges, Sir Ferdiuando 


7, 23, 151, 


152 


oath of allegiance to 






23 


sketch of 






194 


grant, the 






152 


Province of Maine 






188 


Gorgeana incorporated 






197 


Gorham, Colonel 






33 


in days of tirst school 


teacher 




29 


Indian troubles at 






33 


Nathaniel 






184 


Goss. Gustavus A. 






84 


Gould, Alice Mayuard 






231 


Althea Chase 






230 


Capt. Daniel I. 






164 


Edward 






230 


Major John M. 






56 


Maria D. 






56 


Neal Dow 




56,131 


Reverend 






82 


Samuel C. 






56 


William E. 




56 


,230 


Rev. William H. 






16:5 


Governors. Massachusetts 


Colony 


44 


Plymouth Colony 






44 


Province of Mass. Bay 






44 


Gray, Deacon John 






69 


town of 






24 


Greeley. Horace 






50 


Green, Mary 






80 


Capt. Nathaniel 






80 


Greenleaf, Stephen 






85 


Greenwood, Alexander 






96 


Gurney, Mary P. 






93 


Guernsey, Samuel J. 






106 



H 



Frottiiugham. John 
Fuller. Catherine 
Fullerton, John 

Ruth 
Funeral Lane, Portland 




80 

96 

198 

205 

80 


Haines, Maria L. 

Deacon Samuel 

Thomas J. 

William T. 
Hakluyt's Discourse on 

ern Planting 
Hale, Clarence 
Hall, Abigail 


105 
105 

105 
105 
W^est- 

110 

109, 161 

210 


G 






John 


5 






Hamilton. William 


22 








William, Jr. 


00 








Hamlin. Anna 


40 


Gage, Governor 




179 


Hannibal 


22, 40, 81. 133 


Gannett. Guy P. 




119 


Hancock. Governor John 


80,170 


Gard. Roger 




23 


Hardin. Nehemiah 


54 


Gardiner. John 




116 


Hardy, Mary 


187 


Robert H. 


151 


,152 


Theophilus 


187 


Dr. Silvester 


116 


, l'<5 


Harmon, Edward 


210 


William 




122 


Harthorn, Silas 


111 


Gardner. John 




20 


Solomon 


21, 111 


Gay, Seth 




191 


Harvard University 


IS 


Genealogy of the Simmon 


s 




Hatch, Louis C. 


161, 162 


family 


135, 


198 


Hathaway, George E. 


166 


Gerri.sh. Timothy 




65 


Hawthorne. Nathaniel 


81 


Gerry, Elbridge 




180 


Hayden. Sarah 


106 


Gibson, Rev. Richard 




154 


Hayes. Alfred W. 


23 


" Gift of God," ship 


152 


, 195 


John 


23 


Gilley, Eunice 




192 


Joseph 


23 


Hannah L. 




192 


Rev. P. A. 


104 


John 




192 


Hayward, .John 


125 


William of Mt. Desert 




192 


Herrick. Joshua 


22 


declaration of 




192 


Samuel W. 


23 


Ginn. James 




20 


Hersey, Ira G. 


162 


Godfrey, Edward 




23 


Hicks. Abigail 


211, 212 


Goldthwait. C:'pt. 




180 


Adeline 


212 


"Good Old Days" 




29 


Albert 


211 


Goodell. M. T. 




230 


Albion 


212 


Goodkin. John W. 




22 


Alfred 


212 


Goodwin, Capt. Samuel, letter 


of 


98 


Alfred T. 


212 



T«}>J' fj 



|..|; 



\ 



l.s aM 



238 SPRAGUE'S 


JOURNAL OF AlAiNE HibiORY. 




Andrew 








211 


Howe Tavern, the 


W 


1 


Charles 








211 


Thomas 


^ 




Charles H. 








211 


bond as innkeeper 


94 




Conaut S. 








212 


Howlnud. Elizabeth 


156 




Cyrus 








211 


John 


156 




Dennis 








157, 15S 


Hubbard, Levi 


26 




Dilla 








210 


Hull, John T. 


79 




Dolly 








212 


Hunt. John 


209 




Dolly J. 








212 


Thomas 


208 




Dorothy 








210 


Hutchings. John 


20 




Ebeuezer 








210 


Hutchinson, Polly 


96 




Edwin 








212 


Thomas 


13 




Eliza 








210 








Elizabeth 


156, 


157, 158 


159, 


211, 212 








Emma 








212 








Ephraim 








156, 210 


I 






Esther 








210 






Eunice 








211 






1 


Family, Notes 


on 


the 156-159 


210-2l:j 








tirst of family 


in 


Maine 




15«J 


" Income Tax " verse 


107 




Francena 








21:; 


Index of Revolutionary Pen- 






George 








210 


sions in Maine 35, 


144, 214 




Hannah 




158,159 


210 


211, 212 


Indian Chief, Negabamat 


121 




death of 








15S 


Passaguaut 


98 




Henry 








211 


Worambus 


34 




Henry F. 








212, 2i:i 


ravages in Maine 


12 


1 


Hepzibah 








158 


scalps, bounty on 


47 


1 


Isaac 








210 


settlement at Piscataqua 


61 


1 


James 






159 


210. 211 


troubles at Gorham 


33 




James P. 








21 


on Kennebec 


98 




John 






157, 


158, 212 


village at Gorham 


98 




John: York Deeds 






157 


war 


31 




John A. 








212 


Indians at Richmond's Island 


154, 155 




Joseph 






157 


15S. 210 


Eastern, Sullivan's letter to 


180 




Lemuel 






158 


159, 210 


Kennebec 


120 




Lemuel. Jr. 








159 


kidnapped by Weymouth 


151 




Leonard 








212, 2i:J 


Norridgewock 


98. l^i 




Levi W. 








211 


Penobscot 31, 47, ISO 




Lydia 








156, 211 


Saco River 


3:3 




Mauj 








211 


Irishman. A Brave Maine 


102 




Margaret 








156 


Irving, Washington 


50 




Mark 








21U 


" Is Now Accomplished ■' 


160 




Martha 




^58, 159 


210 


211. 212 


Isle Royale 


65 




Mary 






158 


159, 212 


Isles of Shoals 


59,93 




Mary Ann 








210 








Nathaniel 








158, 210 








Neal 








211 








Phoebe 








156, 211 


J 




t 


Richard 








156, 157 






Robert 








13f;. lo() 








Samuel 


156, 159, 210 


211 


212. 21:5 








Sarah 






157 


158, 210 


Jarvis, Leonard 


184 




Sarah J. 








212 


Jeune. Mary Drake 


166 




Susan 








210, 211 


Johnson. Simeon 


20 




Susanna 








21C 


Jones. Cad F. 


84,85 




William 








158 


Jordan, Nathaniel 


210 




Winslotv 








211, 212 


Robert 


154, 155 




Higgens. Richard 






i:i7 


house of 


155 




Higiuson, Steph 


?n 






184 


marriage of 


155 




Highways, location 


of colonial 


137 


Josseline, Henry 


23 




Hinckley. Rev. George W. 




lt>4 


" Just Talks on Common Themes " 51 




Hinds, Asher C. 








124 








Hirst. Grove 








64 








Mary 








64 






1 


Historical island 


. a 


visit to 


an 


l.>4 


K 






Hitching posts. 


the 


passing 


of 


159 






Hix (See Hicks] 
















Hobbs. Amos 








24 








Jeremiah 








24 


Kadesquit 


111 


' 


Holyoke, John 








20 


Kavanagli, James 






Hooper. .Sally 








210 


Keegau. Peter Charles 




Home, Emilv 








106 


Keene, Carter B. 


123 


' 


Houlihan. Rev. 


Job 


n W. 




104 


ad<lress of 


12^ 




Houston, P:iiza 








212 


Kein, Joseph 


143 




Howard. Carrie 


Stratton 




106 


Keith. Sarah 


106 




Cecil Cutts 








74 


Kellogg. Elijah 


29,81 




Capt. James 








119 


Kennebec In<lians 


120 




Jennie 








106 


Purchase, the 


153, 18.S 




John 






• 


98 


Kenney. Henry 


20 


' 


Mary 








106, 111 


Kevf^s. Francis 


26 




Ruth Parker 








106 


Kilgore. Selden Hinckley 


109 




Thomas 








111 


Kimball, Richard 


127 





\ 



INDEX. 



239 



Kin? Phillip's War 

William 
Kittery, the Hicks at 

Poiut 
Kuai>, Samuel 
Kuapp. Moses 

Samuel 
Kuijrht, Amelia D. 

Euoch 
Knox, Gen. Heury 



61 

50, 1S(J 

137, 15S 

«0 

20 

liO 

187 

55 

74 



Land. Edward 




141 


Landing of the Pilgrims, the, 




poem 




118 


Lane, Kufus 




212, 213 


Lally, Col. F. T. 


99, 


155, 1(52 


hou.se. Gardiner 




155 


Leavett, Christopher 




9o 


Leavitt, Samuel 




34 


Leighton. Laviua 




212 


Leuner. Solomon 




138 


Lermoud, Xi>rman W. 






Lessley, George 




"24 


Lewiston Journal, the 




101 


Lexington of the Seas. 


the 


104 


Libby. Emeliue 




212 


Jonathan 




23 


Library. Anti- slavery 




•'2 


Limerick, town of 




17J 


Lincoln. P.enjamin 




17) 


Litchtield marriages 




96 


Lithgow. Captain 




98 


Little Towns, the, poem 


19 


Livermore. William 




26 


Livingston. William Farrand 


161 


Lombard. Lucina H. 




29 


Longfellow, Plenrv W., 


letter of 


229 


Lord, Herbert M.' 




124 


Nathan 




182 


Loring. Jacob 
Jeremiah 




23 




23 


Louisburg Expedition, 


the 


28, 65-71 


Lovejoy, Julia L. K. 




212 


Lowuey. William R. 




95 


Loyalists 




M, l-'l 


Lufkins. Seth S. 




23 


Lurvey, Hannah 




192 


Lynch, John F. 




161 



M 



McCarthy, Capt. Charles 

Derby 

Derm'od 

Col. Florence 

Joan 

Owen 

Capt. Owen 
McCurdy. James 

Robert 
McGouldrick. Frank 
McKeiiney, Kennett 

Lina Moore 
McLelian, Elizabeth 

Hugh 

Martha 

Willi:,m 
McSweeney. Capt. Edmond 

Mary 

Col. Owen 
Machias, town of 
Madison and Old Point 
Magnalia Christi Americana 



172 

172 

172 

172 

172 

172 

172 

21 

21 

163 

20 

153 

29 

29 

29 

30 

172 

172 

172 

103, 190 

15.', 

3,4 



Mahoney, Dennis 172 

Honora 172 

Maine at Louisburg 70 

Catholic Historical Magazine 166 
centennial M. lol. 154. 15'.>. llH. 194. 22;t 

documentary history of 192 

early post offices 127 

early i)ost routes 127 

early voyages to 151 

early woolen mills 89 
Episcopal Church centennial 

151, 154, 194 

first Episcopal service in 152 

first money order offices 12>s 

first postal savings bank 130 

first postmaster in 127 
first rural free delivery routes 128 

first settlement in 195 

first UniversiUist Church in 82 

founder of 194 

Genealogical Society 79 

Gorges" province of 188 

Governor I*hii)s aids settlers in KJ 

Hatch's History o^' 161 

historic dates 193 

Historical Society 50, 155 
;ting chapter 



history, an intei 

of 
history. 



151 



study of in schools 

100, 160, 16:^. 

Indian ravages in 12, 13 

Irishman. A Brave 102 

Lands East of the Kennebec 18^ 

Mass. resolves relating to 95-97 

men at Washington 123-12-5 

My State " 160. 167 

oath from early records 23 

origin of 197 

patriotic-historic societies 2:51. 232 

postal service 123 

postmasters in 1820 191 

Press Association 123 
representatives in Congress 

in 1845 22 

school reader 101, 161) 

state libra rv 42 

united with Mass. Bav 10 

Writers Research Club 101, 160, lv>7 

Maney. Rev. T. C. 104 

Mansell, Jt.hn 21 

John. Jr. 21 

Joseph 20, 111 

Manufacturing restricted in the 

colonies (Vi 
Marbel. Charles F. 110 
Marden. William P. 165 
Margaretta. the 71. 103 
Marriages legalized by legislature 96 
Martin, Burleigh 119 
"Mary and John," ship 152,195 
Massachusetts Bay Colony gov- 
ernors 44 
Massachusetts Bay Province 10. 188. 189 
extracts from charter 189, 190 
governors 44 
Historical Society 185. 187 
resolves of 1820 95-97 
Mather. Cotton 3, 4, 7, 12. 50 
Increase 4, 9, 12, 13 
address to the King 10 
Maxcy. Josiah S. 152, 163 
letter of 155 
Max field. Reuben 2^ 
Maxim. Sir Hiram 59. 81 
Mayflower descendants 34,230 
Mayhew. Elizabeth 111 
Mellen. Grenville 1.32 
Prentiss 1.32 
Merrill. .John, resolve In favor of 97 
Lena S. 212 
Rev. Natlum 82 
Miiliken. Carl E. 167 
Mitchell. Experience 137 
Wilmot B. 161 



^iii'vj-/v.< 



■^ 



m-'"^'' 



w!-3v.;'*-1 -.1 



^•wini-:.iyi,'- 



,*i 



y: 



■..;vJi 



r*«*.- - - ■-•j^-. 



240 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



Monhegan Islaiul 






151, 152, 105 


Old Point 






153 


Moil sou, towu ol" 






55 


Old Poiut Mission 






121 


Moody, Joseph 






65 


Old Towu Enterprise, 


the 




161 


Parsou 






U, 60. 173 


Orcutt, Emerson 






20 


Rev. William 






64. 69, 70 


Orono. tirst wliite chi 


I'l 




108 


Moose. Qiieeii Aunes 




42 


Osgood. Amos 






23 


Morris, Hilda 






10 


Samuel 






127 


Morse, Mrs. W. J. 






lOS 


O'SuUivan. Cornelius 






173 


Mortou, Caleb 






23 


Daniel 




172 


173 


John 






23, 156 


Dermod 






173 


Rachel 






210 


Owen 






172 


Moulton. Augustus 


F. 




161,101 


Major I'hilip 






172 


Col. Jeremiah 






70 


O'SulUvans ot Ireland 


, the 


171 


172 


Mount Desert, au 


ear 


y settler of 102 


Otis Held. t(nvn of 






24 


Mowat, Capt. 






ISl, 192 


Oxford County 






42 


Muster at Norway 


in 


1802 


25-27 


Democrat, the 






56 



N 



Narragansett. No. 7 30 

Nash, James 140 

Lieut. 138 

Sarah 1-W 

Naval battle at Machias lOo 

Neal, John 96 

Nelligau. Rev. Thomas J. 104 

" New England and Her Insti- 
tutions ■' 

origin of name 
New Sharon, Revolutionary 

soldiers 
New Worcester 
New York, early pos-tmaster 
Newichewannocks 
Newspaper, tirst in the colonies 
Nickerson, Eliphalet 

Paul 

Warren 
Noble, Col. Arthur 

Mrs. Clariso 

Francis 

James 
Nobleborough 
Norcross. Mrs. J. Arnold 
Norridgewock and Old Point 
North Church, Boston 

Capt. John 

Yarmouth, Anti-Slavery library 
Northeastern Boundary survey 
Norway Advertiser, the 

Congregational Church 

early doctors 

early muster 

early settlers 

first meeting house 

first minister 

in war of 1812 

land grants 

lawyers 

militia 

notes 
Notes and Fragments 
Notes and Queries 
Notes on the Hicks family 

156-159, 210-213 
Nova Scotia 69 



51 
196 

51 
20 

127 
61 

125 
21 
21 
21 
',70 
22 
27 
27 
27 
93 

153 

3,7 
98 



99 

41.56 

82, 8.3 

25 

25-27 

24 

82 

82 

84 

24 

82 

85 

24.82 

55, 105, 221« 

106 



Oath of Gorges' Councilors 23 

O'Brien. Jeremiah 70, 103. 104 

Morris 70 

Ortiorne. Hatty 175 

William 175 

Ogden, Marguerite 152 



Pabodie, John 

Me rev 

William 
Packard. Henry M. 
Paine. Abiel Ware 

MiUlred 
Palmer. William 
Parker. Judge 

Rose B. 

Susan 
Parsons. David 

Usher 

William. Jr. 
Patriotic- historic societies 

Maine 
Patriots and rebels 
Pattee. Sibyi P. 
Patterson, Margaret Howard 

Rebeckah 

Reuben 
Pattison. Alice 
Paul. Col. Silas 
Pay body. William 
Pearson. Mary 

Moses 
Peck. William D. 
Pemaquid, Phips fort at 
Penobscot Indians 
Pensioners, index of 

tionary 
Pepperrell, Andrew 

Elizabeth 

Mary Hirst 

Col. William 

Sir William 

sketch of 

Sir William, 2nd 
Pepperrellboro 
Pertinent inquiries for 

people 81 

Peterson, Jonathan 205 

Joseph 143 

Philadelphia, early postmasters 126 

Philips. Blaney 20>> 

town of 42 

William 184 

Phinney. Captain 31. 3-3 

Col. Edmund 150 

Sarah 29, 32. 34 

Phipps. Gen. Frank H. 16-3 

Phips. James 4 

Spencer 47 

Sir William 59,66 

sketch of 3-19 

wife of 5, 6 

Phips' bay 4 

Pickerintr. .Judge Timothy 181 

Pierce. Howard I66 

Pike. Dudley g4 

.Tesse gfi 

Seth 84 



141 

140, 141, 143, 200 

141, 142 

45 

106 

106 

137 

116 

165 

210 

23 

72 

84,85 

in 

231, 232 

182 

106 

110 

203 

202 

56 

54 

138, 130 

89 

80 

13, 17.'oi 
31,47 
Revolu- 

35, 144, 214 

62, 71, 72-74 

71 

71, 161 

59, 161 

17, 27, 59, 161 

59-77 

71, 74, 75 

62,176 

Maine 



m- 



INDEX. 



241 



Piljrriius 

I'iueo. Charles B. 

PiukLam, Paul 

Sarah 
Piscataqua Indian 



7, 180, 19<5. 234 
1G4 
157 
157 

settlement 01 



the 



54, 55, 61 
88 
au ap- 

1:K 

188,180 

44 

138, 130, 141, 200 

120 

151, 152 



Piscataquis Observer, 
Plouff, Mrs. I'eter 
Plummer. Col. Stanley 

preoiatiou 
Plymouth Colony, the 
governors 
records 
trading: post at Cushuoc 

Company, the 

Mass. 136 

Pa<»r, John A. 81 

Popham, Chief Justice 151, lOo 

Colony, the 152, lOo 

Port Royal, X. S. 65 

capture of ' 

Porter, Mrs. C. B. 108 

Georgia Pulsifer 108 

Portland, city of 79,80.03 

early postmaster 127 

Evening Express 81 

Head light 81 

Sunday Telegram 158 

Post routes, early Maine 127 

Postal service, evolution of 12:'. 

Postmaster, tirst in America 125 

Postmasters, early American 125-127 
Pownal. Governor 77 

Pownalboro court house 175 

Loyalist 34 

Prentiss. Helen E. 213 

Mrs. J. M. 233 

Pressev, Ernest A. 194 

Preston, William B. 99 

Pride. Capt. Joseph 210 

Pring, Martin 195 

Proclamation, bounty on In- 
dian scalps 
Proctor. Happy 

Provincial Congress, the 170. 182 
Public post, the flrst 
Purington, C. O 



Puritans, the 



Quakers 

Quampegan 

Queen Anne's moose 



Race, " Taff " 

Raising, an old time 

Rale. Sebastian 

Rebellion against Governor 

Andros 
Reed, Asa 
Ensign 

Thomas Brackett 
William, Jr. 
Revere. Col. Paul 
Revolutionary pensioners in 
Maine, alphabetical index 
of 35, 

soldiers 25, 35, 54, 144, 150, 

Rhyme of the Baronet's name, 
Ri<^e. Amelia D. 

Charles 

F. Willis 



47 
158 
1S4 
125 
233 



8, 49, 52, 63, 106 



John Hovey 

Capt. Peabody H. 

Sarah Swan 

Tavern 
Rich, Lemuel 

Mary 
Richmond's Island, sketch 
Rider, John 
Rigby, Sir Alexander 
Ring, Daniel, Jr. 
Robbins, Rev. Thomas 
Roberts, Arthur J. 

Edward 
Robinson. C. H. 

Rev. John 
Rockland Courier-Gazette, the 
R(»e. John 
Rogers. .Jesse 

Lt. Joseph 
Roosevelt Day in Maine schools 

Steamer 
Rose, Joseph 
Rowe. William H. 
Rowell, Daniel 
Rowland. Elizabeth 
Royall. Elizabeth 

Col. Isaac 

Marv Mackintosh 
Rugg, Arthur P. 
Rust. Henry 

Henry, Jr. ^ 

Rusttield 





86 


83.84 


121, 


123 




9 




211 




26 


2. 81 




84 




181 


.144 


214 


174. 


1S2. 


186 


210 


the 






.^)5 




191 




55 



55 

55 

106 

55 

159 

159 

154 

20 

197 

96 

3 

161 

32 

166 

204 

124 

136 

21 

34 

132 

81 

111 

166 

111 

56 

74 

71 

74 

115 

24 

85 



Saco 176 

Gorges establishes courts at 19& 

purchase of 62 

Sagadahoc Patent, the 188 

Saint Croix Island 195 

river controversy 185 

Patricks Church, Damariscotta 16s 

Salem witchcraft 15 

Sampson, Caleb 203- 

Mercy 203 

Rachel 2U3 

Sanborn, Fred 56 

Sangster, Peter 21 

Sankev, Robert 23 

Sargent, H. P. 20 

Judge Nathan P. 182 

Sawtelle, William Otis 165, 102 



Sayings of Subscribers 

School, first Gorham 

Scott, Walter 

Seabury, Samuel 

Sebec, resolve in favor of 

Seitz, Don 

Sewall, Da\'id 

Harold M. 

James W. 

Dr. Joseph 

Judge 

monument at Wiscasset 

Samuel 
Seymour, Rev. Richard 
Shaw, .Justin Henry 
Sherman, William 
Ship Algier Rose 

letters 
Shipbuilding, early 
Shirley, Gov. William 

letter of 
Simmons, Aaron 

Abigail 
Vnna 

Benjamin 

Deborah 

Dorithv 

ElizMl)etli 

family, a genealogy 



48, 108, 162, 2:'>-3 
29 



176, 177, 182, 



143 
95 
41 

161 
109 
115 

64 
115 
115 
152 

77 
136 



125 

62 

28, 68. 70 

67 

140 

204 

204,201 

198, 100, -o* 

2(M 

204 

140. 141 

135-143, 108 200 



*KlJ 



:;^f^!.;;^v,. -f..;.^. 



z- 



242 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



Freilerick Johuson 135,198 


Sparhawk, Nathaniel 




71,72 


Ichabod ^ 204, 205 


William 




71,74 


Isaac 108, IW, 200 


Speucer, Capt. Roger 




5 


Jetlediah -'Ol', 207 


Sprague, John Francis 3 


,161 


171, 22S 


Joliu loO, 140, 141. 143. 19S, 11U». l.HK>, 


I'lunelias 




208 


201, 203 


Samuel 




140, 143 


a constable 142 


Spragues Journal 


160 


101, 22S 


a ferryman 142 


centennial edition 




159, 227 


aa iukeeper 142 


Squatter law, the 




186 


agreeuieut of settlement of 


Stamlish. Alexander 




142, 203 


estate 199 


Capt. Miles 


138 


156, 20.J 


fined 141 


Sarah A. 




203 


and Joseph, partition of Inutls I'Ol 


Staufonl, Joseph 




207 


Joseph I'JS, 199. 200, JOl, ■202. '20o 


Staples. Arthur 




51 


will of ^ 202 


Daniel 




2it 


Joshua 198, 199, 200 


Col. Henry G. 




110 


Lemuel 204 


Starbird, Charles M. 


48 


156, 210 


Lydia 204 


State History, study of 




100 


. Martha 198. 199, iHM) 


Stephens, G, W. 




161 


Marv 140. 200. 20:.'. 200 


Stevens. Edmund 




103 


Mercy 140, 141, 143, 199, 200. 2i>4. 2Uo, 


Jonas 




24 


206. 207, 208 


Joseph 




24 


. tombstone inscription 200 


Stewart, John C. 




lOJf 


will of 198 


St in son, David*^^ - - 




191 


Moses 135, 141, 143, 198, 190, 200. 203. 


Stoddard's, Rev., dream 




8;^ 


204,206 


Stowell, Mrs. David Porter 




41 


deed to John 143 


Stratton, Eunice Haywood 




106 


house lot 138 


Hesekiah 




106 


lands of 138, 139 


Sullivan, Benjamin 




186 


will of 139,204 


Daniel 




186 


Moses, Jr. 139 


Eben 




182, 187 


Nathaniel 202, 205, 206, 207. 208. 209 


Ellena ' 




iT2 


tombstone inscription 206 


Hatty 




175 


Noah 204 


James 




50 


origin of name 1:55 


a sketch of 




171 


Rachel 203, 204. 205. 206 


letter of 




182 


Rebecca 140, 141, 198, 199, 200. 202 


letter to Eastern Indians 


180 


Roger 136 


John 


172 


173, 174 


Sarah 137, 139, 140, 141. 202 


Gen. John 174 


177, 


1S2, 187 


Thomas 1.39 


Margery 




173, 174 


William 198, 199, 200, 204, 205 


Martha 




187 


Sinclair, Susan 89 


Mary 




187 


SkilliLgs. Isaac 23 


town of 




187 


W. B. 23 


Sulivan's History of the 


dis- 




Slave trade, early in Mass. 184 


trict of Maine 




187 


Slavery 22 


of Mass. land titles 




187 


Smart, Hugh 111 


Sutton, Richard 




140 


John 111 


Swan, Hannah C. 




106 


Thomas 111 


Sweat, Solomon 




21 


Smith, Asa ^ 


Symonson (see Simmons) 






Edgar Crosby 161,188 


Moyses 


135, 


136, 198 


Jane 106 


Samuel 




135 


Capt. John 61,196 








Nancy 106 








Parson 80, 158 
Peter T. 80 


T 






Robert 20 








Simeon 21 








Snow. Anthony 138, 139 


Talbot. Archie Lee 




234 


Benjamin 21 


Keziah 




106 


Soldiers, Revolutionarv 2.5. 35. 54. 144. 


Tax list, a colonial 




136 


159, 174. 182. 180. 210. 214 


Texas, annexation of 




22 


Something about Artemus Ward 40 


. " The Budget " 




52 


Song of the Road, the, poem 213 


Thomas, Dr. Augustus 0. 






Sonle, Aaron 141 


101 


132, 


160, 167 


Benjamin 141 


James 




143 


George 141 


John 




20 


James 141 


Nathaniel 




142 


John 140, 141, 142, 14.", 


William 




142 


Joseph 141 


Tibbetts, John 




20 


Josiah 141 


Juilith 




96 


Moses 141 


Tinkham. Martha 




141 


Nathan 208 


Titus. William X. 




48 


Rebecca 140, 141 


Tol)acco Colonial, law 




1.36 


Zachariah 141 


"drinking" 




136 


Souther. Nathaniel 156 
Rev. Samuel 98 


Towle. Angle 
Town. Capt. Amos 




212 

"84 


Southworth, Benjamin ♦^OS 


Townmoeting. the New Englan 


d 178 


Captain 156 


Towusend. Elizabeth 




212 


Constant 199 


Treasure ship 




6 


TEdward 140. 143 


Trent. Jose[)li. land grant to 


97 


Mercy 141 


Trelawney. Robert 




154, 155 



lf:<r. ■ \ 



1 .i\'f ■■■ 



•i^; "-Vif 






:i-l?!i 



-T 



INDEX. 



243 



True, Sally 
Tubbs. Jacob 

Jacob, Jr. 
Tufts, Johu 
Turbot. IVter 
Turuer, Joseph 
Twombly, William 



U 



Uncle Toms Cabin 
Unity, the sloop 
Universalist Soi'iety 
and Norway 



of Paris 



&4 
84 
08 
150 
143 
«4 



81 
103 



82 



Vane, Sir Henry 
Vaughau, Charles 
Veazie railroad, the 
Vines, Richard 
Virgin, William W. 

Mrs. 
Virginia Company, the 
Visit to an historical island, a 
Vose, Robert C. 
Voters in Berlin, Maine, 1831 
Voyagers, early to Maine 



49 
89 

108 

23,196 

82 

83 

7,151 

154 

191 
42 

151 



W 



Waldo, Hannah 


72 


Gen. Samuel 


17, 28, 70, 72 


Stephen 


73 


Walker. Betsey 


90 


Ernest G. 


123 


War of 1812, Norway in the 84 


Ward, Artemus 


81 


Something about 
George Atkinson 


40 


74 


Wardsworth, Mary 


141 


Wait 


206,207 


Warren, Commodore 


68,60 


James 


178 


Martha McLellan 


29 


Washburn Tavern, Falmouth 211 


Waterford. town of 


24,40 


Waterman, Charles E. 


40, 56, 228 


Waterville Sentinel, the 


228 


Watson, George 


156 


Joshua 


96 


Watterson. Col. Henry 


40 


Wayside Inn, the 


94 



Webster, Andrew 

Daniel letter of 
Wentworth, Moses 
West. Ada E. 

George 

Samuel 
Western Cemetery, Portland 
Weston, Deborah 

Eluathan 

Jacob 

Jane 

Mary 

Samuel 
Weymouth, Capt. George 
Wheeler, Everett Pepperrell 
White, Benjamin 

Newall 
Whitetield, town of 
Whitman, Susan D. 
Whitmarsh, John 
Whitney, Phineas 

William C. 
Whittemore, Edwin C. 
Whittier, Benjamin 

Ebeuezer 
Williams College, land grant 
Williamson, Joseph 

William D. 
Wing. George C. 
Wingate. Joshua 
\A'ius]ow, Abigail 

Congregational Church 

Edward 

John 

Josiah 

Major 

Ladies 
versary 

Richard 
Winter. John 
Winthrop, James 

Gov. John 
Wiscasset Court House 

early postmaster at 

town of 
Wiswell, David 
Witchcraft in New Englqnd 
Wood. Ruth 

William 
Woodbridge, Benjamin 
Woolwich 

Worambus, Indian chief 
Wyer. David 
Wyman, Abram 

John 



York Deeds: John Hicks 
Duke of, patent 



143, 



Society, lOOth 



138, 
anui- 



Ul 
99 
21 

88 

86 

199 

81 

205 

200, 1'O-; 

205 

200 

200, 202 

203 

151. 195 



22,165 

H« 

106 

85 

24 

26 

161 

191 

127 

t)G 

50,191 

85,109 

191 

211 

106 

120, 135 

120 

139 

139, 141 

106 

97 

154 

187 

156 

115 

127 

115 

20 

13 lo 

106 

210 

-loT 

4 

34 

177 

98 

54 



157 
188.189 



LIST OF PLATES IN VOL. VII. 



Maine Forest Scene 

Thomas B. Reed, and Residence 

Phips' Point, Woolwich 

Invitation to Sir William Phips' 
funeral 

Col. Noble Monument, Noble- 
borough 

Maine river scene 

Sir Willijim I'epl><^rrell 

Col. William Pepperrell 

Margery (Bray) Pepperrell 

Mary (Hirst) Pepperrell 

Pepperrell Mansion at Kittery 

Herbert Gray Cobb on Pulpit 
Rock 

Stephen Orman Brown 



11 

16 

28 
57 
58 

m 

63 

73 

79 
90 



A Colonial Puritan 112 
The Pearl House, Orrs' Island 113 
Leslie C. Cornish 114 
The Sewall Monument, Wiscasset 117 
Guy P. Gannett 120 
Damariscotta Catholic Church Ki.^ 
Umsaskis Lake H;9 
James Sullivan 170 
Old Pownalboro Court House 175 
Former Residence of Jame« Sul- 
livan, Biddefi.rd, Maine 177 
James Sullivans law ottice, Bid- 

deford 183 

Leonard Hicks 211 

William Edward Gould 230 



IJ 



i-i-iJ:%; 'h:^ v; 



V 



1 









ar¥.:..:v.ia¥v:i«^" ■ i^'F^-..A'^:^^i4a- -.^' 



244 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

FIRST OCEAN STEAMEK 
(Eastern Argus.) 

In looking over some old clippings we ran across a sketch of a 
Portland Fickett family, a member of which built the first steam- 
ship to cross the ocean. The builder was Francis Fickett. who 
was raised at Stroudwater and learned his trade in the yards of 
his father then located there. He went to New York and estab- 
lished himself in business, was successful, became an alderman 
of the city, and was prominently active and energetic in the relief 
and help of the poor who suffered from the cholera epidemic of 
1832. He died in early middle life. 

Jonathan Fickett came to Stroudwater from a place called Bar- 
ren Hill in Scarboro. He was a ship builder, Asa Fickett was his 
second child, born February 14, 1769 — before his father came to 
Stroudwater. He married Dorcas Plummer of Portland for his 
first wife by whom he had ten children. She was born June 30, 
1765. She died Dec. 11, 1819. He was a successful farmer and 
died Sept. 6, 1835. 

Francis, his fifth child, who bui!t the first trans-Atlantic steam- 
ship, was born Oct. 7, 1798. George, the seventh child, was born 
March 16, 1802. James, the eighth child, Nov. 18, 1803. These 
three emigrated to New York, married and settled there, but 
George in the course of time returned to Portland where he died. 
Francis was a heavy shipbuilder, was an alderman and held other 
offices of trust. 

Samuel Fickett built the fine old house in which Walter Fickett, 
Francis Fickett's nephew, resided previous to living at Stroud- 
water. Samuel Fickett then built the great three story house at 
the southwesterly corner of State and York streets. He, too, was 
a shipbuilder. The two following copies of notices will give an 
idea of his business in Portland. 

Launched from Samuel Pickett's new ship yard a vessel of 370 
tons, built for Zachariah Maston. — Portland ARGUS, 1810. 

Launched from the ship yard of Mr. Samuel Fickett a ship of 
400 tons which was built for Zachariah Maston. — ARGL'S, Aug. 
II, 1811. 

After this Samuel Fickett went to New York, the war of 18x2-15 
destroying his business here. There he became prominent as a 
builder and as a politician. He had three wives and became a 
Friend. 



THE MAN FOR THE PLACE 




^.^. 




LEONARD WOOD 

Leonard Wood, major general in the United States 
Army stands before the people of the United States 
at this time as a great hope in the unsettled condition 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



of the Nation and world. He stands out, not as a soldier 
and general, altho efficient and masterful in the military 
game, but as a big, firm humanitarian, maker of states, 
builder of thought and constructionist of peace wherein 
his biggest achievements have been recorded. 

Falling heir to the organization that was originally 
made for Colonel Roosevelt, who had he lived, would no 
doubt, have been the Republican leader, Leonard Wood 
has derived considerable support from the political camp 
of Colonel Roosevelt. 

Roosevelt's sincerest admirers and his most loyal cham- 
pions are leading the Wood fight. Theodore Roosevelt, 
Jr., eldest son of the former President and now a member 
of the New York State Assembly, is a vice-chairman of 
the Leonard Wood National campaign committee. 

No man has written in more admiring terms of Wood 
thcin Colonel Roosevelt. In his book, '*The Rough Rid- 
ers,** dealing with exploits of this famous regiment in the 
Spanish-American War, Roosevelt says of Wood, who 
was the first Colonel of the regiment: 

"I only met him after I entered the navy department, 
but we soon found that we had kindred tastes and kindred 
principles. He had served in General Miles' inconceiv- 
ably harassing campaigns against the Apaches, where he 
had displayed such courage that he won that most coveted 
of distinctions — the Medal of Honor ; such extraordinary 
physical strength and endurance that he grew to be recog- 
nied as one of the two or three white men who could 
stand fe^tigue and hardship as well as an Apache; and 
such judgment that toward the close of the campaigns 



LEONARD WOOD. 



he was given, though a surgeon, the actual command of 
more than one expedition against the bands of renegade 
Indians. Like so many of the gallant fighters with whom 
it was later my good fortune to serve, he combined, in a 
very high degree, the qualities of entire manliness with 
entire uprightness and cleanliness of character. It w^as a 
pleasure to deal with a man of high ideals, who scorned 
everything mean and base, and w^ho also possessed those 
robust and hardy qualities of body and mind, for the lack 
of which no merely negative virtue can ever atone. He 
was by nature a soldier of the highest type, and, like most 
natural soldiers, he was, of course, born with a keen long- 
ing for adventure; and, though an excellent doctor, what 
he really desired w^as the chance to lead men in some kind 
of hcizard. To every possibility of such adventure he 
paid quick attention. For instance, he had a great desire 
to get me to go with him on an expedition into the Klon- 
dike in midwinter, at the time when it was thought that 
a relief party would have to be sent there to help the starv- 
ing miners. 

"DONT SWEAR— SHOOT" 

**I had not seen Wood since the beginning of the skir- 
mish, when he hurried forward. When the firing opened 
some of the men began to curse. 'Don't swear — shoot I' 
growled Wood, as he strode along the path leading his 
horse, and everyone laughed and became cool again. The 
Spanish outposts w^ere very near our advance guard, and 
some minutes of the hottest kind of firing followed before 
they were driven back,*' writes Colonel Roosevelt. 



■■• V/ i. 



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SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



In 1902, Roosevelt wrote in the Harvard Graduates' 
Magcizine: 

"Leonard Wood four years ago went down to Cuba, 
has served there ever since, has rendered services to that 
country of the kind which if performed three thousand 
years ago would have made him a hero mixed up with 
the sun god in various ways; a man who devoted his 
whole life through those four years, who thought of noth- 
ing else, did nothing else, save to try to bring up the stan- 
dard of political and social life in that Island, to teach the 
people after four centuries of misrule that there were such 
things as governmental righteousness and honesty and 
fair play for all men on their merits as men." 

In Roosevelt's "Addresses and Presidential Messages," 
we find the following: 

**He (Wood) established a school system as good as 
the best we have in any of our states. He cleaned cities 
that had never been cleaned in their existence before. He 
secured absolute safety for life and property. He did the 
kind of governmental work which should be the undying 
honor of our people forever." 

NEW ENGLAND SON 

Leonard Wood was born in New Hampshire of May- 
flower stock. As a surgeon, he entered the army and 
that he was proficient is testified to in the selection by 
Presidents Cleveland and McKinley of Leonard Wood as 
attending physician. 

Believing in America, in American ideals and institu- 
tions and determined that all men who come into contact 
with him shall be treated with squareness and fairness, 
Leonard Wood by virtue of training, ability, conscience 
and vision stands pre-eminently the one man for the 

place. Political Advertisement. 



fe> 



AlJCi. 



^^Irir-' 1 



K^K^ I 




WM. W. ROBERTS CO. 

- Office Supplie*, Filing Cabinets and Card Indexes 
233 i\lidaie Street, PORTLAND, MAINE 



The LESLIE E. JONES Co. 

Office Outfitters 

Type%vi ?ten» of aJ! Makes Wood St Steel 

Filing Equipment 

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Beyer & Small 

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SpeciaJistt m Maine Securidea 



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tlTbe Matetpille horning Sentinel 

Goc'i to press later than any other paper reaching Central Maine. It handles 

me* -ages by -wire no to 3 o*dook ia the morning. If you want the latest 

news, READ THE SENTINEL. $4.00 per year by mail for cash. 

TOlaterpille Sentinel publiebing Company 



IT ^I¥^ T H ^ S If F ^*y y^^^ P^'"^ ^° ^^^^ 7^^^ savings account 
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Sat aside One Boilar— more If you can spare it — come to the b«nk and 
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little regularly. Make it an obligation to yourself just as you are duty bound to 
pay the grocer or the co il man. SAVE FAITHFULLY. The dollars you save 
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PISCATAQUIS SAVINGS BANK, Dover, Maine. 
F. E. GUERNSEY, i^res. W. C. WOODBURY, Trew. 



Money Back If Not Satisfied I ^' ^^^^^^ Stevens William G. Thomas 

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of Springfield, Masi. 

JOnN T. CLARK & Co. j Hri&d T^or the home 



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CLOTHIERS 



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82 Exchange St., Portland, Maine 
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Stationers and OlanR OooR AAanufaoturere 

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Typewriters of ail Mai<es Wood & Steel 

Filing Equipment 

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Beyer & Small 

Conservative Investment Bonds 

WE OFFER 

Muxiicipal, Railroad and Public Utility Imucs 

Specialists ia Maine Sectirities 



Augusta Portland 



Bangor 



Cbe Materville HDorning Sentinel 

Goc3 to press later than any other paper reaching Central Maine. It handles 

messages by wire up to 3 o'clock in the morning. If you want the latest 

news, READ THE SENTINEL. $5.00 per year by mail for cash. 

HClaterville Sentinel B^ublisbing Compani? 
TIClaterrille, /Blaine 



IT P^flYi T fl ^^ H V F Lay your plans to start your savings account 
■ B ■• fl I w I U -^a^ n 1 L with this bank on your very next pay-day. 
Set aside One Dollar — more if you can spare it — come to the b«tnk and 
make your firat deposit. Small sums are welcome. 

Put system into your savings. Save a little every week and save that 
little regularly. Make it an obligation to yourself just as you are duty bound to 
pay the grocer or the coal man. SAVE FAITHFULLY. The dollars you save 
now will serve you later on when you will have greater need for them. 
PISCATAQUIS SAVINGS BANK, Dover, Maine. 
F. E. GUERNSEY, Pres. W. C. WOODBURY, Treas. 



Money Back If Not Satisfied 



Is Your Protection 



JOHN T. CLARK & Co. 



CLOTHIERS 



BANGOR, 



MAINE 



J. Putnam Stevens William Q. Thomas 

INSURE WITH 
The Mass. Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

of Springfield, Mass. 

Perfect f for the home 

1 FOR BUSINESS 



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82 Exchange St., Portland, Maine 
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The Simmons Famiiy 

MARCH 



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Steition^rs «ncl Bleink BooR yv\aniafactur©r» 

Office Supplies, Filing Cabinets amd Card Indexes 
233 Middle Street, PORTLAND, MAINE 



The LESLIE E. JONES Co, 

Office Outfitters 

Typewriters of all ^1akes Wood St Steel 

Filing Equipment 

416-17 EASTERN TRUST BLDG. 
BANGOR - - - MAINE 



Beyer & Small 

Conservative Investment Bonds 

WE OFFER 

Municipal, Railroad and Public Utility Issue* 

Specialists in Maine Securities 



Augusta 



Portland 



Bangor 



Cbe Iimaterville riDornino Sentinel 

Goes to press later than any other paper reaching Central Maine. It handles 

messages by wire up to 3 o'clock in the morning. If vou want the latest 

news, READ THE SENTINEL. $5.00 per year by mail for cash. 

"CClaterviUe Sentinel publiebing Compan? 
•CClaterpille, /iDatne 



IT P^AY^ Tfl ^^ il y F Lay your plans to start your savings accoimt 
■ ■ ■ ■■ ' '^ I U ^11^ n I L ij^ith this bank on your very next pay-day. 
Set aside One Dollar — more If you can spare it — come to the bank and 
make your first deposit. Small sums are welcome. 

Put system into your savings. Save a little every week and save that 
little regularly. Make it an obligation to yourself just as you are duty bound to 
pay the grocer or the coal man. SAVE FAITHFULLY. The dollars you save 
now will serve you later on when you will have greater need for them. 
PISCATAQUIS SAVINGS BANK, Dover, Maine. 
F. E. GUERNSEY, Pres. W. C. WOODBURY, Treaa. 



Money Back If Not Satisfied 



Is Your Protection 



JOHN T. CLARK & Co. 



CLOTHIERS 



J. Putnam Stevens William G. Thomas 

INSURE WITH 
The Mass. Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

of Springfield, Mass. 

Perfect a^n the home 

n s 1- i FOR BLSI^NEbS 

Protection I for old age 



BANGOR, 



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82 Exchange St., Portland, Maine 
MAINE { Ask About Our Monthly Income Policy. 



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m 



S.G.SANFORD&SON 


BOOKS ^ewaDdOW 

We carry in stock a large 
and varied assortment of 
books, both old and new. 

Catalogues sent on request. 
Correspondence Solicited. 
Books Bought. 

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92 Exchange Street 

PORTLAND. MAINE 


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Automobiles for Sale and to Hire 

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MAINE'S BEST PAPER 


TRIAL SUBSCRIPTION TO DAILY $1.00 FOR THREE MONTHS 

Weekly, three months for 25 eta. one year, $1.00 
The Coramercial (Daily and Weekly) offers advertisers the most powerful ad- 
vertising influence that can be brought to bear on Maine trade. 

J. p. Bass Publishing Co., ™""'"T.'.«o». -.,k. 


50,000 Horse Power 

AVAILABLE FOR INDUSTRIES IN CENTRAL MAINE 

Central Maine Power Co. 

Offices at Augusta, Gardiner, Waterville, Skowhegan, 
Pittsfield and Dexter 



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w 



*.^ 



The publisher of the Journal 
is not of the l>reed who are 
continually borrowing trouble 
about the future; yet he would 
respectfully suggest that if the 
Journal is to keep sailing it needs 
some more ballast in the way of 
new subscribers to insure its 
passage with a reasonable degree 
of smoothness and ordinary safety. 

Therefore, if any of those who 
appreciate its work and desire to 
giye it a lift will remit to us one 
dollar for a new^ subscriber for 
one year, fifty cents will be al- 
loAved the sender on his or her 
renewal of subscription. 



KINEO TRUST CO., 

DOVER, MAINE 

Organized in 1905 to meet the bank- 
ing needs of this community. Kineo 
Tnut Company haa steadily grown in 
strength and public favor, until today 
it is universally recognized as one of 
the large and strong financial institu- 
tions of Eastern Maine. 

Liberal Interest Paid on 
Savings Deposits 

L. P. EVANS, Pres.. W. S. OWEN, V. Pres. 
G. L. ARNOLD. Treas. 



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Quarriers and Manufacturers 




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JUNE, 1920 



I 



^ 




Special Souvenir Number 



1 

\ 



:'if/-;*)(#,i>''wi* *«'*>»*<*«-"'><■' r.cwiftv^, 



.€%¥1 



CENTRALIZATION 

As it has no brcincheis, the business of this bank 
is centralized at its offices in Bangor, enabling its 
officers and directors to give the bcink*s affedrs 
their immediate attention at first hand. 
Our statement covers simply the one bank in- 
stead of being a consolidated statement of a num- 
ber of banks situated at widely separated points. 
The First National has resources of over 
$7,000,000 making it the largest single commer- 
cial faamking unit in Maine east of Portland. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

BANGOR, MAINE 

We pay 4% compounded quarterly on Savings. 



THE BANGOR HOUSE 

extends its hearty Greetings to its friends in all paurts of 
the good old State of Maine. 



WE PAY 4 ^ INTEREST 

Compounded every three months on all money deposited 
in Dur Savings Department 

BANK WITH US BY MAIL 



OLD TOWN TRUST COMPANY 

We have positive evidence of ttie reliability of advertisers on these pages 



■^ \ . i 






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WILLIAM KIXG, GOVERXOR OF .MAIXE IX 1820. 

The first Goveru(»r of Maine; b<irn Scarboro. Maine, February 9, 17S.S: loeate<l 
in Bath about IHX) and became tlie leadiutr business man of the town. He was 
a merchant and shiiibiiililer. Resigned as (iovernor in ISiil upon his appointment 
as a commissioner under the Spanish Treaty. Collector of customs at Bath 
l^nrA. Die.l at Bath .Tune 17, 1s.">l:. 



CONTENTS. 

PACE 

Maine 3 

Maine's Admission to the Fnion '. S 

Bio-raphies of Fir>t Maine Senate 22 

Befc'iunin^'s <.f Masonic (Jrand Lodjre 27 

Bejrinnin;rs ,,t Odrl Fellows (iraud Lodjre 21) 

State Buryiii- Grounnd :^0 

Two Maine Kmmi-rration Knterprises .*>4 

tav..r Tavern. Dover 47 

Representrttive M.-u ,,t Yesierdav and Todav 50— 7S 

I'oiumentarv .. " ' 7'.> — Nl 

Kdltor.al . ' ..'..['..'.'.'"."'.""."..'['. '.'. ['[[[[['... S7 




^ l , ft ii ^ ->«A^;^A a^aa^j,^:^^;!^ :eg..>^.age5^ka^t- A^ 



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Carl E. MiHiken, Go\ ernor of Maine in 1920. 
(Photo by Cliue<linst Studio, Washington, D. C.) 



p3-0lW 



Sprague's Journal of Maine History 

Vol. VIII Special Number, JUx\E 1920 No. 1 



Maine 

(by the editor.) 

In this year of Our Lord, 1920, the ]\Iame Centennial Conimittee 
has for Chairman of its executive brancli, the Honorable Carl E. 
Alilliken, Governor of the state,, and for its able publicity manager, 
Mr. Daniel W. Hoeg of Portland, Elaine. 

Maine has, in centuries past, had other publicity men to demon- 
strate to the world some of her capabilities and accomplishments; 
and there have been periods in her history when she was in dire 
need, but entirely destitute of such assistance. If in the tenth cen- 
tury, Biarne, Eric the Red. Leif and other bold Icesanders had taken 
a sleek and clever publicity man along with them to have made 
record of their discoveries on the coasts of the Gulf of Maine, as did 
v/ise old Captain George Waymouth a hundred years later, we 
would know more of just how and when Maine was first discovered 
than we now do. By reason of their inexcusable negligence in this 
respect we have to depend entirely upon what obscure and detached 
facts antiquarians may uncover among the sagas of the ancient 
Scandinavians. 

For many centuries of time in the history of the human race it 
took about a thousand years to uproot an old, and establish a new 
idea. 

When the prosecuting attorney of Athens proceeded against 
Socrates, the indictment found against him contained this count : 

Socrates is guilty of crime. First, for not worshiping the gods whom the 
city worships, and for introducing new divinities of his own. 

For a very long time the activities of the human race were based 
upon this hypothesis. 

That the earth was flat was, for ages, considered an immutable 
fact A few had from the remotest times occasionally advocated 
the theory of its globular shape — Aristotle and Strabo being among 



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SPR^VGUE'S JOURXAL OF MAIXE HISTORY. 



the most famous — but it was generally regarded as a fantastic idea 
and had but few adherents. 

In the fifteenth century Christopher Columbus, when a young man 
became a sea rover — historical gossip hinting at piracy as well — 
and sailed in unknown waters. In his wanderings he met adven- 
turous navigators, some of them descendents of the old Xorsemen. 
He had faith in their traditional theories of a western continent and 
concluded that, despite the contentions of the learned, the world was 
after all a globe and not a flat piece of land. With the help of the 
King and Queen of Spain (more especially, it is said, of the Queen ) 
in 1492 he upset this loved and venerable theory by discovering the 
new western continent. 

About as soon as the world had awakened to the importance of 
what had happened Alexander VI, Pope of Rome (1493) issued a 
bull granting the X^ew World to the sovereigns of Spain and Portu- 
gal. In that age a papal bull was recognized by christian nations 
as a sufficient title to heathen lands. England becoming Protestant 
did not hesitate to protest against it; and as early as 1495 Henry 
VII, King of England commissioned John Cabot and his sons of 
high standing as navigators to "seek out and discover and find what- 
soever Isles, Countries, Regions or Provinces of the heathens and 
infidels" hitherto unk-nown to all christians, and as vassals of the 
King, to hold the same by his authority.'' 

In 1502 the same King sent forth Hugh Elliott and Thomas 
Ashurst upon a similar mission. 

In 1524 Francis I, King of France, evidently questioning the wis- 
dom of longer following the old precedents regp.rding the validity 
of titles to heathen lands based solely upon a papal bull, possibly 
even then, having a prophetic vision of a "X'ew France" across the 
seas, made his immortal statement to the other nations "that he 
should like to see the clause in Adams will which gave to his brothers 
of Spain and Portugal the exclusive possession of the American 
continent." 

As a result of this manifesto he is said to have sent out Verraz- 
zano, a Florentine corsair, who as has generally been believed, 
explored the entire coast from thirty (30) degrees to fifty (50) 
degrees north latitude, and named the whole region Xew France.^ 



* Frederick Ridder's pamphlet on '' Discovery of North America by John 
Cabot." X. E. Gen. Reg., Oct., 1878— Charlevoix. Vol. r, p. 20. 
'Chamberlain's Cenn. Address, p. 34, and his citations. 



:^n' 



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(Vi'jf!;. priv/ ^-^^ 



MAINE. 



The late Charles W. Goddard, Commissioner to revise the stat- 
utes of Elaine, (1883) in his note^ on "Sources of Land Titles in 
Maine," published in his revision, first page, says that **in 1588 
Drake decided the issue regarding the titles to heathen lands by 
his victory over the Spanish Armada in the British channel.'' But 
it is evident that the doctrine was never enforced in reference to 
lands on the American continent. The discovery of America had 
so changed conditions that it was regarded as an extravagant claim 
no longer applicable, and it became obsolete.' 

The entire broad expanse of Maine's colonial beginnings is a rich, 
instructive and enchanting field for the student of history. It leads 
one back through the vistas of the past to that period of time when 
by w^ars and revolutions a new spirit of nationalism was awakening 
in both England and France. Its roots extend into the very incep- 
tion of the struggle of the ages for the freedom of mankind. 

The restlessness of Europeans in the sixteenth century evolved 
a new and unique class of men whose like the mediaeval world 
never before had beheld. Abandoning piracy they became explorers, 
discoverers of new lands and regions. Finding new coasts, bays, 
islands, mountains and rivers and applying new names to them be- 
gan to be more attractive than free-booting. Returning with car- 
goes of peltry and sassafras obtained from savages was as renumer- 
ative and less dangerous than the vocation of the corsair. 

And these daring adventurers of the high seas were the first to 
vdew the coast and bays o^* Maine, made cur first maps, found our 
great rivers and marked upon them the places where they emptied 
their floods into the sea. Their reports inspired the people of Eng- 
land with a desire to enter upon a career of empire business by add- 
ing to their dominions new colonies in this new world. 

They were the precursors of the .British stock companies, char- 
tered and organized to engage in American colonization by such 
men as the Pophams and Ferdinando Gorges. An entirely new 
era was dawning upon mankind. 

In France new ideals burst forth seemingly more lofty than any- 
thing the world had known since the days of knighthood in the 
middle ages. At its inception the movement for colonization there, 
dominated largely by the Jesuits, was undoubtedly more spiritual 
than commercial. The government, the people of France and the 
Society of Jesus, then less than a century old, united upon an un- 



Wharton's International Law Digest (2d ed.) Vol. i, p. 8. 



ui:u:\^i ■-. 



6 SPR^XGUE'S TOURXAL OF MAIXE HISTORY. 



dertaking as startling as it was magnificent. It was plainly a deter- 
mination to found in this unknown wilderness a new French empire, 
and to convert to the christian faith a continent of savages of whose 
origin, history, traditions, language or habits of life they i?ad not 
the slightest knowledge. 

The dawn of the seventeenth centur^^ saw enthroned in England 
and France, Elizabeth and Henry IV, two of the greatest sover- 
eigns that either kingdom had ever had. They were human. Each 
had the faults and limitations of the age in which they lived, but 
each were in harmony — possibly without a full realization of it — 
with many of the revolutions and protests, and with the progressive 
spirit of the day. which finally broke the bonds of medi^evalism. 

]^Iaine's 250 miles of natural front of sea coast multiplied i as Gen. 
Chamberlain estimated it) to an extent of 2500 miles of salt water 
line, contains some of the most historic footprints resulting from 
these European political upheavals, to be found in the American 
continent. Within its extent is also much of the battle ground in 
the century's conflict between the Anglo Saxon and the Latin for 
supremacy in the new world. 

Yet the period which marks the genesis of Maine's history is not 
all as plain and understandable as might be desired. All were not as 
adept in publicity service as were Champlain or Captain George 
Waymouth, who employed James Rosier as publicity man. His 
" true relation " of Waymouth's voyage illuminated a page of our 
history as did later the illustrious and picturesque Captain John. 
Smith. Parts of it are misty though fascinating, and full of ma- 
terial for romance and poetry. 

Such was the story of ancient X^orumbega, ever appearing upon 
history's pages, but never explained' never real yet always existing. 
Its fame attracted voyagers and adventurers for a time, and its be- 
wildering tales charmed the European mind. If a dream, it was a 
beautiful one. It was an alluring phantom never chased to its lair. 
It was the will-o'-the-wisp of ^^laine's colonial history. 

And this is but a faint glimpse of the enchanting and romantic 
prelude to our historv- as a province, a district, and a state; only a 
part of what transpired here before the days of Sir William Phips; 
prior to Madokawando and Baron St. Castin and Sebastian Rale ; 
before the valor of Sir William Pepperrell of Kittery Point had in- 
scribed his name on the roll of Anglo Saxon heroes ; before the revo- 
lutionary days when the names of Jeremiah O'Brien, Hannah and 
Rebecca Weston, James Sullivan, Peleg Wadsworth and Commo- 



PORTLAXD SOCIETY OF ART. 



dore Tucker appear : before the Act of Separation ; before the days 
of William King and John Holmes ; before Longfellow or Hannibal 
Hamlin, Dorothea Dix or Sir Hiram ^laxini; before the days of a 
host of others equally as famous in each of these periods. 



PORTLAXD SOCIETY OF ART. 

In the last issue of the Journal (V. 7, p. 230) it was stated by 
a correspondent that the late William Edward Gould " founded 
and was first executive officer of the Portland Society of Art." 
This statement is not correct. Mr. O. P. T. W^ish, Secretary of 
that Society writes as as follows : 

" I find by the records of the Portland Society of Arts that its 
first meeting for organization was held at the suggestion of Hon. 
James P. Baxter at his home on December 19. 1881 ; that the 
organization of the Society occurred on March 3, 1882, and James 
P. Baxter was elected its first president; F. H. Bassett. ist vice- 
president; H. B. Brown. 2nd vice-president; Wm. E. Gould, 
treasurer; Wm. S. Lowell, secretary; Hubbard W. Bryant, libra- 
rian, and for executive committee, Cyrus F. Davis, Chas. F. Libby 
and Geo. F. INLorse.''' 



SUMMIER TWILIGHT. 
(Moosehead Lake.) 



Hushed in the waning afterglow, all nature brooding lies. 
Her colors slowly changing before our half closed eyes. 
The tints of twilight gather, vanish our lines of care 
As a thrush's cornet solo, poignant, dreamy haunts the air. 

The water softly pulsing laps the boat upon the shore. 
Two sw^eethearts tired, yet happy, each with tiptilted oar. 
Go loitering toward the home where peace and love abide. 
Pale stars come shyly one by one at drowsy eventide. 

EUGENE EDWARDS. 



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SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAIXE HISTORY. 



Maine's Admission to the Union 

(by ROLiERT E. HALL.) 

A paper read before the Cosmopolitan Club of Dover-Foxcroft, 

January 2, 1920. 

The jurisdiction of Massachusetts over what is now the territory 
of the State of Maine dates from the middle of the seventeenth 
centur\-. 

Ferdinando Gorges, grandson of the English lord proprietor of 
Maine, Sir Ferdinando Gorges, sold the patent to the State of Massa- 
chusetts in 1677 for 1250 pounds, a little ever $5cco. The pur- 
chase met with the approval of the inhabitants of the District of 
Elaine because of the pressure of the Indian wars upon the inhabi- 
tants of the territory of Maine who received what assistance and 
•protection they got from ^Massachusetts. 

From the histories, it cannot be ascertained ju£t when the move- 
ment started looking to the separation of Maine from ^lassachu- 
setts. Apparently there was no sentiment in this direction until 
after the Revolutionary War but in 1783 there was considerable 
sentiment in favor of the separation of Maine from Massachusetts. 
At that time certain articles appeared in the Falmouth Gazette and 
there was considerable discussion among the inhabitants of Maine, 
the provincials advocating the separation on the ground that Maine 
was geographically separated from ^Massachusetts, which made de- 
lays and expense to the people of Elaine since the courts, records, 
general court and government officials were all in Massachusetts. 

As a result of this agitation, in September, 1785, the Falmouth 
Gazette printed a notice requesting all those inchned to do so to meet 
at the meeting house of the Reverends Messrs. Smith and Dean in 
Falmouth, October 5 of that year, then and there to consider the 
advisability of having the Maine counties erected into a separate 
government and of collecting the sentiment of the people on the 
subject and to pursue some orderly and regular method of carrying 
this object into efifect. Thirty-three gentlemen assembled as a result 
of this notice. The matter was discussed and a committee of seven 
appointed to apply to the several towns and plantations requesting 
them to send delegates to meet at Falmouth in January, 1786, to con- 
sider the expediency of the separation proposed. 

This movement attracted the attention of the government of 
Massachusets and Gov. James Bowdoin called the attention of the 



MAINE'S ADMISSION TO THE UNION. 



General Court to the matter October 20, 1785, referring to the move- 
ment as "a design against the Commonwealth of a very evil te?i- 
dency." The General Court at that session declared "that attempts 
by individuals or bodies of men to dismember the state were fraught 
with improprieties and danger'' and a report of a committee was 
adopted declaring against such a movement. 

Nevertheless, in January, 1786, the convention called was held and 
a committee appointed to prepare a statement of the evils and griev- 
ances under which the people of the district of Elaine labored and 
to make an estimate of the cost of a separate government. The 
committee reported nine grievances among which were those above 
mentioned, the others relating to denial of representation in the 
House of Representatives and to trade relations. The report of 
the convention \\^as sent to every town and plantation in the 
district, and another convention was called. There were more 
than ninety towns and plantations authorized to send delegates 
but only thirty-one appeared, all from the counties of York, Cum- 
berland and Lincoln, and at that convention a committee was ap- 
pointed to prepare a memorial to the General Court asking for sep- 
aration. An address to the towns on the subject was also made, 
asking them to take a vote on the question and return the numbers 
for and against the proposition, and this address was calm and 
moderate in its language and respectful to ^Massachusetts. It was 
decided, however, that since so small a part of Elaine was repre- 
sented at this last convention that the presentation of the petition 
to the General Court be postponed, and it was not presented for 
two years, until 1788, and was then tabled by the General Court. 

It is to be noted that the movement was generally opposed by 
office holders under the Massachusetts government. 

In 1787 the convention met again and received the votes of the 
towns on the question of separation. There were ninety-three 
towns and plantations in Elaine at that time. Only thirty-two 
made returns of votes, which aggregated 618 for separation and 
352 against it. The convention adjourned to September 5 and 
again resolved to collect the sentiments of the people but no action 
in this direction was taken. The convention adjourned five or six 
times thereafter but each meeting was attended by a lesser num- 
ber of delegates, there being only three persons present at the last 
meeting. 

Thus the first movement for separation came to an inglorious end 
but it did result in some considerable benefits to the people of the 



lo SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



district. As a result of the agitation, the General Court exempted 
•wild lands from taxation for ten years, ordered the construction of 
new roads, granted to squatters one hundred acres of land on the 
payment of $5, established a term of the Supreme Court at W'is- 
casset and incorporated Bowdoin College. 

Five years afterward, as a result of a petition by the Senators 
and Representatives from the counties of York, Cumberland. Lin- 
cohi, Hancock and Washington, the General Court of ^lassachusetts 
in February, 1792. passed a resolve providing that the selectmen 
and other ofiicers of towns, plantations and districts in Elaine allow 
the people to vote on the question. As a result of this, eighty-nine 
returns were sent to the Secretary of the Commonwealth, i ne 
vote was 2084 in favor and 2438 against separation. As a result 
of this vote, of course, the advocates of separation could make 
no headway with the members of the General Court and the matter 
was dropped. 

The advocates of independence, however, were not discouraged 
and in 1793 another convention was called which was held in De- 
cember but only fifteen towns were represented. Interest in the 
matter was so slight that the convention adjourned to October when 
a resolution in favor of the creation of the new state vv^as adopted 
but nothing came of it. Two or three petitions were presented to 
the General Court in 1797 and were never reported by the com- 
mittee to which they were referred. 

In 1803 the inhabitants of sixty towns in Maine petitioned for 
separation but no action was taken. 

In 1807 Mr. Gannet of Gardiner, a member of the House of Rep- 
resentatives, presented a resolve in the General Court providing for 
a vote en the first ^londay in April upon the question whether tlie 
senators and representatives of the District should be instructed 
to petition the General Court for separation. This resolve passed 
but the people of Elaine were so eager that year to defeat Gov- 
ernor Strong and elect James Sullivan in his place that they gave 
no attention at all to the separation issue and the votes stood 3370 
for separation and 9404 against it. 

There was no further revival of agitation for the separation until 
after the War of 18 12. That cont st accentuated the discord be- 
tween the two parts of the Commonwealth. The people of Massa- 
chusetts were opposed to the war and this sentiment in Massachu- 
setts and other parts of New England which culminated in the 
Hartford Convention, so called, called forth much wrath in Maine, 



MAINE'S ADMISSION TO THE UNION. ii 



A convention was held in Oxford County at which a resoKUon 
was adopted to the effect that "It is expedient that the District of 
Elaine constitute a part of the State of ^^lassachusetts no longer 
than the State of Massachusetts gives support to the Union." 
This convention was held December 28, 1814. Similar resolutions 
were adopted in Kennebec County. 

Petitions for separation were entered in the General Court in 
1815, were rej;orted on unfavorably by a Committee to which they 
were referred and the Committee's report was accepted. This 
refusal of the General Court caused a great deal of agitation in 
]\Iaine but there was a division of public sentiment in ]\Iaine on 
party lines, the Democrats being in favor of separation and the 
Federalists opposed to it, the reason for this political division 
being that the government of Massachusetts was in the hands of 
the Federalists bui ]vlaine had long been Democratic. Separation 
meant a Democratic State Government with offices and spoils and 
the Federalists in Elaine preferred the existing situation ratlier 
than a separate state government controlled by their political op- 
ponents. 

In 1 81 4 another resolve was passed by the ^Massachusetts Legis- 
lature providing for a vote in Maine to get the sentiment for and 
against separation and as a result of this, a large meeting was held 
in Augusta in April of that year and among the prominent men 
present were \\illiam King, afterward first governor of ]\Iaine, 
John Chandler, Nathan Weston Jr., and Henry W. Fuller, all well 
known ]^Iaine men who afterward filled important state offices. 
This convention adopted strong resolutions in favor of separation. 
It was unanimously "Resolved f therefore) as a sense of this meet- 
ing that the period has arrived when the best ^'nterests of Maine 
will be promoted by a separation from Massachusetts proper, and 
that we will individually use all fair and honorable means to 
effect these objects'' and it was also resolved that the new state 
*'would enjoy equally with other states the protection of the federal 
government in defending it from foreign invasion and in suppress- 
ing domestic insurrection," this latter resolve being a reflection on 
Massachusetts for its attitude in the War of 1812. It wp.s here 
that the contest between Portland and Augusta as to which sliould 
be the capital of the new state was first observed, the opponents of 
separation in Cumberland county then declaring that the attempts 
at separation made by the inhabitants of Kennebec county were 
for the purpose of making Augusta the state capital and the oppo- 



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12 SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

nents of separation in Kennebec county used the same argument 
'there in regard to Portland. 

Meanwhile. Massachusetts manifested indifference and the Bos- 
ton papers rarely referred to the matter at all, the Boston Adver- 
'tiser remarking, *' To us in this part of the state the question is of 
comparatively trifling importance." 

At the April election 1816, other issues were largely disre- 
garded in Elaine and the question of separation only considered 
and a large majority of the senators and representahves elected 
were separationists. and the vote on separation was 10.584 in 
favor and 6491 opposed, although less than half the voters in the 
"District went to the polls. 

The General Court met on May 29. ' and feeling that there 
should be a further expression of the people of Maine on the 
matter, passed a bill giving the consent of Massachusetts to the 
erection of a new state, providing for the election of delegates 
'to a convention to be held at Brunswick for the purpose of form- 
ing a constitution and providing the terms of separation and pro- 
viding further that the people of Elaine should vote on the 
matter on the first ^londay of September; at the same time 
choosing delegates to the Brunswick Convention, and providing 
that the convention should first count the votes expressive of the 
people's wishes and if it should appear that a majority of 5 to 4 
at least of these returns were in favor of the District becoming 
an individual state, then and not otherwise said convention was 
to proceed to form a constitution. This led to a very hot cam- 
paign in Maine and in this campaign it was suggested that the 
erection of a new state within the limits of another was for- 
bidden by the constitution of the United States, which read: 
"New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; 
but no new state shall be formed or erected within the jurisdic- 
tion of any other state; nor any state be formed by ttie junction 
of two or more states, or parts of states, without the consent oi 
the legislatures concerned as well as of the Congress." This was 
apparently an arguable point since Maine had no separate legis- 
lature and it is rather curious that it was not taken up in Con- 
gress and argued in the contest which there took place in regard 
to the admission of Maine to the Union, which I shall speak of 
later. Other arguments were advanced for and against sepa- 
ration. The Boston papers took slight notice of the contest. The 



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MAINE'S ADMISSION TO THE UNION. 13 

final vote was 11,969 for separation and 10.347 against. This 
was not 5 to 4 but when the Brunswick Convention met the method 
of determining the vote was as follows : The convention adopted 
a report of the Committee which reported that the aggregate 
majority in the towns voting yes was 6031 ; the aggregate ma- 
jority in the towns voting no was 4409; now, as 5 is to 4 so is 
6031 to 4829; consequently, the noes failed by 420 to cast the 
requisite number. This absurd report, although accepted by the 
convention, caused a revulsion of feeling in ^Massachusetts. The 
Worcester Spy said, 'Tt was a mode of calculation which in a 
school boy would merit a flogging." The report of the Bruns- 
wick Convention was referred to a committee of the General 
Court, which reported that it had no hesitation in rejecting the 
construction of the act by the Brunswick Convention, and this 
ended the movement of 1816. 

Apparently no movement was made in 181 7 or 181 8 nor until 
the spring of 181 9 when the movement started again gathering 
more strength than any previous movement in this direction. A 
Committee of the ]\Iaine members of the General Court Is.^tied an 
address to the people urging them to select representatives favor- 
able to separation and urged the towns to preseal petitions The 
peoole responded to this address and all the senator:^ elecl^^ed were 
in favor of separation and 114 out of 127 reprcs^entatives. and 
petitioii^; began to pour into the state house in !May, 1819. The 
committees of the General Court to which the matter wa? referred 
reported that while nothing should be done to hasten separation 
the people of Alaine should again have a chance to express them- 
selves by a vote on the matter, and the General Court passed a 
l)ill providing that a general vote was to be taken in Maine on 
the fourth Monday of July on the question whether it was ex- 
pedient that Maine should become a separate and mdependent 
state. The votes were to be returned to the Secretary of the 
Commonwealth and if the number of votes for the measure should 
exceed the number of votes against it by 1500. then and not other- 
wise the people should be deemed to have expressed their consent 
to the separation. The governor, in event the people voted by a 
majority of 1500 for separation, was to proclaim the result where- 
upon delegates were to be elected on the third Monday in Sep- 
tember, to a convention to meet in Portland, October 12, to adopt 
a name for the new state and to form a constitution. This hav- 



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14 SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

ing been done, the convention was to submit the constitution to 
popular vote and if it were adopted by a majority of the people, 
it was to go into effect. Congress concurring, on the 15th of 
March, 1820. If the constitution should be rejected, the con- 
stitution of Massachusetts so far as it was applicable was to be- 
come the constitution of Maine, but the name chosen at said 
convention was to stand in any event. There were attempts to 
amend this bill by requiring two-thirds vote in favor of separation 
and a majority of 2500 instead of 1500, but neither of the amend- 
ments were accepted. The vote on this bill was 193 to 59 in the 
Massachusetts General Court and Governor Brooks of ^lassa- 
chusetts approved the act on June 19, 1819. The passage of this 
bill aroused, too late for eft'ect, great opposition to separation in 
Massachusetts. There were communications reproaching the 
legislature and its members for an easy surrender. The result 
of the vote in Elaine was a foregone conclusion from the start. 
'Every county in the District gave a majority in favor of inde- 
pendence, ranging from 63 in Hancock to 3309 in Kennebec. The 
proclamation of Governor Brooks announced the result of the 
vote 17,091 in favor and 7132 opposed, a majority of almost 
10,000. 

The governor called upon the people to elect delegates on the 
'third Monday in September to meet in convention at Portland 
on the second Monday in October as the act of the General Court 
provided. The question being decided, all antagonisms were for- 
gotten and those opposing separation acquiesced cheerfully and 
all urg^d a united eft'ort in laying deep and strong foundations 
for the new state. The convention met and elected William King 
permanent president. According to the act of separation he be- 
came acting governor until an election was held and was there- 
after elected the first governor of Maine. Among the names sug- 
gested for the new state was Columbus and Ligonia but ]\Iaine 
was chosen by a large majority. The convention voted 119 to 113 
to call the new sovereignty a state rather than a commonwealth. 
The convention lasted two weeks. The constitution was adopted 
236 to 30 and the convention adjourned October 29. The popular 
vote on the adoption of the constitution as reported to the con- 
vention at its adjourned session January 6, 1820 was 9050 in favor 
and 796 against. 



:#il^r> 



MAINE'S ADMISSION TO THE UNION. 



Thus far we have considered the movement for separation from 
Massachusetts and admission to the Union as a separate state 
as it started, progressed and effected its end in, ^lassachusetts and 
Maine. 

Now we will follow the history of the admission of Elaine as 
made at the National Capitol. 

In 1 819 it was evident that the free states of the Union had 
'done all possible for the extirpation of slavery and everything had 
"been done by the Federal Government which the constitution al- 
lowed, and it was evident, also, that a constitutional amendment 
would be necessary before anything further could be done in this 
direction and owing to the fact that a large majority of the states 
would have to vote in favor of an amendment, it was impossible 
to effect such an amendment. 

Of the thirteen original states, seven had abolished slavery and 
six had retained it. To these had been added Vermont, Ohio, 
Indiana and Illinois in which slavery was forbidden, and Ken- 
tucky, Tennessee, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama in which 
slavery was maintained, thus making an equal number of states 
on each side of the slavery issue but the constitution gave Con- 
gress the power to create new states out of the territories of the 
United States. The abolitionists hoped in creating new states to 
make them free and thus in time to obtain free states enough in 
the Union to eft'ect the constitutional amendment necessary to 
abolish slavery. This attempt failed and its failure made a peace- 
able settlement of the matter impossible and led to the war of 
1 86 1. It was at the time this fight was going on in Congress that 
the matter of 2vlaine's admission to the Union was first brought 
to the attention of Congress. 

Missouri applied for admission in the congressional session of 
1818-1819. When this petition for the admission of Missiouri 
was presented, the famous Talmadge amendment was offered in 
Congress, which provided that further introduction of slavery or 
involuntary servitude be prohibited except for the punishment of 
crimes, and that all children born within said state after the ad- 
mission thereof into the Union should be free at the age of twenty- 
five years. This amendment precipitated a discussion which lasted 
more than a year, proceeding upon points of constitutional powers 
and public policy, the question being whether Congress had the 
power to impose restrictions upon new commonwealths which the 






'J-'>',.'i'KJ-frf ^^/''■:>f 



i6 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



constitution did not impose upon the original commonwealths. 
In February, 1819, the Missouri bill passed the House with the 
Talmadge amendment enacted a part thereof. The Senate passed 
the bill without the Talmadge amendment and returned the bill 
to the House, which body refused to agree to the striking out of 
the amendment. 

It was at this time, on December 8, 1819, that Mr. Holmes of 
Massachusetts presented to the House of Representatives a pe- 
tition from the constitutional convention in the District of Maine^ 
praying for the admission of Maine as a commonwealth into the 
Union. It is to be noted here that Maine did not ask the permis- 
sion of Congress to form a constitution and government, its repre- 
sentatives claiming that they already enjoyed the status as a part of 
Massachusetts, and there was some feeling in Congress that the 
people of Elaine were guilty of undue assumption of powers. The 
petition, however, was referred to a committee and a bill was 
reported, providing for the admission of Maine as a common- 
wealth. When the bill came up for discussion. Mr. Henry Clay 
suggested its connection with the Missouri bill, but did not make 
a motion to this effect and the bill for the admission of Maine 
passed the House January 3, 1820 without restrictions or limita- 
tions beyond those placed by the constitution of the United States. 
On January 3, 1820, the House bill admitting Elaine was sent to 
the Senate and was referred to the Judiciary Committee, which 
committee already had the ^lissouri bill and on January 6 the 
committee reported it to the Senate with an amendment author- 
izing the people of Missouri to form a constitution and common- 
wealth 'government. The amendment contained no restrictions 
or conditions with regard to slavery. The chairman of this com- 
mittee was Mr. Smith of South Carolina. Maine would, of course, 
be admitted as a free state and it was doubtless thought by the 
supporters of slavery that the bill so reported would pass, thus 
admitting a free state and a slave state at the same time, keeping 
the balance of power between the slave and free states 

Mr. Roberts of Pennsylvania moved a recommitting of the 
Maine bill to the Judiciary Committee with the instruction that 
the bill should be divested of the amendment in regard to Mis- 
souri, arguing that the two should be disconnected because Maine 
had already framed a constitution and was simply asking for ad- 
mission while the Missouri bill was simply to authorize the people 



Wk^\- 



MAINE'S ADMISSION TO THE UNION. 17 



of Missouri territory to form a constitution and 
This argument was opposed by Mr. Smith and others who argued 
that the two subjects were germane and any contrary appearance 
was caused by the unwarranted action of the people of Maine, in 
proceeding so far as they had done without asking the consent 
of Congress, for which wrongful procedure, presumptuous ]\Iaine 
should not be rewarded and respectful Missouri punished. The 
matter came to a vote and the Senate refused to separate the meas- 
ures. 

The bill came up for consideration and a motion w^as offered to 
amend the bill by a provision prohibiting the further introduction 
of slavery into Missouri. The amendment was voted down. 

Mr. Thomas of Illinois here offered an amendment to the bill 
providing for the exclusion of slavery from the Louisiana terri- 
tory above 36° and 30' except within the limits of the proposed 
commonwealth of Missouri. It was at this point that Mr. Pinck- 
ney of Maryland made his famous argument against the power 
of Congress to lay restrictions on new commonwealths not im- 
posed by the constitution on the original commonwealths. The 
formal vote connecting the two subjects of Maine and Missouri 
was taken in the Senate February 16. and Mr. Thomas' amend- 
ment was adopted as a fair compromise and the bill passed the 
Senate February 18. 1820. The form of the bill was now a House 
bill in regard to Maine with the Missouri bill and the Thomas 
amendment attached. The House voted to disagree. The Senate 
voted to insist upon the amendments and the House immediately 
voted to insist upon its proposition. A conference was then held 
and it was agreed that the Senate should withdraw its amend- 
ments to the House bill for admission of Maine, that both the Sen- 
ate and House should pass the Missouri bill without the condition in 
reference to restriction of slavery in the proposed commonw^ealth, 
and that both the Senate and House should add a provision to the 
Missouri bill prohibiting slavery in the remainder of Louisiana 
territory north of 36° and 30'. The Senate and House voted the 
measures according to the agreed compromise. Thus the House 
gained it point of order in the separation of the subjects and the 
Senate gained its point of constitutional law in defending the new 
commonwealth against the restrictions not imposed by the con- 
stitution upon the original commonwealths and the two bodies 
compromised upon a fair division of the remaining parts of Louis- 



'}: e:cw 



i8 SPRAGUE'S lOURXAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



iana territory between the northern anti-slavery element and the 
southern pro-slavery element. 

The measures were placed before President Monroe for his 
approval and he called a cabinet meeting for the consideration ot 
the subject, the question being upon the point whether this was 
to be taken as prohibiting slavery in the commonwealths which 
might be formed out of Louisiana territory in the future or 
whether Congress only intended to lay this restriction upon the 
territory merely for the period during which it was under the exclu- 
sive jurisdiction of the general government. If the former, the 
Missouri question would have to be fought all over again whenever 
a new commonwealth should be formed out of this territory. The 
cabinet felt that the prohibition applied only during the period 
before commonwealth organization should be established. Upon 
this basis, the President, believing the bill constitutional, agreed 
to the compromise and signed the Maine bill on March 3, 1820 
and the Missouri bill on March 6, 1820. 

Thus the question of the admission of Elaine to the Union was 
involved in the first Missouri compromise, so-called. The real 
question in issue, however, was never whether or not Maine 
should be admitted to the Union but the Senate joined the Maine 
and Missouri bills for the purpose of forcing upon the House its 
interpretation of constitutional law in the matter of the power of 
Congress to impose restrictions upon new commonwealths not 
imposed by the constitution on the original commonw^ealths. The 
result was the admission of Maine, the authorization for the in- 
habitants of Missouri to adopt a constitution and the division of 
Louisiana territory into slave and free sections on the parallell 
above named. 

Thus the act of the Massachusetts legislature or General Court 
providing that the separation act go into efifect March 15, 1820, 
and the signing of the bill by President Monroe March 3, 1820 
made Maine's separation from Massachusetts and admission to 
the Union an accomplished fact March 15, 1820. 

On that birthday one hundred years ago the birth of the new 
state was appropriately celebrated all over Maine by the booming 
of cannon, display of flags and public gatherings. 



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FIRST STATE GOVERXMEXT. 



19 









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Maine's First State Government 

Governor. 
William King ; 

Executive Council. 

Thomas Fillebrown. William Webster, Mark Harris, William 
C. Whitney, Isaac Lane, Abiel Wood. William Emerson. 

Secretary of State, Ashur Ware ; State Treasurer, Joseph C. 
Boyd; President of the Senate, John Chandler; Secretary of 
the Senate, Ebenezer Herrick ; Assistant Secretary of the Senate, 
Rufus K. Goodenow; Chaplain, Rev. Elijah Kellog; Messenger, 
John Morrill; Speaker of the House of Representatives, Benja- 
min Ames. 




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20 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

Meeting Place of the First Legislature 
When the separation between Maine and Massachusetts took 
place, a building was erected in Portland the same year, to accom- 
modate the state officers and the Senate, on the lot adjoining the 
County Court House. It was called the State House, and w^as a 
somewhat pretentious building. The lower story w^as occupied by 
state offices, and the Senate when in session occupied the upper 
stor}^ The House of Representatives did not meet in the same 
building. They held their sessions in a room in the Court House. 
The sessions of the legislature continued to be held in two separate 
buildings until the seat of government was removed to Augusta. 

Organizing the First Legislature 
(From the Eastern Argus) 

Portland, Wednesday, May 31, 1820. 

This being the day designated by the Constitution of this State 
for convening the first Legislature the following gentlemen being 
regularly returned as senators, appeared in the Senate Chamber at 
II o'clock A. M.: From the County of York, WiUiam Moody, 
Josiah W. Seaver and John McDonald, Esquires ; Cumberland, 
Joseph E. Foxcroft, Esq. : Lincoln, Nathaniel Green, Esq. ; Han- 
cock, Andrevv' Witham, Esq. ; Washington, Jeremiah O'Brien, Esq. ; 
Kennebec, John Chandler, Joshua Gage and Timothy Boutelle, 
Esquires ; Oxford, Samuel Small, James W. Ripley, Esquires ; 
Somerset, John Moore, William Kendall, Esqrs. ; Penobscot, 
William D. Williamson, Esquire. 

At half past eleven o'clock, the President of the Convention 
accompanied by the Treasurer and Secretary pro tem, and attended 
by the Sheriff of Cumberland, came into the Senate Chamber and 
the gentlemen aforesaid, took and subscribed the oath prescribed 
by the Constitution to qualify them to discharge the duties of 
their offices. 

The Governor having returned, the members of the Senate pro- 
ceeded to the choice of a President. John Chandler had 14 votes 
and was chosen. 

Mr. Chandler then arose and addressed the Senate as follows : 
The vote which you have now given, by which you have elected 
me to preside over your deliberations, confers on me an honor 
which I had little right to expect. I feel very sensibly the honor- 
able testimony which you have given of your confidence in me. I 



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ORGAXIZIXG FIRST LEGISL.\TURE. 21 



am, however, aware that the duties which will devolve on me will 
be arduous, and perhaps more difficult, in consequence of this being 
the first session of the Legislature, under a new government, which 
is now about to be organized. One better qualified to preside than 
myself, might well hesitate in accepting the appointment, and I 
assure you. Gentlemen, that nothing could induce me to accept it. 
did I not believe that the members of the Senate will extend to 
me their utmost candor, and aid me with their wisdom and expe- 
rience, while I shall endeavor to discharge the duties which you 
have assigned me. Relying therefore on your friendly assist- 
ance, I accept the appointment. 

It was ordered that Messrs. Williamson, Boutelle, Seaver, Ripley 
and Foxcroft be a committee to receive and examine the votes for 
Senators and report thereon. * * * The Committee appointed to 
receive and examine the returns of votes given in the several towns 
and plantations for Governor, report the whole number of votes 
returned to the office of the Secretary of State to be 22,gi^\ neces- 
sary for a choice, 11,458, and that WiUiam King, Esq., has 21,083 
votes, and is chosen. No return received from the town of Green- 
wood, Oxford county. 



MEETING PLACE OF THE FIRST LEGISLATURE OF 

MAINE. 
When the separation between Maine and Massachusetts took 
place, a building was erected in Portland the same year, to accom- 
modate the officers and the Senate, on the lot adjoining the County 
Court House. It was called the State House, and was a some- 
what pretentious building. The lower story was occupied by the 
State officers, and the upper story by the Senate. The Repre- 
sentatives met in a room in the County Court House adjoining. 
Sessions were held in these two buildings until the removal of the 
Legislature to Augusta. The so-called State House was subse- 
quently moved to the corner of Congress and Market streets, and 
was destroy in the fire of 1866. 

JAMES PHINNEY BAXTER. 



54 



YEARS the Insurance Man of Somerset Co. 

Never a Failure— Never a Law Suit— What more do you want? 

Member Soc. Col. Wars; Sons Am. Rev; Past A. A. C. G. A. R.) 

CHARLES FOLSOM-JONES, Skowhegan Maine 



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22 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAIXE HISTORY. 

Short Biographies of the Members of the 
First Maine Senate 

By Edg.\r Crosby Smith 

The limited space that can be devoted to this article obliges the 
compiler to make the space devoted to a member short; giving 
the reader a key by means of which he may search further if he so 
desires. 

I regret that I was unable to find any data regarding two of 
these men and should any reader have information regarding them 
I should be pleased to receive it. It will be published in a future 
number. 

The first Maine Senate had three presidents : 

JOHN CHANDLER, from (Monmouth) Kennebec county, b 
Epping, N. H., Feb. i, 1762; d Augusta, Sept. 25, 1841. Revolu- 
tionary so-dier ; Commissioned Brig. Genera! during War of 1812; 
came to Maine about 1780 and settled on a farm in Monmouth. 
Senator and councillor in ^lassachusetts General Court 1803 ; mem- 
ber of Congress from Kennebec district 1805-09; member of con- 
stitutional convention. W^as ejected president of the Senate on 
the convening of the legislature May 31, but resigned June 19 to 
become one of the first U. S. Senators from the new state ; served 
in the senate until 1829 when he was appointed collector of cus- 
toms for the port of Portland, which position he held until 1837, 
when he removed to Augusta. 

COL. WILLIAM ^lOODY, from (Saco) York county. b 
Saco, Mar. 15, 1770; d Saco, Mar. 15, 1822. Son of William 
Pepperrell Moody who came to Saco from Kittery in 1763. Col. 
Moody's education was limited but by native force of character 
and intellect he became a prominent citizen. He was a member 
of the ^lass. House 1804-12; of the Senate 1812-20: member of 
the constitutional convention ; he was elected president of the 
first Maine Senate upon the resignation of John Chandler but 
served only a few days, resigning June 28 to accept the appoint- 
ment of sheriff of York county. He died suddenly in the midst 
of his useful life. 

WILLIAM D. WILLIAMSON, from (Bangor) Penobscot 
county, b Canterbury. Conn., July 31. 1779; d Bangor, May 27, 
1846. Graduated Brown University 1804; read law with Samuel 



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BIOGRAPHIES OF FIRST SENATE. 23 



F. Dickinson. Amherst. Mass., and was admitted to the bar 1807 
and at once located in Bangor. County attorney 1811-16: mem- 
ber Massachusetts Senate 1816-20: member Maine Senate 1820 
and elected president of that body June 2S, upon the resignation 
of Col. Moody. By virtue of that office he became acting governor 
early in 1821 when Gov. King resigned: representative in Con- 
gress 1821-23: Judge of Probate 1824-40; postmaster of Bangor 
1810-21. His greatest achievement was his history of Maine, 
published in 1832, which is his lasting memorial. 

SENATORS 

JOSIAH W. SEAVER, (South Berwick) York county, b 
Norwich, Vt., Apr. 12, 1777; d Rochester, N. Y., Sept. 29. 1847. 
He was a teacher by profession and for many years resided in. 
So. Berwick: was principal of Berwick Academy 1813-16. ; 

JOHN McDonald, (Limerick) York county, b Gorhani, 
Apr. 6, 1773 : d Limerick, 1826. He was one of the early settlers 
of Limerick; merchant: ^Major General of militia: for a number 
of years a member of the Court of Sessions; state senator 1820- 
24. He was the father of Moses McDonald, member of Congress 
and collector of the port of Portland. 

JOSEPH E. FOXCROFT, (New Gloucester) Cumberland 
county, b N. Gloucester, Mar. 10, 1773; d N. Gloucester, Sept. 
'i, 1852. ■ Son of Rev. Samuel Foxcroft, first settled minister of 
"N. Gloucester; merchant and one of the leading men of his town 
and county; postmaster 1804-1844; representative to Mass. Gen. 
■Court, 1803-11; commissioned Lt. Col. of Mass. militia. Apr. 23, 
'181 1 ; senator in 1820; appointed sheriff of Cumberland county 
'1821 and served until 1828. Bought township No. 5, Range 7. 
"N. \V. P. of Bowdoin College in 1801 and at once commenced 
'securing settlers for the town; in 1812 the town was incorporated 
'and named Foxcroft in his honor. 

* BARRETT POTTER, (Portland) Cumberland county. b 
Lebanon, N. H., Mar. 8, 1777; d Portland. Nov. 16, 1865: Grad- 
uated Dartmouth, 1796. Read law with Benjamin Gilbert, Han- 
over, N. H., one year, and finished his studies with his uncle, John 
'Barrett at Northfield, Mass., and was admitted to practice in 1801. 
He at once located in No. Yarmouth where he remained until 
March, 1805, when he removed to Gorham. In June. 1806, he 
located in Portland as a law partner of Salmon Chase. Member 



24 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



of Ex. council of Mass., 1819: member first Maine Senate; in 
'1822 appointed Judge of Probate of Cumberland county, retiring 
in 1847. 

' JONATHAN PAGE, (Brunswick) Cumberland county. b 
'Conway, N. H., Oct.. 1777; d Brunswick. Nov. 18. 1842. Came to 
Brunswick in 1795 and commenced the practice of medicine there 
'in 1808; senator 1812; member of constitutional convention; 
member first M^ine senate, also in 1829. He was an original mem- 
"ber of the Maine Medical Society and for many years an instructor 
in the Maine Medical School of Bowdoin College ; for more than 
20 years was a member of the Board of Overseers of the College. 
' NATHANIEL GREEN, (Topsham) Lincoln county, b 1782; 
d Topsham, April 12. 1848. Settled in Topsham, 1804; lumberman 
and merchant ; member of constitutional convention ; member of 
senate 1820-24 and 1826; member of house 1838-40 and 1846. 
Was sheriff of Lincoln county one year also register of deeds sev- 
eral years and at the time of his death w-as one of the county com- 
missioners. 

ERASTUS FOOTE, (Wiscasset) Lincoln county, b Water- 
bury. Conn., Oct., 1777: d Wiscasset. July 4. 1856. Read law with 
Judge Samuel Hinkley and was admitted to the bar in Hampshire 
county. Conn, in 1800; commenced practice at Northampton, Conn., 
"but in 1801 came to Camden; in 181 1 was appointed county attor- 
ney and held the office until the separation; in 1812 was a senator 
in the ^lass. Gen. Court from Lincoln county; in 1815 moved to 
Wiscasset; in 1819 was a member of the Mass. House and was a 
vigorous advocate of separation ; member of the first Maine Senate 
and in 1820 was appointed attorney general which office he held- 
until 1832. 

DR. DANIEL ROSE, (Boothbay) Lincoln county, b 1771 ; d 
Thomaston, Oct. 25, 1833. Came to Wiscasset as a young man ; 
practiced medicine there from 1795 to 1823; member Mass. Gen- 
eral Court, i8c8 and 1815; captain of militia in War of 1812; 
leading member of constitutional convention ; state senator 1820- 
'2^; and president of that body 1822-23; removed to Thomaston 
in 1824 to become the first warden of the State Prison. Land agent 
1828-9 and 183 1. Selectman of Boothbay many years and held 
many other town offices. 

JOSHUA GAGE, (Augusta) Kennebec county, b Mass., 1763; 
'd Augusta, Jan. 24. 1831. Settled in Augusta, 1795; member 



BIOGRAPHIES OF FIRST SEXATE. 25 



Mass. House 1805-7; nieniber Mass. senate 1813-15; member of 
Congress 1817-19; member of Gov. Parris' council 1822-23. He 
was a member of the first Maine senate and was treaurer of Ken- 
nebec county 21 years; also a member of the constitutional con- 
vention. 

■ TDIOTHY BOUTELLE, (Waterville) Kennebec county, b 
Leominster, ^lass.. Nov. 10, 1777; d Waterville, Nov. 12, 1855; 
Graduated Harvard, 1800. He taught in Leominster Academy for 
one year after his graduation; studied law with Abijah Bigelow 
of Leominster for a time and completed his studies with Edward 
Gray of Boston. \\'as admitted to the bar in 1804 and came to 
"Waterville ; he served six years in the Maine senate and six years 
m the House ; was always active in municipal affairs. He was 
one of the founders of the Waterville bank in 1814, a promoter of 
the Androscoggin & Kennebec Railroad in 1847. 

■ CHARLES MORSE, (Wilton) Kennebec county, b Sutton, 
Mass., Oct. 2-], 1785 ; d Wilton, May 30, 1845. ^^^- Morse was 
elected a Kennebec Senator to fill the vacancy caused by the resig- 
nation of John Chandler to become a U. S. senator; settled in 
Wilton in 1809 and became a leading citizen ; colonel in militia ; 
prominent in temperance and abolition movements. 

' ANDREW WITH AM, (Bluehill) Hancock count>. b Brad- 
'ford, Mass., Nov. 11, 1768; d Bluehill May, 1858. Came to Blue- 
hill a young man and became a leading merchant and ship owner ; 
member constitutional convention; member senate 1820, 21, 23 and 
29; member House, 1831. 

GEN. GEORGE UL:^IER, (Lincolnville) Hancock county, b 
Waldoboro, Feb. 25, 1756; d Lincolnville in 1826. He was of 
'German descent, his parents being among the immigrants brought 
to Broad Bay by Gen. Waldo. Revolutionary soldier; major gen- 
eral in militia; member of Mass. legislature, 1806-1807; member 
first Elaine senate. The Ulmers were among the earliest and most 
"important settlers of Duck Trap, now Lincolnville. 
' JEREMIAH O'BRIEN, (Machias) Washington county, b 
Machias, Jan. 21, 1778; d Boston, Mass., May 30, 1858. Son of 
Gideon, who was one of the famous O'Brien family of Machias 
that took part and led off in the first naval battle of the Revolution ; 
Gideon was a member of the crew of the '' Unity " which captured 
the Margaretta. Jeremiah was a member of the Maine senate 



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26 SPRAGUE'S TOURXAL OF MAIXE HISTORY 



1820-1823. and 1835; niember of the House 1832 and 1834; repre- 
sentative in Congress 1823- 1829. 

DR. SAMUEL S^^IALL. (Jay) Oxford county, b New York 
'state, 1785 ; d Wilton. 1869. Came to Jay from X^ew York state 
and settled on Jay Hill ; he was a scholarly gentleman and a wit ; 
town clerk 1805-1809; medical examiner during War of 1812. 

JAMES W. RIPLEY, Oxford county. Xo data available. 

JOHX MOORE, Somerset county. Xo data available. 

WILLIA:M KEXDALL, (Fairfield) Somerset county, b July 
11, 1759; d Fairfield. Aug. 11, 1827. He was a Revolutionary sol- 
'dier and came, to what after his settlement there, was called Ken- 
dalls' Mills, and later Fairfield, soon after the close of the Revolu- 
tion ; he acquired the water power there and he and his sons devel- 
oped it. He was a member of the constitutional convention: 
member of the first Maine senate ; sheriff of Somerset county. 
He was a major general of the militia. 



I Fryburg, named for Joseph Frye, is one of the most distin- 

' guished towns in Maine. It has a notable history. Within its bor- 
ders the Pequaket tribe of Indians under its celebrated chief Pau- 
gus, had its ancient seat and here on Battle brook which empties 
into a beautiful lake, in May. 1725, was the fearful fight between 
the savages and Capt. John Lovewell's company- from Dunstable 
and vicinity, in which the Indian chief was slain and the tribe prac- 
tically destroyed. Of 34 scouts in the engagement, 17 lived to 
return to their homes. 
[ Among those killed were Captain Lovewell and the chaplain ; Jona- 

I than Frye, a promising young man, then recently a graduate of Har- 
vard was mortally wounded. Besides Chief Paugus, shot by Ensign 
Wyman, over 50 of the Indian warriors lost their lives. It was a 
fierce death grapple betvveen the contending forces. 

Fryeburg was settled in 1763, and by the time of the opening of 

^'' the Revolutionar}' war in 1775, by the British attack on Lexington 

^ and Concord, it was a flourishing plantation. In January, 1777, 

it was incorporated as a town, the only one at that period in what 

is now the countv of Oxford. 



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MASOXIC GRAXD LODGE. 27 



Beginning of the Masonic Grand Lodge 
of Maine 

(From Eastern Argus of January 2~, 1820.) 

On Saturday last the Grand Lodge. Free and Accepted ^lasons 
of Maine was consecrated, and its officers installed in this town 
in presence of the most numerous concourse of citizens we recollect 
ever to have seen on any occasion in Elaine. The scene was ren- 
'dered doubly interesting by the presence of our Chief Magistrate 
as Grand Master of ^lasons in Maine, and by the attendance of the 
Grand Lodge of Xew Hampshire. At 11 o'clock A, ')A. the Grand 
Lodge of X^'ew Hampshire was introduced to the Grand Lodge of 
Maine, by whom they were received in ancient form, affectionately 
welcomed by the Grand ^^laster in the chair, who delivered a suit- 
able address on the occasion. At 12 o'clock a procession was 
formed of the new Grand Lodge and about three hundred of the 
fraternity, which escorted the Grand Lodge of Xew Hampshire to 
the Rev. Mr. Payson's meeting house. 

Here were held appropriate exercises. The prayer was offered 
by the Rev. President of Bowdoin College, and an elegant and 
instructive oration delivered by J. H. Sheppard of Wiscasset. The 
prayer of consecration was by Rev. Mr. Tilton of Scarborough. 
At the close of the ceremonies of consecrating the lodge and instal- 
ling the officers, the brethren returned to Masons Hall and partook 
of a rich repast ; after which were toasts and responses. The first 
toast was by the Grand blaster Governor King and was : '* the 
memory of our departed Grand Master — ^the illustrious Wash- 
ington." 

(Eastern Argus, June 6, 1820.) 

At a Masonic convention holden in this town on Thursday last. 
the following Right "Worshipful brethren were elected and appointed 
to the respective grand offices as follows : 

Hon. William King. Esq.. Grand Master 

Simon Greenleaf. Deputy Grand Master 

William Swan, Senior Grand Warden 

Xathaniel Coffin, Junior Grand Warden 

Joseph \L Gerrish, (jrand Treasurer 

Robert P. Dunlap, Corresponding Grand Secretary 

William Lord, Recording Grand Secretary 



j-'Mi^v^'^i 



28 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



Joseph E. Foxcrott, Grand Marshal 

Rev. G. W. Olney. Grand Chaplain 

Henry \V. Fuller, Senior Grand Deacon 

Josiah Calif, Junior Grand Deacon 

Wil'iam Terry. Jesse lobin^on, Eleazer Wyer, Nelson Racklyft, 

Grand Stewards 
George Thacher, Jr., Grand Sword Bearer 
Seth Clark, John P. Boyd, Pursuivants 
William Stevens, Grand Tyler 

(Eastern Argus, August 29, 1820) 
NOTICE 
Those physicians who were members of the Massachusetts Medi- 
cal Society at the time Maine became a separate State are requested 
to meet at Massachusetts Hall in Brunswick, on Wednesday the 
'6th of September next, at 5 o'clock P. M. for the purpose of 
organizing a Medical Society for the State of Maine. 

JOSEPH GILMAN, 
AMMI R. :\IITCHELL, 
TIMOTHY LITTLE, 
SAMUEL WEED, 
JOHN MERRILL, 
Censors for the District of Maine at the time of the Separation 
from Massachusetts. 
Portland, Aug. 29, 1820. i . - 



Census of Maine in 1820 

The census of the new State of Maine, by counties was as fol- 
lows : 

York county, population 42,284 

Cumberland county, population 49^339 

Lincoln county, population 52,953 

Penobscot county, population 13,931 

Washington county, population 12,746 

Somerset county, population 21,698 

Kennebec county, population 42,632 

Oxford county, population. . . . = 27,185 

Hancock county, population 31,071 

Total 297,839 



ODD FELLOWS GRAND LODGE. 29 

Beginning of the Odd Fellows Grand Lodge 

of Maine 

(From the Journal of Proceedings of the Right Worthy Grand Lodge of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of the State of Maine.) 

Maine Lodge — the first in this State — was instituted in the city 
of Portland on the 25th day of August, A. D. 1843. The first 
session of the Grand Lodge was in 1844. The first page of its 
record is as follows: 

Ancient Brothers' Hall, 

Portland, March 18, 1844. 

Agreeably to a call duly made by District Deputy Sire Churchill, 
the following Past Grands appeared as representatives from their 
respective lodges for the purpose of organizing a Grand Lodge for 
the State of Maine, viz. : 

Maine Lodge, Xo. i, David Robinson, Jr. 
Maine Lodge, No. i, James N. Winslow 
Saco Lodge. No. 2, George W. Churchill 
Saco Lodge, No. 2, George W. Warren 
Saco Lodge, No. 2, James Smith 
Georgian Lodge, No. 3. Lucius H. Chandler 
Ancient Brothers' Lodge, No. 4, Edward P. Banks 
Ligonia Lodge, No. 5, John D. Kinsman 

The meeting was called to order by District Deputy Grand Sire 
Churchill, who, after stating the object, authorized Brother Albert 
Guild, District Deputy Grand Sire of Massachusetts, New Hamp- 
shire and Rhode Island, to officiate at the organization. 

The petitioners for the Dispensation then answered to their 
names. The Dispensation having been read, the petitioners pro- 
ceeded to elect officers for the ensuing year; and the following 
brethren were accordingly chosen : 

Past Grand, George W. Churchill, M. W. Grand Master 
Past Grand, Lucius H. Chandler, R. W. Deputy Grand Marshal 
Past Grand, James Smith, R. W. Grand W^arden 
Past Grand, David Robinson, Jr., R. W. Grand Secretary 
Past Grand, J. N. Winslow, R. W. Grand Treasurer 
The lodge then adjourned until 4 o'clock P. M. for the purpose 
of installing the officers elect. 



so SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



The State of Maine Burying Ground 

(by EDGAR CROSBY SMITH.) 

From tombstone inscriptions by Edgar Crosby Smith published 
in the Journal (Vol. 5, pp. 153-158) August-September-October 
number, 191 /.) 

E. Lincoln 

of Portland 

Gov. of Maine 

Died 

Oct. 8, 1829, 

aged 40. 

In the state house park opposite the state house at Augusta, at 
•the extreme eastern end and barely visible from the street, is a 
plain granite shaft erected by the state over the tomb containing 
the remains of one of her early governors. 

Enoch Lincoln, the third governor of Maine, was from a family of 
governors. His father, Levi, was lieutenant, and for a short time 
acting governor of Massachusetts, and his brother Levi, was gov- 
ernor of that commonwealth from May, 1825, to March, 1834. 

Enoch was born in Worcester, Mass., December 28, 1788. He 
was educated at Harvard and Bowdoin colleges, studied law with 
his brother Levi, and was admitted to practice in 181 1; practiced 
a short time at Salem and Worcester and settled in Fryeburg, 
Maine, in 1812. Removed to Paris, Maine, in 1818; was elected 
to Congress in 1818 and served continuously until 1826, when he 
resigned to become governor of Maine. January, 1827. He was 
twice re-elected and died in office October 8, 1829, and was buried 
in the state park facing the capitol. 

In 1842 the legislature, by a resolve, appropriated three hundred 
dollars to erect " suitable and durable monuments " over the graves 
of persons interred on the public grounds and authorized the selec- 
tion of a portion of the grounds facing the capitol for the interment 
of "public officers dying at the seat of government." A tomb was 
constructed over the door of which is engraved on a marble slab: 



m^- 



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STATE BURYIXG GROUND. 



31 



ERECTED 

BY THE STATE 

1842 

A granite monument, enclosed by an iron fence, was raised over 
the tomb, on the west face of which is chiseled the inscription to 
the niemory of Governor Lincoln. 




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The Governor Lincoln Monument in the State of Maine Burying 

Ground, Augusta, Maine. 

(Contributed by Mrs. Lena R. Pierce.) 



A double row of stately elms extending from the street to the 
sepulcher line a wa'k to the door of the tomb. 



32 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



W. DELESDERNIER 

of Baileyville 

Died Jan. i6. 1842 

aged 49. 

William Delesdernier was the son of Lieut. Lewis Frederick 
Delesdernier, a Cumberland county. Nova Scotia, refugee, who 
came to Machias in 1776. In May, 1777, he was commissioned 
first lieutenant in the Continental Army by Col. John Allan, and 
acted as his secretary while Col. Allan commanded the Eastern 
Indians. Soon after the close of the Revolution he removed to 
Passamaquoddy and was the first collector of customs and the first 
postmaster of Eastport. 

William was born at Eastport in 1792 or 1793 and in his young 
manhood was a merchant in his native town. He removed to Calais 
about 1830. He was active in politics and in 183 1 was a represen- 
tative in the state legislature from the latter town. He was sheriff 
of Washington county in 1833, '34, and '35. He removed to Bailey- 
ville and in 1838, '39, '40 and '41 represented the Baileyville class 
in the state legislature. In 1841 he was elected one of the Wash- 
ington county senators and took his seat January 5, 1842. He was 
stricken with a fatal illness and died at the seat of government^ 
January 16, 1842, and was buried in the state grounds. 

It was undoubtedly the interment of Mr. Delesdernier in the 
state grounds that hastened the action of the legislature in dedicat- 
ing a spot for the burial of officers of the state and erecting a suit- 
able memorial. A resolve was introduced in the Senate in 1841 to 
erect a memorial to Governor Lincoln, but it seems that the House 
took no action thereon. In 1842 the House took the initiative, the 
Senate concurred, and the State Burial Ground was laid out and a 
tomb and monument erected. 

J. CUSHMAN 

of Winslow, 

Died Jan. 27, 1834. 

Aged 70. 

Sometimes the memorial erected over the mortal remains of the 
departed serves as something of an index to the principal events of 
a life. Not so. however, in this case. He who scans this simple 
inscription obtains no hint of any of the events in which this man 
participated. 

Joshua Cushman, son of Abner and Mary (Tillson) Cushman, 
born in Halifax, Massachusetts, 1758 or '59; soldier of the Revolu- 



.14 '-..v 



STATE BURYING GROUND. 33 



tion for three years ; suffered at X'alley Forge and witnessed 
Burgoyne's surrender. He was a graduate of Harvard in the class 
of 1788, and on June 10. 1795, was ordained as the first town min- 
ister of Winslow, which then incUided Waterville. He served the 
people of that town in this capacity for nineteen years, when, in 
1814, by mutual consent and with feelings of mutual regret the 
relations between them were severed. 

In 1810 he served Kennebec county as a member of the Massa- 
chusetts Senate: in 181 1 and 1812 the town of Winslow as a repre- 
sentative in the ^lassachusetts legislature. In 1819 he was elected 
a member of Congress for the Kennebec District, and served three 
full terms. He was a man of influence in the national house, his 
broad views and gift of oratory making him a powerful advocate 
or a strong opponent. 

He was a member of the Maine Senate in 1828 and in 1833 was 
elected to represent the town of Winslow in Maine House of Repre- 
sentatives. He presided at the organization of the House, January 
I, 1834. but was in feeble health and twenty-six days later, January 
2.^, he died. His body was interred in the state grounds. 

In 1843 ^ resolve was passed by the legislature directing the 
superintendent of public buildings to deposit his remains in the 
state tomb and to inscribe his name on the monument surmounting 
the same. 

C. WATERHOUSE 

of China, 

Clerk, 

Died March i, 1839, 

Aged 38. 

Of Charles Waterhouse I am unable to find much data. He was 
first elected clerk of the House of Representatives in 1837, when 
the record gives his residence as Augusta. He was not a clerk in 
1838, but 1839 ^^ ^^'"^^ again elected and his residence is then given 
as China. He died March i, during the session, was buried in the 
state grounds, and in 1843 his remains were deposited in the state 
tomb and his name placed upon the monument. 

No more interments have been made in the state grounds since 
1842. For three-fourths of a century the tomb and monument have 
stood as a memorial to these four men who died at the seat of 
government while in the service of the state, and today very few 
residents of Maine know that such a memorial exists. 



34 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



The First Baptist Church in Maine 

(Lewiston Journal ^lagazine) 

During the Revolutionary War, in the same year that Rev. Ben- 
jamin Randall, the founder of the Free Will Baptist denomination, 
organized the first church in New Durham, X. H., — 1780 — he made 
his first tour into Maine, visiting several towns on the Saco river. 

At Little Falls Plantation, afterwards Phillipsburg and now 
Hollis, many believers were baptized and a church was organized. 
Three years later Randall and other ministers, who preached a free 
and full salvation, felt the need of regular associations of some 
kind, They found, too, that the churches needed some organized 
bond of union, some authorized body to look after their interests, 
and some appropriate tribunal for counsel and appeal. And it 
v/as believed, also, that some combined effort for the worship of 
God and the salvation of souls would be blessed by tne '' Great 
Head of the Church." 

Arrangements were therefore made for a convention to be held 
in Hollis, in October, 1783. The result of that meeting was an 
agreement to hold a " general meeting '' at dift'erent places four 
times a year to be composed of ministers and delegates trom the 
churches. The Convention again met at Hollis on Saturday, Dec. 
6, 1783, when the meeting was permanently organized with Mr. 
Randall moderator and ]\Ir. Tingley as clerk. Sunday was a day 
of rest and worship. On Monday is was voted to meet quarterly 
for the advancement of " Christ's glorious Cause " and from this 
circumstance the meeting was called the '* Quarterly Meeting." 
The times and places of its future sessions were fixed as follows : 

New Gloucester, first Saturday in March : New Durham, N. H., 
first Saturday in June; \\'oolwich, first Saturday in September; 
Hollis, first Saturday in December. 

The first yearly meeting was instituted in 1792: general Con- 
ference in 1827; Maine Free Baptist Association in 1889. The 
General Conference changed its name from Free Will Baptist to 
Free Baptist in 1889. The Free Baptist Association is merged 
with the Maine Baptist ^lissionary Convention to help form the 
United Baptist Convention of Maine in Oct. 7, 191 5. baptist and 
Free Biaptist churches in the northern part of York county formed 
the North York Association. Sept. 27. 19 16. 



#- 



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH IX MAIXE. 35 



The List of Ministers. 

1838, Rev. Oliver ^McKenney ; 1839, l^ewis Witham; 1841, 
Franklin Morrill; 1841, Lewis Witham; 1841, Novum Foss ; 
1844, William Y. Smith; 1845, Samuel Fabyan ("Father 
Fabyan '') ; 1845. Jobn and James Buzell ; 1847, Thomas Kenes- 
ton; 1850, Jacob McDaniel ; 1851, Stephen Coffin; 1852, Frank- 
lin Morrell ; 1854, Theodore Stevens; 1856, Lewis H. Witham; 
1858, Daniel A. Maddox ; 1858, E. Stockman; 1861, James Hodg- 
don; 1861, Moulton Hodgdon ; 1866, Ira C. Guptill; 1869, Per- 
kins Smith; 1871, Andrew Hobson; 1872, Perkins Smith; 1879, 
Ed. C.Brown; 1880, Seth W. Perkins ; 1883, Uriah Chase; 1884, 
Abram H. Milliken; 1887, L. G. Clark; 1889, John Pettingill; 
1893, John D. Waldron; 1896, Burton Minardetal ; 1896, George 
A. Downey; 1898, Frank Willcock; 1900, Friend D. Tasker; 
1904, James W. Williams; 1907, Samuel W. Brown; 1909, Guy 
Benner, Prof. Hodgdon. etc. ; 1910, V. E. Bragdon ; 1910, Frank 
Long; 1910, W. R. Calder; 1913, C. W. Ash; 1916, A. R. Turn- 
bull. 

The church has no settled pastor at present but hopes to be 
fortunate enough to secure one soon. 

The present church was built in 1840; the parsonage was bought 
in 1866. 

This historic church is situated amid some of the most delightful 
scenery of Kate Douglas Wiggin's country. A profusion of wild 
flowers in their season and bountiful orchard crops displaying 
their brilliant colors against the background of gray granite stone 
walls. The distant White Mountains and the sea 17 miles away 
may be seen from the church. 

LUCINA H. LOMBARD. 



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36 SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

Encouraging Massachusetts Citizens to Emi- 
grate to the District of Maine in 1817 

(From the Dedham Historical Register (Vol. X, No. 3) July, 
1899.) 

Mr. C. K. Bolton, Librarian of the Boston Athenaeum, recently 
called the attention of the Register to a folio broadside, printed 
in Dedham, which he had given to the Library of Bowdoin Col- 
lege. The title and description below, give some idea of the 
method of settlement of Maine lands in the early part of this cen- 
tury. It will be remembered that then Maine was a part of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

* * * Public Lands in the District of Maine for settlement. 

Broadside. 
Dedham, A. D. ALLYNE, Printer. 

The " Commissioners of the Land Office, having addressed their 
fellow citizens in July last, on the subject of settlements contem- 
plated on the public lands in the District of ]Maine * * '^ think 
it their duty once more to invite the attention of the industrious 
and moral husbandmen, who are destitute of farms, to notice the 
proposals of a beneficent government, to improve their conditions 
in life * * * by a donation of one hundred acres of good land to 
ever^^ actual settler." They say that they " have explored and 
opened a road through the Commonwealth's land in the county of 
Somerset, north of the settlements on Kennebeck river, in the 
direction of Canada: " that on " this road settlements may be made 
within one hundred miles of Quebec, sixty miles of which is 
through a settled country, that is frequently travelled with wagons 
in one day ; " that a " contract is made for building a bridge over 
the Moose river, which is the only =5= * * water obstruction to the 
traveller from Kennebeck to Canada," to be " finished m July or 
August next ; " that the *' government of this state have provided 
for erecting a Saw and Grist Mill contiguous, for the benefit of 
the present settlement ; " that there " will be two Townships sur- 
veyed into lots of one hundred acres on this road, and offered for 
settlement immediately ; " that the " road from Penobscot in a 
direction for St. Johns, has been opened the last season a consid- 
erable distance ; " that the " government have directed a settlement 
to be made on this road * * * and Township Number Four, about 



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BOWDOIX COLLEGE CLASS OF 1825. 37 

twenty miles distance on said road, is designated * * * for that 
purpose ; that " Five dollars expense will place any man on the 
spot, who will take a water passage from Boston early in I\Iay ; " 
that the " yoemanry of Massachusetts * should ' duly accredit the 
amount of their fellow citizens living in Washington, Penobscot 
and Somerset counties, where the public lands now offered as a 
donation to settlers are situated ; " that the " Land Office in Bos- 
ton, northeast corner of the State House, lower floor," to " Loth- 
rop Lewis at Gorham * * * qj- Joseph Lee at Bucksport ; " signed, 
" Edward H. Robbins, Lothrop Lewis. Joseph Lee," and dated 
" Land Office, 2d March. 1818," the "' Selectmen of the respective 
towns are requested to deposit one of these advertisements with 
the town clerk * * * and give publicity to the others * * * ^g 
there is reason to believe, that one notification of the 9th of July, 
18 1 7, published in most of the newspapers, in August and Sep- 
tember last, did not come to the knowledge of one-fourth of the 
people of the State." 



The class which graduated from Bowdoin College in 1825 has so 
often been called "the famous Bowdoin class," that it is now an old, 
old story. In examining some newspaper clippings of 1875. ^^'^ were 
again reminded of it by the following, written by a correspondent 
of the New York Tribune of that year, as follows : 

In the latter part of the summer of 1825 there passed through the turn- 
stiles from the College grounds in Brunswick, Me., 37 young men, namely: 

Charles J. Abbott, John S. C. Abbott, Thomas Ayer, Elisha Bacon, Samuel 
P. Benson, Alden Boynton, James \V. Bradbury, Richmond Bradford, Horace 
Bridge, Geo. B. Cheever, Jonathan Cilley, Cyrus H. Coolidge, Jeremiah Dum- 
mer, Nathaniel Dunn, Joseph J. Eveleth, David H. Foster, Pat'k H. Green- 
leaf, \Vm. Hale, Xath'l Hawthorne, John D. Kinsman, Josiah S. Little, 
Stephen Longfellow, H. \V. Longfellow, Alfred :Martin, Alfred Mason, Fred- 
erick :Mellen, Mark H. Xewman, Hezekiah Packard, Geo. W. Pierce, Edward! 
D. Preble, Culler Saw^telle, David Shepley, Charles Snell, William Stone, 
Edward J. Vose, Eugene Weld, Seward Wyman. 

Why would not this be an interesting subject for historical pa- 
pers by members of literary clubs, scholars in our public schools, 
etc.? How many readers of the Journal can give accurate infor- 
mation about them? 



38 SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

Maine as a District and as a State has had Two 
Successful Immigration Enterprises 

(by the editor) 

Two notable events once occurred in Elaine more than a century 
remote from each other, which, if the policy of either had been 
pursued until the present day, might have made Maine in popula- 
tion, wealth and industry, as she is now in area, and in latent 
resources, one of the largest states of the Union. And these bring 
into view two honored names, one an adopted son and the other 
to the manner born, but both famous sons of Maine. 




General Samuel Waldo. 

Probably all of our readers have knowledge of the fact that a 
large tract of land in eastern Maine is known as the Waldo Patent. 
Every lawyer, every land surveyor, and all having knowledge of 
land titles here, know that the letters " N. W. P." as applied to 
a township in Maine signifies that it is lying north of the Waldo 
Patent. But it would not be at all remarkable if some are not 
entirely familiar with its history. 

Two hundred and ninety-one years ago the Plymouth Council 
made a grant of a large tract of land situated between the Mus- 
congus and Penobscot rivers, to a couple of Englishmen, named, 
respectively, Beauchamp and Leverett. For a long period of time 
there was much litigation by numerous parties and claimants in 






w- 



TWO MAINE IMMIGRATION ENTERPRISES. 39 



many courts in both England and America regarding the titles to 
this grant. One of these contested claims was based upon a deed 
of a portion of it from Madockawando. a chief of the Penobscot 
tribe, (a famous name in the colonial history of Maine, and in 
romance and poetry) to Gov. Phips in 1694. About 1750 a part 
of this grant was owned and under control of Gen. Saumei Waldo 
of old Falmouth in the District of Maine. He was second in com- 
mand under Pepperrell at Louisburg and is a person of renown 
in the early history of the District of Elaine. 

In the year 1753 he went to Germany as agent for the owners 
of this patent to procure emigrants to settle on this land. This 
effort was the beginning of quite a large and prosperous settlement 
at Broad Bay, now W^aldoboro, and that vicinity. 

So far as we are aware no other similar attempt was ever made 
until 117 years later after Maine had enjoyed a half century of 
statehood. 

In 1870 it was repeated by William Wldgery Thomas, a bright 
young man. who like General W'aldo was also a resident and a 
native as well, of old Falmouth, then the city of Portland. 

Born in 1839 ^^ graduated at Bowdoin in i860. Left his law 
study in 1862, and as U. S. bearer of despatches, carried a treaty 
to Turkey. This was the beginning of a notable, diplomatic career. 

Becoming Vice-Consul-General at Constantinople, he was later 
appointed by President Lincoln one of the thirty " war consuls " 
of the L'nited States and sent to Gothenburg, Sweden. In 1865, 
having resigned his office, he returned to his home in Portland. 
His residence in Sweden, his intercourse with and study of the 
Swedes convinced him that if a colony of them could be induced 
to settle in Maine, they would be of great advantage in helping 
to develop the state. Obsessed with this idea for three or four 
years he was an agitator, a crusader. A brilliant writer and a 
public speaker of grace and eloquence, his message to Maine dur- 
ing that time was read and heard almost daily by its citizens, for 
his publicity work in the press of Mlaine was unceasing and his 
eloquent voice advocating the scheme was heard in nearly all the 
cities and larger towns of the state. At last he won a victory. 
The legislature of 1870 adopted his plan and Governor Chamber- 
lain appointed him Commissioner of Immigration. 

He went to Sweden that year and returned with a colony of 5 1 
persons and established it in the wilds of Northern Aroostook, 
and on July 22, 1870, New Sweden in Maine was born. 



1^ 1 5 -I, i: -Tj 



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40 SPRAGUE'S JOURXAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

^ Today they constitute two thrifty and prosperous towns, New 
Sweden and Stockhohii, with a total population of more than 
■3000 inhabitants and an assessed valuation of over a half million 






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Honorable William Widgery Thomas. 



'dollars, besides hundreds of other thrifty Scandinavians who have 
followed them there and who are dwelling in neighboring towns. 
^And today in Waldoboro and other Maine coast towns the 
'descendants of that first migration are among the most worthy and 
'substantial citizens of that part of Maine. 



TWO MAIXE IMMIGRATIOX EXTERPRISES. 



41 



' These two examples of what '* might have been "' here in Maine, 
bespeak in undeniable facts with vastly more force and eloquence 
than can be conveyed by words, the wisdom and foresight of 
General Waldo in the i8th, and of the Honorable William Widgery 
Thomas in the 19th century. 

Is this not a strange array of facts? — Both of these attempts 
at inducing foreign immigration to Maine were eminently success- 
ful, and yet, the policy of our state was so — well, we will not say 
stupid, but, perhaps, absurdly ultra-conservative, that it was 
abandoned, and opportunity turned away when it knocked at our 
door. 

Later Mr. Thomas had a long and distinguished career as Min- 
ister and Ambassador to Sweden, serving 15 years under the 
appointment of three presidents. 

Mt. Thomas is an entertaining writer and has written exten- 
sively. His book Sweden and the Swedes, a richly illustrated 
volume of 750 pages, published by Rand, McX'^ally & Co., Chicago, 
in 1892, and republished in both the English and Swedish lan- 
guages, is his most famous work as an author. 

In 1887 he married a Swedish lady of noble birth, whose death 
occurred in 1912 and on June 2, 191 5, he married the youngest 
sister of his first wife. 

' W^hile their real home is yet in Portland, they spend a part of 
their time in Sweden. 




Alice u.^eeU'* Is-'-ftn. 



*_^.<^.^^-^-^^.A^ 



In Old Falmouth, now PcrLland, Maine. 



42 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



Pilgrims in Maine 

' In my talk to the Rotary Club of Lewiston and Auburn January 
30th, 1920, on the subject of the Pilgrims of the Mayflower in 
Maine, I submitted nine points of interest to be remembered and 
considered by the people of Elaine. I note with great satisfaction 
that scz'oi of these points have been published by you, and appears 
in Vol. 7, Xo. 4, page 234 of Sprague's Journal of Maine History. 
It is equally important to have the other two points remembered 
and considered by the people of Maine. They are as follows : 

■ Eight. That soon ( 1920) the three hundredth anniversary of 
the Landing of the Pilgrims of the Mayflower \vill be celebrated 
in Massachusetts and elsewhere with great pomp and pageantry, 
and by the creation of some permanent and splendid additional 
memorial at Plymouth in honor of the Pilgrims. 

' Ninth. Shall the rich heritage of Pilgrim history of Maine 
continue to remain without a permanent memorial monument on 
the cite of the abode of the Pilgrims at Koussinoc for a whole 
'generation ? 

We then asked this question. " Would not the State of ]\I!aine 
reflect honor upon herself to erect a granite monument on the site 
of the abode of the ^layflower Pilgrims, in honor of those famous 
men who first opened the Kennebec valley to the early white set- 
tlers and transmitted their territorial rights to the present genera- 
tion? We think it would reflect great honor upon the State of 
iMaine, to do this. My friends, any other state in the Union 
would erect a monument two hundred feet high in honor of the 
Pilgrims if it had the Pilgrim history of Maine." 

Sprague's Journal of Maine History is widely read not only in 
Maine, but beyond her borders, and it is a good medium to reach 
those of historical tastes and all who have pride in the standing 
of the State of Maine, in preserving her historical sites. 
' It would be gratifying to me to have this communication pub- 
lished in the next issue of your excellent historical Journal. 

ARCHIE LEE TALBOT. 
Lewiston, Maine, March 29, 1920. 



^5:1 i>flV/' 



REVEREND JOHX SAWYER. 43 

Reverend John Sawyer 

(contributed by WILLIAM C. WOODBURY.) 

' The following paper, relating to Reverend John Sawyer, sup- 
posed to have been written by the Reverend Wooster Parker, was 
found among the papers of the late ^fajor Charles H. B. Wood- 
bury of Dover, Maine : 

Rev. John Sawyer, a Congregational minister, now 
(M'arch, 1852) living in Garland, Penobscot county, 
•Maine, was born in Hebron, Conn., Oct. 9, 1755, being 
now in his 97th year. 

His father's name was Thomas, who had two brothers, 
John and Isaac. 

He moved to Oxford, N. H. in the spring of 1767. He 
had five sons and two daughters who lived to grow up 
and have families. The sons' names were Jonathan, Ed- 
ward, Ichabod and John. The names of the daughters 
were Mary, who married Tillotson, and Hephzibah who 
married Cross. 

John, now of Garland, graduated at Dart. College in 
1785, at 30 years of age. He was licensed and com- 
menced preaching in the autumn of the same year at 
Newbury, Vt., where he labored several months. Though 
licensed to preach, he spent several months first with 
Judge Nathl. Niles of Vt, then several with Dr. Saml. 
Spring of Newburyport, and afterward several more with 
Dr. Hart of Preston, Conn., in the study of Theology. 
He was ordained as pastor at Oxford, N. H., about the 
year 1788 and continued a pastor there about nine years. 
After his dismission he was installed pastor at Boothbay 
in what was then the " District of Maine," in or near the 
year 1798. 

In the year 1777, and while a member of College, he 
went on a campaign of one month as one of a Company 
of Militia to Saratoga, N. Y., where the conflicting 
armies were rallied and where the celebrated Gen. Bur- 
goyne had surrendered he saw the arms and musical 
instruments of the general's army stacked up on the field. 
After that, when the Canadians came out and burnt 
Royalton, Vt., he was one of a Company of Militia who 



44 SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAIXE HISTORY. 



repaired to the town, but they had only to pursue the 
affrighted assailants one afternoon in their hurried re- 
treat, and were at libert}' to return the next day. 

He remained pastor at Boothbay some eight or nine 
years. In 1800 he performed three months missionary 
labor, under the Massachusetts Missionary Society, 
mostly in the easterly part of Elaine, and was the first 
missionary sent into that section. After his dismission 
from Boothbay he removed to Bangor about the year 
1804. There, before the settlement of Rev. Loomis, 
he supplied the pulpit of the First Congregational Church 
for about 15 months, and at the same time taught a district 
school. 

He traveled over a large portion of the State in order 
to fix on the best location for what is now Bangor Theo- 
logical Seminary, in the establishment of which he was 
one of the earliest and most efficient movers. 

Since the year 1800 he has spent most of his time as a 
missionary and minister in the newer portions of the 
state. He has been able to preach and has done so almost 
constantly up to May, 185 1, when he was disabled by a 
fall from his wagon. His health now is quite good 
again, so that he has rode into neighboring towns and 
preached several Sabbaths since the year 1852 came in. 
His health and strength are so good that he has chopped 
the greater part of the wood at the door for his fire this 
cold" winter. His voice is still clear and strong, and he is 
able to conduct the services of public worship twice or 
even three times on the Sabbath with quite as much ease 
to himself as most young ministers, making each of his 
sermons at least 45 minutes long. 



Piscataquis to Mother Maine 

This poem from the pen of Professor William Smith Knowlton 
of Monson, Maine's famous " Old School ]^Iaster " was written 
by the request of the Maine Centennial Committee. It was 
designed to be used with other poems descriptive of the different 
counties of Maine at the contemplated pageant which was once 
intended to have been a part of the centennial celebration at the 



'r;'Oi:;'i'yvi 



V/Oi; 



PISCATAQUIS TO MOTHER MAINE. 45 

city of Portland, but which was later abandoned by the committee. 
Prof. Knowlton has been quite a prolific writer of both verse and 
prose in magazines and newspapers. His most notable published 
works are the Old School Master or Forty-Five Years with the 
Boys and Girls (Kennebec Journal Press, 1905) Modern Classics 
(same publishers, 1912) and Sangerville Centennial Poem, 1914. 



A >x)unger born of Mother Maine 

Piscataquis, rejoicing stands. 
She brings, resplendent in her train, 

True loving hearts and willing hands. 

The buzz of saw and whirl of wheel 

Makes her orchestral band complete. 
She brings her all with ardent zeal 

And lays them at her ^Mother's feet. 

She throws around her shoulders dear 

A mantle soft as eider down 
Kimonas made for evening cheer. 

And coats of grey and coats of brown. 

She brings her Jove-defying slate, 

To shield from snow and hail and rain, 

And masts for ships so tall and straight, 
To plow her ever-restless main. 

She wraps around her ^Mother's form 

A coat of beaver, fox or lynx. 
To keep her hands secure and warm 

A muff of otter, or of minks. 

She sent her boys across the sea 

To fight for Freedom and the right. 
The Wheatfield there will ever be 

Memorial of that bloody fight. 

Should hostile band> assail her gate; 

Or enemies invade her beach, 
A Maxim Ci) gun already waits, 

With smokeless powder in her breech. 

Her eagles guard Katahdin's heights 

To watch for any hostile foe. 
On Boarstone with her lakes bedight, 

On earthquake riven Kineo. 

(1) Sir Hiram Maxim, inventor oi the maeliine trim, born at Brookwav'^^ Mills, 
banffervillo (Piscataquis county t Maine, Feb. 5, 1K4(). Died in London. 'En;?lanrt, 
Nov. 24, 1016. 



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46 SPRAGUE'S JOURXAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



And Moosehead with her woody shore 

Invites the weary to repose. 
On cahn Sel>ec the sportsman's oar 

Bright sparkles in the sunbeam throws. 

And Mother dear we've other gifts 
We fain would lay upon thy knee 

Sweet Anna's (j) woodsong's rich uplifts 
And Sprague himself is History, 

But her best gifts to ^Mother Maine 
Free from mixture and all alloys 

Are her right loyal dames and men 

Her handsome girls and stalwart boys. 

The men we sent to speak for you 
At Washington we'll ne'er forget 

A Wiley, Rice, and Davee too 

And Guernsey's star is rising yet, , 

Should gloomy care and doubts prevail 
x\nd Somnus from your pillow fly 

We'll drive away each fresh assail 

With copious dose of Our Bill Xye. (3) 



(2) Refers to the late Anua Boynton Averill of Foxcroft (Piscataquis county) 
Maine, author of Birch Stream and other poems. 

(.3) Edgar Wilson Xye. a noted humorist known to the literary world as " Bill 
Nye," was born in Shirley (Piscataquis county) Feb. 20, 18.50. He died in Ash- 
ville. X. C, Feb. 22, IHXi. 






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This engine was built by Robert Stevenson & Co., Xew Castle, upon Tyne, 
England, in 1835. Its first trip over the Bangor, Old Town and Milford, 
R. R., later known as the Veazie R. R. was November 6, 1831, Its last trip 
was August 19, 1867. 



.;: ^ 



FAVOR TAVERN. DOVER. 47 



Favor Tavern, Dover 

(by a member of the PISCATAQUIS BAR.) 

The accompanying picture is that of the once famous and historic 
Favor Tavern at Dover, Me. It was once the most important stage 
tavern along the Hne of the stage route from the city of Bangor 
to Moosehead Lake. In its time it was not only the principal 
public house at Dover, the county seat of Piscataquis, but the most 
noted hostelry in the county and entertained in its day many dis- 
tinguished men. For several decades it lodged under its roof 
eminent judges and attorneys from all over the state whose busi- 
ness brought them to the regular sessions of the District and 
Supreme Courts sitting at Dover. It was the half way house 
between Bangor and the Moosehead Lake region where the lum- 
berman, the business man and the traveler for pleasure found it 
most convenient to stop ofif for lodging and refreshments. 

It is related that often times midnight parties arrived at its 
hospitable doors from Bangor and were served with food and 
drink in abundance regardless of the lateness of the hour, and 
from which they returned to the Queen City of the East in the 
early hours of the morning. 

It figured in a celebrated road case in which the Court held that 
a town meeting could not properly be held on wheels. It seemed 
that in the case in question promoters of a much desired road 
caused a town meeting to be called to be held at the Favor Tavern 
and on the day and hour appointed the proponents of the road in 
accordance with a well laid plan, fearing opposition to their pur- 
pose, arrived in force at the Tavern in buggies to which were 
attached smart horses. The warrant being read by the, clerk, a 
moderator was quickly chosen who called the meeting to order 
from the front door of the tavern, and thereupon a motion to 
adjourn to another part of the town four miles distant was made 
and carried, whips were cracked and the interested citizens of 
Dover departed at full speed to the point of adjournment where 
the meeting was again convened and the necessary appropriation 
voted long before the opponents could arrive on the scene. 

The late D. D. Stewart, one of Maine's most distinguished 
lawyers, frequently stopped at the Favor Tavern during sessions 
of the Court. He stated on one occasion an eminent jurist, later 



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48 SPFL\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Maine, came to his room 
in company with men of local importance and proposed that they 
pass the evening by playing high-low-jack. Partners were chosen 
and the game went on until a late hour. Fortune favoring Mr. 
Stewart and his partner to such an extent that Mr. Stewart was 
watched with embarrassing closeness as he handled the cards. 
Mr. Stewart was a man of exemplary habits w^ho neither drank 
nor gambled, but frequently during the evening the 'bell was rung 



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The Old Favor Tavern 



by his callers and the proprietor brought the customary drinks 
of the times to the room which were freely partaken of by Mr. 
•Stewart's companions. Finally when it became time to close the 
game the gentlemen arose from the table and one of the opponents 
of Mr. Stewart in the game drew his pocket book and passed a 



FAVOR TAVERN, DOVER. 49 



considerable sum of money to ^Ftr. Stewart's partner, who, observ- 
ing the astonishment on Mr. Stewart's face, promptly and vigor- 
ously remarked to him : '* As you won't play for stakes, you can't 
have the money.'' Air. Stewart said he could truthfully state that 
he had gambled and had never gambled. A day or two later, as 
Mr. Stewart came to settle his bill w'ith the proprietor, he found 
it amounted to more than he had expected, and on inquiry he 
discovered that the refreshments of the evening had been charged 
to his room so he promptly paid the bill, remarking that he " was 
glad to have the opportunitv to pav for the Court's rum." 

On days of the general muster which were annually held in 
earlier times, the Favor Tavern entertained festive crowds, and at 
times of important horse trots for which the twin towns were 
widely knowm, its ample stables were filled w^ith racers from all 
sections of the state. 

The Favor Tavern was built in 1834 by Edward R. Favor, a 
well known innkeeper, on the site of the homestead of the Hon. 
Thomas Davee, who later was Piscataquis county's first member 
of Congress. Mr. Favor acquired the Davee property in 1832, 
the buildings on which were destroyed by fire in 1834 and replaced 
that year by the erection of the Favor Tavern which w^as kept by 
Mr. Favor for many years. He was followed in the proprietorship 
by E. G. Thompson, Henry Norcross, Will Nichols, Solomon 
Chandler and Ira F. Palmer. Mr. Palmer w^as followed by Elihu 
Sanford as proprietor from about the time of the Civil War until 
the early eighties. 

The property was finally owned by Caleb O. Palmer, a well 
known citizen, financier and noted horseman of Dover, who 
appears in the foreground of the picture with his celebrated trot- 
ting stallion, Gloster,- which held the two-year-old record for the 
state. On September 6, 1894, at ten o'clock in the evening, fire 
broke out in the stables attached and Mr. Palmer, who lived near, 
rushed from his house into the stables in an endeavor to rescue his 
wife's favorite horse and lost his life in the fire. 

The following year in 1895 the Tavern was torn down. Thus 
passed one of the important land marks in Piscataquis county. A 
portion of its site was set apart by Amanda E. Palmer for the 
benefit of the Thompson Free Library, and is known as the Caleb 
Orin Palmer Library Reservation. 






# ,. ',....,.. 



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50 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



Some Representative Maine Men of 
Yesterday and Today 

Note — The Journal acknowledges the kind co-operation of Dr. Henry S. 
Burrage author of Maine in the Northeastern Boundary Controversy, in the 
production of this department. Through his courtesy we are enabled to pro- 
duce herein the following portraits : John Holmes, Albion K. Parris, Charles 
S. Daveis, Enoch Lincoln, Leuel Williams, John Fairfield, George Evans, 
Peleg Sprague, Edward Kent and William King. 




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HENRY E. DUNXACK. 
Henry E. Dunnack, State Librarian since 1915, was born in 1869, graduated 
from Bowdoin College in 1897. He was married in 1895 to Adella Smith 
Df Dixmont, Maine, who died in June, 1913. Mr. Dunnack has two sons. 
In addition to his library work, Mr. Dunnack devotes much time to the 
lecture platform. Among his lectures, the following are most popular: 

Heroines of Browning and Shakespeare. 

Elijah Kellogg, the Boys' Man, 

The Achievement of Life. 

The Dream of Democracy. 

Maine's Part in Building the Republic. 



r . 



REPRESENTATIVE MAINE MEN, 51 







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PELEG SPRAGUE. 

Born in Duxbury, Mass., April 27, 1793; Harvard College 1812; admitted 
to Plymouth County 'Mass. bar in August, 1815, and located in Augusta, 
Maine; removed to Hallowell about two years later; member Maine House 
1820-21; U. S. Congress 1823-29; U. S. Senator 1829-35; appointed judge 
of U. S. District Court 1841 and served until 1865; died in Boston October 
13. 1880. 



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52 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



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JOHN KELLER AMES. 

John Keller Ames of Ma- 
chias was born in East Machias 
November 2. 1831, the son of 
Capt. Alfred and Mary (Kel- 
ler) Ames. Mr. Ames was 
one of the leading merchants 
of Machias and was largely- 
interested in navigation and 
timberlands. He was select- 
man of his town for thirtv 
years ; state senator 1893-96, 
and at the time of his death 
was collector of customs at 
the port of Machias. 

He married Sarah Albee 
Sanborn October 7, 1855. 
Children : Edwin Gardner 
Ames, Seattle, Washington ; 
Mrs. Anna M. Peavey. Ma- 
chias; Mrs. Julia P. Fuller, 
Providence, R. L : Frank San- 
born .\me5, Machias ; Alfred 
Keller Ames, Machias ; Lucy 
Talbot Ames, deceased. 

Mr. Ames died at Machias, 
March 22, 1501. 



GEORGE C. WIXG, JR. 

George C. Wing, Jr., of Au- 
burn, the son of . George C. 
and Emily B. (Thompson ) 
Wing, was born in Auburn 
October 6. 1878. He was grad- 
uated at Brown University in 
igco ard at Harvard Law 
School 1903 and admitted to 
the Maine bar in 1904, since 
which time he has been en- 
gaged in the practice of law. 
served two terms as city solici- 
tor of Auburn and two terms 
as a member of the Auburn 
Board of Education ; was a 
member of the Legislature in 
1909, and is now a trustee of 
the Auburn Public Library. 
For a number of years he wa> 
connected with the National 
Guard and rose to the rank of 
Captain, receiving his honor- 
able discharge January 9, 1912. 

•Mr. Wing 's unmarried. 




REPRESENTATIVE MAINE MEN. 



53 




RUEL WILLIAMS. 
Born Hallowell, Maine, June 2, 1783; admitted to Bar 1802, and began 
practice in Augusta; member of Maine House of Representatives 1822-26 
and 1829-32; Mame Senate 1827-28; U. S. Senator 1837-43; died in Augusta 
July 25, 1862. 



. 54 SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAIXE HISTORY 



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U. S. SENATOR FREDERICK HALE. 

Senator Hale, the son of foimer Senator Eugene Hale and grandson of 
Senator Zachariah Chandler, was born in Detroit, Michigan, October 7, i874» 
his mother being Mary Chandler, daughter of the former Michigan senator. 
Senator Hale is a graduate of Harvard and for several years prior to his 
becoming a United States Senator practiced law in Portland, Maine. Mem- 
ber of Governor Hill's staff 1901-1904; member Maine House of Represen- 
tatives 1505-06; National Republican Committeeman 1912-18; United States 
Senator 191 7 to date. 

Senator Hale is a member of the committee on naval affairs, also thi 
committee on appropriations. 

Unmarried. 



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REPRESENTATIVE MAINE MEN. 



55 



RUPERT H. BAXTER. 

Rupert H. Baxter of Bath. 
Maine, the son of James P. 
and Sarah (Lewis) Baxter, 
was born in Portland. Maine. 
July 26, 1871. Graduated 
from Bowdoin College 1S94. 
By occupation 'Sir. Baxter i> a 
canner and is prominent in the 
business interests of his city 
and of the state. State Sena- 
tor from Sag-adahoc county 
1917-20. President Bath Trus: 
Company and director U. S. 
Trust Compar-- of Portland 
and First National Bank oi 
Brunswick. 

He married, June 3. 1896. 
Kate Depuy ^ilussenden. Chil- 
dren : ^lary Lincoln, bom 
April II. 1901 ; Lydia ^IcLel- 
lan. born February 7, 1907. 




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FRANK P. MORISON. 

Frank P. ^loriscn. the son 
of John and Eiiza J. (Fcrd) 
Morison, was born in East 
Corinth. ]\Laine, -\ugust 14, 
1870, and has made that town 
hii home during- his life time. 
He is a large farmer and man- 
ufacturer of fertilizer, for- 
merly for many years was a 
lumberman. He has held va- 
rious town offices and was a 
member of the state legisla- 
ture 1913-14 and 1917-18. 

Married Linnie ^L Ames, 
September 19, 1893. No chil- 
dren. 



56 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 




CHARLES S. DAVEIS. 

Born in Portland, 'Maine, 1788; Bowdoin College 1807; was one of the 
leading lawyers of Portland. He was prominent in the Northeastern Bound- 
ary controversy and was appointed by Governor Lincoln to investigate the 
arrest and imprisonment of John Baker, He was the author of several 
reports and articles on the Northeastern Boundary controversy. Died in 
Portland in 1865. 



REPRESENTATIVE MAINE MEN. 



57 











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LUCILIUS A. EMERY. 

Lucilius A. Emery of Ellsworth, Maine, was born in Carmel, Maine, July 
27, 1840, the son of James S. and Eliza (Wing) Emery. Graduated from 
Bowdoin College i8v5r ; studied law and in 1863 settled in Ellsworth ; from 
1869 to 1883 was a law partner of the late Senator Eugene Hale. City solici- 
tor of Ellsworth; county attorney Hancock county 1867-71; state senator 
1874-75 and 1881-82; attorney general of Maine 1876-79. In 1883 he was 
appointed associate justice of the Supreme Judicial Court and served as such 
until 1906. From 1906 to 191 1 he was chief justice of the Supreme Judicial 
Court of Maine, retiring to private life in the latter year. 

November 9, 1864, Judge Emery married Anne S. Crosby of Hampden. 
Mrs. Emery died in Ellsworth December 12, 1912. Qiildren : Anne Crosby, 
bom January i, 1871, married Francis Greenleaf AUimro ; Henry Crosby, 
bom December 21, 1872. 



58 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF :^IAIXE HISTORY 



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JOHN HOLMES. 

Born in PCin^stcn, ^Nlass.. March i.;, 1773; Brown University 1796: admitted 
to Bar 1799 and located in Alfred, Maine; member of Congress 1817-20; 
U. S. Senator 1820-1827 and i%2C,-2i2,\ member of Elaine House of Repre- 
sentatives 1835-38; U. S. attorney 1841 until his d^arh which occurred in 
Portland July 7, 1843. 



REPRESENTATIVE MAINE MEN. 



59 



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IRA G. HERSEY 



Ira G. Hersey, the present representative in Congress frcni the Fourth 
Maine District, was born in Hodgdon, Elaine, March 31. 1858, the son of 
Samuel ar.d Elizabeth (White) Hersey. He was educated in the public 
schools and at Ricker Classical Institute at Houlton, Maine. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1880; representative to State Legislature 1909-12 and 
state senator from Aroostook county 1913-16; president of the Maine Senate 
1915-16. He was elected to the sixty-fifth congress taking his seat March 4, 
191 7, and was re-elected as a member of the sixty-sixth, the present congress. 
On January 6, 1884, he was united in marriage with Annie Dillen- 



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6o SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 





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ALBIOX K. PARRIS. 

Born Hebron, Maine, January 19, 1788; Dartmouth College 1806: 
admitted to Bar 1809; member of Massachusetts General Court 1813; state 
senator 1814; member of Congress 1815 to February 3, 1818 when he re- 
signed; judge U. S. District Court 1818-20; governor of Maine 1822-27; 
U. S. Senator 1827 to August 26, 1828, when he resigned to accept ap-point- 
ni«»nt as judge of Maine Supreme Court serving until 1836; died in Port- 
land, "Maine, February 11, 1857. 



m^ 



REPRESENTATIVE MAINE MEN. 



6i 



DELMOXT EMERSOX. 

Delmont Emerson of Island 
Falls, Maine, was born in tha: 
town April jo, 1S64. the son 
of Martin L. and Belle (Carr) 
Emerson. For more ihan 
thirty years he has been en- 
gaged in the lumber business. 
His parents moved to Island 
F?lls a short time before Mr. 
Emerson was born and took 
up a farm in that then new 
country and Mr. Emerson wa-^ 
born in a log cabin in the 
town which, since his birth. 
has been his home. Represen- 
tative to the Legislature 191 1- 
14 and State Senator 1919-20 

He married, Aueust i-i. 
1888, Myra Hall Morrison. 
Children : Madella. born Jun • 
10, 1895: Ro-well Delmcnt. 
born Augu-t 28, 1897. 




»i*JW*.'*"' '""^vi 




WILUAM B. KENDALL. 

William B. Kendall of Bow- 
doinham is a descendant of 
William Kendall of Fairlield, 
one of the signers of the con- 
stitution of the State of 
Maine. He was born in Bow- 
doinham, Maine, October 19, 
1855. the son of James M. and 
Emily R CWhitten) Kendall. 
Mr. Kendall is a fertilizer 
manufacturer and manager of 
the Sagadahoc Fertilizer Com- 
pany. He was a member of 
the legislature of 1907. He 
has always been interested in 
educational matters and for 
eight years was chairman of 
the school board of his native 
town. 

He married Ella C. Adams 
February 19. 1895. 



62 SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 




FRANK E. GUERXSEY. 



Frank E. Guernsey is a native of Dover, Maine, and the son of Edward H. and 
Hannah (Thompson) Gcernsey. He was educated at Foxcroft Academy, East 
Maine Conference Seminary. Bucksport. Maine; Wesleyan Seminary. Keuts' Hill, 
and Eastman Business College. Poughkeepsie. New York. He was admitted to 
the bar of the state in ISIM): treasurer of Piscataquis County ISOO-KG: repre- 
sentative to state legislature lSI>7-irXX>; state senator 1903-04; elected as repre- 
sentative from the Fourth Maine District to the Sixtieth Congress to fill the 
vacancy caused by the death of Llewellyn Powers and represente«l his district 
from December 7. 1908, to March .3. 1917. While in Congress he served on two 
Important committees, viz.: Territories, and Banking and Currency. Mr. Guern- 
sey Is president of the Piscataquis Savings Bank, Dover, Maine, and trustee of 
the Kineo Trust Company, also of that town. 

He married, June IG, 181/7, Josephine Frances Lyford of Vinalhaven. They 
have one child, Thompson L. Guernsey, born February 17, 1904. 



^ 



REPRESEXTATIVE MAIXE MEX 



63 










Vx V 



ENOCH LINXOLX. 

Born Worcester, Mass.. December 28, 1788; attended Harvard and Bow- 
doin Colleges; admitted to Bar 181 1; settled in Fryeburg 1812; removed 
to Paris 1818; member of Congress 1818-1826; governor of Maine 1827 
until his death which occurred October 8, 1829. 



# 



64 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



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FORREST H. COLBY. 

Son of Warren and Mary \V. Colby, was born in Bingham, Maine, Feb- 
ruary 4, 1869. He received his education in the schools of his native town 
and for many years has been a prominent figure in the lumber industries of 
his county. He made a special study of forestry and is recognized as a lead- 
ing authority upon that subject. 

Mr. Colby was a member of the Maine House of Representatives 1909-12 
and of the Senate 1913-16. He was appointed Forest Commissioner of the 
State of Maine in February, 1917. 

He married, April 38, 1891, Carrie Robinson. Children: Lena Mary 
Colby, born 'May 16, 1893 ; Florence H. Colby, bom August 2, 1896. 



# 



REPRESENTATIVE MAINE MEN. 



65 



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JUDGE CLARENXE HALE. 



Judge Clarence Hale was born in Turner. Maine, Ai>ril 15, 1.S4S, the younsest 
♦"hild of James Sullivan and Betsy (.Stai>les) Hale. Graduated Bowdoin College 
iStilj; admitted to the bar IhTI and located in I'ortland where he shortly acquired 
a large practice. Member state lejrishiture l.^^J-M*. He was appointe<i judge of 
^he U. S. District Court in I'.MrJ. and has now served in that important position 
for eighteen years, (m Marr-h 11. is.'^O. Ju<ige Hale was united in marriage with 
Margaret Rollin-^ <.f I'orthuul. ilaine. Tlicir children are Katherine, born March 
-^K 1SS4. marrie<l. VMy't. I'hilif. (;. Clifford: Robert, born November 1% 18.^9, 
unmarriefl. 

Judge Hale is a member of the Maine Historical Society, is a keen student of 
Maine history and has written many valuable articles upon the subject. 



66 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



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ROBERT F. DUXTOX. 

Robert F. Dunton of Bel- 
fast, son of Hcratio and Julia 
Ann Diinron. was born in 
Searsmont. Maine, Xovember 
24, 184S. Educated at the 
East Maine Conference Sem- 
inary, Maine \\ esleyan Sem- 
inary and Carlton College : 
admitted to die bar in 187J; 
several times mayor of Bel- 
fast; cGunt}^ attorney of 
Waldo county: meml)er of the 
legislature 1907-08; state bank 
commissioner 1911-13. 

Mr. Dunton married, June 5, 
1878, Elizabeth Mabel Farrar. 
Children : Helen Dunton Gil- 
chrest, March 31, 1879; Edirli 
Dunton Cool, born March 22, 
1882 ; Florence Elizabeth Dun- 
ton, born October 20, 1883 ; 
William Farrar Dunton, born 
October 6, 1886. 



PERCIVAL P. BAXTER. 

Percival P. Baxter of Port- 
land, Maine, the son of James 
P. and Mahetable C. (Proc- 
ter) Baxter, was born in 
Portland, Xovember 22, 1876. 
He received his education in 
the public schools of his native 
city ; was graduated from 
Bowdoin College in 1898 and 
from Harvard Law School in 
1901, since wdiich date he has 
been engaged in the practice 
of law in Portland. He was 
a member of the Maine House 
of Representatives 1905-06, 
1917-20, and of the State Sen- 
ate 1909-10. Mr. Baxter has 
taken a prominent part in the 
movement for the conserva- 
tion of the Maine water 
powers for the benefit of 
Maine residents. He is un- 
married. 







■€>-'^ 



REPRESEXTATIVE MAINE MEN 



67 






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EDWARD KENT. 



Born in Concord, X. H., January 8, 1802: Harvard College 1821; admitted 
to bar and located in Bangor, 1825 ; member Maine House of Representatives 
1828-29: Governor of Maine 1838 and 1841. Justice Supreme Judicial Court 
1859-1873. After his retirement from the Supreme bench practiced law in 
Bangor until his death which occurred May 19, 1877, 



68 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 




U. S. SENATOR BERT M. FERXALD. 

Senator Fernald was born in West Pownal, Maine, April 2^, 1858, the son 
of James H. and Betsey (Libby) Fernald. The senator states his business 
or profession is farmer and corn packer, and parenthetically, United States 
Senator. Senator Fernald held various town and county offices and in 1897- 
98 was a member of the Maine House of Representatives; State Senator 
1899-02, and in 1909-ro was Governor of Maine. He became a member of 
the U. S. Senate in 1918. 

In 1878 he married Annie A. Keene. Children: James H., born 1880; 
Mellie H.. born 1884. 



REPRESENTATIVE MAIXE MEN. 



69 



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JUDGE BERTR.\M L. SMITH. 

Judge Bertram L. Smith of the Penobscot County Superior Court was born ia 
Exeter. Maine, November L'O. lsr><), son of William and Rosiua (Fo>i.s) Smith. 

He was admitted to the bar in IsTT and until 1S^S practiced in Dan^'or, Maine, 
In the latter year he removed to I'atten. Maine, where lie remained until hi.s 
appointment as judjje of the Superior Court in July. r.)10. Judjre Smith wa.s 
county attorney of I'en<>b.s<-ot County 18l>7-l;X>4 ; a member of the Maine House 
of Representative-; VMfi-t<, and l'>l"'.-ir>. 

On October lH. IsTI*. he married Charlotte Louise Murch. Mrs. Smith died 
December 25. I'.HT. One child was born to them, Bertram L.. Jr., born October 
16, 1880. who died September 21>, liK);{. 



70 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



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WILLIS ELLIS PARSOXS. 



Willis Ellis Parsons, a son of Levi and Lydia (Ellis) Parsons, wjts born 
in Sangerville, Maine. May 10. 1S54 : read law with Aujjustus G. Lebroke. and 
was a<imitte<i t<» Piscataquis h::r in isTs when a i)artnershii> was formed as 
Lebroke & Parsons, whicii continued until Mr. I'arsons election as county attor- 
ney in 1SS4. He was county att(»rney of Piscata(iuis ('ounty l.H.s.j-r)0: memher 
of the Maine House of Kepresentatives ISVo-'M', jind of the Senate ISKT-IIS. He 
has served as a nn-rnber of the Itepublicau State Conuuittee and was' presidential 
elector in IUV2: for many years a trustee of Foxcroft Academy. F^rom .lanuary, 
1914, until February 14. vAs. he was one of the trustees of the State Hospitals 
■ml School for F'eeble Minded, serving practically all of his term as president of 
tlie board. ()u I-^-bruary 14. I'.HS. he entered uiion the duties of Commissioner 
of Inland Fisheries and (lame, beirjr the tirst one to occuuy that {)osition after 
the aboli^liinent of the <dd three men commission makinij the change to a single 
commissioner. 

Mr. I'arsoTis Is a j>romine"t 0<ld Fellow and has served as Grand Patriarch of 
the Grand P^neamnment of Maine, also as Grand Master of the Grand Lo<lge of 
Maine. 

He has acquired fame throughout the state as a political orator and public 
speaker. 



REPRESENTATIVE MAINE MEN. 




GEORGE EVAXS. 

Born in Hallowell, Maine, January 12, 1797; Bowdoin College 1815; 
admitted to Bar 1818; member of Maine House and served as speaker 1829; 
member of Congress 1829-1841; U. S. Senator 1841-1847; attorney general 
of Maine 1850, 1854, 1856; died in HalloweH April 5, 1867. 



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MATTHEW CHURCHILL .MORRILL. 

Matthew Churchill Morrill of Gray, Maine, was born in Rajmuml. Maine. Nov. 
5, 184:i, son of William and Maria B. (Cliurchill) Morrill. He was a member of 
the S€fConil Maine Cavalry and whs .nustered out of se'vice Liecember (j, 1>->>j. 
In the spring of l.s«u; he settled in (iiay and for the many years of his long life 
has folIowe<l the «>ccui»ati<)n of farmer and lumberman. He carveil most all of 
his present large farm out of tlie virgin forest. 

Mr. Morrill was a representative to the legislature 1".10:>-10()4 and State senator 
1905-lOO.H. He was the father of the bill to prohibit carrying old soldiers to the 
poorhouse: was i»risf>n inspector during Gov. Haines" administration. He has 
always been active in promoting the welfare <»f his town, countv and state. 

He married, Jan. 12. ls«;7. Miry Brown, b. May 17. IM-', d. Dec. .'>, ls72. Of 
this marriage there were three children: Hugh I'., b. De<*. :{. isr^v, ,i. June 7, l^'.M}; 
John, b, June 8. isTO. <1. Aug. -MK 1n72 : Mary B., b. Oct. '.». l.S7_'. d. Nov. 2«5. ISJto. 

He married secon<l. Mary J. McConky. .Tan. 17. 1*574, b. Aur. 17. 1S.V>. Children 
of second marriage : Ada E.. b. Feb. 27, 1870. d. .Tune 27. IS-SO; .John \V., b. Julv 
7, 1878; George A., b. June 7. Isso : True ('.. b. Julv 2:5 18M1, d. Aug. .!, 1884; 
True C, b. May 3, Ik's*; Margarette E., b. May 29, 1895, d. Jan. 5. 1896. 



REPRESENTATIVE MAINE MEN. 



7Z 




PETER CHARLES KEEGAX. 

Peter Charles Keegan. the son ut James and Lucv (Parent) Keegau was born 
. \aa P.uren. Miiine. May i:5. lsr,(>. He sei-ured his education in such -schools 
H ,-'"'. ^''^^"tier country tiien afforded and com{>leted his acidemic education aC 
ine I. niversity of New Brunswick. Mr. Keejran was admitted to tiie bar in 1,%9 
an*i settled in his native town (»f Van liuren. He has sei-\-ed nine terms as a 
representative to the leirislature. In VMil he was appointed i)v (Joveruor Cobb 
■« nieniber of tho commission to inquire into the a<lvisabilitv of establishinf; a 
•Mate Board of Charities aivl Corrections, and J'nuarv VI. IMof). wa< aitpointed bv 
J resident Roosevelt a member on the pa^t i>t the United States of tlie St. John 
Kiver Com mission, serving until March 1, Unti. when the duties of the commission 
^vere completed. 

iJ'\V ,K*'^'-':'fi i-* fhe jMithor of the chapter on the Histo-y of the Catholic Church 
in Maine in the C-thoIic Encyclouedia published New York. 11)10. pages TA\-TAK 
«i 1 -^**^"'^<^ ">• l"^^- Peter Cliarles Keesran was united in marrij-.ge with Mary 
Miarkey of Fre<l nickton. New Brunswick. They have no children. 



74 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 










LEOX G. C. BROWX. 

Leon Oilman Carleton 
Brown of Milo, was born in 
Medford, Maine, May 27, 
i88r, the son of William E. 
and Florence A. (Sawtelle) 
Brown. !Mr. Brown received 
his legal training at the Uni- 
versity of Maine Law School. 
and after his admission to the 
bar located in Milo where he 
has been prominent in the 
municipal affairs of the town. 
He has been town clerk of 
Milo since 1906; was county 
attorney of Piscataquis county 
191 1 -12, and was a member of 
the Inland Fish and Game 
Commission 1916-18. M r . 
Brown is prominent in the 
Democratic councils of the 
state and is the present Demo- 
cratic nominee for Congress 
from the Fourth District. 

He married, August 3, 1907. 
Rose E. Holbrook. One child 
has been born to them, An- 
nctta Ruth. May 19, 1908. who 
died July 12, 1909. 



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PATRICK THERRIAULT. 

Patrick Therriault of Grand 
Isle, Maine, was born in that 
town April 18, 1875, the son 
of Isidore Therriault and 
Philomene Daigle. He was 
educated at the Madawaska 
Training School and Van Bu- 
ren College. By occupation 
Mr. Therriault is a merchart. 
He was a member of the 
House of Representatives 
1905-06 and of the Senate 
1907-10. He has been County 
Commissioner of Aroostook 
county since 1911. 

He married, August 7, 1897, 
Zelie Morneault. Oiildren : 
Edmond. born January 21. 
1899; Alma, born March 19, 
1904. 




REPRESEXTATIVE MAINE MEN 



75 




WILLIA-M PEXX WHITEHOUSE. 

Former Chief Justice Whitehouse was born in Vassalborough, Maine, 
April 9, 1842, the son of John R- and Hannah (Percival) Whitehouse. 

He was graduated from Colby College 1863 ; was admitted to Kennebec 
County bar in 1865, and in December, 1866. located in Augusta, Maine. For 
seven years he was county attorney of Kennebec county, and for twelvd 
years judge of the Kennebec Superior Court. In 1890 he was appointed an 
associate justice of the Supreme Judicial Court which position he held until 
1914 when he was elevated to Chief Justice. He retired from the court in 
1916, since which time he has practiced as a counselor-at-law. 

Chief Justice Whitehouse married, June 24, i860. Evelyn M. Treat of 
Frankfort, Maine. Their only child is Robert Treat Whitehouse of Portland, 
born March 27, 1870, a leading member of the Maine bar. 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



-,..^-1 




JOHN FAIRFIELD. 



. vi^-tMY 4it^4f^y^'a^ 



Born Saco, Maine, January 30, 1797; admitted to Bar 1826; reporter of 
decisions 1832-1835; member of Congress 1835-39; Governor of Maine 
1839-43; U. S. Senator 1843 until his death which occurred in Washington. 
D. C-, December 24, 1847. 



REPRESEXTATIVE MAINE MEN. 



17 




WILLIAM B. BERRY. . 

William B. Berry of Gardiner, Maine, is a direct descendant of Lieut. 
Samuel Berry, whose daughter Lydia was the first white girl born in Gardi- 
ner. He was born December 2^, 1866, on his father's ship " Washington " off 
Cape Horn. His parents were Capt. Arthur C. and Charlotte Lambert Berry. 

Air- Berry is a prominent Maine business man. He organized the Augusta. 
Gardiner and Boothbay Steamboat Company and made a success of the 
Augusta and Bath Steamboat Company. He also organized the Berry-Gark 
Company of Portland, and is at present sales manager for the American 
Soda Fountain Company of Boston, Massachusetts, for Maine, the maritime 
provinces and Newfoundland. On June 7, 1886, he was united in marriage 
with .\lice L. Maxcy. Children: Doris M.. born July 30, 1887: Gladys M., 
born September 20. 1889: William C, born May 30, 1909. Mr. Berry is vice 
president of the Maine society, S. A. R. 



^^' 



78 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAIXE HISTORY. 




FREEMAX D. DEARTH. 

Freeman D. Dearih of Dex- 
ter, Maine, was born in San- 
gerville, IXiaine. April i6, i86r, 
the sen of Freeman D, and 
Mary B. Dearth. He was 
graduated from Foxcrofr 
Acadeni}' 1881. Maine Central 
Instirute 1SS3, Bowdoin Col- 
lege, 1887. Read law and 
located in Dexter. Has been 
judge cf Dexter Municipal 
Court and was postmaster of 
Dexter : representative to the 
Legislature igij-iS, and State 
Senator 1919-20, and was re- 
cently appointed Reporter of 
Decisions. Unmarried. 



(To b3 con.inuid.) 



^iiiiu^iiJ&^aillia^iM^. 



^ ,itJk*MciJ4i6<lc^/^^^^.»t.if*^ -^^ -v^ - 



Camp of the Second Maine Cavalry, Augusta, Maine. 
quartered here from the fall of 1863 until March, 1864. 
State Fair grounds. 

(Contributed by Mathew C. Morrill.) 



This regiment was 
Formerly the old 



DOCUMENTARY. 79 



Maine Centennial Documentary Items 

>pie.s of records of the Stat 
It Augusta. 

Boston, March 2, 1820. 



The following official documents are true copies of records of the State of 
Maine in the office of the Secretary- of State at Augusta. 



Sir: 

As several Gentlemen from the District of Maine, members of 
the Legislature, were desirous that the Proclamations to observe 
a day for public Fasting and Prayer, in April next, should be sent 
to the several religious societies there, as formerly, they will be 
forwarded to the SherilTs of the respective Counties of the Dis- 
trict. For should Congress give consent to the Separation of 
^faine before that time, a distinct government will not be organ- 
ized. And it is presumed, that the good people in that District 
will be disposed to unite with their brethren in this part of the 
State, in fervent and humble supplications to the Almighty, for 
his favor upon the various interests and concerns of the whole 
ancient Commonwealth. 

I am, with sentiments of esteem 

ALDEN BRADFORD, 

Secy, of Comth. 
Ashur Ware, Esq., 
Secretary pro tem 
of the State of Maine 



Bath, October 13th, 1820. 
Dear Sir: 

The enclosed Proclamation I wish you to have printed on good 
paper, and in a way that will be creditable to us, you will direct 
to all the Clergimen you can ascertain, where they cannot be 
ascertained, I think it will be well to forward to the selectmen of 
the Towns, or the assessors of Plantations for their use — the Clerk 
and I am inclined to think you will circulate them as well as any 
way through the Post Office, taking care to pay the postage, which 
would be a grevious thing to a Clergiman. 

Should you adopt this mode, notice in the argus, to the Post 
Masters would be well to aid in having them forwarded to per- 
sons in Towns where there is no office. 

I expect to leave the last of this week for the County of Som- 
erset to be absent a short time, say 10 or 12 days. 

Respectfully your 

Humble Servant, 

Ashur Ware, Esq. WILLIAM KING. 



8o SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

Governor King's First Thanksgiving Day 
Proclamation 

' Whereas, it is the duty of rational beings to acknowledge the 
wisdom of the Creator, and the beneficence of his Providence; it 
is therefore no less the dictate of reason than piety to worship 
that Supreme Power and perfect Goodness, which ordains in 
wisdom the dirersified conditions of men. Yet more emphatically 
it is the duty of a people in whose condition, like that of the citi- 
zens of the State, a benevolent Providence has been pleased to 
grant so many favors, with so few of the evils, which usually fall 
to the lot of man, publicly and unitedly to acknowledge, by every 
f expression of grateful veneration, the mercies of that Being, who 
has distinguished them by such peculiar and signal favors. 

I therefore, William King, by the advise of the Council, and 
- in conformity with the usage of our ancestors, who have left us 
so many examples of mortal wisdom and rational piety, do appoint 
Thursday, the thirtieth day of November next, to be observed by 
the good citizens of this State, as a day of Thanksgiving and 
Praise ; and I do exhort them to assemble in their respective places 
of public worship, and to unite in devout ascriptions of praise to 
that Providence which has signalized them by so many favors ; — 
That we are blessed with a system of government, founded on 
the natural rights of man, and wisely adopted to maintain the 
peace and order of society, to preserve our liberties, to promote 
the general happiness and to diffuse the advantages of education 
and useful knowledge among all ranks of people. 
' That with the inestimable blessings of a pure and holy faith, 
we enjoy the advantages of religious freedom and universal tolera- 
tion; and the various religious sects divide from each other in 
their speculation abstruse points of theology, uncontrolled by any 
power but that to which they all owe obedience, all may unite 
under the great moral precepts of religion, in the harmony of 
Christian love ! That while we see other nations involved in 
alarming confusion, and divided into acrimonious factions by the 
domestic dissentions of their rulers, or struggling with generous 
devotion to repair the mischief of a long period of hereditary mis- 
rule, or reclaiming with violence the rights, which had been by 
Violence usurped, and laying the foundation of civil liberty and 



DOCUMENTARY. 8i 



national prosperity, in the tears and blood of the brave and the 
good, we behold in this country a people prosperous in their indus- 
try and happy under rulers of their choice, and laws of their own 
making, and in the midst of present tranquility, gladden with a 
prospect of a lengthened period of happiness and repose. 

That while other nations, and some of our sister states, have 
been during the present year, visited with distressing and deso- 
lating sickness, to the people of this state it has been a season of 
general health ; That the treasures of the great deep have rewarded 
the diligence of our fishermen; that commerce, left free to the 
enterprise of our merchants, and wisely regulated as it relates to 
foreign nations, has been prosecuted with increasing success; 
and that the labors of the husbandman have by a fruitful and 
salubrious season, been crowned wnth plenty. 

And while our grateful recollections on the undeserved mercies 
which we have received, may we not forget that all human virtue, 
like all human happiness, is imperfect ; may we humble ourselves 
before the perfections of that Being, whom we have so often 
ottended, and with praise for his manifold kindnesses, join our fer- 
vent supplications that we may in the future so live as to be more 
worthy of his favor ; and that by uniting to the virtues of good 
citizens of this State may continue to bring down on themselves 
the blessings of that Providence which has hitherto distinguished 
them among the nations of the world by such peculiar mercies. 

Given at the Council Chamber in Portland, this second day of 
September, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred 
and twenty ; and in the forty-fifth year of the independence of the 
United States of America. 

WILLIAM KING. 
By the Governor. 

Ashur Ware, Secretarv of State. 



Secretary of State's Office, 

Portland, Nov. 24, 1820. 
^on. William Pitt Preble, 

Sir; — I am directed by the Governor and Council to inform 
you, that you, with the Hon. Prentiss Mellen, Chief Justice, and 
Hon. Nathan Weston. Junior, one of the Justices of the Supreme 
Judicial Court, have been duly appointed a Board of Jurispru- 



-€^ 



82 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



dence, under Resolve of the Legislature passed the 15th day of 
June last. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, etc.. 

Your most obedient servant, 

ASHUR WARE. 



(From an editorial in the Easton Argus of March 14, 1S20) 
* * * Maine is at last admitted into the L^nion ; and from and 
after the fifteenth day of this month takes her rank as a Free 
Sovereign and Independent State. The die is cast; the question 
is settled ; and another glory is added to the star spangled banner. 
The long delayed hopes of the people are at last gratified. Maine 
has now the essential attribute of a free state, the power to man- 
age her own aft'airs in her own way, without control, let, or hind- 
rance from any one. In the overflowing of joy on finding that it 
is so, perhaps we are not disposed to examine so critically as we 
ought into the means by which this glorious and happy result has 
been effected. At least we will not affect to regret that Missouri 
is admitted with precisely the same rights as we have always 
claimed, and which are at last conceded; the right of managing 
her own concerns in her own way. 



Secretary of Staters Office^ 

Portland/ 6 March, 1827. 
Hon. Joel Wellington, Albion: 

Sir: — I am directed by the Executive to notify you that you 
have this day been appointed by the Governor, with advice of 
Council, the Agent in behalf of this State, for the purpose of lay- 
ing out a road, to begin near the Penobscot river, and at the ^lata- 
nawcook, where it will unite with the road from Sunkhaze to said 
Matanawcook, and to extend from thence to Houlton Plantation, 
under the Resolve, entitled " Resolve for locating a road from 
Matanawcook to Houlton," passed the seventeenth day of Feb- 
ruary last, a copy of which Resolve is hereunto annexed : And 
you are hereby authorized, by the Governor and Council, in pur- 
suance of the provisions of the Resolve aforesaid to select the 
most suitable route, between the points aforesaid, for the location 
of the road aforesaid, and, when you shall have completed the 
laying out thereof, you will return a plan of the same to the Land 



DOCUMENTARY. 83 



Office of this State, and present your account of expenses therein 
to the Governor and Council for allowance. 
I have the honor to be etc., 

A. NICHOLS, Secretary of State. 



Secretary of State's Office, 

Portland, February 18. 1828. 
Mrs. John Baker, Madazcaska, Maine: 

Madam : — The Resolve, a copy of which is annexed, having 
been passed by the leg-islature. I am authorized by the Council to 
inform you, that any supplies which may be necessary for the sup- 
port of your family during the imprisonment of your husband 
Mr. John Baker, at Frederickton, on the grounds on which he is 
at present detained will be paid out of the Treasury of this State. 
The accounts must be furnished with a proper authentication of 
their correctness, and satisfactory^ testimony of the propriety and 
necessity of the supplies. A direction to the Secretary of State 
of any communication you may wish to make will probably ensure 
its safe direction. 

I am Madam, very respectfully 

Your most obedient servant, 

A. NICHOLS, Secretary of State. 



In 1902 a large and excellent public fountain was erected in the 
village of the historic town of Fryeburg. Maine. It is a memorial 
fountain, and the following inscription appears upon a granite 
shaft, telling its own story : 

In memory of John Stevens, an early settler in this town, who spent 
the winter here in 1762-3. Erected by his great grandson, Henr\- Pierce 
of San Francisco, California, 1902. 

The fountain stands in the center of the village, on the south 
side of ^lain street, at the head of Portland street. 

The memorial is made of white Hallowell granite, resting upon 
a base seven to eight feet square and two feet thick. On the base 
rests four large pieces of granite, three for bowls for animals and 
one with faucet and cup for the people. The entire structure is 
18 feet high. It weighs nearly 30 tons. 



84 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



Bishop Fenwick to Gov. Lincoln 

Boston, Dec. i8, 1827. 

His Excellency, Enoch Lincoln, Governor of the State of Maine: 

Sik: — I have been anxious this some time past to communicate 
to your Excellency my views respecting the Passamaquoddy and 
Penobscot Tribe of Indians. Standing as I do in relation to them 
and bound by my sacred office to do eyery thing in my power to 
promote their temporal as well as spiritual welfare, I have, ever 
since my arrival in Boston turned my thoughts to that matter. 
Hitherto several obstacles interposed — among these was the 
want of clergymen to supply the different congregations under 
my charge; and especially of such a one as would suit in every 
respect an Indian Afission. But happily I have now one ready 
whr is every way calculated for this important work, and who, 
I trust, after a proper trial will be found to give the fullest satis- 
faction, not only to the Indians but to the State at large. As I 
wished, before I took any decisive step in the business, to see the 
ground, to become acquainted with the Indians, their character, 
names, habits, present mode of life, etc., as well as to examine 
what previous arrangements it might be proper to make in order 
that the plan I should propose to be adopted by the pastor, to be 
stationed among them, might be attended by every success, I, in 
the course of last summer, paid a visit to them. The following 
is the result of my observation and I submit it to your Excellency 
in the hope that the Government will approve of the measures I 
am about to adopt, and approving will assist and co-operate with 
me in my endeavor to render the two Tribes of Indians mentioned 
above, consisting of eight hundred souls, good Christians, a sober 
and industrious class of people and an intelligent and useful por- 
tion of the Commonwealth. 

I have observed when among them a strong and deep rooted 
attachment to their religion. This attachment pervades each and 
ever}' individual of the two Tribes. Accordingly the first thing 
I propose to do is to send this next spring a proper Pastor among 
them, who shall be a native of this country, who shall reside among 
them and who shall devote the whole of his time to their instruc- 
tion and care. 






;;>j jK- / -.• btEq .v.y\'.ii^}:i' 



DOCUMENTARY. 85 



The next thing I propose is that this Pastor shall immediately 
open a school tor the instruction of the Indian youth of both 
sexes, in English reading and writing and in Arithmetic, shall 
superintend this school in person and devote the chief part of his 
time to it. 

Thirdly, he shall use his best endeavors to inspire a love of 
Agriculture — to encourage and promote it by every means in his 
power — to encourage the building of proper and more convenient 
houses — the rearing of sheep, cattle, poultry, etc., and in process 
of time, and as soon as proper arrangements can be made for the 
purpose, to encourage the women to card, to spin, to weave and 
make their own clothing and that of their children. 

Thus an attempt will be made to better the condition of that 
interesting though long neglected class of people, which I pledge 
myself to follow up as far as my own exertions, influence and 
even pecuniary resources will allow ; and which from the obser- 
vations I have made respecting their character, etc., if Govern- 
ment will only second it, I am confident will be attended with the 
most happy success. 

I beg leave farther to represent to your Excellency, that there 
is no school house at present erected at the chief place of residence 
of the Penobscot tribe — nor have they a church fit for divine 
worship either at Penobscot or Pleasant Point; the church, how- 
ever, at this last place, with some repairs, may soon be rendered 
serviceable. It will advance the object materially if Government 
will give directions to have these buildings put up or repaired as 
the case may require. In the hope that during the approaching 
session of the Legislature something will be done for these 
unhappy people, worthy of the State in which they reside, 

I remain with sentiments of the highest veneration and esteem, 

Your Excellency's Obt. Servt., 

B. FENWICK, B'p of B'n. 

(Secretarj- of State Records) 



H;/ /■■ 



■f'.^, it/' ii.. ) 



iijliJSl"} £ '■'(. 



86 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HIS'^ORY 



Relating to the Aroostook Military Road 

(Contributeil by ANNA BAKXKS L'.brariM,:; „f the Cary Public Library, 

Houltou. Me.) 

Through the kindness of Mr. Henry B. Black of Everett, Mass., 
formerly a resident of Houlton, we have recently come into 
possession of a letter to Joseph Houlton, Esq., reading as follows: 




Fort Kent at Fort Kent, Maine. 

Washington, Mar. 31, 1828. 
Dear Sir: 

I have the pleasure of informing you that a bill has this day 
passed the Senate for making a Military Road from the mouth 
of the Mattawampkeag to Mars Hill, and authorizing the Presi- 
dent to cause the United States Troops that are to be stationed 
on that frontier to be employed thereon. 

The bill also appropriates fifteen thousand dollars to be expended 
in making the road. 

Very respectfully, etc., 

ALBION K. PARRIS. 



m 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

PUBLISHED QUARTERLY 



Entered as second class matter at the post office, Dover, Maine, by John 
Francis Sprague, Editor and Publisher. 

Terms: For all numbers issued during the year, including an index and 
all special issues, $r.oo. Single copies of current volume, 25 cents; of pre- 
vious volumes, 50 cents. Bound volumes $2.00 each. 

Postage prepaid on all items, except bound volumes west of Mississippi 
River. 

Commencing with Vol. 3, the terms will be $1.00 only to subscribers who 
pay in advance, otherwise $1.50. 

This publication will be mailed to subscribers until ordered discontinued. 



OUR MESSAGE TO YOU 

FIRST TEACH THE BOY AND GIRL TO KNOW AND LOVE 
THEIR OWN TOWN, COUNTY AND STATE AND YOU HAVE 
GONE A LONG WAY TOWARD TEACHING THEM TO KNOW 
AND LOVE THEIR COUNTRY. 



TO OUR SUBSCRIBERS. 

Since the last issue of the Journal there has been a considerable 
increase in the cost of everything used by the printer in making 
this magazine. 

Just what course to pursue under the present conditions is quite 
a problem with the publisher. 

One -thing is a positive fact, however, we must raise the sub- 
scription price or reduce the number of its pages. We shall 
pursue the latter course for the remainder of the current volume. 

The text of the next three or four numbers cannot exceed 46 
pages. 

We regret being obliged to do this but regard it as more desir- 
able than increasing the rates. 

By reason of this situation we have been compelled to omit from 
this centennial number several valuable articles. These will, how- 
ever appear, during the present volume. Among such are the 
New York address of Judge Garence Hale on the State of Maine; 
a sketch of the Berry family of Gardiner; a history of the Blaine 
Mansion by Norman L. Bassett, etc. 






.'-■ h-s.;\h'-c< 



-C'l:' r?n:l ^?:?x-^ iivm 3 



88 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAKNE HISTORY 



When Maine became a state she possessed such an immense 
area of wild land and much of it was covered with, what was even 
then, valuable timber, that the office of Land Agent was one of 
the most important of all the state offices. 

Before this office was established by law, in 1824, under an act 
to promote the sale and settlement of Public Lands, the governor 
and council were empowered to appoint and commission an 
Agent to superintend and arrange the sale and settlement of these 
lands. 

James Irish was appointed such an agent and is frequently 
called the " first land agent of Maine." 

The Land Office was not organized until 1828. That year 
under an act to promote the settlement of public lands, the office 
was established, and Daniel Rose was appointed the first Land 
Agent by Gov. Lincoln. 



The Journal has in its files several articles of value to genealo- 
gists which we are obliged to omit in this issue, but they will 
appear in the next and succeeding numbers. 

The following are some of them : Franklin Pierce and the 
State of Maine, Chas. E. Waterman; Ancestry of the Stewarts, 
A. W. Stewart; Berry Genealog}--, W. B. Berry; Rev. Richard 
Gibson, R. W. Wormwood; The Cleveland Family, Frank B. 
Miller; Continuation of the Revolutionary Pensions, Flagg; 
Monson Records, Prof. Mathews. 



..'.Coin and Stamp Collectors ... 



w 

ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 

Prices I Pay — of every U. S. Coin 
worth over face — 15 cts. 



WANTED 
Rare Coins, Stamps ."and Curios 



What are your wants? Perhaps I 
can supply them 



Stamp Catalogues and other Philatelic and Xuiiiisniatie 
Uterature at publishers j^rices 

lAy. B. GOULD 
292 Hammond St. Bangor, Maine 



:3 



Yo>:i 




1820 



1920 



Its History, 

Romance, 

Famous 

Sons and ] 

Daughters, 

Physical 

Features, 

Industrial, 

Commercial, 

Agricultural 

Possibilities, 

Epitomized. 



HERE'S to the State of Maine, settled mostly by 
the blood of Old England, but always preferring 
liberty to ancestry; a strong, old democratic State, yet 
among the first to help give liberty to the slave. May 
her future be as noble as her past . ^ Here's to the 
State of Maine, the land of the bluest skies, the greenest 
earth, the richest air, the strongest, and, what is better, 
the sturdiest men, the fairest, and what is best of all, 
the truest women under the sun. — Thomas B. Reed. 

Published by the Maine Centennial Committee 






-'v ., 



^'\I^' 



i I 






1| fe4 



MAINE 



A FEW INTERESTING EVENTS IN ITS ILLl >. 
TRIOUS HISTORY 

1498 — ^The first European, barring possible discover. 
by the early Norsemen, to visit the roast . f 
Maine, is thought to have been John Cabot, th, 
English explorer. 

1501 — Maine is believed to have been visited by the 
Portuguese explorer, Corte-Real. 

1524— Verrazano, the Italian explorer, sailing under n 
French commission, cruised along the coast (,{ 
Maine. 

1525 — ^The Spanish explorer, Gomez, discovered and I 
named the Penobscot River, Rio de las Gomcv, I 
or Stag River. I 

1526 — The French explorer, Thevet, visited the Main*- f 
coast and returned to Europe with a story oi | 
Norumbega, Maine's mythical city. s 

1563 — The British explorer. Sir John Hawkins, visited | 
the coast. i 



Sons and daughters of Maine living 
outside of the State: Observe the 
100th anniversary of Maine's en- 
trance into the Union by paying the 
old home town a visit. 



1567 — Three survivors of a second expedition of Sir 
John Hawkins crossed the interior of Maine, 
the first white men to visit any part of the 
present State, away from its coast line. 

1602 — Captain Bartholomew Gosnold explored the 
southern coast of Maine. 

1603 — Captain Martin Pring, British trader, visited 
the coast of Maine and discovered Casco Bay. 

1604 — Sieur de Monts, the French explorer, established 
the first settlement in what is now the United 
States north of Florida, within the borders of 
the present State of Maine, on Neutral Island 
in the St. Croix River. The renowned Cham- 
plain was a member ol the party and explored 
the Maine coast as far east as the Kennebei- 
River, naming Mount Desert Island. 

1607 — English Colony established at Popham, at the 
mouth of the Kennebec River, by George 
Popham. This, with the colony at Jamestown. 
Virginia, established the same year, were the 
two first English settlements on the Atlantic 
coast. 

1607-08 — The Virginia, the first vessel to be built in 
North America, was constructed at Popham 
and formed one of the fleet of the Somes and 
Gates Colony in 1G09. 



^n^^rrcticii j«i,uicS ebiumiKiieu a iiussioii on mount 
Desert Island. 

1614 — Coast of Maine visited by Captain John Smith, 
of Pocohontas fame, who made first rehable 
map of it and named many of its principal 
points, including Cape Elizabeth. First to 
apply the name New England to this north- 
eastern section of the United States. 

1620 — Captain Christopher Levett established a 
trading post on one of the islands now within 
the limits of the City of Portland. 

1623 — The King of Great Britain made a division of 
the Grand Charter of 1606 and granted to the 
Plymouth Company of New England the whole 
country lying between 40 and 48 degrees North, 
and to the Virginia Company the southern 
portion of the original patent. 

1628 — First settlements along the shore of Casco Bay 
at Brunswick and Cape Elizabeth. 

1632 — Portland settled by George Cleeve and Richard 
Tucker. 

1641 — Sir Ferdinand© Gorges established the first 
chartered city in the United States under the 
name of Gorgeana, now the town of York. 



r 



Not only will the sons and daugh- 
ters be welcome but former residents 
as well. "Back to Maine for our 
vacation" is to be their slogan. 



1677 — Massachusetts purchased from the heirs of 
Gorges all of their interest in the Province of 
Maine. 

1691 — A new charter issued by William and Mary 
combined the provinces of Maine,Massachusetts, 
Plymouth, Acadia and Sagadahoc into one 
province called Massachusetts Bay. 

1775 — Falmouth, now the city of Portland, bom- 
barded and destroyed by British fleet under 
Mowatt. 

First Naval Battle of the Revolutionary War, 
first naval engagement of the present United 
States, and the first time the British flag was 
struck to Americans on land or sea, was the 
capture of! Machias, Maine, of the British 
warship Margaretta by the American ship 
Unity. The latter was commanded by Captain 
Jeremiah O'Brien of Machias, often called the 
"Father of the American Navy," and for his 
notable achievement he was given a vote of 
thanks by Congress. 

Benedict Arnold made his famous march through 
Maine to Quebec. 

1779 — Castine captured by the British. It was in this 
engagement that the famous Sir John Moore 
received his "baptism of fire." Paul Revere 
commanded the Massachusetts troops. 



t 

t.. 

I . 

I; 



'/ij ^'' 






i8D3-^Commodore Edward Preble of Portland, cnrr. 
e manded the American squadron at Trip. : 

i which defeated the Barbary pirates. He u-jv 

f . received on his return to the United Stalo^ 

f with great distinction and was given a vote of 

. thanks, and awarded a medal by Congress. 

i 1813 — Famous naval battle of the American warshu^ 

Enterprise and British warship Boxer foucht 
off the eastern end of Casco Bay, the captain ^ 
of both ships being killed in action, and both 

[ were buriea in the old Eastern Cemetery at 

i Portland. 

1814 — Eastport captured by the British and held n^ 
a part of Canadian territory for about four years. 

( Second capture of Castine by the British. 

?■ 

! Battle of Hampden in which both American 

I and British soldiers were killed and the present 

I cities of Bangor and Belfast captured. 

\ 1820 — Maine oiTicially became a separate State of the 

i Union on March 15th. 

\ 1839 — Aroostook War which threatened hostilities, 

j between Great Britain and the United States. 

. Troops were raised by both nations for the 

[ expected conflict. 



Portland is to be the scene of the 
great official State celebration from 
June 28 to July 5. Plan to be present. 



1842 — Northeastern Boundary controversy, of which 
Aroostook War was the beginning, settled by 
treaty negotiated by Daniel Webster, Secretary 
of State, and Lord Ashburton, representing 
Great Britain. 

1851 — State prohibitory amendment adopted prohib- 
iting the manufacture and sale of intoxicating 
liquors. 

I 1919 — Maine ratified the Susan B. Anthony suffrage 

I amendment to the National constitution. 

I Maine ratified the prohibitory amendment to 

^ the Federal Constitution. 

1920 — Maine celebrates 100th anniversary of its en- 
trance into the Union. 



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MAINE 



SOME OF ITS WONDERFUL AGRICULTURAL, 
COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 
POSSIBILITIES 

Maine's wonderful waterpower possibilities are almost 
limitless. Its mighty rivers, the Penobscot, Kennebec, 
Androscoggin, Saco, Piscataquis, Aroostook, St. Croix, 
and the scores of others almost equally well-known, 
possess tremendous opportunities for development, 
in addition to the vast number of industries which 
already line their banks. 

Maine is one of the great lumbering States of the 
Union, 75 percent of its land area being covered with 
a forest growth, the principal woods being pine, fir, 
spruce and hemlock, with an abundance of cedar, 
beech, birch, hard maple and black and white ash. 

Maine ranks among the highest in its fisheries, the 
State being in close proximity to some of the greatest 
fishing grounds of the world. The principal catch 
includes herring, smelts, sword fish, cod, haddock, 
halibut, as welt as all of the other standard varieties 
of the North Atlantic. Maine lobsters and clams are 
unexcelled in the world. 



Strangers, also, will find a cordial 
welcome awaiting them in Maine 
this Summer, not only those who 
have long enjoyed their vacations 
there but those who have never been 
to the State before. 



The State ranks high in agriculture and its potato 
crop, especially that of Aroostook County, is nationally 
famous. It also produces an immense crop of hay. 
Its sweet corn is the world's standard for quality and 
Maine canned sweet corn is recognized as the best in 
ever>' market. The State also takes high rank in the 
production of apples, the crop being a very large one 
and the quality the finest. Nearly all of the vegetables 
and grains, as well as the fruits common to its latitude, 
are raised in Maine. It does a large business in berries 
and its blueberr>' canning industry is an important one. 

In the manufacture of paper and wood pulp, based 
on the amount of capital invested and the value of the 
product, Maine stands first in the states of the Union 
today. 

Maine does an enormous business in the manufacture 
of cotton and woolen goods. 

Maine's leather products, principally boots and 
shoes, are ranked with the best, and the industry is 
an enormous one. 

The finest snow-shoes, canoes and woods equipment 
in the world are made in Maine. 

The canning of fish, vegetables, fruits and berries 
constitute a tremendous industry in Maine. Their 
quality is of the highest. 



Do you know the names and ad- 
dresses of any sons and daughters 
of Maine, or former residents? If 
so send them to the Centennial 
Committee that they may receive 
an official invitation to be present. 



Maine has always been a leader in shipbuilding and 
its workmanship in this line is unexcelled. 

The manufacture of lime is an important one in the 
State. 

Ice-cutting is still a thriving industry and brick 
making also is of considerable importance. 



One of the big features of the 
anniversary will be a great Maine 
industrial, commercial and agricult- 
ural exposition to be open all Summer 
at the Exposition Building, Portland. 



Hundreds of different articles are made in Maine, in 
the manufacture of many of which the State leads. The 
list of even the principal ones is too long to enumerate 
m this brief pamphlet. It is only necessary to state 
that Maine has a wonderful future in industry and 
agriculture because of its location so close to the great 
centers of population, its splendid system of trans- 
portation to these centers as well as throughout the 
State, and the fact that it possesses such a bountiful 
supply of the raw materials for the manufacture of 
many staple articles. The State also has the finest of 
transatlantic steamship service to many parts of the 
world through the port of Portland, as well as two 
transcontinental railroad systems. 



For complete information regard- 
ing the plans for the big celebration 
write the Publicity Department, 
Maine Centennial Committee, City 
Hall, Portland, Maine. 



M A 1 IN t 

FACTS OF INTEREST ABOUT IT 

The total area of Maine is 33.(V10 square miles, or 
19,132,800 acres. Of this the land area is 29.895 and 
the water area 3,145. The State is 302 miles in length 
and 285 miles in width. In size it practically equals 
all of the other New England States combined. 

The State has about 1,300 islands and about 1.600 
lakes. 

There are about 5,000 rivers and streams in Maine. 

There are sixteen counties in the State, one of which, 
Aroostook, practically is as large as Massachusetts. 

The Maine coast, "as the crow flies," or in a straight 
Une from its most westerly to its most easterly point is 
about 278 miles. It contains so many bays and in- 
dentions, however, that the actual coast-line of the 
State reaches the astounding figure of about 2,486 
miles. 

The rivers and lakes of Maine comprise one-tenth 
of the total area of the State. 



The **latch-string will be out" in 
Maine this Summer for every son 
and daughter now living outside of 
the State. 



Moosehead Lake, the largest in New England, has 
an area of 120 square miles, and is about thirty-five 
miles in length. 

Maine's loftiest mountain is Katahdin, one mile in 
height, and famed for its rugged beauty. 

Mount Desert Island, one of the largest on the 
Atlantic Coast, contains 60,000 acres and is noted for 
its wonderful scenery. On it is located the only 
national park east of the Mississippi River, Lafayette 
National Park. 

Only about one-third of the State in the South, and 
in the Valley of the St. John River in the North, is 
below an altitude of 800 feet. 

The Penobscot River is the longest in Maine with 
a length of approximately 300 miles. The Kennebec 
River is about 150 miles long. 

Maine is exactly midway between the equator and 
the North Pole. 






No State in the Union has a greater variety of wonder- 
ful scenery than Maine, combining as it does, rugged 
seacoast, towering mountains, superb lakes, limitless 
forests, beautiful rivers and charming agricultural 
country. 

It is the paradise of the seeker after health and 
recreation. 



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WAl N E 

^ SOME OF ITS NOTED SONS AND DAUGHTER> 

I Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, America's greatest 

I poet, born at Portland. 

* Artemus Ward, one of the world's greatest humorists, 

born at Waterford. 

Sir Hiram S. Maxim, inventor of the Maxim Machine 
Gun, born at Sangerville. 

Hudson Maxim, inventor of smokeless powder, born 
at Oraeville. 

Lillian Nordica, one of the world's greatest singers, 
; born at Farmington. 

; Franklin Simmons, one of the world's greatest 

f sculptors, born at Webster. 

i Benjamin Paul Akers, renowned sculptor, born at 

Westbrook. 

Rev, Elijah Kellogg, author of Spartarus to the 
Gladiators, as well as other orations, and famous 
writer of boy stories, born at Portland. 



There is now a splendid macadam 
and concrete boulevard all the way 
from Boston, New York, and all 
other Southern New England, Middle 
Atlantic, and Middle Western States, 
to Portland, and beyond to the prin- 
cipal Maine points of interest. Plan 
to enjoy this Summer with a wonder- 
ful automobile trip to the "Play- 
ground of the Nation/* 



Jacob Abbot, novelist and historian, author of the 
Rolio books, born at Hallowell. 

John S. C. Abbot, author of the celebrated Abbot 
histories, born at Brunswick. 

Elizabeth Akers Allen, author of the world-renowned 
"Rock Me To Sleep Mother" and other famous 
poems, born at Strong. 

John A. Andrew, Massachusetts' noted war governor, 
born at Windham. 

Noah Brooks, widely known author and friend of 
Lincoln, born at Castine. 

Annie Louise Cary, world famous singer, born at 
Wayne. 

Neat Dovr, father of prohibition, born at Portland. 

Rebecca Sophia Clark, widely known writer of 
children's stories, under the nom-de-plume of 
Sophie May, born at Norridgewock. 



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Sarah Orne Jewett, one of America's most popular 
woman authors, born at South Benvick. 

Hugh McCuIloch, famous financier and former 
secretary of the treasury, born at Kennebunk. 

Sergeant Smith Prentiss, one of America's most 
famous orators and said to be the greatest 
extemporaneous speaker that ever lived, horn at 
Portland. 



¥: 



insane, and as head of the female nurses during 

the Ci\al War. born at Hampden. j 

Cyrus Hamlin, first president of Roberts College, ? 

Constantinople, born at Waterford. J 

Cyrus H. K. Curtis, publisher of the Saturday Evening 

Post, Ladies Home Journal and other widely f' 

known publications, born at Portland. |. 

Frank A. Munsey, publisher of Munsey's Magazine, ^'^: 

New York Herald and other famous publica- f 

lions, born at Mercer. | - 

Maxine Elliott, renowned actress, born at Rockland. T 

Gertrude Elliott, noted actress, now wife of Sir J. : | 

Fordes-Robertson, born at Rockland. | f 

Sewell Ford, creator of Shorty and Torchy stories, ^ P 

bom at Levant. J f 

Walter M. Brackett, America's greatest painter of J f 

fish, born at Unity. | r 

Eastman Johnson, America's renowned portrait ' j'- 

painter, bom at Lovell. | g 

James Otis Kaler, known to hundreds of thousands r 

of boys as James Otis, writer of Juvenile stories, I. 

born at Winterport. 4 f 

Edgar Wilson Nye, known to the world as Bill Nye, ■; f 

the famous humorist, born at Shirley. | 

Sarah Payson Parton, one of the best known woman | 

writers of the last century-, under the pen name 

of "Fanny Fern," born at Portland. ^ 

George Palmer Putnam, founder of the great pub- f-' 

lishing house of George Putnam's Sons, born at S* 

Bmnswick. | » 

Harriett Prescott SpofiFord, famous writer, born at | | 

Calais. | | 

Nathaniel Parker Willis, at one time America's I I 

most popular essayist, born at Portland. | | 

Professor Dudley Allen Sargent, one of the best ! I 

known directors of physical training in the | | 

United States, born at Belfast. | | 

George Otis Smith, director of the U. S. Geological j 

Survey, born at Hodgdon. | t 

John F. Stevens, former Chief Engineer of the Panama ^ 

Canal, born at West Gardiner. j | 

Richard Hawley Tucker, widely known astronomer 1 

and director of the great Lick Observatory at I 

Mt. Hamilton, California, born at Wiscasset. i | 

John Washburn, President of the great Washburn- | 

Crosby Flour Company, Minneapolis, born at $ 

Hallowell. 1 l 

Walter M. Lowney, chocolate manufacturer, born at ^ ,1 

Sebec. j t 



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Thomas Brackctt Reed, America's greatest par- 
liamentarian and former speaker of Congress, 
born at Portland. 4 

i 

John D. Long, former secretary of the Nav\' and 
Governor of Massachusetts, born at Buckfield. 

Hannibal Hamlin, Vice-President of the United 
States wth Lincoln, born at Paris. 

Sir William Pepperell, conquerer of Louisburg, born 

at Kittery. ^ 

Sir William Phipps, first Royal Governor of \ 
Massachusetts, first American on whom Great 
Britain conferred Knighthood and the conquerer 
of Annapolis Royal, born at Woolwich. ; 

William King, First Governor of Maine, born at • 
Scarboro. I 

Israel Washburn. Jr., Civil War Governor of Maine 

and noted Congressman, born at Livermore. 1 

General Oliver O. Howard, famous Civil War 

Commander, born at Leeds. j 

General Joshua L. Chamberlain, "Hero of Little ' 

Round Top," Gettysburg, the man who received j 

the surrender of General Lee at Appomattox. j 

bom at Brewer. \ 

General George F. Shepley, distinguished jurist 
and military Governor of Louisiana and of 
Richmond in the Civil War, born at Saco. 

General Henry C. Merriam, inventor of the Mer- 
riam Iiifantry Pack and famous military 
strategist, born at Houlton. i 

General James A. Hall, famous artillerist, who \ 
opened the battle of Gettysburg, born at ^ 
Damariscotta. | 

Rufus King, twice United States Minister to Great , 
Britain and one of the leaders in the drafting \ 
of the American Constitution, born at Scarboro. ' 

Commodore Edward Preble, "Hero of Tripoli," j 
born at Portland. I 

William P. Frye, American diplomat, former acting l 
president of the United States, born at Lewiston. i 

Lot M. Morrill, Secretary of the Treasury, U. S. * 
Senator and Governor of Maine, born at j 
Belgrade. ' 

Nelson Dingley, American legislator, bom at Durham. I 

Me!>ille W. Fuller, former Chief Justice of the i 
United States Supreme Court, born in Augusta. f 

Eugene Hale, noted statesman, born at Turner. j 

William Widgery Thomas, American diplomat, 
minister to Norway and Sweden and founder 
of the famous Maine Colony of New Sweden, 
born at Portland. 

Holman F. Day, one of America's most popular 
novelists, born at Vassalboro. 

Charles Ranlett Flint, one of the prominent business 
men of the United States, born at Thomaston. 

Sumner I. Kimball, father of the great life saving J 

service of the United States, bom at Lebanon. 1 



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THEIR SUCCESS WHILE RESIDENTS OF 

THE STATE, OR WHO LIVE IN IT AT 

THE PRESENT TIME. 

Rear Admiral Robert E. Peary, Discoveier of the 
North Pole, came of Maine stock. Home was 
on Eagle Island, Casco Bay, in the town of 
Harpswell. 

Emma Eames, world-famous singer, live«i at Bath. 

Emilio de Gogorza, one of the world's greatest 
baritones, lives at Bath. 

William Pitt Fessenden, former secretary of the 
Treasury under Lincoln and famous American 
Statesman, life-long resident of Portland. 

Jame? G. Blaine, former Secretary of State, Repub- 
lican nominee for President, lived at Augusta. 

Donald B. INIacMillan, renowned Arctic explorer, 
lives at Freeport. 

General Henry Knox, first Secretary of War of the 
United States and Washington's Chief of Staff, 
lived at Thomaston. 

Kate Douglas Wiggin, famous author, lives at HoUis. 

Hugh J. Chisholm, industrial magnate, lived at 
Portland. 

This list, as well as that of Maine-born notables, is 
verj-^ incomplete and contains only a small 
percentage of the famous people who have 
added lustre to the State's escutcheon. 






P 



MAINE 



PLANS FOR ITS CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION. 



June 28 

to 
July 5 



All 
Summer. 



All 
Summer. 



Now 
Open. 



Grand official celebration to be held at 
Portland. Big daily features, parades, 
fireworks, warships, airplanes, music fes- 
tival, and a dozen other notable events 
the details of which will be announced 
at an early date. 

Big industrial, agricultural and commercial 
exposition to be held at Exposition Build- 
ing, Portland, throughout Ihe Summer. 
This will show Maine's great manufact- 
uries, Summer and Winter resort attrac- 
tions, agricultural development, and a 
host of other features about the State 
the magnitude of which is little known to 
the outside public. 

There will be other local celebrations 
throughout the State and a warm welcome 
will be extended by every town to its 
sons and daughters and former residents 
who come back to visit the old town 
and the old home. 

The Maine Centennial Committee's Head- 
quarters occupying the entire East Wing 
of the new City Hall at Portland are 
now open and will keep "Open House" 
througnout the Summer. Everyone is 
invited to visit them when in Portland. 
A staff is now on duty there to answer 
all questions in regard to the Centennial, 
etc. 










MAINE CENTENNIAL COMIMITTEE. 

Governor 
Carl E. Milliken, Augusta 

Councilors 

Edward F. Gowell, Berwick 

George W. Norton, Portland 

Walter E. Plummer, Lisbon Falls 

Willis E. Swift, Augusta 

Elmer S. Bird, Rockland 

George W. Stearns, Millinocket 

Clarence A. Powers, Fort Fairfield 



City of Portland 

Charles B. Clarke, Mayor 

Walter B. Trickey 

Sydney B. Larrabee 

Joseph A. Craig 

Portland Chamber of Commerce 

Alexander T. Laughlin, President 
Fred E. Eastman 
Herbert J. Brown 

Special Legislative Committee 

Senate 

Rupert H. Baxter, Bath 

Guy P. Gannett, Augusta 

Freeman D. Dearth, Dexter 

House 

Edgar E. Rounds, Portland 

Frederic 0. Eaton, Rumford 

Frank H. Holley, North Anson 

Charles H. Hanson, Saro 

Alfred D. Sawyer, F'ort Fairfield 

Harry Cochrane, Monmouth 

John T. Fagan, Portland 

Business Manager 

Fred H. Gabbi 

Publicity Manager 

D. W. Hoegg. Jr. 

Musical Director 

William R. Chapman 

Copies of this booklet will be mailed free to any 
address. Send names to Publicity Manager 
Maine Centennial Cominillce, City Mall* 
Portland, Maine, Depl. 12. 



CONTEXTS. 



8; 



MAIXE IXLAND SCEXERY 



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On the Allagash Trip 

Contributed by Hon. Leroy T. Carleton. 



CONTENTS. 

FACE 

Louis' Annance 90 

Xorombega gi 

Genealogy of Simmons Family 97 

Berry Genealogy 108 

Rev. Richard Gibson 1 12 

Representative Men of Yesterday and Today 117 

Jock Kelley and His Birches ." 119 

Revolutionan.' Pensioners in Maine 121 

Editorial 125 

Maine (poem) 129 

Regarding the Simmons Family 130 



54 



YEARS the insurance Man of Somerset Co. 

Never a Failure— Never a Law Suit-— What more do you want? 

iMember Soc. Col. Wars; Sons Am. Rev; Past A. A. C. G. A. R.J 

CHARLES FOLSOM-JONES. Skowhegan Maine 



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90 SPRAGUE'S JOURXAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 




LOUIS AXNAXCE 



LOUIS ANNANCE. 



Louis Annance was for more than thirty years a famous charac- 
ter around Moosehead Lake in Piscataquis County, ]\Iaine. At 
one period of his Hfe he was a chief of the once powerful St. 
Francis tribe of Indians. He was born August 25, 1794, where is 
now the town of St. Francis, county of Yamaska, in the Province 
of Quebec. He received a CathoHc tuition from the Jesuits in his 
neighborhood, who subsequeuntly procured his admission to a school 
in Hanover, Xew Hampshire, where he was prepared for a college 
course; but as he was about to enter college, the war of 1812 was 
declared, and he was summoned to his home in Canada to serve 
with his tribe under the British government. He was engaged in 
that war three years. His brother Xoel had command of all the 
Indian forces during that war and both were noted for their bravery 
and daring in battle. He died at his home in Greenville, Maine, 
December 15, 1875. 



Sprague's Journal of Maine History 

Vol. VIII AUG., SEPT., OCT. 1920 No. 2 



Norombega 

(By the Editor.) 

Possibly there is no American place-name that has been so much 
of a mystery as has Norombega, anciently spelled Xorumbega. 

The writer has sometimes referred to it as ** the \vill-of-the-\yisp 
of Elaine's colonial history: a fascinating tale rarely explained, 
never real, yet always existing," which view, hovrever, may itself 
properly be regarded as too fanciful and astray from established 
historical facts. 

But where, when and what was Xorombega? 

Nearly all of the early and most of the more recent writers have 
agreed that its locality, according to the cartography of the ancient 
voyagers, was somewhere in the Penobscot region in what is now 
the State of Elaine. 

It is generally conceded to be an Algonquin word but there is 
confusion as to when it first appeared on the earliest maps and charts 
of North America. There is some evidence that it was as early 
as John Cabot's voyage in 1497. It appears with frequency in the 
work of the voyagers of the sixteenth century — such as Gasper and 
Miguel, Ward, Ashurst. Hugh Elliot, Cartier, Sir Humphrey Gil- 
bert and others. 

Some have attempted to prove that its location was on theAIassa- 
chusetts coast, and other localities have been suggested. 

The University Press of Cambridge (1886), published a brochure 
upon the subject, which was a letter by Eben Norton Horsford, 
addressed to Chief Justice Daly, president of the American Geo- 
logical Society, entitled '' John Cabot's Landfall in 1497 and the site 
of Norumbega." It is an elaborate discussion of the question of 
location, accompanied by several maps and plans. His " conclu- 
sions " are as follows : 



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92 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



I submit: 

1st That the site of the Landfall of John Cabot in 1497 has been derer- 
mined to be Salem Xeck, in 43° 32' north latitude, the Xoruni (Xeck. to one 
standing on it) of the Xorumbega of Cabot, and Xahum of the Xahumbeak 
of Ogilb}^ and Smith. The first land seen may have been Cape Ann, or 
possibly the mountain. Aganienticus. 

2. That the town of Xorumbega, on the river of Xonmibegue of Alle- 
fonce, the Xorumbega visited by Ingram, and the fort of Xorumbegue and 
the village of Agoncy of Thevet, were on the Charles river between River- 
side and Waltham, at the mouth of Stony Brcok, in latitude 42" 21' north. 

3d. That John Cabot preceded Columbus in the discovery of America. 

The Rev. Dr. DeCosta, an eminent worker in the field of Ameri- 
can historical research, and other writers equally as authoritative, 
have been convinced that it was somewhere in the Penobscot river 
and bay country. 

There has also been some interesting speculation among learned 
researchers and cartographers as to what was the original Indian 
meaning of the word ; whether it was the name of a locality in the 
sense of a district or settlement, or whether it was intended to 
describe a place similar to a town, village or city. 

The story of Xorombega, nearly four hundred years old, has had 
a curious and devious course in its passage through the pages of 
history, fable, poetr}- and romance. " Alen who go down to the 
sea in ships " and adventurers of many sorts and from various ports 
followed for quite a period of time the rays of this new world rain- 
bow. Champlain searched for it and found a coast of grandeur 
skirting a trackless wilderness, the magnificent work of nature and 
not of men. He beheld no " golden city with walls of pearls," no 
" houses with pillars of silver." Instead were the squaHd huts of 
'savages in a primeval forest. Yet the bewildering tales of the 
city of Norombega constituted the greatest project of American 
publidty that has ever been known. It surpassed by far the frenzy 
of the Mlississippi Bubble. That it was perhaps entirely uninten- 
tional and purely a^ccidental, is only one of its amazing features. 

For a long time it fascinated the European mind, and its fame 
encouraged the most venturesome and fearless to engage in hazard - 
ot^ enterprises in the unknown and mysterious western country. 
And these hardy and bold explorers, missionaries and adventurers 
came to these shores at an opportune time wihen the advancement 
of civilization required them to be here and prepare the way for 
the occupation of New England. 



NOROMBEGA. 93 



Undoubtedly the wild and exaggerated description of Xorom- 
bega, widely circulated in England and France, added stimulus 
to the rivaln.- in colonization in these countries. 

The real story of Xorombega begins at the seaport of Cardiff 
on the coast of Wales, in the year 1567. At this time Cardiff was 
a base for the operations of pirates and slave traders. 

The most daring and famous one among them was Captain John 
Hawkins, later becoming a British admiral during the reign of 
Queen Elizabeth. She knighted him for his valor and distin- 
guished services against the Spaniards. He is knowTi in later 
history as Sir John Hawkins. His son. Sir Richard, was also 
a naval commander and a writer of some note. Sir John wa^, 
when only a captain, a pioneer ki the business of stealing black 
savages in Africa and selling them to white Christians in Europe. 
•So far ^s is known, he never withdrew from or renounced the slave 
trade. Elizabeth sanctioned it and it became England's national 
policy. Sir John''s coat of arms bore a half-length figure of a 
negro child bound with cords.^ 

During October of this year (1567) Captain Hawkins fitted out 
at Cardiff five ships and sailed to the coast of Guinea. There he 
loaded his vessels with human beings and sailed for Spanish 
America. At de la Hacha he sold out his cargo, and on his way 
home entered the harbor of St. John d'UUoa, where, while at anchor 
he was attacked by hostile Spaniards and lost four ships. With 
the remaining, vessel he escaped in a disabled condition and put 
to sea, September 3, 1568. October 8, his men suffering from 
v^-ounds and lack of food, he put into Tampico river, on the bay 
of Mexico in latitude 23° 30' north. 

There he held a conference with his men and it was decided to 
separate the crew into two companies, one of which should remain 
and subsist as best it could, while the other proceeded to England, 
•Hawkins promising to return the next year and take them ofiF. 
It is evident that all agreed to this, but some who remained 
regretted it before the others had departed. How many perished, 
or what their fate was, is not a part of this story, neither is it well 
known. 



C) DeCosta, in Mag. of Hi«t. vol. 9, p. 168. 



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94 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Among those who were left behind were David (or Davy) 
Ingram, a man named Twid or Twide and another named Browne. 
.These three traveled in a northerly direction on foot and bv canoe, 
subsisting on fish and game, the fruits of the countrv- and what 
food could be obtained from the Indians, who were kindly dis- 
posed and hospitable. 

During a large part of the sixteenth century there was discour- 
agement, both in England and in France, regarding the discoverv 
of any place in the northern pan of .America attractive to colo- 
nists. There had been so many failures that many were adopting 
the opinion of Peter ^lartyr to the effect that " they that seek riches 
must not go to the frozen north." ' A few, however, like Sir 
Humphrey Gilbert, the Earl of Warwick and others, continued to 
hold an adverse opinion. 

About 1575 the intere\st in Xorombega and other points on the 
northern coast had revived to such an extent that renewed effort -^ 
were made to obtain all possible information regarding that coun- 
trv-. This could be secured only by interviewing voyagers, pirates, 
slave traders and adventurers. 

The government appointed a commission of inquiry for the 
-astensible purpose of inquiring into piracy, which sat at Cardiff 
April 3, 1577. It would seem, however, from the interrogatories 
propounded, that its principal object was to obtain facts to be used 
in colonization enterprises. Of course the records are obscure, 
but this is quite probable from what have been rescued from 
oblivion, and published. 

Among the witnesses examined was David Ingram. His deposi- 
tion was published in full by DeCosta in a pamphlet entitled 
" Ancient Norumbega or the V^'Oyages of Simon Ferdinando and 
John Walker to the Penobscot River 1 579-1 580," printed by Joel 
Munsell's Sons,, Albany, 1890. This was the beginning of the 
excitement in England regiarding Xorombega. He testified that 
he traveled 

in those countries from beyond Terra Florida extending rewards Cape 
Britton about Xi monethes in those countries wch lye towards the Xorth 
of the River Maia (May) in which time he traivled * *' * by land 2.000 
miles at least, and never continued in any one place above 3 or 4 dales sav- 
ing only at the city of Balma. 



(') Baxter, in Tercentenary of Martin Pring's first voyage. (1903). 



NOROMBEGA. 95 



To the question '* whether the countrv- be fruitful, and what 
kind of fruits tliere be," the answer is recorded that he " con- 
fessed," or, as it would be written today, he " deposed : " 

yt is exceedingre fruitful and that there is a tree as he called it a plum tree, 
wch of the leaves thereof bing prssd will yealde a very excellent lycor as 
pleasant to drincke and as good, as any kinde of winne. 

He saw -.. 

a Beast in all points like unto a horse, saving he had two longe tusks, of 
wch beast he was put in great danger of his lyfe, but he excaped by clyminge 
a tree. 

As to " what kind of people there be, and how they be apar- 
relled," 

He hath confessed yt farre into the land there be many people, and that 
he sawe a town half a mile longe, and hath many streats farr broader than 
any streat in London. Further yt the men goes naked savinge only the 
myddell part of them covered with skynns of beasts and wth leaves. And 
that generllye all men weare about there amies dyvers hoopes of gold and 
sylver wch are of good thickness and lykewyse they weare the lyke about 
the smale of there leggs wch hoopes are garnished wth pearle dyv^ers of 
them as bigge as ones thume. That the womenne of the countr\-e gooe wth 
slats of gold over there body much lyke unto armor about the middest of 
there bodys they weare leafes. whath growinge there one very longe much 
lyke unto heare. and lykewise about there armes and the smale of there 
leggs they weare hoopes of gold and sylver garnyshed wth fayer pearle. 

Ais to " what kind of buildings and houses they have in that 
country : " 

He confessed yt they buyld there bowses round lyke a Dovehouse and 
hath in lyke manner a touer on the topps of there howses and that there 
be many pillars that upholdeth many things of gold and sylver very mas>ye 
and great and lykewyse pyllers of Crystall. 

At the bottom of this testimony appear the following words: 
EHvers other matters of great impotaunce he hath confessed (yf they be 
true) which he sayeth that upon his lyfe he offereth to goe to the place, 
approve the same true 

" (Endorsed 

abt 1584 

Questions demanded of David Ingram concerning his 
knowledge of a discovery. 
2 



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96 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Subsequently this was followed by wliat writers have called 
" a larger statement." and what some have termed the " Relation 
of David Ingram." Under just wliat circumstances this was pro- 
duced, is not entirely clear. It is reasonable to assume that his 
testimony aroused so much interest that a further and more elab- 
orate account of it was demanded. The original of this may be 
found in the Magazine of American Histcry, vol. 9. page 200. In 
this he gives no new *' facts " other than appeared in his depos- 
ition, but enlarges upon the details and makes a more wonderful 
and attractive story. 

It had a wide circulation in England and throughout Europe, 
and as has already been suggested, it is evident that later it had 
a potent influence in encouraging emigraton to both the New Eng- 
land and the New France of America. 

- Near the close of this unique document appears the following : 
After long travell the aforesaide David Ingram with his two companions, 
Browne and Twid, came to the head of a river called Guida (Garinda) which 
is 60 leagues west from Cape Britton wher they understode by the people of 
that Countrie of the arrival of a chri>tian whereupon they made ther repairs 
to the sea side and then found a Frenche Captaine named Mons. Champaigne 
who tooke them into his shipp and brought them unlo Xew Haven and from 
thence tiiey weare transported into England, Anno dni 1569. 

The sources of information upon this subject, used by DeCofsta 
and other writers, are found in the works of Hakluyt, Purchas, 
and in some of the early volumes of the Collections of the Massa- 
chusetts Historical Society. 

This subject has interested a multitude of writers who have 
delved in the lore of early New England and the beginnings of 
Maine. In " Elaine My State " pubhshed by the Maine Writers' 
Research Club in 1919, one of its most interesting articles is " The 
Lost City of Norumbega," by Emmie Bailey Whitney. 



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snmoxs family genealogy. 



A Genealogy of a Few Lines of the Simmons 
Family of Maine and Massachusetts 

DESCEXDENTS OF MOSES SIMMOXS (MOSES 
SYMOXSOX). '^FORTUXE," 1621. 

(by FREDERICK JOHNSOX SIMMONS.) 

(Continued from Vol. VII, page 198.) 

4 
Nathaniel Simmons was in Waldoboro, Me., when the General 
Court of Mass. passed an act of incorporation for the town of 
•Waldoboro on June 29, 1773. On the 21 Sept., 1773, at the log 
meeting house at meeting house cove, the first town meeting of 
the town of Waldoboro was held. Waterman Thomas was elected 
moderator and a few other officers were also elected, then the 
meeting was adjourned to meet next day at ten o'clock. At this 
meeting Xathaniel Simmons was elected Sealer of Weights and 

4 
Measures. X'^athaniel also served the town of i\\'aldoboro. Me., 
as one of its selectmen for the years 1775, 1776. 1777 and 1782. 

At Ehixburv', Mass., on Oct. 23rd, 1767, Xathaniel Simmons, 
Gamaliel Bradford, E. Fish, Peleg Wadsworth, Judah Delano and 
Thomas Weston were called upon to give advice relative to a dis- 
pute over the will of John Soule. I also find several records of 
Nathaniel Simmons aiding in settling estates. 

4 4 

The children of X'^athaniel and Mercy Simmons were all born 
in Duxbury, Mass., and were : 

5 _ 

Mary Simmons bom June 19. 1742; m. John Hunt, Jr., Apr. 26, 1764. 

5 

* Joseph Simmons born Sept. 19, 1744; m. Eliz. Chamberlain Dec. 4, I770- 

5 

* Zebedee Simmons Bp, Aug. 10, 1746 ; m. Mary Waterman. 

5 
Sarah Simmons Bp. Aug. 26, 1750. 

5 
Dorothy Simmcns Bp. May, 1753: m. John Winslow. 

5 
Rachel Simmons at Waldoboro, Me., died Dec. 2, 1788, aged 25 yrs., 2 

mo„ 4 da. 

5 

* Stephen Simmons, m. Betsey 



98 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



The wHll of Nathaniel Simmoiis follows : 

Lincoln County Probate Records. 
The will of Xathaniel Simmons of Waldoboro, Me. 
In the name of God Amen : I Xathanael Sinmions of Waldoborough in 
the County of Lincoln in the State of Massachusetts Bay in -\merica Hus- 
bandman Calling to mind the Shortness of my Life and Being in Perfect 
mind and memory- think fit to Ordain and appoint these Presents to be my 
Last Will and Testament I therefore in the first Place give my soul to God 
in Jesus Christ and my Body to be Buried Decently according to the Dis- 
cresion of my Exercutors herein after named Believing that at the grate 
and General Resurection to Receive the Same again— and I Do Hereby Dis- 
pose of the Estate which Almighty God has Bles'ed me with in manner as 
follow eth. Item first I give to my True and Loving Wife the one half of 
all my Real estate together with the Improvement of all my House-movables 
and I here further give to my wife Mrs. Marcy Simmons the Improvement 
of three Cows and five Sheep — What is here ment is the Improvement of all 
the Real and Personal Estate here Given to my wife so Long as She the Sd 
Mercy Simmons shall remain my Widow — Item I hereby give too my two 
oldest Sones viz Joseph Simmons and Zebedee Simmons the whole of that 
my Farme it Being the Homestead Farme on which I Dwell after their 
mothers Improvement as above to them and their Heirs forever Equally ; 
further I give to sd Joseph and Zebedee my four best oxen together with 
my Horse and two thirds of all my tools of all sorts ; further I give Joseph 
and Zebedee the t^vo Gunes that they noe Improve and my two Swoards — 
Item I hereby give to my Son Steven Simmons the Long Island farme which 
I bought of Benjamin Bradford Lying on Long Island near a Place Called 
the midle narroAvs further I give to my son Steven my Half of the farme 
on which he the s'd Steven Does now Dwells on — further I give Steven 
the gun that he Improves Itim I hereby Give to my four Daughters viz 
'Mary the wife of John Hunt Dorothy wife of John Winslow Sarah Sim- 
mons Rachel Simmons all that my Farme which I bought of Mrs. James 
Cleveland and Contains one Hundred Acres and lyeth on the Southerly side 
of Jacob Wades farm.e all which farmes or Tracts of Land Laying within 
the Township of Waldoborough above s'd Except the Long Island Lot fur- 
ther I hereby give to Mary and Dorothy four Pounds a Piece to be Paid to 
them in one year after my Deceas further I give Mary and Dorothy Each 
of them one Cow a piece itim I hereby give to my three Children now Liv- 
ing at home viz Zebedee Sarah and Rachel after m.y wifes Improvement as 
above the three Cows and five Sheep together with all the House movables 
to be Equally divided among them further I give to Zebedee Six Sheep and 
what Remains after my Debts and funeral Charge are paid Equally to be 
Divided among my Seven Children I hereby appoint my two Sones Joseph 
and Zebedee to be my sole and only Executors to this my last will and Testa- 
ment in Consideration of the Love that I bare to my Loving wife and Duti- 
ful Children I give as above s'd to them and their heirs forever In Witness 
and Confirmation whereof I hereunto set my hand and Seal this Twenty 
Second Day of January in the year of our Lord one Thousand Seven Hun- 
dred and Eighty Seven 



W: 



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SIMMONS FAMILY GENEALOGY. 99 



Signed Sealed and Declared to be my Last Will and Testament In Pres- 
ence of these Witnesses 
Peleg Oldham 

John Haupt Nathanael Simmons (seal) 

Andrew Storer Probated 22 Jan., 1789. (Iv, 21) 



Inventor}' by Nathaniel Pitcher, Jabesh Cole and Peleg Oldham, 
all of Waldoborough, 2 Feb., 1789, (IV, 85 to 87) Cornelius 
Turner and Peleg Oldham, both of Waldoborough, sureties, 
Account filed 18 Sep., 1792. (V, 91-92). 
4 321 

Ichabod Sihimons (Closes, John, Moses), the son of IMoses and 
Rachel (Sampson) Simmons, was bom 18 Oct., 1722, and died in 
Feb., 1798. He married firstly Lydia Soule, youngest daughter 
of Josiah and Lydia (Delano) Soule, who was born Oct. 2, 1719, 
secondly Widow Mercy Sprague, 1781. -. ' 

The children of Ichabod and Lydia (Soule) Simmons were: 

5 ^ 

Consider Simmons born Sept, 2"^, 1744. 

5 ■ ' . 

* Noah Simmons born April 2, 1745. 

5 
Lemuel Simmons born Feb. 22, 1749. 

~'^ 5 • ' 

Abigail Simmons born May 24, 1753. 

5 
Nathaniel Simmons born Apr. 3, 1757- 

5 
Ichabod Simmons born Mch. 25, 1761. 

This may be the Lieut. Ichabod Simmons of Readfield. Maine, 
v/ho had children born there and named Moses, bom July 19. 1784-. 
Lydia, b. Aug. 28, 1787; Jerujah, Apr. 22, 1790; Samuel Sept. 
20. 1792; Daniel Apr. 20. 1795; and Patty, Sept. 15, 1797. 
4 321 

William Simmons (Moses. John, Moses) "son of Moses and 
Rachel (Sampson) Simmons was born in Duxbury, Mass., 28 
Aug., 1736. He was one of the executors of his father's will in 
1761. Since I have found no other records of this William Sim- 
mons in Massachusetts. T suspect that he moved to Waldoboro, 
Miaine, when his sisters, Mercy, Anna (Simmons) Oldham and 
his brother-in-law cousin moved there about 1768 or 1772-3. His 
nephew, Zebedee Simmons, was there in 1764-5. 



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loo SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



3 2 I 

Anna Simmons (Moses. John, Moses) the daughter of Moses 
and Rachel (Sampson) Simmons, was born, 4 Sept., 1739. She 
married Nov. 29, 1764, Peleg Oldham. They had four children, 
born in Duxbury, Mass. They later moved to Waldcboro. Maine. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

5 4 321 

Joseph Simmons (Nathaniel, Joseph, John. ^Loses) the son of 
Nathaniel and Mercy (Simmons) Simmons, was born at Duxbury, 
Mass., Sept. 19, 1744. and died at Nobleboro, Maine, in May, 
1816. His funeral service was conducted by Elder Phinehas Pills- 
bury on Sunday, May 26, 1816. The services took place at the 
home of his son, James Simmons (home of Widow Molly (Smith) 
Keen, James Simmons' mother-in-law where James Simmons and 

5 
_wife Christanna were then living.) Joseph Simmons married 

.6 
Dec. 4, 1770 (at Bridgewater, Mass.) Elizabeth Chamberlain (Job, 

5 432 I 7 

Freedom, Nathaniel, WiUiam, Henry, Widow CHiristian). . Eliza- 
beth Chamberlain was the daughter of Job and Rachel (Bonney) 
Chamberlain, and was born in 1751. Rachel Bonney was from 

5 
Pembroke, ^lass, Joseph Simmons' first child was probably bom 
in that part of ancient Pembroke, now Hanson, Mass. Jojseph's 
father Nathaniel owned a farm near the above named place. 

5 
Joseph's son was named Nathaniel and was baptized Jan. 12, 1772, 

at the Second Church of Christ in Pembroke (now Hanson, Mass.") 

6 
Nathaniel Simmons died at W^aldoboro, Me., Oct. 22, 1788, aged 
17 years, 3 days. He is buried in the old Slaigo yard on the 
Simmons estate. 

5 
About 1772 Joseph Simmons and family moved to Waldoboro, 

5 
Me., as we find them there in 1773. Joseph Simmons served in 
the war of the Revolution in 1777 in Capt. Phillip M. Miner's Com- 
pany and in Col. McCobb's regiment (from town of Waldoboro). 



I") f ttsor-:"ii.' 



SnrMONS FAMILY GENEALOGY. loi 



4 
In 1787 by will of Nathaniel Simmons, Joseph Simmons received 

5 

one-half of his father's farm; in 1790 census Joseph Simmons of 

•Waldoboro. had 138 acres of land valued at $700 and one house 
valued at $90.. 

5 
Joseph Simmons spent his last days with his son Col. James 
Simmons, Nobleboro, ^le., w^here he died in 181 6. 
• It may be of interest to some of his descendants to know that 
his Bible and hymn book were passed down to his son Joseph's 
family of Palermo, Me. (This branch married into the Hall 
•family of Rockland, Me. ) ; the sea chest of his grandfather Joseph 
and his father's cane have been handed down to that Simmons 
bearing the name of Nathaniel. The chest was last in the hands 
of the late Nathaniel Simmons of Poor's Mills, Belfast, Me., and 
Lawrence Nathaniel Simmons of Waldo, Me., has the cane. 

5 
The children of Joseph and Elizabeth (Chamberlain) Simmons 

were : 

_ (All but Nathoniel born in Waldoboro, Me.) 
6 
Xa'thaniel baptized Pembroke, Mass., Jan. 12, 1772; died at Waldoboro, 
Me., Oct. 22, 1788. 
6 
Job Simmons. 
6 

* Thomas Simmons died Oct. 4, 1868, ae. 86 yrs, 4 mos. 

6 

* James Simmons born Jan. 10, 1781 ; died Oct. 2, 1872. 

6 
♦Joseph Simmons lived and died in Palermo, Me. 

6 
Sovia Simmons married Oldham. 

6 

* Mercy Simmons died at Belfast, Me., 1884, ae. 93 yrs., 5 mos. 

5 4321 

Zebedee Simmons (Nathaniel, Joseph, John, Moses) the son of 
Nathaniel and Mercy (Simmons) Simmons, was baptized at Dux- 
bury, Aug. 10, 1746, and died by drowning, while attempting to 
cross the Medomack river (on the ice) to Waldoboro, Me. He 



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I02 SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



was on horseback, hunting to secure a doctor for his sick wife. 

5 
Zebedee Siinmons married :Mar>' Waterman. She died March 
i8th, 1809, aged 60 yrs., and is buried in the Slaigo yard, Simmons 
estate, Waldoboro, ^le. 
5 

Zebedee was the first of the Simmons brothers to come to Waldo- 
boro, Me. One of his descendants informs me that he was inter- 
ested in and owned saihng vessels and had something to do with 
salt and fish business and quarries near Friendship, Ale., as well 
as farming in Waldoboro, Me. The District of Maine census, 
•1798 shows that the heirs of Zebedee Simmons held 165 acres of 
land valued at $850, and a house valued at $90. 

Zebedee Simmons served the town of Waldoboro, Me., as select- 
man in 1778, 1779 and as town treasurer in 1790. 

THE WILL OF ZEBEDEE SBIMOXS 

I give to my wife the income of ihe Sloop till she thinks best to sell her 
and then to be Devided between her and the children as the rest of my 
Estate likewise one Hundred Dollars in Cash. Likewise I give to Polly 
Haupt Fifty Dollars and Thomas Waterman Fifty Dollars and Deborah 
Waterman Fifty Dollars, and I likewise give to my Sister Sarah Simmons 
a note of Hand against my Brother Stephen for Twenty four Pounds. I like- 
wise give the income of my Place to my wife and children, one third to my 
wife and the ether two thirds to my children till they come of age and then 
to be equally Devided between them after the charges and Debts are paid. 
I likewise give the Debts due me to my wife and children to be Eaquly 
Devided between them Except the noie of Hand and the other Legacies that 
I have bequeathed abov. Likewise I would give Thomas Waterman my part 
of the Timber that I own in a vessel frame but not as a gift but for him 
to have the Refusal of it towards what I owe him ; Likewise I give my Mare, 
to my wife to be disposed of according to her Desire exclusive of what I 
have above given and all the rest I have net mentioned to my wife and Chil- 
dren to be Divided Eaqualy between them; Likewise appoint my Brother 
Stephen Simmons Thomas Waterman and My Brother Joseph Simmons 
Exicutors to this my will 

In presence of Zebedee Simmons 

Ezekiel Dodge Given under my hand and seal 

Robt. Farnsworth this Sixteenth Day of October 

In the Year of Our Lord one Thousand Seven hundred and Xinty three. 
I likewise appoint my wife Guardian to my Children till Thomas Waterman 
comes of Age and then I appoint him their guardian. 

Probated 25 Ap., 1794. Letters testamentary issued to Stephen 
Simmons and Joseph Simmons, both of Waldoborough, 25 Ap., 



SIMMONS FAMILY GENEALOGY. 103 



1794. ( ) to Mary Sininions of Waldoborough, widow, 

guardian unto Zebedee, minor son, 28 Ap., 1794. (VI 28). Inven- 
tory by William Farnsworth, Peleg Oldham and Nathaniel Pitcher. 
all of Waldoborough, (VI, 161-5). Accounts filed 25 June, 1806. 
(XI 213-214). 

5 4321 

Stephen Simmons (Nathaniel, Joseph, John, Moses) was the son 

4 4 

of Nathaniel and Mercy (Simmons) Simmons married Betsey 

5 
. She married after Stephen Simmons* death Ephraim 

5 5 

Patch. Stephen Simmons died about 1795. Stephen Simmons 
served the town of Waldoboro, Maine, as selectman for the years 
3793 and 1794. By his father's w^ill he was given the "Long 
Island " farm and his father's half of the farm on which Stephen 
then dwelt. In the census of District of Maine, 1798, Stephen 
Simmons' heirs held a house (occupied by Wm. Groton) valued 
at $200. 

The children of Stephen and Betsey Simmons were: 



6 
* Peabody Simmons 

6 I 

Abigail Simmons 

6 

Stephen Simmons 

6 
Urania Sprague Simmons 

6 
Nancy Simmons 

6 J . 

Betsey Simmons ' " 

6 
Rachel Simmons 

The children w^ere all minors at the time of Stephen's death and 
Spooner Sprague was guardian to x\bigail ; Joseph Simmons guard- 
ian to Peabody, Stephen and Urania Sprague ; Ezekiel Sprague to 
Nancy Simmons; Nathan Sprague was later guardian to Urania 
Simmons. 



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I04 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



6 5 4 321 

Peabody Simmons (Stephen, Nathaniel, Joseph, John, Moses) 

was a minor in 1795. Peabody married Groton. and 

lived and died at Hope, ]vlaine, probably buried at Hope in Mowry 
yard. 

The children of Peabody and (Groton) Simmons were: 

7 

Adeline Simmons married C. G. Baclielor in Camden. 

7 
Stephen Simnicns married Sophia Sprngue of Waidoboro. 

' 7 " 

* Nathaniel Simmons married Chloe Dunton. 

7 • ■ ' 

Peabody Simmcns married Salome Sprague. 

T ■ 6 5432 

Nathaniel Simmons (Peabody, Stephen, Nathaniel, Joseph, John, 
I 
Moses) married Chloe Dunton and their children were: 

8 

Clerendcn A. b. in Hope (Appletcn) ]May 21, 1838, married at 22 yrs. 
M. A. Fogler of Union. Their children are : 

9 

George M., 47 yrs. old in 1912. 

9 
Char. A, b. Xcv. 29, —. 

9 
Martha M. 

8 
Calesta A. Simmons m.. ist, Geo. E. Cummins; 2nd, Warren Hills both 
of Union (two sons by ist husband). 
8 
Carrie D. Simmons, m. ist. A. Gushee who died in army at Petersburg; 
m. 2nd, W. H. Sumner. 
8 
Joseph M. Simmcns, new lives at Schuyler, Neb. 

8 
Clarendon A. Simmons had a store for years at 23 Sea St., Rock- 
land, Me. 

.5 4 321 

Noah Simmons (Tchabod. Moses, John, Moses), the son of 
Ichabod and Lydia fSoule) Simmons was born at Duxbury, Mass., 
April 2, 1745, a descendant gives the birth date Oct. 5, 1745. H't 






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SIMMONS FA.MILY GENEALOGY. 105 

died June 24, 1832. aged S6 yrs., 6 nios., 10 days. Noah Simmons 
married Sylvia Southworth (b. Dec. 3, 1747) July 2, 1769; mar- 
ried secondly, Diana Keen, Sept. 19, 1771 ; married a third time 
Mary or Molly Sherman of Marshfield, Mass., 1773. (A descend- 
ant gives her name as German, and also states that she was a newly 
arrived immigrant, possibly Scotch. I doubt this statement.) 

5 
Children of Noah and Sylvia (Southworth) Simmons were: 

6 

Wealthia Simmons, b. March 10, 1770; d. ]^Ich. 3, 1795. 

6 
Peleg S. Simmcns (possibly), died at sea 1803 aged 31 yrs. 

5 
Chjldren of Noah and Molly (Sherman) Simmons were: 

6 _ 

* Charles Simmons b. Xov. 23, 1774; d. Xov. i, 1857. 

6 
Daniel Sim.mons b. Feb. 17, 1777. 

6 
- Nathan Simmons b. Apr. 18, 1779. 

6 
♦James Simmons died April 28, 1822, aged 41 yrs. 

6 
Joseph Simmons died Jan. 19. 1809, 22 3TS. 

6 
Lydia Simmons died Xov. 9, 1791, i mo., 23 days. 

6 
Martin Simmons died Nov. 19, 1794, 10 mos., 3 days. 

6 
Noah Simmons died Nov. 27, 1776, i yr., 5 days. 

6 
Oliver Simmons died Feb. 10, 1786. i mo., 22 days. 

6 
Diana Sim.mons. 

6 
Stephen Simmons. 

Noah Simmons Hved in Kingston, Miass., and there many of his 
children are buried. 

6 5 

Charles Simmons, the -on of Noah and Molly (Sherman) Sim- 
mons b. Nov. 2^, 1774: died Nov. i. 1857, aged 82 yrs.. ii mos.. 



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io6 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

8 days. He married Lydia Weston, Jan. 25, 1798 and had chil- 

7 7 7 

dren: Lydia, Joshua \V. b. Sept. 14, 1798: Alden b. ]\Iay 4, 1801, 

7 7 

died May 11, 1881 ; James b. Aug. 4, 1803; Peleg b. Aug. 21. 

7 7 

i8c6; Henry b. Aug. 13, 181 1; Caroline (?) b. March 10, 1809; 

7 
Sylvia S. Simmons b. July 19, 1814. 

7 6 

Joshua W., son of Charles and Lydia (Weston) Simmons mar- 

8 
ried Lucy Arnold Oct. 28, 1821. They had Lucy Briggs b. April 

8 8 

II, 1823; Charles Henry b. Mch. 5, 1824; Susan James b. July 9, 

8 8 

1826; Wesley Simmons and Wilbur Simmons b. Jan. 10, 1835. 

8 ' 8 

Wesley died Nov. 12, 1859 ; Wilbur died Apr. 27, 1863, at Ber- 

8 
wick, La., aged 28 yrs., 3 mos., 17 days. Wilbur Simmons mar- 

9 
ried Mary J. Lewis, March i, 1856, and had Edwin Wilbur Sim- 

9 ^ 

mons b. Nov. 28, 1859; Wesley. 

7 • 654 321 

Alden Simmons (Chas., Noah. Ichabod. Moses, John, Moses) 
was born May 4, 1801. died May 11, 1881. The following account 
appeared in the paper at the time of his death. 

\ 

An old and respected citizen of this place departed to the spirit life in the 
person of Captain Alden Simmons, May irth, 1881. The deceased had 
attained the ripe age of 80 yrs. and 7 days. He was bom in Duxbury, com- 
mencing a seafaring life at the early age of 14 yrs., and has during that 
time visited all parts of the world, been among all nations, and has sailed 
in sixt>'-one different vessels without once having been wrecked. He became 
master at a very early age. During three years, 1858, 59, and 60, he was first 
assistant officer of Minot's Light Ship, and for six years after the erection 
of Minot's Light House he was assistant keeper. He was a member of the 
Second Congregational church, a kind and friendly neighbor. On Thursday 
funeral services were held at his late residence, conducted by Rev. Mr. 
Yager, from whence the remains were conveyed to Duxbury- for interment. 



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SIMMONS FAMILY GENEALOGY. 107 



6 54321 

James Simmons (Noah, Ichabod, ]\Ibses, John, Moses) lived in 

7 
P.ympton, Mass., and married Joanna Everson. His son was James 

T. Simmons " Agent Plympton Station O. C. R. Road," who mar- 
ried Zerviah P. Fish, daughter of Joseph and Roxanna Fish, Mar. 
19, 1848. 
6 
James and Zerviah (Fish) Simmons had children, among them, 
Maria Simmons who married WilHam Faulkner, a retired shoe- 
maker and farmer, who now lives in West Diixbury, near Pem- 
broke, Mass. 

(To be Concluded) 



Dr. A. O. Thomas, ^liaine's wide-awake and exceedingly efficient 
State Superintendent of Schools, has prepared and is now send- 
ing to all local superintendents of schools and school teachers an 
outline of a course of study of State history, civics, and ancillarv 
subjects, entitled " History from the Sources, and One Hundred 
Leading Facts of Maine." 

Maine's superintendents of the public schools for the past many 
years have been very able men, but have never heretofore appeared 
to get the right vision of the possibilities and advantages to the 
youth of Maine which lie in the path of a systematic study of State 
history. This course of study contemplated by Dr. Thomas will 
lead up to and assimilate the social and industrial activities of the 
Maine of today as well as of the fascinating past. 

We believe this sort of school work will be an inspiration to the 
scholars of Maine and inculcate in their breasts a deeper love for 
old Maine, something, as it seems to us, that our public school 
"system has always lacked. It will be a privilege and a pleasure 
•for the Journal to co-operate with the School Department in this 
'work whenever it may be possible so to do. 



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o8 SPRAGUE'S TOURXAL OF MAINE HISTORY 




Tablet at Gardiner, Maine, in Memory of Lieutenant Nathaniel Berry 

THE BERRY FAMILY OF GARDINER, AMINE. 

William Bradstrcet Berry of Gardiner, Maine, a zuell known and 
prominent business man of that city, mention of zuhom and whose 
likeness appeared on page YJ of the last issue of the Journal, is a 
direct descendant of the first Samuel Berry and his son, Lieut. 
Nathaniel Berry. Mr. Berry has always taken a keen interest in 
all Maine historical matters, and belongs to various historic-patri- 
otic societies, and is vice-president of the Maine Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution. He contributes to the Journal 
the follozinngg valuable sketch of the Berry family: 

Berry Genealog}^ 

S.AMUEL BERRY. 

(i) Samuel Berry was an Englishman by birth. He built a 
large house and kept a tavern, which was the first house for enter- 
tainment ever built in Bath. On the hill north of the mill, they 
built a two story garrison of timber 12 inches square, the upper 
story projecting to protect themselves against the Indians. 

This block house stood imtil after the capture of Quebec by 
General Wolfe in 1759. It was taken down by Mr. Berry, and 



BERRY GENEALOGY. 109 



three houses built of it for his three sons, on the west side of the 
mill pond, on three separate lots 30 rods wide and extending east 
to \\'innegance Creek. 

Names of the three sons : 
(2) Nathaniel Berry, 
Samuel Berry, 
James Berry, 
(Joseph was taken by the Indians) see below. 

1739 — Berry & Sears built a double saw mill. (Samuel, Sr.) 

1749 — Second mill built by Berry. 

1750 — First grist mill built by Berry and others. 

1763 — Third saw mill built by Berry and others. 

1782 — Fourth saw mill built by Berry and others. (Samuel, Jr.) 

1783 — Second grist mill built by Berry. 

1750 — Previous to this date Samuel Berry built mills, tavern, 
and a strong garrison at Mill Cove. His son Joseph taken by the 
Indians. 

Mr. Berry's land commenced at the Kennebec river, running 
west to the New Meadows river, and a hundred twenty rods wide. 

The first mill Mr. Sears sold out to ^Ir. Berry. 
~~ (The above is taken from Lemont's History of Bath, Maine.) 

(2) Nathaniel, a mariner, at one time owned 100 acres in 
Hallowell which he sold to Samuel Norcross. Capt. Nathaniel 
Berry came to Litchfield from West Bath in 1763. He was a man 
of great bodily strength and a great hunter. On one occasion he 
was chasing a moose on snowshoes, and his companions had the 
curiosity to measure his leaps and it was found out that he had 
leaped seven feet between the shoes time after time. He used to 
visit Litchfield, coming up the Cobbossee stream in a boat, fre- 
quently for the purpose of hunting. In 1780 he moved his family 
upon the farm now owned by C. H. Hodgkins and later upon the 
farm afterwards occupied by his son Andrew, and his grandson 
Orrington, and lived there until his decease. He was a member of 
the board of selectmen in 1796, and held other town offices. He 
married Mary Mitchell, Jan. 18, 1755, at Georgetown. 

(Hanson's History of Gardiner, p. 78; History of Litchfield. 

P- 52.) 

(2) Joseph Berry was born at New Meadows, Brunswick. Sept. 
28, 1740. His parents had previously resided at Berry's Mills, in 
Bath, then called Georgetovv^n. Nothing has been obtained as 



^■rsf.' ...UO 



no SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



regards his ancestors. He married ist Feb.. 1776, Jane, the second 
daughter of Capt. Adam Hunter of Topsham. Joseph Berry either 
prior or after his marriage settled in Topsham. During the last 
Indian War he is said to have been captured by the Indians and 
carried to Canada. It appears in an entry in the office of the 
Registry of Deeds that Dec. 28, 1768, he received from James 
Hunter 100 acres of the N. W. parts of lots Nos. 30-31, in Top- 
sham. He was one of the committee of Correspondence & Safetv 
in 1785. He died Sept. 2;^, 1830, in Topsham, Maine. 

(History Brunswick, Topsham.) 

(3) Samuel Berry, Nathaniel Berry and a deaf and dumb 
brother named Benjamin came from West Bath in 1763. Samuel 
received an eight acre lot (No. 5) on " Plaisted Hill" and his 
house was near the first dam on the Cabbassa-Contee. The terms 
on which his land was obtained were : that it shouM be well 
fenced, have a good house, and that the grantee should dwell 
thereon seven years,, clean up three acres and work on the high- 
way and ministerial lot certain days each year, and that he should 
not sell it until the Plantation of Gardinerston contained 60 fam- 
ilies. Berry bought out James ]McCaus!and in 1776. 

(Hanson's History of Gardiner, p. 78.) 

(3) Samuel Berry of Bath cut timber on the shore of Cabassa 
first pond and hay at Brown's farm as early as 1761. 

(Hanson's History of Gardiner, p. 68.) 

(3) Lieut. Samuel Berry, b. Aug. 10, 1737; m. Sarah Thorn; 
she was b. Oct. 14, 1739. Children: 

I. David, b. Nov. 22, 1759: m. ^lary Bradstreet ; she d. in 

1827. Children: i, Polly, b. :\I. 23, 1782; m. Webster. 

2, Arthur, b. Nov. 5, 1783; m. Harriet Stackpole, 2nd wife. Eliza- 
beth Grant, 3d. Mary Taylor. 3. Rachel, b. Apr. 7, 1785; m. 

Pollard, 2nd husband, Wall. 4, Patty, b. July 10, 

1793; d. unm. 5, Harriet, b. Dec, 1795; d. unm. 

II. Thomas, b. Aug. 23, 1763; m. Polly Davis, 2nd wife, Mary 
Hanscom^ Children: i, Samuel, u^m ; 12, Jpseph, m. Betsey 
Tabor. 3, Keziah, m. Samuel Falls. 4, David, unm. 

III. Lydia, b. Aug. 22, 1765; m. Nathaniel Berry (Lee N. 
Berry.) 

IV. Martha, b. July 10, 1767; m. 



BERRY GEXEL\LOGY. in 



V. Lucy, b. March 22, 1769; m. Joseph Lambert of Hill Cove, 
Bath. 

(3)) Nathaniel Berry was born in Georgetown, now called 
West Bath, Dec. 22, 1755. When he was eight (8) years of age 
(1763) his father removed to Gardiner, and Nathaniel continued 
to reside here until he was twenty-two years old (1777) when he 
went to Boston and enlisted. He was on the northern frontier 
with Gen. Schuyler at the retreat of Saratoga, surrender of 
Burguo}Tie, the skirmish at White ^larsh. He soon became a 
member of George Washington's Life Guards, and, was at Valley 
Forge, in that darkest period of the Revolution. In January, 
1780, he was honorably discharged, and he returned to his home 
in Pittston. \\'hile at AV.ley Forge, a member of the Guard 
opened a writing school and Mr. Berry attended. He wrote the 
names of the Life Guards in his book. His death took place 
Aug. 20, 1850. Hon. George Evans pronounced a eulog>\ and 
a large procession of the people, officers, military escort, fire 
department, etc., attended the body to the Methodist church, and 
thence to the Pittston Cemetery, where it was buried amid the 
tolling of bells and the firing of ^linute guns. Mr. Berry was a 
man of vigorous mind and body and will long be remembered as 
one of Washington's Life Guards. 

(3) Nathaniel Berry was the first selectman elected (1781) 
in Pittston, ^liaine. 5 

(4) Lydia Berry, the daughter of Samuel Berrv^ and the wife 
of Nathaniel Berry, who was born Aug. 22, 1765, was the first 
white girl born in Gardiner or Pittston. 

Children of Capt. Arthur Berry and Harriet Stackpole: 

1. Arthur, Jr.. m. Charlotte Lambert. 

2. Julia, m. J. ^^lacy of New York. 

William Bradstreet Berry, son of Capt. Arthur Berry, Jr., and 
Charlotte Lambert, was born ofiF Cape Horn on his father's ship 
the "Washington" Dec. 23, 1866; m. Alice Louise ^laxcy. 
Children : 

1. Doria Maxcy Berry. 

2. Gladys Marshall Berry, m. Harrison Morton Berry; they 
have one son, Harri-on Morton Berry, Jr. 

3. W^illiam Clark Berry. 



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112 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



Rev. Richard Gibson 

(By R. F. Wormwood, Editor of the Biddeford (Maine) Journal) 
SKETCH OF ONE OF MAINE'S PIONEER CLERGYMEN. 

In *' A Visit to an Historical Island." printed in the November- 
December- January number of Sprague's Journal of Elaine His- 
tory, the writer thereof, referring to Rev. Richard Gibson, says : 

" Tradition has it that Cape Elizabeth might now be peopled 
largely with Gibsons instead of Jordans if the Rev. Richard would 
have consented to marry Winter's only daughter. Apparently he 
refused to accept her hand and fortune, which was a large one for 
those days, and returned to England heart free." 

As a matter of fact, Rev. ]Mr. Gibson did not return to England 
" heart free." In the interest of historical accuracy the following 
necessarily incomplete sketch of this pioneer Maine clergyman is 
submitted. 

When John Winter returned to New England in 1636 as agent 
for Robert Trelawny at Richmond's Island, he was accompanied 
by an Episcopal clergyman. Rev. Richard Gibson, who was, so far 
as the records show, the first clergv-man in this vicinity. The 
coming of Rev. ^Ir. Gibson is supposed to have been due to an 
appeal made by Edward Trelawny, a brother of Robert, who was 
at Richmond's Island in 1635. In a letter written by him to his 
brother not long after his arrival, he refers to an earlier request 
*' for a religious, able minister." He says it is " most pitiful to 
behold what a most heathen life we live," and he contrasts condi- 
tions at Richmond's Is'and with those with which he was made 
familiar during a visit to Boston, mentioning in particular " those 
sweet means which draws a blessing on all things, even those holy 
ordinances and heavenly manna of our souls, which in other parts 
of this land flows abundantly even to the great rejoicing and com- 
forting of the people of God." 

Rev. Mr. Gibson came under a three-years' contract with Tre- 
lawny and remained at Richmond's Island until his contract 
expired. Concerning him, Winter wrote to his employer: "Our 
minister is a very fair condition man, and one that doth keep him- 
self in very good order, and instructs our people well, if it please 
God to give us grace to follow his instruction." Later Winter's 
attitude changed, however, and Mr. Gibson'- ministry on the island 
and the nearby mainland was not thereafter a happv one, Slan- 



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REV. RICHARD GIBSON. 113 



derous reports concerning him soon reached Trelawny in England, 
and Gibson refers to them in a letter to Trelawny. dated June 11, 
1638. The source of those reports is not stated, but may be 
readily inferred. The minister, in his letter, mentions the willing- 
ness of the people of Richmond's Island and vicinity to contribute 
twenty-five pounds a year to the fifty pounds he received from 
Trelawny and he says that Winter opposed the movement to 
increase his salary " because he was not sought unto." It appears 
from this that ^Ir. Winter, who evidently considered himself the 
foremost man in the community, took offense because he was not 
consulted in this matter. It was in this connection that Mr. Gib- 
son referred to the defamatory reports. He affirms that no such 
reports have been in circulation on the island, and continues : 
" It is not in my power what other nien think or speak of me, 
yet it is in my power by God's grace so to live as an honest man 
and a minister and so as no man shall speak evil of me but by 
slandering, nor think amiss but by too much credulity, nor yet 
aggrieve me much by any abuse." 

There is internal evidence, however, that Trelawny was influ- 
enced by these reports, and Rev. Mr. Gibson appealed to him to 
seek other testimony than that he had furnished, adding : '' You 
may, if you please, hear of them that have been here, or come 
from hence, if they have known or heard of any such drinking as 
you talk of. I had rather be under ground than discredit either 
your people or plantation, as you, believing idle people, suppose 
I do. If you have any jealousy this way (so doubtfully you write) 
I think it is best you hold off and proceed no further with me either 
in land or service." 

There is a suggestion of another reason why Mr. Winter w^as 
opposed to giving Rev. ^It. Gibson an increase of salary. Mr. 
Gibson had married a daughter of Thomas Lewis of Saco, while 
W'inter had a marriageable daughter, an only child, who subse- 
quently married Rev. Robert Jordan, who came from England 
about 1640, and who, in 1648, was administrator of Winter's 
estate. In a letter to Governor Winthrop, dated Jan. 14, 1639, 
Mr. Gibson mentions his marriage, referring to it as " a fit means 
for closing of differences and setting in order both for religion 
and government in these plantations." 

It did not have precisely that effect, but at length the way was 
opened for Rev. ^Ir. Gibson to go to the Piscataqua, whither, in 



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114 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



the summer of 1636. he had been preceded by some of the men in 
the employ of Winter who had become so dissatisfied with him 
that they '' fell into a mutiny," and left Richmond's Island for a 
place where they might be at liberty '* to fish for themselves." 
One of these men, mentioned by Winter at the time of the 
'* mutiny " as ''the leader of them all," was a moving spirit among 
the parishioners who " founded and built " at Piscataqua the 
" parsonage house, chapel, with the appurtenances at their own 
proper costs and charges," and made choice of Rev. Mr. Gibson 
to be *' the first parson of said parsonage." 

In a letter written at Richmond's Island, July 8, 1639, and 
addressed to Trelawny, Stephen Sargent, who was an employe of 
Trelawny under Winter, says that Mr. Gibson '' is going to Piscat- 
aqua to live, the which we are all sorry, and should be glad if that 
we might enjoy his company longer." 

Winter, however, did not seem to share this sorrow. In a letter 
written to Trelawny, dated two days later than the one written 
by Sargent, his only reference to the matter was : " Mr. Gibson 
is going from us ; he is to go to Piscataway to be their minister, 
and they give him sixty pounds per year and build him a house 
and clear him some grounds and prepare it for him against he 
come." 

Mr. Gibson, writing to Trelawny, the letter bearing the same 
date as that of Mr. Sargent, gives the reason for his removal as 
follows : "For the continuance of my service at the island, it is 
that which I have much desired, and upon your consent thereunto 
I have settled myself into the country, and expended my estate 
in dependence thereon ; and now I see Mr. W'inter doth not 
desire it, nor hath he ever desired it, but * * * |^a.th enter- 
tained me very coarsely and with much discourtesy, so that I am 
forced to remove to Piscataway for maintenance to my great hin- 
drance. * * * I shall not go from these parts till Michaelmas, 
till which time I have offered my service to Mr. Winter as form- 
erly, if he please, which whether he will accept or no I know not ; 
he maketh difficulty and suspendeth his consent thereto as yet." 

At least one early historian has fixed the date of Mr. Gibson's 
removal to Piscataqua " at the close of 1640, or early the follow- 
ing year," but it is a matter of record that he was paid by Winter 
for six weeks' service after his three-years' contract with Tre- 
lawny expired, and as he came here with Winter, landing at Rich- 



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REV. RICHARD GIBSON. 115 



mond's Island, M(ay 24, 1636, it would seem that his departure 
from that place may have been in the latter part of the summer 
of 1639. Between that time and ^^lichaelmas he may have lived 
in Saco, the home of his wife's father. 

The successor of Rev. Mr. Gibson at Richmond's Island, Rev. 
Robert Jordan, was a graduate of Oxford University and a clerg}-- 
man of the Church of England. For two years he had been liv- 
ing with his kinsman, Thomas Purchase, at Pejepscot, where he 
had probably held religious services. In a letter to Robert Tre- 
lawny, dated Aug. 2, 1641, Winter speaks of Mr. Jordan as fol- 
lows : " Here is one Mr. Robert Jordan, a minister, who has been 
with us this three months, which is a very honest religious man 
by anything as yet I can find in him. I have not yet agreed with 
him for staying here, but did defer it till I did hear some word 
from you. We were long without minister, and were in but a 
bad way, and so we shall be still if we have not the word of God 
taught unto us sometimes." 

This reference is believed to be the negotiations which had 
already been commenced with settlers at Pemaquid, who expressed 
a desire to secure Mr. Jordan's services half the year and allow 
Richmond's Island to have him the other half. An agreement 
upon this proposal was not reached, and Mr. Jordan remained at 
Richmond's Island, where, soon after his arrival he married 
Winter's daughter, Sarah, and, by reason of his natural ability, 
education and deep interest in provincial affairs, long occupied a 
place of considerable influence in the region. The church of which 
he was a member and for which he labored did not find the New 
Kngland soil congenial, however, and he soon gave up the ministry 
and devoted himself to private business affairs. 

The life of the pioneer preacher of the gospel in the territory 
now included within the limits of the state of Elaine, who felt 
upon his conscience the burden of precious souls to be saved, was 
not an easy one, either mentally or physically, for only too often 
v/as he called upon to fight with the weapons of the flesh as well as 
v/ith those of the spirit. He was usually the best educated man of 
the community and his position gave his opinions a weight greater 
than that of the average citizen in the adjustment of minor dififer- 
ences between neighbors and in the settlement of matters of more 
public moment. It was a country of magnificent distances, and the 
parishes of the early preacher? were broad ones. This involved 



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lib SPRAGUE'S TOURXAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



long journeys, by horseback if they could not be made by boat, 
and, as there were no improved highways, this meant following 
a path or more often a mere trail of spotted trees. Even in tinie.-^ 
of peace this was bad enough, but it was much worse when fear 
of hostile Indians was added to the natural and ever-present fear 
of prowling wild animals. ^luch of the seed then sown fell upon 
stony ground ; some fell to the share of the birds of the air, an<l 
some fell in spots where the soil was neither deep nor fertile, but 
these pioneer preachers had in no small measure that faith calcu- 
lated to remove mountains, and they were not easily discouraged. 
They found some fertile soil, and they planted, and cultivated and 
prayed without ceasing. Some went to a reward all the more 
deserved because they had missed an earthly recompense ; others 
•lived to see the fields ripe for the harvest, and passed on, hopeful 
to the end. And their successors sit in the shade of the tree 
they planted in the soil of a new world, a tree whose branche:;- 
spread far and wide and whose leaves are for the healing of the 
nations. 

In a broad review of the religious history of the last three 
hundred years, as it has, directly and indirectly, affected the 
development of the state of Maine, it should be easy to forget the 
bigotrv', the intolerance, the self-seeking, the schisms originating 
in differences over minor points of faith, the persecutions, the evil 
speaking, the lack of the spirit of the Master, of the few. and 
remember only the courage, the honesty, the energy, the personal 
sacrifices, the prayerful seeking for the light and for the right, of 
the many. The settlement of New England marked the begin- 
ning of a new era of religious tolerance, and the pioneer clergy- 
men of this our good state of Mkine had no small share in estab- 
lishing on these shores the faith that makes men free. 



REPRESENTATIVE MAINE MEN 



1^7 



Some Representative Maine Men of Yesterdaj^ 

and Today 



^ 1^ 



■i^ 




JOSEPH \V. SIMPSON. 

Joseph W. Simpson was 
born in York, Maine. Dec. 
20, 1870, the son of Jeremiah 
P. and Mary Lowe Simpson. 
He is State Treasurer of 
r^Iaine, and is also engaged 
in banking, hotel bv.siness 
and other enterprises, and 
has been a representative to 
the Legislature and state 
senator. He is one of the 
leaders in the public, political 
and business affairs of \crk 
County. 

He married Ida L. Rogers. 



SEBA SMITH. 
Seba Sm.ith was born Sept. 
14, 1752. in his father's log 
house in the woods of Buck- 
field, Maine. He was an edi- 
tor in Portland, Maine, from 
i82Z-;^S, a:d an editor and 
author in New York City 
from 1839-68. He was a 
compeer of John Xeal, both 
of whom were among the 
founders of Main? literature. 
He was a humorist and ac- 
quired great fame as an 
author of the "D wning'" let- 
ters. These appeared in the 
leading American periodicals. 
Perhaps his most famous 
book was "^^y Thirty Years 
out of the Senate, by Major 
Jack Downing.'* Tt was a 
good natured satire on the 
political affairs of that time. 
His writings attracted the attention of Abraham Lincoln, and he w; 
his favorite authors. He died in Patcliogue, L. L, July 29, 1868. 




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ii8 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



LEMUEL JOSHUA 
COBURX. 

Lemuel J. Coburn of San- 
gerv'ille, Maine, is one of the 
progressive and wide-awake 
business men of Piscataquis 
county. He was the pro- 
moter of the Glencoe Wool- 
en Co., which succeeded the 
Sangerville Woolen Co., and 
is now a large owner in this 
enterprise. His activities ex- 
tend into the public and 
political affairs in his town 
and county. 

He is the son of Joshua 
Lemuel and Ella E. (Palm- 
er) Coburn, and was born in 
Parkman. Maine, Jan. 25. 
1874. He was educated in 
the public schools, and at an 
early age entered upon a 
business career. Prior to his 
return to Sangerville in 
April, 1915, he was in the employ of and connected with industrial enter- 
prises in Boston, Xew York City, and Xew Britain, Conn. 

Lemuel Joshua Coburn was united in marriage, January 29, 1897, at Lynn,. 
Massachusetts, w'th Annie Louise Morgan, daughter of George William 
and Flora (^loore) Morgan. They are the parents of the following chil- 
dren: Lemuel J., Jr., born June 5, 1898; William Morgan, born August 14, 
1900; and Dwight A., born January 31, 1904. 




A regrettable error occurred in the historical data relating to 
U. S. Senator Bert M. Fernald in this section (Vol. VIII, No. i, 
p. 68) in stating that he was born in West Pownal. This popular 
Maine Senator was born in West Poland, April 26, 1858. 



The valuable Simmons family articles will be concluded in our 
next number. We also intend to close the Flagg Revolutionary 
series during the present volume. 

The next (ninth) volume will be changed so that it will here- 
after begin in January of each year instead of in May as formerly. 



c 



JOCK KELLEY AND HIS BIRCHES. 119 

Jock Kell}^ and His Birches 

On the 28th day of July of this year the editor zvas riding over 
the old highway hetzveen Monson and Greenz^ille li^ith ''Bill" 
Bonney, knozi'n in more polite language as the Honorable IVilliajn 
L. Bonney of Bozvdolnhani, Maine, zi'fio zi'as speaker of the Maine 
House of Representatives in 1917. On the summit of a hill over 
which this road passes in the northerly part of the tozcn of Shirley 
and near the Greenville tozoi line, is a prosperous and fine looking 
set of farm buddings. At this place on either side of the road 
is a pretty little grove of zvhite birches, not transplanted shade 
trees, but standing as first planted by the hand of nature. Sufficient 
space Zi'as left around each to prevent the hardest hearted and 
most technical road-builder from slaughtering them " because, you 
knozi', they don't let the sun onto the road." They are also so far 
from the road-bed that it zcould seem no sane e.rcuse can ever 
be found for their destruction. It is a charming little cluster of 
trees along a dusty higJrway, a delightful sight to any lover of 
nature. 

It attracted the attention of the ex-Speaker, zvho made the 
remark that " those trees must have been left by a zmse man zvho 
had the soul of a true artist." As zee sped along tozi'ards the 
shores of Moosehead Lake, my memory zvas in the past for three 
or four decades, and zve sazi' the big, rugged Jock Kelly with a rough 
exterior and a kind heart, who left this monument to his memory 
to bless future generations of travellers along the old highway. We 
^ told Jock's sto-ry to our friend, w'ho zi*ondered why Professor 
Knozvlton ''had never made it a subject for rh\me." Thus on 
the follozving day, zvhile under the kindly shade of the Professor's 
oztii trees at his pleasant home in Monson village, the suggestion 
that his muse had neglected a duty in this regard was made to him. 
The result was the follozving contribution to the Journal, higJdv 
appreciated by us: 

He was rugged and rough, crude in his speech, 
Could swear more proHfic than the parson could preach ; 
Yet down in the innermost depths of his -heart 
Was a love for beauty in nature and art. 



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I20 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



With peaw and pole he could break the worst jam, 
And set it afloat with a low muffled " damn." 
He could see the " king log " with a glimpse of the eye, 
Though he never had read our Day or Bill Nye ; 

Never heard of the Druids who worshipped the tree ; 
Never knew of the oaks of the French Tuileries ; 
Yet the birches so white, so tall and so trim. 
Were objects of beauty, and sacred to him. 

He never had heard of the Venus of ^lilo ; 
W^as much better versed in euchre and *' high -low ; " 
Yet he loved to sit mid his birches so trim, 
Smoke his pipe and admire each delicate limb. 

W'hen he cut down the trees to make him a farm, 
He carefully guarded each tree from all harm. 
They stand there today a monument true 
To a man that loved nature far more than he knew. 

Never had heard about Bryant and the temples of God, 
Or the cedars of Lebanon or oaks of Ashrod ; 
Yet he saw in his birches a temple so fine 
That the hand that planted them must be divine. 

Ye parsons who ride in your automobile, 
F.orget for a moment your partisan zeal, 
And let it not ruffle a thread of your " frock " 
To pray for the soul of rugged old Jock. 

— William S. Knozvlton. 



REVOLUTIONARY PENSIONERS IN MAINE. 121 

An Alphabetical Index of Revolutionary Pen- 
sioners Living in Maine 

(Compiled by the Late Charles A. Flagg, Librarl\x, Bangor 
(Maine) Public Library.) 

(Continued from Vol. VII, page 226.) 

This index began in Vol. V, No. 4, Nov., Dec, 1917; Jan.. 1918. 
In that number may be found an introduction and explanation of 
sources and abbreviations. 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Raak. Age 



County. 



Remarks. 



'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 



'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'35c 

'36c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 



McAlester, Richard. . . jN. H. line. 

McAlester, Richard. . . 

McCastin, Alexander.. Mass. line. 
M'Causland, Henry.. . Mass. line. 
McCausland, .lames.. . Mass. line. 

McCausIand, Mary 

McCausland, Robert 



Private. 



'35c M'Clellan. John N. H. Une. 



McClellan, Prince. . . 
|McCormick, James. . 
McDaniel, James. . . . 

McDaniel, John 

• McDaniel, Susannah. 
McDonald, John. . . . 
McDonald, Pelatiah . 



McDuffin, David. 
I Mace, Andrew. . . 



Cont. navy. 
Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 
Mass. mil.. 



Private. 
Private. 
Private. 



Private. . . 



seaman. . . 



Mass. line . 
Mass. line. 



Private. . . . | 
Private. . . . ; 
Private. . . . j 

Sergeant.. . ] 
Private.. . . 



Mass. mil iP^t. & Ser. 



M'Farland, Benjamin. 
McFarland, Elijah . . . . 
'M'Farland, James. . . . 
IMcFarland, James. . . . 
j McFarland, William. . 
iMcFarlin, Solomon. . . 
JMcGaughlin, William. 



Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 
Mais. line . 
Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 



'35c jM'Gee, Neil Mass. line. 

'40 \McGill, Martha , 



Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 



Private. 



75; Lincoln.. . 

or74l 

78 Waldo . . . 
72 Hancock. 
75 Kennebec. 
60 Kennebec. 
75 Kennebec. 



74 Penobscot. . 

90 Cumberland 
88 Cumberland. 

62 York 

70 Lincoln 

74 York 

77 Cumberland. 
80 Cumberiand 
86 Cumberland 

66 Kennebec. . 

76 Kennebec. . 
83 Kennebec. . 
83 Lincoln 

77 Somerset . . . 

75 Kennebec. . 

67 Somerset . . . 

55 Lincoln 

55 Somerset . . . 
66 Cumberland 



'35d 
'35c 
'35d 

'40 



•35d 
'40 



'40 
'35c 



Mclntire, Phineas . . . .'Mass. line. 

Mcintosh, John Mass. line. 

iMass. line. 



McKenney, Jonathan. Mass. line. 



McKenney, Joseph . . 
McKenney, Margaret. 



Mass. line . 



McKenney, Sarah 

Mckinney, Isaac iMasa. line. 



Private. . . 
Private. . . 
Private. . . 

Private. . . 



Sergeant. 



Private. 



.63 Hancock. . . 
85; Cumberland 



82; York 

73 Cumberland 
78 &'Cumberland 

73| 

80 Cumberland 



Res. Mont\-ille. 

d. Aug. 21, 1829 
d. Mar. 4, 1826 
Res. Gardiner 
|S e e Causland, 
I Robert M. 
Same as Mc- 
' Leilan. J.? 
d. July 19, 1829. 
d. Sept. 2, 1829. 
d. Aug. 1821. 

Res. York. 
d.Feb. 8, 1825. 

Res. Standish. 
Res. Winthrop 

Res.Readfield. 

d. Mar. 1828. 
d.Mar. 3, 1834. 
d. Mar. 1, 1S24. 
d. Apr. 2,1823. 

. d. Feb. 20,1820. 
See also Mc- 
Laughlin, 
d. Sept. 2, 1825. 
. Res. Brunswick 
See also Ma- 
! gill. 



Kennebec. 
Lincoln.. . 



York 

Cumberland. 



Res. Scarbor'gh 
I Same as Mc- 
Kinney. 

jRes. George- 
town. 
iRes. Waterbor- 
i ough. 



■#f' 



1/ .'■■^(■ 






122 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



List, 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. Age. County. 



Remarks. 



•35d 

'35d 
'35c 
•35c 
'35c 
'40 



'40 

'40 

•40 

'35d 

'35d 
'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

'35d 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 



McKinney, Jonathan. Mass. mil. 



M'Kinney, Robert. . . 
McKinney, William. . 

McLain, Samuel 

McLane, Ichabod 

McLaughlin, Hannah. 



McLellan, John 



Mass. mil.. 
Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 



McLellan, John . 



McLellan, William. 



McLelland, William. 



M'Lure, James 

McMahan, Joseph.. 

McMahon, Daniel. . 

M'Manners, Daniel. 
jMcManus, Daniel. . 
McManus, John. . . . 



McMichael, James.. . 
McMuUen, .\rchibald 
McNally, Michael . . . 
Macomber, South'th. 

Madden, John 

Maddin, John 



Maddock, Henry. . 
Maddocks, Samuel. 



Magill, W^illiam . 



Mass. line. 



N. H. line. 
Mass. line. 



Private. . . . 

Private. . . . 
Lieutenant 
Private.. . . 
Private. . . . 



72! Cumberland. 



76; Lincoln 

84 Cumberland. 

80 Lincoln 

89 Kennebec.. . 
78 Cumberland. 



79 



Penobscot. . 



74 Cumb. 



Same as Mc- 
Kenney. 

d. Jan. 27, 1823 



. .80 Cumberland. 
to90| 
Private.. . . 77 Cumberland. 



Serg. & Pvt' 
i Private. . . . : 



Mass. line . 
Mass. mil.. 



Private. 
Private. 



Mass. line 'Corporal.. 



Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 



IPrivate.. 
I Private. . 



Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 



IPrivate. 
Private. 



R. I. line.. 
Mass. line . 
Mass. line. 



Mass. line. 



'35d Main, Amos 

'40 Maine, William .... 

'35c Mallet, William 

'40 Mallett, WilUam. . . . 
Maloon, see Baloon. 
35d (Mann, Amos j .Mass. lir 



Mass. line. 



'35d Mann, David 
'35d jMann, Joseph. 
'35d Mann, Oliver. 



'40 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'3od 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 



iMann, Robert. . 
iMansell, Joseph. 



Mansfield, James ^L 
Manson, Thomas. . . 
Manton, Joseph P.. 
'Marble, John 

Marble, Samuel. . . . 

March, James 

.March, Matthias. . . 



Mass. line. 
Mass. mil.. 
Mass. line. 



Mass. line. 



Penn. line. 
Mass. mil. 



Private. 
Private. 



Private. 



Sergeant. 



Private. 



Private. . 
Private. . 
Private. . 
Surgeon's 
mate. 



81iWaldo 

73 i Lincoln 

83 1 Lincoln 

68|Lincoln 

74!Cumberland. 
75;Cumberland 
80iCumberland. 

73; Lincoln 

61 Hancock. ... 
88 Kennebec. . 
70 Cumberland. 
77 Hancock. . . . 

83 Waldo 

I 
651 York 



Res. Scarbor- 
ough. See 
also McGau- 
ghlin. 
Res. Glenburn 
Same as Mc- 

Clellan? 
Res. Portland. 
j 3 d. Ward. 
jRes. Gorham. 

See also McLel- 
I Ian. 

'd. Aug. 22. 
! 1825. 



.Res. Brunswick. 
Res. Brunswick. 



72 Hancock.. . . 
78 Hancock.. . . 
81 Cumberland. 



York 

Lincoln.. . 
Kennebec. 
Lincoln.. . 



Serg. & Lt. 



72 Penobscot . . 

75 Penobscot. . 
73jCumberland. 

76 Hancock. .. . 



iRes. Clinton. 



Res. Waldo. 

Plantation, 
d. Aug. 25, 

1821. 

Res. Ellsworth, 
d. Sept. 25,1828. 

See also Mc 

Gill. 

Res. Phipsburg 

JRes. Topsham. 

i 



'35d I March, William 

'35c iMargary, Jonathan. 

'35c Marr, James 

'40 'Marr, Lydia 

35'c iMarsdon, Theodore. 



'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

'35d 



Marsh, Xoah. 
Marsh, Stephen. 



X. H. line. 
X. H.line. 
Mass. mil.. 



Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 
Mass. line . 



X. H.line. . 
X. H.line.. 
X. H. State. 



Private.. 
Private. . 

Private. . 
Private.. 
Private. . 



Private. . 
Private. . 
Corporal. 

Private. . 
Private.. 
Private. . 



Penobscot. . 

Penobscot . . 

Penobscot . . 

Kennebec. . 

86jYork 

78 1 Kennebec. . 
70 1 Kennebec. . 
74 Somerset . . . 

73 York 

SOlCumberland. 
to90' 

71 1 Penobscot . . 
68 Cumberland. 

81 York 

721 York 



Res. Bangor. 

d. Feb. 22, 1825. 
Res. Fayette. 
i 
Res. Gorham. 

'd. Mar. 5, 1821. 



;Res. So. 
I wick. 



Ber- 



Marshall, George D i 

Marshall, Bcnjamain.. Mass. line. 

Marshall, Bcnjamain 

Marston, David N. H. line. 



Private. 
Private. 



64 Kennebec 
75 Somerset. , 

74;York 

79' York 

— iPenobscot , 
63 Hancock. . 
49 Lincoln... . 
781 York 



d.Oct.25, 1830. 

[Res. Acton. 
Res. Bradford. 
,d. March, 1822. 
iRes. St. George. 



I&76I 



REVOLUTIONARY PENSIONERS IN MAINE. 123 



List. 


Name. 


Service. 


Rank. 


1 


County. 


Remarks. 


•40 

'35d 

•35c 

•35c 

'35c 

•40 

•35c 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

•40 

'35c 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 
'35c 
'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'3oc 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

•35d 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

•35d 

'35d 

•35c 

•40 

'40 

'40 

•35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'3.5d 

'35c 

•40 

•35c 

'35e 

•35c 

•35d 

•35c 

'35c 

•35c 

•40 

•35c 

•40 

•40 

•35c 

'35d 

'35d 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

•35d 

•35d 

'35d 

•40 

'35d 


1 






82 
72 
67 
74 
73 
66 

72 

79 
74 
88 
81 
64 
71 
77 
80 
65 
77 
74 
82 

75 
64 

78 

89 
61 
79 
55 
74 
78 

74 
74 
8 
SO 


Kennebec... . 
Kennebec... . 
Kennebec. . . 
Washington.. 
Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Waldo 

Waldo 

Penobscot. . . 
Cumberland. 

Waldo 

Kennebec... . 

Kennebec 

Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 

Oxford 

Somerset .... 
Lincoln 

Oxford 

Cumberland. 
Kennebec. . . 

Oxford 

Somerset .... 

York 

Penobscot . . . 
Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Cumb 

Kennebec. . . 


Res ^lonmouth 




Mass. State 

N. H. line 

N. H.line 

Mass. line 



Mass. line 

Cont. line 

Mass. line 

Mass. line 

N. H.line 

Mass. mil 


Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Private 



Drummer.. 



Prinate.. . . 
Private. . . . 
Private.. . . 

Private 

Private 




Marston, Nathaniel.. . 

Marston. Samuel 

Martin, David 

Martin, Elizabeth 

Martin, John 

Martin, Joseph 

Martin, Joseph 

Martin, Nathaniel. . . . 
Martin Robert 


d. June 4, 1824. 

Res. Portland. 

7th. ward, 
d. May 23. 1820 
Res. Prospect. 


Mason, Broadstreet. . . 
Mason, Ebenezer 


d. June, 1824. 
Res. Vienna. 


Hason Eunice. 






Res. Bethel. 


Mason, John 

Mason, Moses 

Mason, Tilley 


Mass. line 

N. H. mil 

Mass. mil 


Private. . . . 

Private 

Private. . . . 


Oct. 22, 1824. d. 
Res. Thomas- 


Masterson, James 

Mathews, Daniel 2'd. . 
Mathews, Desire 


Mass. mil 

Mass. line 


Pvt. & Sea 

Private 


ton. Same as 
Moosman. 

d.Feb. 10. 1823 
Res. Vassallbor- 


Mathews, John 1st.. . . 

Mathews, Daniel 

Mathews, John 2'd 

Maxfield. Daniel 

Maxfield, Robert 


Mass. line 

N. H.line 

Mass. line 

Mass. line 


Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 

Private 


ough. 
d. Jan., 1826. 
d. in 1826. 

Res. Bradford. 

Res No Yar- 


Maxfield. William. ... 




Mass. mil 


Private 


mouth. 
Res. Danville. 


Maxwell. William 


Mass. line ..... 


Private. . . . 


Res. Dan\ille. 


Mayberry, John 

Mayberry. Thomas. . . 
Mayber,ry, William. . . 


Mass. line 

Mass. line 

Mass. line 


Private 

Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 


70, Cumberland. 
74|Cumberland. 
75 1 Cumberland. 
82|Cumberland. 
81 Penobscot. . . 
81 Penobscot. . . 


Res Ravn^ond. 


^layhew, James 






Res. Bangor. 








Res. Carmel. 


Mayhue, James 

Mayhue, Joshua 

Maynard, Joseph 


^Mass. line 

Mass. line 

Mass. line 


Private. . . . 

Private. . . . 
Sergeant... 


75 

83 
76 
81 
76 

87 
86 


Penobscot . . . 

Hancock 

Somerset .... 
Somerset .... 

Waldo 

Somerset .... 


Same as May- 

heu? 
d. Jan. 11, 1820. 

Res Madison. 


Mayo, Isaac 

Meader, Francis 

^Nleans, James 


Mass. line 

Mass. line 


Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 


Res Brooks. 


Means, James 


Mass. line 

2'd. Regt 

1st. Mass. line. 

Mass. line 

Mass. line 

Mass. line 

Mass. line 


Captain. . . 
Captain. . . 
Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Private.. . . 
Private. . . . 


65 Cumberland. 
— Cumberland. 

72 Kennebec 

72 Oxford 

70 York 

77 Hancock 

85 Kennebec 

81 York 

77 York 

86 Piimherland. 


d. Oct. 15, 1832. 
d. Jan. 5, 1828. 

d.Dec.7,lS22. 
d. Jan. 20, 1830. 


Means, Thomas 

Meharin, Isaac 

Meldrum. John 

Mel\-in, David 

^lelvin John 


Mendum, Anna.. 


Res. York. 


Mendum, William. . . . 
Menow, Margaret.. 


Cont. Navy.. . . 


Mariner. . . 


d.Feb. 18, 1831. 
Res.Standish. 


Merb, Josiah .... 






85 

79 
73 

78 


Lincoln 

Kennebec... . 

Lincoln 

Lincoln 

Somerset .... 

Vf.rL- 


See also Merro, 
Res. Warren. 


Merchant, John 

Mero, Arnariah 

Mero, Joaiah 

Merrick, John 

Merrill, Abel 


Mass. line 

Mass. line 

Mass. mil 

Mass. line 

Mass. State. . . . 


Sergeant . . . 
Sergeant... 
Private. . . . 
Pvt. & C'p. 
Pvt.& Mas. 


Same as Mero. 
d.Feb. 5, 1819. 
Same as Meso? 
Same as Merb. 


Merrill, Abner 


49 Piscatac4ui:5 . . 
82 Cumberland. 
79 Cumberland. 

75 York 

81 York 

73 PiiTTihprland 


Res. Park man. 




Mass. line 

Mass. line 

Mass. line 


Private. . . . 

Private 

Private. . . . 




Merrill, Jacob 

Merrill, Jacob 

Merrill, James 


Res. Kenne- 


Mass. line & mil 


Private. . . . 


bunkport. 











;^* 



124 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



List. 



Name. 



Rank. |Age.! County. 



Remarks. 



'40 
'40 
'3od 

'3od 

'35d 

'40 

'3od 

'40 

'40 

'3od 
'35c 
'35c 

'35c 
'35c 
'40 

'3od 

'40 

'35d 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 
'3od 
•40 



I Merrill. John.. 
I Merrill. John.. 
I Merrill, Moses 



Mass. line jS e r g. & 

' Lieut. 

Merrill. Xathan iMass. line Private.. . . 

Merrill. Roger ; Mass. State .... Private. . . . 



} Merrill, Samuel ' Mass. line Private. . 

' Merit, M'ary I ; 

(Merit, William ! ; 



jMerritt, Jonathan. . . Mass. State... . Private. 

jMerritt, William Mass. line Private. 

i Merrow, William i Mass. line Private. 



JMeseroe, Solomon. . 
]Meserve, Nathaniel. 
Meso, Amreah 



'Mass. line Ensign. . . . 

Mass. line Private. . . . 



Metcalf, Titus. 



Mass. State . . . . i Private. 



Michals, William . . . .jMass. mil I Private. 

Miller, Asa ; Mass. line j Private. 

Miller, Frank i Mass. State . . . . ! Private. 



! Miller, John i Mass. line i Private. . . . 

i Miller, Lemuel I Mass. line Lieutenant. 



'40 j Miller, Noah 



'35c 
'35c 
'40 

'35c 
•40 



'35d 
'35d 
'40 

•40 

•35c 
•35c 
'35d 
'35d 
'40 

•35d 
'35c 
'40 
35c 
'40 
'35c 
•35c 
'35c 
•40 
'35d 
'35c 
'35c 
'35d 
•40 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'35d 

•40 

'35c 

'40 

'40 

'35d 



j Millet, John IN. H. line. . 

! Millet, Thomas iCont. Na\-\'. 

jMUlett, John 



Private. . 
Mariner. 



Milligin, Joel I Mass. line . 

jMilliken, John | 



Private. 



Milliken, Joshua i Mass. line ' Private. 



Milliken, Lemuel jMass. line. 

\1 illiken, Lydia j 



Milliken, yiargaret. 



I 

Millikin, Abner iMass. line 

Millikin. Josiah iMass. line 

Mills, Phillip jMass. mil 



Serg. & Lt. 



iMink, John. 



iMink, Paul 

iMink, Valentine. . . 
[Mitchell, Ammi.. . . 
'Mitchell, James M 



Private. . 

Private. . 

Private.. 

Mass. mil j Private.. 



Mass. mil ! Private. 

Mass. line i Private. 



Mass. line j Private. , 



'Mitchf'll, John Slass. line jPrivate. 

! Mitchell, Joshua Mass. line 'Private. 



81 Cumberland. 

SO Lincoln 

90 Cumberland. 

82 Cumberland. 
72 Kennebec. . . . 
7S Kennebec. . . . 

SO York 

78 Lincoln 

81 Washington. . 



80 Lincoln 

64 Washington. 
75 Cumberland. 

77 Cumberland. 

87 York 

83 Somerset ... 



80 Waldo... 
85, Waldo... 
71; Waldo... 
85 Somerset . 
69 Lincoln.. 
75 i Lincoln.. 



iRes. Gray. 

I Res. Lewiston. 



Res. Litchfield. 

Res. Bremen. 
Residence. 
Addison. 



d. Aug. 2. 1823. 
See also Merrow 

d. Jan. 1825. 
Res. Starks. 
Same as Mero? 

Res. Appleton. 



72 York.. 
84 York. . 
89! York.. 

66 1 Waldo. 



93 York 

87 Kennebec. 
77 i York 



72 Cumberland. 
78iWaldo 



Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 



83 Cumberland. 



Mitchell, Josiah Mass. line Private.. . 

'Mitchell, Pammey 

!Mitchell, Richard Mass. mil Private.. . 

Mitchell, Samuel Mass. line iPrivate. . . 

jMitchell, William N. H. line jPrivate. . . 

; Monk, Elias , Mass. mil Private. . . 

I Monk, Elias i i 86 



Hancock. .. . 
Cumberland. 

Oxford 

Lincoln 

Lincoln 



Lincoln 

Kennebec... 

Oxford 

Lincoln 

Lincoln 

Washington. 

Lincoln 

Kennebec. . 

Lincoln 

Cumberland. 
Kennebec. . . 

York 

Oxford 

Oxford 



Res. Waldobor- 

ough. 
d. Nov. 28, 1825 

Res. Kenne- 
bunkport. 

Res. Lincoln- 
viUe. 

id. Sept. 6, 1824. 
Res. Kenne- 
bunkport. 

Res. Montville. 
Same as Mulli- 

ken. 
d. Nov. 27, 1832 

R e 4. Scarbor- 
ough. 

Res. Scarbo- 
rough. 

d. Jan. 7, 1832. 



Res. Waldobo- 
rough. 

d. June 19, 1832 
Res. Mexico. 



JRes. Bath. 

'd. Nov. 6, 1826. 
d. Nov. 12, 1819 
Res. Bath. 



I Monroe, Abijah Mass. line Private. . . . 

[Monroe, Hugh |Mass. line Private.. . . 

1 Moody, Edward N. H. Hue JPrivate.. . . 

Moody, George Mass. line iPrivate.. . . 

Moody, John iMass. line Pvt. ACo'p 

Moody. John j 

Moody, Joishua IMass. line Private.. . . 

Mo'jdy, Lucy 1 j 76 

Moody, Rthecca S3 

Moody, Samuel ilass. State. . . . iFifer&Sorg. 76 



or87 
75 
66 
76 
73 
82 
59 
82 



Oxford 

Lincoln 

.Somerset . . . 

York 

Lincoln 

Kennebec. . 
Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 
Kennebec . 



d. March. 1827. 
Res. Hebron. 

d. June 22, 1832 



Res. Monmouth 
d. Dec. 28. 1828 
Res. Minot. 
Res. Sebago. 



0f 






I 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

PUBLISHED QUARTERLY 



Entered as second class matter at the post office, Dover, Maine, by John 
Francis Sprague, Editor and Publisher. 

Terms : For all numbers issued during the year, including an index and 
all special issues, $i.oo. Single copies of current volume, 25 cents; of pre- 
vious volumes, 50 cents. Bound volumes $2.00 each. 

Postage prepaid on all items, except bound volumes west of Mississippi 
River. 

Commencing with Vol. 3, the terms will be $1.00 only to subscribers who 
pay in advance, otherwise $1.50. 

This publication will be mailed to subscribers until ordered discontinued. 



OUR MESSAGE TO YOU 

FIRST TEACH THE BOY AND GIRL TO KNOW AND LOVE 
THEIR OWN TOWN, COUNTY AND STATE AND YOU HAVE 
GONE A LONG WAY TOWARD TEACHING THEM TO KNOW 
AND LOVE THEIR COUNTRY. 



OTIS MARTIN. 

Otis Martin died at his home in Guilford, Maine, July 18. 1920. 
He was the son of xAddison and Lydia Martin. In the fall of 
1825 his father opened the first store in what is now Guilford 
village. He was born in Guilford Nov. 14, i8_|4. He married 
Annie Atwood May 29, 1872. Of this union the children now 
living are Rev. George A. Martin, a Methodist clergy-man of note 
in St. Johnsbury, Vt., Frank O. Martin at the head of the Straw 
& Martin Insurance Agency in Guilford, and Carl and Florence 
S. Martin of Guilford. During his life he was a leading figure 
in the political and civic affairs of Piscataquis county, serving as 
sheriff six years and as deputy sheriff twenty-one years. He 
was a member of the Maine House of Representatives in 1891. 
He had positive ideas regarding religious, political and relative 
subjects, and was a life-long member of the Methodist denomina- 
tion and the Republican party. He was in the truest sense of 
that often carelessly used term *' a good citizen." He was a true 
type of that staunch and upright citizenry which makes the State 
of Maine one of the grandest and most wholesome places in the 
entire world for a real home. 



nl^-^<' t-'id^'oidm m 



M.?^> 






'fiijn 



126 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



The last number of Americana (third quarter 1920) contains a 
genealogical article of deep interest on the Coe-Harthorn families 
of America. It traces the Coe family from the time of John Coe. 
born in the county of Essex, England, about 1360, down to the 
present day. Robert Coe was born in Suiifolk county Oct. 26, 
1596. He became a Puritan in early manhood, and emigrated to 
Connecticut, April 30, 1634. Among its illustrations are fine 
engravings of the late Eben Coe of Bangor, formerly a prominent 
figure in the financial circles of eastern Maine, and at one time 
the largest ow^ner of wild lands in the State, and his son, Dr. 
Thomas Upham Coe, now a resident of that city, and prominent 
in its financial, professional, literary and social interests. Dr. Coe 
has ever taken a deep interest in the history of Maine. He has 
been an active member of the Bangor Historical Society from its 
beginning. 

Since the foregoing was wTitten Dr. Thomas Upham Coe died 
Saturday morning, July 31, 1920, at his summer home at Kineo, 
after an illness of two days of pneumonia. His death was entirely 
unexpected. He was in his 83rd year. 



One of the finest and most important things in a literary line 
which has been produced by the ^Maine Centennial this year is the 
neat little, well illustrated brochure by Windsor Daggett entitled 
" A Down-East Yankee from the District of Maine," which relates 
the life-story of John Neal. It is a valuable historical sketch of 
an important character in the early days of Maine's statehood. 
Mr. Daggett, whose home is now in New York, was formerly of 
the faculty of the University of Elaine. He is a facile and enter- 
taining writer, and in this work has done a great service to the 
literature and history of Maine. 

It has always seemed to the writer that for some reason, or per- 
haps unintentionally, the historical writers of Portland have neg- 
lected due and proper reference to John Neal, one of the ablest 
and most notable of any of Maine's early writers. He was a 
native of that city, his birth-place being on Free street. He came 
from venerable Quaker stock. When ^faine became a state he 
was 27 years old, and was then beginning to write both prose and 



EDITORIAL 127 



poetry. Professor Daggett says that he was " the first writer 
to represent the United States of North America in the British 
quarterUes." John Xeal was also as a writer and lecturer one of 
the pioneers in the advocacy of woman's suffrage. 

In the same book he also tells in a delightful manner the story 
of Thomas Shaw of Standish, Maine. He was one of the old 
timie writers of broadside poetry. He was born in 1753. was in 
the Continental Army, and died October 20, 1838. 



In Bulletin Xo. 2 of the Department of Agriculture relating to 
market activities in Maine, issued for June, 1920, Hon. Frank S. 
Adams has a timely warning against drifting too far into the 
vortex of excessive centralization. In his article on (p. 56) 
*' Conniumity Spirit " along this line is a familiar and accurate 
glimpse into old customs in Maine's early days as follows : 

There is a great need of more civic pride manifest in ihe work. A 
co-operative spirit to make the tcwn we live in and the country a desirable 
place for a home. 

As our government is becoming more centralized there seems to be a notable 
lack of community spirit, a spirit to do something for the public benefit with- 
out any thoughts of a financial recompense. Under the old method when 
towns were divided into small units for the administration of schools and 
roads, the individuals in these divisions made direct contributions to the 
schools in order to save moneys that came from municipal taxation and 
funds from the state for the support of teaching, thereby lengthening out 
the school year. The individual contributions consisted of each family con- 
tributing a certain amount of fuel, determined by the number of scholars 
in the family, and the same was true in relation to the board for the teacher, 
a teacher boarding a certain time in each family determined In- the number 
of scholars attending school. The. highways were built and repaired by a 
similar method, each family working on the highways, the amount of work 
performed depending almost entirely on the amount of availaljle man and 
team labor in a family. While it is true that there was a certain direct road 
tax under the law, little regard was paid to it in the repairs of the highways. 
I am not trying to defend this old system only from the standpoint of the 
community spirit that it developed, a spirit of civic pride. We should try 
now to get some force at work to revive this community -r^rit. We do not 
think we need any new organizations for this purpose. This is a field that 
the Grange in co-operation with Farm Bureaus might work to good advan- 
tage. We have demonstrated this past winter that this community spirit 
is still alive by the splendid work done in some of the communities in help- 
ing restore service on the trolley lines during the snow blockade.. 



■^.' 









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128 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



On the afternoon of June T5th, 1920, the writer sat on the ter- 
race of the front yard of the residence of Alarcellus L. Hiissey on 
Main street in the village of Guilford, Elaine. We have recently 
been informed that this is the spot where was located the first 
tavern in that village. Of the accuracy of this statement, how- 
ever, we are not positive. This terrace was constructed by some- 
one of a wise and benevolent conception of how to do common 
things in a way beneficial to future generations. It makes th? 
most comfortable and delightful loafing place without interfer- 
ence of any stern visaged and sour looking yard-keeper. On that 
balmy afternoon we were one of a group of congenial spirits who 
happened along and stopped a while to talk. Others were ^Ir. 
Hussey himself. Henry Hudson, John Houston, '' Wal " Edes, 
the late Otis Martin, and several others of Guilford's distinguished 
citizenry. We talked of the early history of Guilford, some of 
its interesting characters in the days of yore, of politics, religion, 
the candidates for governor, etc. It was a pleasant and agreeable 
hour to us which we shall long remember, especially so, as Mr. 
Hussey at the time presented us with a century old book entitled 
" A Narrative of a Tour of Observation, Made during the Summer 
of 181 7, by James Monroe, President of the United States, through 
the North-Eastern and North-Western Departments of the 
Union : with a View to the Examination of Their Several Military 
Defences," published in Philadelphia, 1818 by S. A. Mitchell & H. 
Ames, Clark and Raser, Printers. This is a book of 228 pages in 
which is an accurate account of President Monroe's visit to the 
district of Maine, which in the near future we intend to compile 
for the readers of the Journal. Mr. Hussey has always taken an 
interest in Maine historical subjects, but has devoted more of hi? 
busy life to the making of the industrial history of his own town 
and county than to historical research. 



Another of the most valuable of the Maine Centennial produc- 
tions is " The Maine Book " written and compiled by Henry E. 
Dunnack, the able and popular librarian of the Maine state library. 
In his preface the author says, " This book is in no sense a his- 



.-,-a,;^^.i^.h- 






^7^r* 



MAINE 129 



tor\' of Maine, nor is it intended to be substituted for any period 
of Maine history : " yet it contains very much regarding the his- 
tory of Maine from its early days to the present time, of its geog- 
raphy and topography, and of its industrial and social development. 
It is beautifully illustrated. Its every page is entertaining and 
instructive and it makes one of the best reference books on the 
State of Elaine that has ever been written. 



MAINE. 

I love the dear old state of Maine, 
Its mountains, streams and rills ; 
And above all the slender pine 
That grows upon the hill. 

I love to hear the legends 
WTiich cluster about thy name; 
And the history of the past 
Which has given thee much fame. 

I love thee, Elaine, My Native State, 
The State which gave me birth, 
And all thy children, too, 
Who sit around thy hearth. 

I love thy beauty, dear old Maine, 
Thy rockbound coast, and briny sea; 
AM that charms and fascinates ; 
TTis surely very dear to me. 

Chorus. 

We will sing thy praises, Maine, 
From Aroostook to Casco Bay; 
All hail to thee, my dear old State, 
On this glad centennial day. 

— Victoria Aurora Magnusson. 

Gorham, Me., June i, 1920. 



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I30 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

Regarding the Simmons Family 

Miss \V. B. Fairbanks of Farmington. Elaine, a well known 
research worker along genealogical lines, writes to the Journal as 
follows : 

Speaking of the Simmons family I wish to say that 
referring to Vol. 7, No. 3, p. 139, of your magazine, 
Moses (i) and Moses, Jr. (2) were not one, but two 
individuals, father and son. Moses, Sr., married Sarah. 
had Closes, Jr., who married, 1662, Patience Barstow. and 
died before his father. Their daughter Patience Sim- 
mons baptized in 1676 married George Barrows and 
from them I am descended in a Waterman-Chipman- 
Fairbanks line. Of course documentary evidence can be 
furnished for the statements herewith made. I would 
like to have them written out and printed in your maga- 
zine. Some think that Sarah was a daughter of Roger 
Chandler and if this is true there is ^I'ayflower Pilgrim 
\)lood there. 



..'.Coin and Stamp Collectors .:. 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 

Prices I Pay — of every U. S. Coin 
worth over face — 15 cts. 

WANTED I What are your wants? Perhaps I 

Rare Coins, Stamps .•and Curios can supply them 

Stamp Catalogues and other Philatelic and Numismatic 
literature at puVjlishers prices 

\A/. B. GOULD 

292 Hammond St. Bangor, Maine 



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CONTEXTS 131 



MAIXE INLAND SCENERY. 



f'^^jfj^^^^: .-- '-^' '-:^^^«WH 







Contributed by Hon. Leroy T. Carleton. 



CONTENTS. 



PACE 

The Governor Kavanaugh homestead ;. 132 

l\ Frank Talk by The Publisher 133 

Genealogy of the Simmons Family 136 

•Ancestry of the Stewarts 151 

Revolutionary Pensioners in Maine 154 

'Editorial 180 



54 



YEARS the Insurance Man off Somerset Co. 

Never a Failure—Never a Law Suit—What more do you want? 

(Member Soc. Col. Wars; Sons Am. Rev; Past A. A. G.. G. A. R.) 

CHARLES FOLSOM-JONES, Skowhegan Maine 



^ (• '/J 



132 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 







Home of the Hon. Edward Kavanagh, Governor of Maine, 1843, in the 
village of Damariscotta Mills, to\vn of Newcastle, Maine. For references to 
Gov. Kavanagh see the Journal (biog. sketch) Vol. II, pp. 37-39, and (in 
connection with the Northeastern Boundary Controversy) Vol. V, pp. 22-25, 



M 



Sprague's Journal of Maine History 

Vol. VIII NOVEMBER, 1920 No. 3 



To the Patrons of the Journal: 

A FRANK TALK BY THE PUBLISHER. 

For many years prior to 1913 the writer had been pos- 
sessed with a strong desire or an inspiration, — whatever 
that word may really mean — to furnish Maine people with 
a publication of modest ambition devoted entirely to topics 
relating to the history of Maine, and especially to inter- 
esting side-lights on it colonial period. During the win- 
ter of that year I wais at Augusta some of the time, and 
talked about it with certain friends whom I knew to be 
interested in such matters, and the result was that upon 
returning to my home, I sir ranged with a printer to pro- 
duce what was the first number of Vol. I of the Journal. 

Taking a samiple copy of this with me, I returned to 
Augusta and called the attention of members of the Legis- 
lature and other public men of the state whom I met there 
to it. They approved of the project to such an extent that 
I secured two hundred or more subscribers. Immediately 
this frail literary bark, laden with fragmentary bits, facts 
and scraps, many of them on the border of oblivion, yet 
all pertaining to ancient and venerable things in Maine, 
was set adrift upon the uncertain sea of Maine Journalism. 
These first subscribers would make a roster of many of 
Maine's brightest and most distinguished men. The fact 
that, with the exception of those who have dropped from 
the list through death and changed conditions, nearly all of 
them yet honor the Journal's mailing list with their neunes 
is indeed gratifying. 

I never had any delusions about this rather slenderly 
equipped enterprise. I fully realized that so far as 
remuneration was concerned it must necessarily ever be 



l.-'.oH 



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134 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



largely a labor of love. Yet under adverse circumstances 
it hats kept on a safe track until the enormous rise in print 
paper during the first pao-t of the present year. Now, in 
its eighth volume, this publication has arrived at the part- 
ing of the ways, and must choose one of three courses to 
pursue. These are: To maintain it at a considerable 
financial loss, to discontinue it, or to raise its price. 

The first I am not financially able to do. The second 
grieves me to contemplate. While in the end it may 
involve some personal loss, I feel that it is a duty to myself 
and to the loyal friends of the Journal to undertake, for 
one volume at least, the third way out of the dilemma. If 
this be so, it only remains to fix the price. I have careful 
estimates of several printers and an exact account of the 
expenses and receipts of the previous volumes. I have 
studied it all with ceire, and my conclusion is that to con- 
tinue it with the same cuality of paper as is now used, 
the number to average 50-60 pages of text, the price must 
be two dollars per volume in order to avoid such a slump 
as would put it entirely out of existence. 

It is very desirable to change the issuance of these quar- 
terly numbers so that the first part of each volume will 
begin with January-February-March of each year instead 
of May-June-July as has formerly been the practice. To 
readjust this the fourth and last number of the current 
volume will be issued in December. Volume IX will 
begin with the January-Februaury-March number at two 
dollars per year. 

Now, friends, the future life of the Journal is up to you. 
It is only with your hesu-ty co-operation that its existence 
can be made safe. In this connection we quote from a 
letter just received from General Henry L. Mitchell of 
Bangor, a lawyer and for many yeeu's a leader in the social 
and industrial life of that city: 

" I read your card on * reinforcement ' in your last issue 
of the SPRAGUE JOURNAL, and have asked several of 
my friends to subscribe for same. 

" I hope to get you several new members, shall do my 
best to do so, not for the fee you offer but to help you in 
your good work. 



A FRANK TALK BY THE PUBLISHER 135 

"I read the Journal with much interest and want it to 
go on. I hope others will take an interest and help you 
get new subscribers." 

This letter in its expression of appreciation for the work 
that the Journal is doing for Maine is typical. Many of 
a similar tone have been received, some of which have 
appeared on our pages under the title of "Sayings of 
Subscribers." 

Recently there are indications that some of the public 
schools of Maine desire to use the Journal as a work of 
reference. Dr. Thomas, the State Superintendent, and 
other leading educators are urging this. Hence the Jour- 
nal will make every effort to co-operate with them in this 
regard. Commencing with the first number of the next 
volume (IX) several pages will be devoted to a depart- 
ment along these lines if superintendents and teachers 
will aid in furnishing suggestions, data, etc., appropriate 
for it. 



On a beautiful August day of the present year the editor of the 
Journal enjoyed a pleasant auto ride with Hon. William L. Bonney 
of Bowdoinham, Maine, and Prof. Bertram E. Packard, superin- 
tendent of schools at Sanford, Maine. We passed over much of 
the territory that was the ancient town of Pownalboro, the present 
town of Dresden being an important part of it. There we visited 
the court house (see Journal, Vol. VH, p. ,175), and saw the place 
where John Gardiner lived and practiced law when he represented 
Pownalboro in the Massachusetts legislature. We were during 
the entire day on historic ground of Revolutionary times, passed 
the old Mustard and Peacock taverns and many other points and 
places of interest to the antiquarian. Dining that evening at 
" The Oaklands/' the historic old Gardiner mansion with a most 
delightful host and hostess, Mr. and Mrs. William Tudor Gardiner, 
was also a most delightful feature of a delightful day. Mr. Gar- 
diner is a direct descendant of Dr. Silvester Gardiner. 



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136 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

A Genealogy of a Few Lines of the Simmons 
Family of Maine and Massachusetts, De- 
' scendents of Moses Simmons (Moses Sy- 
monson). ''Fortune'' 1621. 

(by FREDERICK JOHNSON SIMMONS.) 

(Concluded from page 107) 
SIXTH GENERATION. 

5 4 321 

Thomas Simmons (Joseph, Nathaniel, Joseph, John, Moses) 
was the son of Joseph and Elizabeth ,( Chamberlain) Simmons. 
His tomb-stone in the Slaigo yard, Waldoboro, Me., reads thus: 

Col. Thomas Simmons 

died, Oct. 4, 1 858, 

M 86 yrs., 4 mos 

7 

• Thomas served in the war of 1812 and received the title of 

! 6 

colonel. He (Thomas Simmons) married Catherine Fyler, (died 
June 7, 1872, 7E. 86 yrs. 9 mos). They had 10 children as fol- 
lows: 

Thomas Jefferson Simmons, b. April, 1808; d. Dec. 26, 1883, ae. 75 yrs., 
8 mos., 2 dys. 

7 

Capt. Joseph W. Simmons died Jan. 16, 1892, ae, 75 yrs., i mo., 27 days. 

7 
Gorham Parks (?) Simmons. 

7 
Daniel Webster Simmons. 

7 
Louise Simmons m. Jacob Moody, (Nob. Me.) ; d. in Massachusetts. Lived 
In Portland, buried in Rockland, Me. 

7 
Elizabeth Simmons, m. Silas Gowen, Belmont, Me. 

7 
Susanna Simmons, d. May 29, 1888, ae. 73 yrs., 8 mos. 

7 
Caroline Simmons, b Nov, 6, 1827 ; d. Nov. 8, 1852. 



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SIMiMONS FAMILY GENEALOGY 137 



7 

John Adams Simmons. 
7 

William A. Simmons died June 30, 1882, ae. 60 yrs, i mo., 6 days; m Mar- 
garet Lake, who died .March 7, 1899, ae. 71 yrs., 2 mos. Children, Carrie, 
Arthur, died young. 

^ 54321 

Joseph Simmons (Joseph, Nath'l, Joseph, John, Moses) was 
the youngest son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Chamberlain) Sim- 
mons. He had a daughter Elizabeth and a daughter or grand- 
'daughter Jennie Simmons who married S. H. Hall. They lived 

6 
'imtil recently on Union St., Rockland, Me. Joseph Simmons 
lived and died at Palermo, Me. 

6 54321 

Mercy Simmons (Joseph, Nath'l, Joseph, John, Moses) the 

5 

'daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Chamberlain) Simmons was 
"born at Waldoboro, Me., and died at Belfast, Me., May 7, 1885, 
aged 93 yrs., 4 mos., 24 days, and she is buried at Montville, Me. 
'6 2 I 

Mercy Simmons married Ephraim Keen (Nye) Dec. 23, 1813. 
They were married by Elder Phinehas Pillsbury. Ephraim Keen 
died May 31, 1839, ^^^^ 45 J^^v 3 mos., 19 days. He was born 
at Bremen, Me. 

6 
Children of Ephraim and Mercy (Simmons) Keen were: 

Nathaniel Emory Keen, lived and died at Belfast, Me., (dealer in wood 
and coal). 

7 
Louisa S. Keen, married a Mr. Hall and has a daughter, the wife of Mr. 
Fred Healey, Winthrop, Mass. 

7 
Ephraim Keen. 

7 

Joseph Keen. 

7 
Thomas Keen, 

7 • 
Mercy Ann. 

7 
Lucinda. 



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138 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



^ 54321 

James Simmons (Joseph. Nath'l, Joseph, John, Closes,) was 
born at Waldoboro, :Maine, January 10, 1781, and died at Noble- 
boro, Maine. Oct. 2, 1872. In the cemetery at Nobleboro, Me., 
there is a tomb-stone to his memory that reads : 

* Col. James Simmons 

Died Oct. 2, 1872, 
Aged 92 yrs., 9 mos. 

' James Simmons married Christania Keen daughter of Nye and 
Molly (Smith) Keen. Christania (Keen) Simmons was born 
'Sept. 16, 1784, and died at Nobleboro, Me., May ist, 1861, aged 
'76 years. 

' James Simmons was farmer, blacksmith and soldier. He 
'received the title of Colonel for training a company of men in the 
war of 181 2. He was Colonel in one regiment, his brother Thomas- 
Simmons in another. In his earlier days James Simmons was a 
skilled drummer, a drum major, so called, of his company. His 
'drum seemed to have been a part of his being. One day when he 
was drumming, a relative not over fond of such music said to him, 
""-Colonel, don't you think if you should drum less and work more 
you would get on better ? " He always attended the " Musters " 
'of the Militia, and was ever young in spirit. Even when eighty 
years old (it has been said) he could ride horse back and did so 
at a review at Damariscotta, Me. At this time he remarked that 
he felt like enlisting in the Army (the Civil War was then in prog- 
ress). He was active to the end and died suddenly while engaged 

6 
'with his usual home duties. Col. James Simmons was musician 
in Capt. C. Miller's company, Lieut. Col. S. Thatcher's regiment, 
'from Sept. 4, to Sept. 10, 1812, raised at Waldoboro, Me., served 
'at Camden, Me. 
' The children of James and Christania (Keen) Simmons were:: 

7 

Nathaniel Simmons, b. Oct. 14, 1802; d. April 26, 1889. 

7 

Mary Simmons, b. Feb. 2nd, 1805; m. Geo. Light (Waldoboro). 

7 
Lucy Simmons b. Sept. 15, 1807; m. Thaddeus Moody, (Jefferson). 



SIMMONS FAMILY GENEALOGY 139 



7 

James Simmcns, b. Sept. 5, i8ro; m. Betsey Hobbs. 

7 
Sarah Simmons, b. July 30, 1813 ; m. Austin Mero. 

7 
Jcb Chamberlain Simmons, b. May 13, 1816; m. Clarissa Orff. 

7 
Rachel Simmons, b. Aug. 11, 1819; m. J. C. Robbins. 

7 

Josiah Simmons, born Jan. 21, 1823; m. Rachel Benner. 

7 

Zebedee Simmons, b. Aug. 27, 1825; m. Margaret Houston, (Damariscotta, 
Me.) 

7 
Jchn Randall Simmons, b. March 11, 183 1 ; m. Mary Dubet. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

7 65432 

Nathaniel Simmons (James, Joseph, Nath'l. Joseph, John, 
I 
Moses,) the eldest child of Col. James and Christania (Keen) 
Simmons was born at Waldoboro, Me., Oct. 14, 1802, and died at 
'Belfast (Hayford Hill) Maine, April 26, 1889. In the private 
yard on the Simmons' estate, Belfast, Me., is a stone to his mem- 
ory,— 

Nathaniel Simmons, — Father — 

Died April 26, 1889 

2E 86 yrs., 6 mos. — Gone but not forgotten — 

He married first his cousin Mary Keen, Nov. 30, 1822 or 1826; 
3 ^ I 

secondly Rosanna Moody (John, Amos) Nov. 2^, 1S2J or 30. 
The dates of his marriages as given by relatives differ from those 
given in Pillsbury's Journal. 

The following is a newspaper account of his life that appeared 
at the time of his death : 

" Nathaniel Simmons was born in Waldoboro, Me., Oct. 4 or 12, 
1802, and died in Belfast, Me., April 21, 1889, »" the 87th year 
of his age. He was the eldest of ten children, four of whom are 
now living, three having died during the past three months. His 
parents, GdI. James and Christania (Keen) Simmons moved to 
the town of Nobleboro, when he was eight years old, and he rode 
behind his aged grandfather on horseback. 



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I40 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

"He witnessed some of the scenes of the war of 1812. Amon^ 
them are the following: One Peter Light a fisherman, was cap- 
tured by a British privateer and carried to Halifax. The crew 
liaving gone ashore for a holiday. Light and the negro cook were 
left on board the vessel. 

'T>uring the absence of the crew. Light and the negro cut the 
cable and steered for the New England coast. As they sailed 
up Waldoboro river they fired several guns which alarmed the 
'people in the vicinity. 



X 








NATHAXIEL SBBIOXS. 

7 654321 

Nathaniel Simmons (James, Joseph, Xathaniel, Joseph, John, Moses). 



**His father fCol. James Simmons) on hearing the report of the 
guns, saddled his horse and taking Nathaniel on behind him, 
^started for Waldoboro. There was great rejoicing among the 
jpeople on account of this successful and bold adventure. 
' "They took the barrels of liquor out of the vessel, knocked in 
'the heads and passed it around. At another time he engaged to 
'drive a baggage wagon to Wiscasset. The troops on arriving 



SIMMONS FAMILY GENEALOGY 141 



'there, marched to the top of a high hill to show their number to 
'the British, who lay in the harbor. The English as soon as they 
'saw the Americans, climbed into the rigging, which was red with 
'British troops in scarlet uniforms. 

^ "^Ir. Simmons learned the blacksmith's trade while young and 
'followed it until a few years ago. He was twice married. First 
in 1822, to Mary Keen, of Nobleboro. Two children (Philip and 
^Susan) were born to them. His wife and children died. In 1830, 
"he married Rosanna Moody, daughter of John and Peggy (Lud- 
'wig) Moody of the same town. Seven children were born to 
'them. All of whom are living. He was converted in 1836 and 
was baptized by Rev. Mr. Pillsbury, settled pastor of Nobleboro. 
•He united with the Second Baptist Church of that place." 
' In February, 1847, he moved to Belfast, Me., where he engaged 
'in farming and blacksmithing. January 16, 1875, his second wife 
died (aged 68 yrs., 18 dys.) From that time he has lived with his 
eldest son John (Moody) Simmons on the homestead. He was a 
kind husband and indulgent father. He was a very industrious, 
hard-working man. giving up work only a few weeks before his 
death. He was a man of robust frame, having been sick only a few 
times during his long life. 

All his children were born in Nobleboro, Me., except Nahum 
Ludwig Simmons. The children of Nathaniel and Rosanna 
'(Moody) Simmons were : 

8 

Margaret Simmons, b. ; d. March 7, 1897, ae. 65 yrs., 2 mos., 5 dys. 

8 
John (Moody) Simmons, b. Xov. 10, 1833; d. Feb. i, 1914. 

8 ' : 

Nathaniel Simmons, b. Jan. 15, 1838; d. Oct. 14, 1899, 

8 
Sarah Elizabeth Simmons, b. Sept. i, 1835 ; m. Aug. 30, 1858, F. S. Johnson. 

8 
Allan Jackson Simmons. <> 

8 
Mary Ann Simmons, b. June 15, 1845; d. Sept. 10, 1903. 

8 
Nahum Ludwig Simmons, b. Jan. 2, 1848; d. Jan. 21, 1909. 

7 654321 

James Simmons (James, Joseph, Nath'l, Joseph, John, Moses) 
the son of James and Christania (Keen) Simmons was born Sept. 



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142 SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

5, 1810. He married first Betsey Hobbs, secondly her sister Mary 

7 
iHobbs. James Simmons was surveyor and lived for a time at 
Bangor, Me., and then moved to the West (Wisconsin). 

7 654321 

Sarah Simmons (James, Joseph, Nath'l, Joseph, John, Moses) 
was born July 30, 1813, and married Austin Mero. They had ten 
children, among them, Fred, Rachel, Ahvilda, Miranda and Elden 
Mere. They lived in Diamond Bluff, Wise. 

7 65432 

• Job Chamberlain Simmons (James, Joseph, Nath'l, Joseph, John, 

I 
Moses) was born May 13, 1816; married Clarissa Orff. They had 

8 
sl son Everett Simmons who married Ellen A. Howard who lives 
'at W^aldoboro, ^le., and has two sons Fred and LeGrand Simmons. 

9 8 

'LeGrand Simmons, son of Everett, married LiUian A. Whitlock, 

10 10 10 

7an. 12, 1910. Their children are Dorothy Marie and Arland 
Everett Simmons. Fred Simmons, son of (8) married Faustena 
M. Sidelinger. 

7 654321 

Rachel Simmons (James, Joseph, Nath'l, Joseph, John, Moses) 
tnarried J. C. Robbins, proprietor of hotel at Belfast, Maine. 
rrhey had a son, John Robbins. 

7 654321 
Josiah Simmons (James, Joseph, Nath'l, Joseph, John, Moses) 

v/as born at Nobleboro, Me., Jan. 21, 1823. Married Rachel Ben- 
her. Their children were: 

8 - 

Harrison Simmons. 

8 
Luville Simmons. 

8 
Sarah Simmons m. Mr Chester W. Bryant 
Three children : 

Mary Edna m. Dr. P. E. Joslin. 
LeRoy Bryant m. Ger. Patterscn. 
Chessell Brvant m. ; 13 children 

Ira Simmons. 



"^ 



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a. 1 ' *r' l! 



SIMMONS FAMILY GENEALOGY 143 



8 

Luville Simmons married Hattie Woodworth and has daughters, 
one of whom is Edna Simmons, a graduate of Boston University; 
another, Eleanor Simmons, Boston University, and Murray J. 
Simmons. 

7 654321 

' Zebedee Simmons (James, Joseph, Nath'l, Joseph, John, Moses) 
born Aug. 27, 1825 ; married Margaret Houston of Damariscotta, 
Maine. 

' The children of Zebedee and Margaret (Houston) Simmons 
were: 

Dexter Simmons, Knox St., Rockland, Maine. 
Fred Simmons. 

7 65432 

John Randall Simmons (James, Joseph, Nath'l, Joseph, John, 
' I 

Moses) born Aug. 2.J, 1831, married ^lary Dulet. Their children 
were : 

Carrie m. Uphen. 
Another m. March. 

7 6543 

' Thomas Jefferson Simmons (Thomas, Joseph, Nath'l, Joseph, 
'21 
John, Moses) born at Waldoboro, Maine, in April, 1808, was the 

6 
son of Thomas and Catherine (Flyer) Simmons; d. Dec. 26, 1883, 

aged 75 yrs., 8 mos., 2 days; married Clarissa W. . 

She died Aug. 22, 1897, at J'j yrs., 5 mos. 

' The children of Thomas Jefferson and Clarissa W, were born 
in Waldoboro, Me. 
8 

Hugh John Anderson Simmons, b, July 24, 1843 \ ^i^d in Aug. 
or Sept., 1912; married Jan. 19, 1892, to Ida Grey Soule. 

Bernice Dunker Simmons b. Sept. 29, 1884; d. spring of 1916 
or 17. Both H. J. Anderson and his sister Bernice lived on the 
'old Simmons estate at Waldoboro, ^le. Their grandfather the 
'first Thomas Simmons, a carpenter by trade built the present 
colonial house that still stands (well kept) on the Simmons farm. 



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144 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



EIGHTH GENER.\TION. 

8 7 65432 

Margaret Simmons (Nath'l, James, Joseph, Nath'l Joseph, John, 
'I 

"Moses) daughter of Nathaniel and Rosanna (Moody) Simmons, 
was born at Nobleboro, Me., Jan., 1832; died March 7, 1897, (and 
is buried in Morrill, Me., cemetery) aged 65 yrs., 2 mos., 5 dys. 
^he married Albion K. Jackson of ^Morrill, Me. 

The children of Albion K. and Margaret (Simmons) Jackson 
are : 

'9 

Ervin Jackson, m. Mary Keen and have Arthur Jackson and 
"Fred Jackson who married ^vlabel Hatch of Morrill, Me., and is a 
'grain merchant at Belfast. 

■ 9 

Albion K. Jackson, who has two children, one, Margaret, a grad- 
uate of Belfast High School, married to Miller Ross of Lincoln- 
ville, Me. 

' 9 

Anna Jackson, m. Mr. Bowden, has one child, Gladys Bowden, 
graduate of the Holbrook, Mass., High School. 

9 

Rosanna Jackson, m. J. W. CoUins. 

8 
Margaret (Simmons) Jackson married secondly Mr. Van Ren- 
salaer Neal. 

8 7 6 5 4 3 

■John Moody Simmons (Nath'l, James, Joseph, Nath'l, Joseph, 

2 I 

John, Moses) was born at Nobleboro, Me., Nov. 10, 1833; ^^^"^ 
at Belfast, Me., (Hayford Hill) Feb. ist, 1914. He married three 
times; first, he married Mary Jane Hall. His third wife was 
Angelia Hutchins (Boulter) whom he married in 1880. Mr. Sim- 
mons was a farmer and a highly respected citizen. The children 
cf John Moody and Angelia (Hutchins-Boulter) Simmons were: 
-9 , 

■ John Percy Simmons, b. Nov. 28, 1881. a graduate of the Belfast, 
"Me.. High School (1902), of the University of Maine (B. S. 
degree, 1906) ; captain in University Cadets Company. Mr. J. P. 
Simmons is now a civil engineer and has held responsible positions 
in New York and elsewhere. 



SIMMONS FAMILY GENEALOGY 145 



9 

Charles Hutchins Simmons, b. May 2nd, 1883; married Dec. 20, 
1913, Myrtle Nash and they have three children: Ruth, John, 
Moody. Mr. Chas. H. Simmons now lives on the Simmons' home- 
stead. He is of the third generation to live upon it. 

8 765432 

Nathaniel Simmons (Nath'l, James, Joseph, Nath'l, Joseph, John, 

I 
Moses), was born at Nobleboro, Me., Jan. 15, 1838, died at (Poor's 
Mills,) Belfast, Me., Oct. 14, 1899; buried at Alorrill, Me., ceme- 
tery. He was a blacksmith by trade, a Baptist and an excellent citi- 
zen. He married Abby Patterson. They had one child, Arline 
Simmons, a graduate of Coburn Classical Institute, Waterville, 
Me. She married Mr. Walter Cooper and has a daughter. 
8 765432 

Sarah Simmons (Nath'l, James, Joseph, Nath'l, Joseph, John, 

I 
Moses) was born at Nobleboro, Me., Sept. i, 1835. She rnarried 
Frederick Stevens Johnson of Belfast, ^le. They lived in Idaho 
several years where Mr. Johnson was engaged in mill business. 
Later they lived at Poor's Mills, Belfast, Me., and he ran a flour 
and grist mill. Mr. Johnson died Aug, 31, 191 1. He was born 
Mar. 2y, 1831. 

8 765432 

Mary Ann Simmons (Nath'l, James, Joseph, Nath'l, Joseph, John, 

I 
Moses) was born at Nobleboro, Me., June 15, 1845; ^' Sept. 10, 
1903, at Belfast, Me., (near "Head of the Tide"). She married 
Richard W. Woodbury, Mar. 2y, 1862. 

Their children are : 



9 

Abby Woodbury who married bloody. 

Child, Merle Moody m. 

9 ' 

Mary Woodbury, school teacher at Belfast. 

Sarah Woodbury, who married Russell Stevenson and they have the 
lOllowing children : 

Richard Stevenson and Rachel Stevenson^ 

8 765432 

Allan J. Simmons (Nath'l. James. Joseph, Nath'l, Joseph, John, 



i^iri^air^fiC 



am Ji .^v,A 



146 SPR.-\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



I 

Moses) was born at Nobleboro, Me., 184 — . Died at Waldo, Me. 
Married Addle Ray. ]Mr. Simmons was a farmer, blacksmith, and 
veterinarian. He was a cheerful, kindly father, helpful to neigh- 
bors and hospitable to all. He was a favorite uncle to all his many 
nieces and nephews. 

The children of Allan J. and Addie (Ray) Simmons were: 

Helen Simmons m. Bert Shorey. '^ 

Elizabeth Simmons m. Chas. K. Forbes. 

Georgia Simmons m. Walter I. Neal. 

Marcie Simmons m. Chas. Stocker. 

Mary Simmons m. Chas. Wallace, (Frank R. Wallace, son). 

Rose Simmons m. Fred Bunker. • 

Ada Simmons, died young. 

Ardria Simmons m. Arthur Payson. 

Lawrence Nath'I Simmons m. Adelia Holmes. 

Nathalia Simmons, died young. 

Cora Simmons, died young. . ^ 

10 

' Frank Ray Wallace, a graduate of ^larshall College, Hunting- 
ton, W. Va., lieutenant in U. S. Army, 1917-18. 
-Allen Neal, Freedom Academy and Vet. College. 

9 

■ Lawrence S., graduate of M. C. L, Pittsfield, Me. His children 
are Ralph and Phyllis. 
10 
Ralph Simmons, Belfast High School ; student at University of 
Maine. 

8 76543 

Nahum Ludwig Simmons (Nath'I, James, Joseph, Nath'I, Joseph, 
2 I 

John, Moses) the youngest child of Nathaniel and Rosanna Moodr 
Simmons was born at Belfast. Me., (Hayford W^ell) Jan. 2, 1848,, 
and died at Morrill, Me., Jan. 21, 1909. 
8 
Children of Nahum Ludwig and Annie (Brown) Simmons: 

9 

Roscoe Nahum Simmons, b. at Knox, Me., July 16, 1879. 

9 

Harry Guy Simmons, b. at Knox, Me., Nov. 15. 1881. 



H\v:-;iIoj ii 






SIMMONS FAMILY GENEALOGY 147 



9 

Frederick Johnson Simmons, b. at Knox, Me., May 23, 1884. 

9 
Edmund Phinney Simmons, b. at Knox, Me., Oct. 26, 1886. 

9 
Winifred Bernice Simmons, b. at Belfast, Me., Sept. 22^ 

9 

Grace Burnette Simmons, b. at Knox, Me., March i. 

9 

Joanna Pierce Simmons, b. at Morrill, Me., Oct. 4. 

9 

Hugh Ludwig Simmons, b. at Morrill, Me., Oct. 31, 1893. 

9 * 8 7 6 5 

Winifred Bernice Simmons (Nahum, Nath'l, James, Joseph, 

4321 
Nath'l, Joseph, John, Moses) was born at Belfast, Me. She was 
graduated from the East Maine Conference Seminary in 1895. 
She taught in the common schools at ^lorrill. Belfast, Montville, 
and Limestone, ]Me., and Latin and Greek in the Camden, Me., 
High School (Megunticook H. S.) She married (at ^lorrill, ^le.,) 
July 12, 1899, Chester Boice Allen of Spencer, Mass. Mr. Allen 
was then principal of the Camden, Me., H. S. He was educated at 
Worcester Polytechnic Institute, at the L^niversity of Gottingen, 
Germany, and at Clark L'niversity. They have one child, Chester 
Boice Allen, Jr., b. at Holbrook, Mass., July 21, '07. 

9 87654 

Grace Burnette Simmons (Nahum, Xath'l, James, Joseph, Nath'l, 

3-21 

Joseph, John, Moses) was born at Knox, Maine. She studied at 
East Maine Conference Seminary, Bucksport, Me., and was grad- 
uated from the Maine Wesleyan Seminary and Female College in 
1899. ^liss Simmons has taught in the public schools of Morrill, 
Belmont, Searsmont and Belfast, Elaine, and has been assistant 
teacher in the Milford, Conn., High School and in the Scituate, 
Mass., High School ; principal Hatherly Grammar School, Scituate, 
Mass., and principal of W. H. McElwin Grammar School. Bridge- 
water, Mass., and principal of Nevin Grammar School, South Wey- 
mouth. Miss Simmons has been advisor to the Normal Art Mag. 
and is a member of the Twentieth Century Club of Boston. 

9 87654 

Roscoe Nahum Simmons (Nahum, Nath'l, James, Joseph, Nath'l, 



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148 SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



3 2 I 

Joseph, John, Moses), was born at Knox, Me., July i6, 1879. He 
was graduated from the '* School for Nurses " of Butler Hospital 
in 1902, and is now a registered nurse in the State of Rhode Island. 
9 87654 

Harry Guy Simmons (Nahum, Nath'l, James, Joseph, Nath'l, 

321 
Joseph, John, Moses), was born at Knox, Me., Nov. 15, i88r. He 
attended the Bank's Business School. He has been bookkeeper at 
Megunticook Woolen Mills at Camden, Maine. He is now travel- 
ing mechanic for the Whitins Machine Co., Whitinsville, Mass. 
He is married to ^liss Helen Malloy of Blackstone, Mass. 

9 ^ 8 765 

Prederick Johnson Simmons (Nahimi, Nath'l, James, Joseph, 
4321 . 

l^ath'l, Joseph, John, Moses), was born at Knox, Me., May 23, 
1884; attended school at ^lorrill. Me. He is a graduate of the 
Camden, Maine, High School, and of the University of Maine 
(A. B. degree 1906). 

Mr. Simmons is a high school principal and is a member of the 
High School Masters' Club of Massachusetts, the Twentieth Cen- 
tury Club of Boston, and of the New England Historical Geneolog- 
ical Society. 

9 8 765 

Edmund Phinney Simmons (Nahum, Nath'l, James, Joseph, 

4 32 I 

Nath'l, Joseph, John, Moses,) was born at Knox, Me., Oct. 26, 
1886. He attended school at Morrill, Me., and at Maine Wesleyan 
Seminary, Kent's Hill, Me. Mr. Simmons is a mechanic in the 
cotton mills at Linwood, ^lass. He married Alice Jorde and they 
have two children, Thelma Alice and Dorothy Pauline. 

9 87654 

Joanna Pierce Simmons (Nahum, Nath'l, James, Joseph, Nath'l, 
3 2 I 

Joseph, John, Moses,) was born at Morrill, Me., and was grad- 
uated from Higgins Classical Institute, Charleston, Me. She has 
taught school at South ^lontville. Me., North Hampton, N. H., 
Andover, Mass., and at Rockland, Mass. Miss Simmons was mar- 
ried to George Oliver Richardson at Melrose Highlands, Mass., 
by Rev. John O. Paisley on Nov. 29, 1917. Mr. Richardson is a 
graduate of the Andover High School and the Lowell Textile 



i:---i'r/in'}.-v:v: ^ li 



SIMMONS FAMILY GENEALOGY 149 



School (degree course). Mr. Richardson served his country as a 
lieutenant in Chemical Corps of the L^. S. Army during the Euro- 
pean War. He is now connected with the National Aniline and 
Chemical Co., and is stationed at 3B Pekin Rd., Shanghai, China. 

9 87654 

Hugh Ludwig Simmons (Nahum, Nath'l, James, Joseph, Nath'l, 
3 2 I 

Joseph, John, Moses) was born at Morrill, Me., Oct. 31, 1893. 
He attended the Morrill public schools, the Geo. F. Hatch High 
School, Pembroke, Mass., and was graduated from Higgins Clas- 
sical Institute, Charleston, Me., in 1912, and from the Medical 
School of Tufts College in 1916; from doctor's course of Medicine 
and Surgery at Worcester, Mass., City Hospital in 1918. He 
serA^ed his country as a lieutenant in the European War. He was 
in the Medical Corps of U. S. Army stationed at Camp Greenleaf, 
Chickamauga Park, Ga. Dr. Simmons is now on the staff of the 
Worcester City Hospital and is practising medicine in that city. 
Dr. Smmons during his student days was active in all forms of 
athletics, and was captain of his basket ball team. 

_ ^MYFLOWER ANCESTORS. . 

A great many members of the Simmons family can trace their 
lines to eight passengers of the Mayflower, viz. : John Alden, Wil- 
liam, Alice and Priscilla Mullins, George Soule, Henry Sam(p)son, 
Capt, Myles Standish and Edward Doty. 

The following outlines may be of interest to the members of the 
Maine Simmons family : 

Alden Line. 

I 2 I I 

I. John Alden m. Priscilla Mullins, (William and Alice). 
2 2 I 

II. Elizabeth Alden m. William Pabodie (John). 

3 2 I 

III. Mercy Pabodie m. John Simmons (Moses). 

Second Alden Line. 

I 2 I 

I. John Alden m. Priscilla Mullins (William). 

4 



i' 



I5Q SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



2 2 1 

II. Sarah Alden m. Alexander Standish (Myles). 

2 I 

HI. Mercy Standish m. Caleb Sam (p) son (Henry). 

3 2 I 

IV. Rachel Sam (p) son m. Moses Simmons (John, Moses). 

SouLE Line. 
I. George Soule m. Mary Becket. 

2 I 

II. John Soule m. Rebecca Simmons (Moses). 

3 2 I 

III. Aaron Soule m. Mary Wadsworth (John, Christopher). 

5 4 3 

IV. Mary Soule m. Freedom Chamberlain (Nath'l, WiUiam, 

2 I 

Henry, Wid. Christian). 

4 3 2 1 

V. Job Chamberlain m. Rachel Bonney (John. John, Thomas) 

5 4 3 

VI. Eliz. Chamberlain m. Joseph Simmons (Nath'l, Joseph, 
2 I 

John, Moses). 

Doty Line. 

I. Edward Doty m. Faith Clark. 
XL Mary Doty m. Samuel Hatch. 

3 2 I 

III. Elizabeth Hatch m. John Bonney (John, Thomas). 

6 5 4 

IV. Rachel Bonney m. Job Chamberlain (Freedom, Nath'l, 

32 I 

William, Henry, Wid. Christian). 

5 4 3 

V. Eliz. Chamberlain m. Joseph Simmons (Nath'l, Joseph, 
2 I 

John, Moses). 

(The end.) 



ANCESTRY OF THE STEWARTS 151 

ji 

Ancestry of the Stewarts. 

Early Settlers of Howardstowx, Canaan^ Bloomfield, 

Skowhegan. 

STEWART— STUART— STEWARD 

(by a. W. STEWART^ AUGUSTA^ MAINE.) 

The name Stewart is spelled in more than thirty different ways. 
It was derived from the Latin word seneschal, or senescallus which 
the Scots interpret Stewart and the English stew^ard. 

In ancient Scotland the seneschal, stewart, or Lord High Stewart 
was, next to the king, the highest officer in the realm, and was 
Minister of Justice, Finance and War, Chancellor of the Excheq- 
uer, and Commander-in-Chief of the Army. 

The office of Lord High Stewart was appointive until the reign 
of Malcomb IV who made it hereditary in the family of Walter 
Fitz Alan, who held it at that time, 11 57. The father of Walter 
Fitz Alan was Alan Fitz Flaald. He was born in Brittany, and 
'removed to England before iioi where he became Lord of 
Owestrie. 

Walter 3rd assumed the office of Lord High Stewart in 1204, 
and like many others of his time adopted as his surname, the name 
of his business, or office, and consequently became the founder of 
the Clan Stewart of Scotland. He married Beatrix, grand- 
daughter of David i, and, consequently, while few of the mem- 
bers of Clan Stewart were descended from the Stewart kings, all 
are descendants of the ancient kings of Scotland. 

The name appears first in Scotch records when Sir William 
Stewart took part in the proceedings of parliament in 1398. Mary 
" Queen of Scots " was educated in France where the name, owing 
to the absence of the letter w in the French alphabet, was neces- 
sarily apelled with u, and the form Stuart was established, and 
although her ancestors as well as her son James VI used the form 
Stewart, most writers follow Queen Mary's example. 

Duncan Stewart was born in the Highlands of Scotland about 
1623. He espoused the cause of his kinsman King Charles II, 
and in supporting him, either at the battle of Dunbar in 1650, or 
Worcester in 1651, was captured by the army of Cromwell, and 
with the other prisoners taken in those battles sent to the American 
Colonies, and indentured as servants to the Colonists. 

Duncan was landed at Ipswich, Mass., in 1654 and married 
Anna Winchurst of that town. They removed to Newbury in 






1. "K.'a 



152 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 

/ 

1659 ^^^^ for thirty years occupied a farm in Byfield Parish near 
the Rowley town line. They later removed to Rowley. 

In early Suffolk Court Records, Vol. 42, p. 75, dated 1698, on 
file at the courthouse in Boston. Mass., can be found the deposi- 
tion of Duncan Stewart " About seventy-five years old '' and 
witnessed by the court officer. The name of Duncan Stewart, and 
later a reference to his widow as '' Old Widow Stewart " appears 
in Rowley town records. Duncan died in 1717, and his wife in 
1729, probably over a hundred years old. 

James Stewart (son of Duncan and Anne Winchurst) was born 
in Newbury, Mass., in 1664. He was a " Carpenter and Planter." 
His name first appears on the Newbury tax list in 1688, and he 
served in the Canadian Expedition. (King William's war) from 
that town. His first wife's name was Elizabeth, and he later 
married Sarah Prime, of Rowley. He removed to Rowley where 
he died in 1750. 

Samuel Stewart, son of Duncan and brother of James, married 
Dorcas Boston and their son John was born in Wells. District of 
]\raine. in . 1709. A document is on file in the Suffolk county 
records which he signed " John Stewart." His son *' Joseph the 
Quaker " and grandsons Samuel. Wentworth. and Calvin, lived 
in Belgrade, Me., and used the French form Stuart. Kennebec 
County Treasurer. Bert P. Stuart, belongs to this branch. 

Solomon Stewart (son of James and Elizabeth) was born in 
Rowley, Mass., in 1698. He resided in Rowley. Salem, and 
Limenburg, Mass. He entered the military service in 1721, and 
ser\'ed as sergeant in Capt. John Wainwright's Company. In 1722 
he was with Capt. Johnson Harmon's Company, fighting Indians 
in the " District of Elaine." He was one of the garrison at Bruns- 
wick, Me., when the Indians burned the town. In 1725 he acted 
as scout for Capt. Richard Kimball's " Troop of Horse." 

He married in Andover, ^lass., June 28, 1727 Martha Earring- 
ton of that town. Their children were Benjamin. Solomon, 
Phineas, Daniel, William, James. Jacob and Mary. Solomon 
Stewart died in Lunenburg. February 28, 1758. Martha, wife of 
Solomon Stewart died in 1777. and her gravestone declares " She 
was a Virtuous Wife, a kind Neighbor and a tender Parent. 
'* ^Itjurnful Children here I lie 
as you are Now So Once Was I 
As I am Now So You Must be 
Prepare yourselves to Follow Me." 



ANCESTRY OF THE STEWARTS 153 

Of the children of Solomon and Martha Stewart, Dea. William, 
Phineas and Daniel married Abigail. Anne and Mary, daughters 
of Lieut. Abraham Ireland, who served in the French and Indian 
war. 

Solomon, Phineas and Dea. William were among the pioneer 
settlers of Fitchburg when it was separated from Lunenburg in 
1764, and about 1776 they removed, as their nephew Daniel, (son 
of Daniel) had the previous year, to Howardstown, which later 
became Canaan and Bloomfield, and is now Skowhegan, Me. 

About that time they adopted the English form — Steward — 
of spelling their name. The most of their descendants have con- 
tmued its use ; some, however, have returned to the original form, 
among them may be mentioned, George S. Stewart, Genealogist, 
of Bedford, Mass., a descendant of Daniel; the late Hon. D. D. 
Stewart, lawyer, of St. Albans, Me., great-grandson of Deacon 
"William, and the late Elijah W. Stewart of Augusta, Me., who 
was a grandson of Phineas, and father of the writer of this sketch. 

Solomon Stewart-Steward was born in Rowley, Mass., January 
14, 1730. He married Elizabeth Taylor. Their children were 
Solomon, Mary, Betsey and Rebecca. 

Phineas Stewart- Steward was born in Rowley, Mass., March 
2^, 1732. In 1754 he was one of the carpenters employed in build- 
ing Fort Halifax, at the junction of the Kennebec and Sebasti- 
cook rivers in what is now Winslow, Me. In 1756 he was a sol- 
dier in the Crown Point Expedition. He married .\nne Ireland. 
Their children were Samuel Bird, Anne, Phineas, x\braham, 
Thomas and Martha. 

Daniel Stewart was born in Salem, Mass., November 21, 1734. 
He married Alary Ireland. Their children were Daniel (who 
removed to Howardstown), Benjamin, John, Amassa, Amherst, 
Stephen, Thomas and James. 

Deacon William Stewart- Steward was born in Salem, Mass., 
March 14, 1736-7. He married Abigail Ireland. Their children 
v/ere William (better known as Dr. Bill), James and Jonathan. 

The descendants of the Stewart pioneers of Howardstown are 
many, and have been, like their ancestors, sturdy and reliable men 
and women, ready to obey and enforce the laws of their country, 
and when their country needed them for its defencce in 1812, its 
preservation in 1861 and " to make the world safe for Democracy " 
in 1917, they furnished their full quota. 



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154 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAIXE HISTORY. 

An Alphabetical Index of Revolutionary Pen- 
sioners Living in Maine 

(Compiled by the Late Charles A. Flagg, Librarian^ Bangor 
(Maine) Public Library.) 

(Concluded from page 124) 

This index began in Vol. V, No. 4, Nov., Dec, 1917, Jan., 1918. 
In that number may be found an introduction and explanation of 
sources and abbreviations. 

A reprint of this index in pamphlet form will soon be issued 
and sold by A. J Huston, 92 Exchange St, Portland, Me, and at 
the office of Sprague's Journal, Dover, Me. 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. Age.i 



County. 



Remarks. 



'3oc 

'35c 

'40 

•Bod 

'3od 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'3oc 

'35d 

'35d 

'35d 

'35c 
'40 
'35c 
'35c 
'40 
35c 
'35d 
'35c 
'40 
•35d 
'35c 
'40 
'35d 
'40 
'35d 
•35d 
'35c 
'35c 
'40 
'35d 
'35c 
'35d 
'40 
'35d 



Moore, Benjamin. . .'X. H. line. 
Moore, Edward. . . .i Mass. line. 

Moore, Edzabeth. ... 

Moore, Goff N. H. line. 

Moore, Isaac 1 N. H. line . 



I Private.. 
I Private. . 



Moore, 
Moore, 
Moore, 
Moore, 
Moore, 
Moore, 
Moore, 
Moores 
Moores 
' Moores 
j Moores, 
'Moores 
' Moosm: 



James ;X. H. 

John Mass. 

Joshua Mass. 

Josiah 

Nathaniel ... Mass. 

Nathaniel 

Pelatiah. . . . Mass. 

, David Cont. 

, Da\'id 

Jonathan. . Mass. 
, Peter Mass. 

Samuel. . . . Mass. 

n, Aaron. . . Mass. 



line, 
line, 
line. 



Private.. . 
I Private. . . 

! Private. . . 
i Private. . . 
i Private. . . 



line I Private. . 



line. . 
Na\'y. 



Private., 
i Mariner. 



line, 
mil., 
mil., 
line. 



Morgan, Jonathan. . :N. H. line. . 

ilorr Mary 

Morrill, Jacob iN. H. line. . 

Morrill, Moses Mass. line. . 

Morrill, Stenhen. ... 

Morris, William. . . Cont. Navy. 
Morrison, James.. . . N. H. line. 



I Private. 
I Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 



Private. 
Private. 



Morrison, Moses. 



Mass. line. 



Morrison, William. .Mass. mil... 

Mors, Mark Mass. line. . 

Morse, Daniel 

Morse, Daniel Mass. State. 

Morse, David 

Morse, Eliphalet. . . Mass. line. . 
Morse, Enoch Mass. line. . 

Morse, Isaac N. H. line. . 

Morse, Jacob N. H. line. . 



I Lieutenant. 
1 Private.. . . 
I Private.. . . 

. ! Private. . . . 
. I Private.. . . 



Private. . 



Morse, Jonathan. . . Mass. mil. 
Morse, Josiah. .... Mass. line 
i Morse, Levi, 2d . . . . Mass. mil., 



Morse, Levi Mass. line . 



Private. . . 
Pvt. of art 
Private.. . . 
Fifer 



Private. . . 
Private.. . 
Private. . . 

Private. . . 



69 York 

68 York 

77 York 

73 Kennebec. 
80 Lincoln. 

88 Lincoln 

73 Kennebec. 
. . . . York. 

77 Kennebec. 

80 Washington. . 

74 Penobscot. 

84 Lincoln 

82 York. 

73 Kennebec. 
84 Kennebec. . . 

64 Cumberland. 

82 Kennebec. 
86 Kennebec. 

"Sor Lincoln 

76 

83 Kennebec. . 
97 Cumberland. 

78 Hancock. . . . 

77 Cumberland. 

65 Kennebec. . 

66 York 

81 York. 

78 Lincoln. 

84 Lincoln 

75 Kennebec. 

70 York. 

94 Lincoln 

86 Lincoln. 

79 Somerset . . . 
79' Oxford. 

71 Cumberland. 
84 Kennebec. 

69 Kennebec. 
75 Kennebec . . 

70 Lincoln. 

60 Penobscot . . 

73 Lincoln. 

78 Lincoln 

72 Cumberland. 



d. May 14, 182f 
d. Sept. 1826. 
Res. Biddeford. 



Res. Edgecomb. 

Res. Addison. 
Edgecomb. 

Res. Pittston. 

Same as Massman 

d. Dec. 2, 1831. 
Res. Freeport. 
d. Dec. 15, 1830. 
d. Oct. 27, 1823. 
Res. Rome 
d. Dec. 20, 1822. 

Res. Phipsburg. 

Res. Phipsburg. 
Res. Lexington. 

Res. Sidney, 
d. June 2, 1824. 
Res. L'nion. 



IB 



'y:}K 



■r.-'., V •.:'> 



'i""^iM'f ;:;,t; K; 



,>":r'/4:*ii J^inM/v^j 



'MUirl.^'.;^^ V. 



REVOLUTIONARY PENSIONERS IN MAINE is 



:)5 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. 



Age. 



County. 



Remarks. 



Morse, Philip. 



Mass. line 

& State 



Morse, Seth Mass. mil 



'Morse, William Mass. line. 

jMorton, Benjamin.. 

I Morton, David Mass. line. 

Morton, James Mass. line . 

i Morton, Thomas. . . Mass. line. 



'35d 

•40 

'3od 

•40 

•3od 

•40 

'35c 

•3od 

•3od 

•40 

•3oc 

•35d 

•3od 

•35d 

•35d 

'35d 

•40 

•35d 

'40 



'35d iMowen, Samuel. . . . Mass. mil. 

•35d I Mower, John Mass. mil. 

-40 j 1 

'40 I Mower, Samuel . . . . i 



Private.. . . 

jPvt.&Corp 

'Private.. . . 

I Private. . . . 
I Private. . . . 
! Private. . . . 



: Moses. Daniel Mass. line . . 

j Moses, Josiah Mass. line. . 

! Moulton, Daniel.. . . Mass. line. . 
.Moulton, Da\-id.. . . X. H. line. . 
■Moulton, Da%-id. ... X. H. mil.. . 
j Moulton, Joseph. . . Mass. State. 

Moulton, Joseph 

! Moulton, Simeon. . . X. H. line. . 
iMountfort, Elizabeth 



j Sergeant. . . 
1 Private. . . . 
j Private. . . . 
iPvt. &Serg 
Private.. . . 
I Private.. . . 



'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'40 

•40 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35e 

'3oc 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

•35d 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

•35d 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 

'35c 
'35d 

'35d 

'35c 

'40 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 



Mudget, John X'. H. line. . . . 

Mugford, John Mass. line. . . . 

Mugford, John 

Mulikin, Edward 

Mulligan, Patrick 

Mulliken, Ed%vard. . Mass. mil 

MuUiken, John Mass. mil 

Mun, Joseph 

Murch, Matthias. . . Mass. line. . . . 
Murdock, James.. . . Mass. line. . . . 

Murdock, James. . . 

Murphy, Pierce. . . . Cont. Xavy.. . 
Murphy, Thomas. . . 1st Conn. line. 
Murphy, Thomas.. . Cont. X'avy. . . 

Murray, Cotton 

Murray, William. . . Mass. line. . . . 

Xasan, Be'sey 

X'ash, Jonathan. . . . Mass. mil 



Private. 



79 Kennebec. 



85' 
70 
76 
73 
55 
60 
S3 
70 
70to 
80, 
72 
78 
82 
80 
74 
75 
83 
73: 
72 



Kennebec. . 
Oxford. 

Oxford 

Kennebec. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

York. 

York. 

Oxford. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

York. 

Cumberland. 



Private. . . . j 
Private.. . . i 



Sergeant. 
Private. . 



Private, 
j Private.. 



[Private. 
Private. 



. Marine . 
.Private. . 
. I Mariner. 



I Private. 



Xason, Edward. 
Xason, Edward. 



Mass. line . 



Xason, John Mass. mU. . . 

X'ason, Jonathan. . . .Mass. line. . 
Xason, X'^athaniel. . .;Mass. line. . 

Xayson, John j 

Xeal Isaac 1 

X'eal, John i X. H. line. . . 

Xeal, Walter Mass. mil . . . 

Xeale, Thomas Mass. line. . 

Xealey, Benjamin . 

Xeedham, John. . . .Mass. line. . 

Xeedham, Mary. . . . , 

Xelson, Daniel Cont. X'avy. 

X'elson, Xason 

Xelson, Xathan. . . . Mass. mil.. . 
Xewbegin, George. . Mass. line. . 



Xewell, Jonathan. 
Xewell, Zachariah 



Mass. line. 

Mass. line, 
and mil. 
Xewman, Ebenezer. Mass. line. 
Xewman, Josiah.. . . Mass. mil.. 



XiohoUs, John Mass. mil.. 

Xichols, Bela Maes. line. 

Nichols, Es'or 

Xichols, John 

Xichols, John X. H. line. 

Xichols, Xathaniel. R. I. line. . 



Pvt. «fe 
Serg. 



Private. 



Private. . . 
Private. . . 
Captain. . 



73 Kennebec. . . 
75 Kennebec. 
81 1 Kennebec. . . 
79' Kennebec. . 

! 

84 Somerset. 

67 Cumberland. 
79 Cumberland. 

71 Kennebec. . 
52 Washington. 

68 Kennebec. 

72 Waldo 

79 Cumberland. 
75 Cumberland. 

80 Cumberland. 
83 Cumberland. 
82 York. 

88 Washington. . 
78 York. 
. . . Cumberland. 
75 York 

81 York 

81 Cumberland. 

87 Cumberland. 
78 York 

85 York 



Ord. serg. 
Private. . . 
Private. . . 



Private. . . 



Mariner. . 



Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 

Captain. . . 
Sergeant. . . 

Private. . . . 
Pvt. Serg.. 
& Corp. 
Private. . . 
Lieutenant 



Private. . 
Private. . 



74 Waldo 

! 93 York 

i 73 York 

i 84' Waldo 

i 58i Waldo 

91 Lincoln. 
' 76 York 

80 Kennebec. 
: 51;York 

75 Oxford. 

i 75 Oxford 

73 Somerset. 

' 80 Oxford 

74 Oxford. 
71 York. 

' 76 York 

74 York 

65 Cumberland. 
or83 

78' Oxford. 



76 Oxford. 
75 Kennebec. 

77 Haucuck . 

78 Lincoln.. . 
81 Lincoln.. . 
66 Lincoln.. . 
80, Waldo. 



jRes. Fayette. 
iRes. Paris. 
Res. Standish. 

iRes. Gorham. 
Id. Feb. 8, 1824. 



Res. Scarborough. 

I Res. Portland. 

1st. Ward. 
Same as Mower. 

Res. Greene. 
Res. Greene. Same 
as Mower. 



Res. Windham. 
Res. Sidney. 
iRes. Eastport. 

Same as MilHken. 
Res. Freeport. 



Res. Minot. 

d. June 1, 1825. 

Res. Cumberland, 
d. Sept. 14, 1833. 
Res. S. Berwick. 

Res. Minot. 
See also Xasan. 
Res. Kennebunk- 
' port. 

See also Xavson. 
d. Mar. 8, lJ<31. 
d. July 27, 1818. 
Res. Hope. 
Res. Belmont. 

|d. Aug. 12, 1833. 

I Res. S.Berwick. 



{Res. Norway. 

1 

IRes. Oxford. 



I Res. Parsonsfield. 
Id. Jan. 5, 1821. 



id. May 12, 1833. 

See also Xickels. 
JRes. Georgetown. 

Res. Bristol. 
Id. in Jan. 1825. 



156 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



List. 



N.VME. 



Service. 



Rank. Age.i County 



Remarks. 



'3oc 

•35c 

35d 

•40 

'35c 

•40 

•35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 
•35 
•35c 
'40 

•40 

'35d 

*35c 

'35c 

'AO 

'35c 
^35d 
'40 
''35d 

MO 

'35d 

•35d 

•35c 

•35d 



ichols, Samuel. . 
icholson. Luke. . 
ickells, William, 
ickerson, 



Cont. Navy. 
Mass. line. . 
Mass. mil.. . 



i Musician. 
I Private. . . 
i Sergeant.. 



ickerson. Moses. . . Mass. line ; Private. . 

ickerson, Moses I 

ickerson. Paul. . . . Mass. line, 
ickerson. Reuben. Mass. line, 
oble, Anthony. . . . Mass. line. 

oble, John : Del. line. . . 

oble, John 

oble, Stephen Mass. mil.. 



Nock, Jonathan. ... X. H. line. 
Xocke, Sylvan us. . . X. H. line. 

Xorman, John Mass. line . 

Xorris, James F. . . . 

Xorris, Ru'h 

Xortoii, Elihu ' 

Xorton, Elijah Mass. line . 

Xorton, Joseph Mass. line. 

N^orton, Josiah Mass. line. 

Xorton, Mary . . . 

Xorton, Xathaniel. . Mass. line. 
Xorton, Xathaniel. . Mass. mil.. 



Xorton, Xoah ^Nlass. State . 



Xorton, Noah 

Xorton, Samuel. . . . Mass. State. 
Xorton, Stephen. ... Mass. line . . 
Xorwcod, Closes. . . Mass. line. . 
Xowell, Mark Mass. line . . 



•35c Xowell, Paul Mass. line . 

'35c Xoyes, Bela Mass. line. 

'35d Xoj es, John Mass. line . 

•35d Noyes, Timothy. ... X. H. mil. 

'35c Nutting, Abel Mass. line . 

'35c Xutting, Thomas. . . Mass. line. 

'35d : Nye, Llisha Mass. line . 



Private. . . 
Private. . . 
Private. . . 
Private. . . 



Private & 
Mariner. 
Private. ... 

Private 

Private. . . . 



Pvt. of art. 
Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 



Private. . 
Mariner. 



Private & 
Coporal 



70; Hancock. . . 
S3 Cumberland. 

S3 Lincoln 

S2| Waldo 

70i Hancock. . . 
81i Kennebec. . 
. . . {Penobscot. 
74 Penobscot . . 
64 Cumberland. 
76 Washington., 
78i Washington. 

77! York. 
761 York. 
76iYork. 

SllYork 

67j Kennebec. . . 
74| Kennebec. . . 

53| Franklin 

75i Lincoln. 

82 Kennebec. . . 

SeiWaldo. 

73| Lincoln 

64} York. 
72 Lincoln. 
79 Lincoln 



Artificer. . . 

Private 

Private. ... 
Private &.'. 
Musician: 
Private. . . . j 
Private.. . . 
Private. . . . i 
Pvt.&Corp: 



'3od Xye, Jonathan Mass. line. 

i I 

Oaks, John Mass. line . 

•35c 'Oaks, Joshua X. H. line. 

•40 ■ Oaks, Joshua 

•35d O'Brien, John Mass. line. 

'40 lO'Brion, John 



'Private.. . .'• 
I Private. . . . 
Lieutenant 
& Captian. 

Private & 
Sergeant.. . 
! Private.. . 
Musicia^n . . 



•35c lOdiorne, Samuel.. . . Cont. Navy. 
•35d ; Oliver, David Mass. state. 

•35d 'Oliver, Henry Mass. state. 



Private. 



86; Hancock. 

921 Waldo 

77lYork. 

77i Lincoln. 

75' Washington. . 

72: York. 
82: Lincoln. 

63! Oxford 

79; Cumberland. 
. . I Cumberland. 

671 Lincoln 

69i Kennebec. 

or68 Kennebec. 

74I 

80 Somerset. 
or76; 

80' Penobscot. 

74i Hancock. 

8II Washington. 

73iYork. 

78 York 



•35d 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

•35d 

'35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'35d 

•40 

•40^ 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

35d 

'40 

•35c 



'Oliver. John Mass. 

jOliver, Jonathan. . . Mass. 

lOliver, Mary 

jOliver, Thomas Mass. 

'Oliver, William Mass. 

jO'Rian, John Mass. 

Osborn, James Mass. 

jOsborn, Mifhael.. . . Mass. 
iOsbourne, Hugh... . Cont. 
i Osgood, .\sa Mass. 

Osgood, Chri'o'er.. -Mass. 

Oshee, Joseph. . . . 

On, Beulah 

Ott, Beulah 

Overloc<, Charles.. . Mass 

Owen, Hugh Mass 

Owen, Hugh 

Owen, Philip , Mass 



state . 
line. . 



Seaman. . . 

'Private of; 

Art. j 

Private ofi 

.\rt j 

Private. . . . | 
Private. . . . i 



line. . 
state . 
line. . 



une. . 
navy . 
line. . 
line. . 
. . Mass. state. 



state, 
state 



Paccard, Daniel 




76 Lincoln. 



75 



Lincoln. 



Sergeant.. . 1 
Private.. . . 
Private.. . . ' 
Private.. . . 
Private.. . . 
Mariner. . . 
Sergt. Maj. 
Private. . . . 
Lieutenant 



Private. 
Private. 



Private. 
Private. 



79! Lincoln. 
78, Lincoln. . . 
84 Lincoln. 
70 Lincoln.. . 
83 Lincoln. 
79' Lincoln. 

98 York 

75: York. 
73 Lincoln. 
72 Kennebec. 
79 Oxford. 
72 Penobscot 
88; Lincoln. 
82: Lincoln.. . 
82j Waldo. . . 
74i Lincoln. 
66! Lincoln. 



Kennebec. . 
Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 
York. 



d. in 1826. 
;d. May 4. 1829. 

d. Aug. 19, 1S32. 
jRes. Frankfort. 

Res. Readfield. 

d. Aug. 17, 1821. 
d. Mar. 2, 1S26. 

,Res. Calais. 



d. May 19, 1820. 
iRes. Monmouth. 
Res. Monmouth. 
Res. Farmington. 

!d. Oct. 7, 1822. 
j 
Res. Cushing. 

jRes. Wiscasset. 

Res. Montville. 

I 
d. Dec. 9, 1833. 



d. Aug. 21, 1833. 
! 

j Residence N. H. 
iPaid in Portland, 
d. Sept. 4. 1827. 



Res. Lmbec. 

Res. Cornish. 
Same as preceding 



d. May 7, 1834. 
Res. Georgetown. 

d. Dec. 28, 1822. 



d. July 31, 1823. 

Res. Thomaston. 
Res. Camden. 



Res. Wales. 
Res. Brunswick. 



REVOLUTIOXARY PENSIONERS IN MAINE i 



0/ 



List. 



Name. 



Rank. Age.' County. 



Remarks. 



'35c 

'3oc 

'40 

•3od 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

•35d 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'3od 



Packard, David .... Mass. line . 

Packard, James Conn. line. 

Packard. James .... 

Packard. Job Mass. mil.. 



Packard, Jonathan.. Mass. line. 

Packard, Xehemiah 

Page, Abraham. ... . X. H.line.. 

Page, Caleb Mass. line . 

Page, Chase X. H. line . 

Page, Edward X. H. line . 

Page, Enoch N. H. line . 

Page, Xathan Mass. mil.. 

Page, Philip Mass. line . 

Page, William Mass. line . 

Paine, Thomas Mass. line. 



Private. 
Private. 



Private. . 
Private. . 



Sergeant. . . j 
Private. . . . , 
Private. ... 
Private. ... 
Private &' 
Sergeant.. . 

Private i 

Private. ... 

Private 

Sergeant.. . 



Pallman. Peleg 

Palmer, Bezaleel.. . Mass. 
Palmer, Jenkins . . . Mass. 

Palmer, John Mass. 

Palmer, Xathaniel. . Mass. 
Palmer, Xathaniel. . Mass. 

Palmer, Sj.rak 

Palmer, Simeon. ... X. H. 

Palmer, Simeon 

Parcher, George. . . . Mass. 
Parker, Aaron Mass. 



D. Feb. 9, 1S33. 



Res. Unity. 



Lincoln.. 
Oxford . . 
Waldo . . 
Oxford. 

Oxford Res. Buckfield. 

Oxford ;d. Aug. 30, 1S25. 

Cumberland. 'Res. Minot. 

Kennebec. . . .d. ]\Iar. 6, 1S22. 

Kennebec. I 

Penobscot . . . d. :\ray 1S25. 

York. 



line, 
line 
line 
line 
line 



j Private. 
; Private. 

Private. 
, Private. 

Private. 



line ; Private. . 



line 
mil. 



Parker, Barnabas .. . Mass. 
'Parker, Benjamin.. . Mass. 



line 
mil. 



line 
line, 
line 



i Parker, Daniel Mj 

[Parker, Ebenezer. . . Mi 
Parker. Edmund. . Mj 

Parker, Fred G 

I Parker, Freegrove. . Mi 

I Parker, Josiah Me 

Parker, Josiah Mj 

Parker, Josiah.. . 
Parker, William ... Mi 
Parkhurst. George. . Mi 
Parkman, Daniel. . . M: 
Parlin, Ebenezer.. . . M: 

Parlin, Eleazer 

Parris, Josiah Mass. line . 



. I Private. . . . i 
. j Private. . . . | 

[Private • 

'Private &] 
iSergeant.. .■ 
,i Private. . . . 
Private.. . . 
[Private.. . . 



Lass, 
[ass. 

[ass. 



mil., 
line, 
line . 



Private. . . 
Private.. . 
[Private.. . 



Lass. 
lass 

[ass 



mil. 
line, 
line, 
line 



j Private. . . . • 
Private.. . .'■ 
Private.. . .! 

; Private I 



'40 Parris, Josiah 

'35d Parris, Samuel Mass. state 

'35d Parsons, Eleazer.. . . Mass. mil.. 

'40 ; 



! Private & 
'Sergeant.. . 



'35c 
'35c 
'3oc 
'40 

'3oc 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

'35e 



'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'3od 

•40 

'35d 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

•3.5d 

'35d 



Parsons, Josiah Mass. line. 

Parsons, Xathan ... Mass. line. 
Parsons, X'athaniel. 'X'. H. line. 
Parsons, Thomas B 



I Lieutenant 
|& Sergeant 
Private. . . . i 

Private. . . . 
Ensign .... 
Private. . . . 



Partridge, Da\-id . 
Partridge, Mary . . 

Patch, John 

Patten, Benjamin 

Patten, James Mass. line 

alias Underwood 

Edward 

Patten, X'athaniel. . Mass. line 



Mass. line Private. 



Mass. line Private 



Private. 



[Patterson, Adam. . . X*. H. line. 
Patterson, Alexander Mass. mil. 

[Patlfnon, Mnry 

j Patterson, William Mass. mil. 



Sergeant. 

[Private., 
i Private.. 

.1 



[Pattin, John Mass. line. 

' Paul, David Mass. line . 

'Paul, David 

'Paulson. X'athan. . . Mass. mil.. 
1 Payne, John Mass. mil., 



i Private & 
jSeaman . . . 
j Private. . . . 
[Private.. . . 



j Private.. . . . 
Private.. . . ' 



Somerset . . . . 

Waldo. 

Oxford. 

Lincoln 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Lincoln 

64 Lincoln 

78 Washington. 
80 Kennebec. 
76 Lincoln. 

76 Lincoln. 

80 Lincoln 

83'Kennebec. 
79lKennebec.. . . 
SliKennebec. . . 
75 Cumberland. 

81 Cumberland. 

77 Kennebec. 



d. Nov. 22, 1832. 



d. Jan. 9, 1821. 

Res. Pownal. 
Res. Bath. 



Res. Bremen. 

I Res. Windsor. 
Id.Apr. 16, 1831. 



Res. Standish. 



'^i? 



Kennebec. 

Lincoln.. . 

Somerset. 

Somerset. 

Hancock. 

Hancock. 

Somerset . 

Waldo. 

Somerset . 

Somerset . 

Lincoln.. . 

Somerset . 

Somerset . 

Franklin jRes. Freeman. 

Oxford. i 

Oxford iRes. Buckfield. 



d. in 1822. 



;Res. Bucksport. 



Res. X. Portland. 

d. Xov. 21, 1830. 
;d. Oct. 1824. 



'8 Oxford. 
'2 Oxford. 



Oxford Res. Buckfield. 

Lincoln d. Aug. 31, 1826. 

Penobscot. . . d. in 1824. 

Penobscot . 

Cumberland. Res. Portland 6th 

, Ward. 
Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 

York 

Somerset . . . 
Lincoln.. 



Res. Poland. 
;d. July 29, 1828. 
!Res. Solon. 



73 Penobscot. I 

79 Hancock. . . .Res. Penobscot. 

8.5 Hancock. . . . d. Feb. 8, 1827. 

81 Washington. 

90 Waldo , Res. Belfast. 

83 Lincoon. | 

68 Penobscot. . . d. Dec. 22, 1820. 

70 Lincoln. j 

79 Lincoln iRes. Lewiston . 

84 Somerset. . . .;d. Dec. 18, 1833. 



79 York. 



'B' 



r^^lp<''^ M: ,*Al 



158 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. 



Age, 



County. 



Remar.£s. 



'3oc 
'35c 
'35c 
'35c 
•40 

'40 

'3oc 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 

'35c 

•3od 

'3oc 

'40 

'40 



'35d 

'35d 

'40 

•35d 

'35c 

'35c 

'50 

•35d 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'40 

♦35d 

•40 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 

•35d 

'40 

'35d 

'35c 

•35d 

'40 

'35d 

•40 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 



Payne, William -Mass. line. 

Payson, Ephraim.. .'Mass. line. 

Payson, Samuel. . . Mass. line. 
i Payson, Samuel .... Mass. line . 
jPaysons, Samuel. . . | 



I Private.. 
[Private. . 
jCaptain. 
I Private. . 



iPeabody, Charles . . . ' 

Peabody, Seth ; Mass. line . 

I Pearce, James Mass. line . 

Pearcy, Stephen. . . . Mass. line. 

I Pearl, John 

j^earson, Mark Mass. line. 

j Pease, Samuel N. H. line. 

[Pease, Zebulon Mass. mill. 

i Pea%T. John S 

jPeavy, Winthrop. . . N. H. line. 
I Peck, George R. I. state. 

'Peck, Joshua Mass. line. 

Peebles, William W. Mass. mil.. 
I Pelton, Joel Mass. line . 

Pelton, Joel 

iPendexter, Thomas 



jSergeant.. 
i Private.. . 



i Private. 



(Private. 
Drum. maj. 
I Private. , 



I Pengree, Stephen. . . Mass. mil. 
iPenley, Joseph Mass. mil. 



Pennell, Joseph Mass. mil.. . 

Penney, John Mass. line. . 

; Penney, Salathiel. . . ^lass. line. . 

Penney, Salathiel. . . 

Penny, Benjamin... Mass. line. . 

Penny, Benjamin 

Perkins, Abner Mass. mill. . 

Perkins, Daniel Mass. state. 

Perkins, Ebenezer . . . 

Perkins, Enoch Mass. mil.. . 

I Perkins, James Mass. line. . 

Perkins, Joseph. . . . Mass. line. . 

Perkins, Me hi' able. .: 

Perkins, Oliver . . . 

Perkins, Pelatiah. . . Mass. mil.. . 



Private. 
Captain & 
Lieut. Col 
Private. . . 
Private. . . 
Private. . . 



Private. . . . 
Pvt. & Serg 

|Pt. &Crop. 
I Private.. . . 
I Private. . . . 



76 Somerset. '. 
SO Waldo. 

85 Lincoln d. June 19, 1S19. 

72 Lincoln.. 

79 Lincoln Res. Cushing. 

j Same as Paysoa 
44 Penobscot. . .Res. Dixmont'. 
70 Kennebec. . . d. Jan. 24, 1S2S. 
59 Lincoln. i 

84! Oxford. "■ 

41 i Oxford Res. Porter. 



Kennebec. 
York. 
York. 
Penobscot . 
Kennebec. 



d. Jan. 21, 1821. 



Res. Exeter. 



Washington. 
74 Kennebec. . 
69i Cumberland. 
78, Oxford. 

83l Franklin 

68 York 



Private. . 



Private. . 
Private.. 



Musician . . , 
Private. . . . i 
Private.. . . j 



Private. 



Per':in^, Sarah : 

Perkins, William .. . Mass. line. 

Perley, Daniel [Mass, mil., 

Perry, David jMass. mil.. 



Perry, James Mass. state 



Perry, Jesse Mass. line , 

Perry, Job Mass. mil. 



Perry, Joseph Mass. line . 



Perry, Reuben : Mass. line . 

Peterson, .\ndre\v.. .; Mass. line. 
Peterson, Joseph , . . i 



•35d Pettingall, Obadiah i Mass. line . 



•35d 
'35d 



'40 



'40 

'35c 

•40 

•35c 

•35d 

•40 

•35c 

'40 

'35c 



Pettingell, Matthew Cont. navy. 
Pettingell, William..! Mass. state 

{Pettingill, Obadiah. 

iPettingill, William. 



N. H.line 



I 

I Phelps, Samuel 

(Philbric, Nathaniel. 
Philbrook, David. .. i Mass. line . . 
iPhilbrook, William, i Mass. state. 



'Philbrook, William. 'Cont. navy 

\PhiUipi, Abigail. . . . | 

j Phillips, Ichubod . . . ! .Ma.ss. line . 



Private. . . . 
Pvt. of art. 
Pvt. of art. 

Pvt., Corp' 

& Serg 

Private. . . . ; 
Private. . . . , 

Private. . . . ' 

Private.. 
Private. . 



81 Oxford. 
78! Cumberland. 
83i Cumberland. 
87' Cumberland. 
74j Kennebec. . , 
81! Kennebec. 
83j Kennebec. . . . 
79: York. 

79, York 

72iLincoln. 

76' York 

83 Oxford 

72 Cumberland. 

63i Lincoln 

. .Oxford. 

70! Oxford 

42|York 

80 York. 

86iYork 

77|Oxford 

61 York. 

83 Cumberland. 

73! Lincoln. 

771 Lincoln 



Res. Madrid. 
(Res. Parsonsfield. 
See also Pindext- 
[ er. 



Res. Danville. 

Res. Waterville. 

Res. Wells. 

d. July 31, 1832. 
Res. Hebron. 



Pvt. & Serg 

Mariner. . . 
Private. . . . 



Private. 



Private.. 
Private. . . 



Marine. 
Private. . 



76!Oxford. 

75iWashington. 

68!LincoIn. 

75! Lincoln 

74!Lincoln. 

79 Lincoln 

69 Oxford. 
72 Oxford. 

57! Oxford 

I 
72; Kennebec. . . 

79' Kennebec. 
74 Kennebec. . 



78 Kennebec 
80! Kennebec. 



62 Oxford. . . 
47; Oxford. . . 
99 Kennebec. 
75 Waldo. 
80 Waldo... . 
77 Hancock. 
84 Oxford. . . 
55 Kennebec. 



Res. Paris. 

Res. Kennebunk. 



Res. York. 
Res. Oxford. 



Res. Richmond. 

d. Dec. 18, 1832. 
Res. Thomaston. 
Res. Thomaston. 



Res. Dixfield & 

Peru. 
Same as Pettingill, 

O. 

Same as Pettingill, 
W. 

Res. Leeds. Same 
I as Pettingall. 
!Res. Leeds. Same 
i as Pettingell. 



I Res. Roxbury. 
Id. Feb. 17, 1831. 

iRes. Thorndike. 
Id. Nov. 2, 1829. 
jRes. Turner. 



^^ 



#* 



REVOLUTIONARY PEXSIOXERS IN MAINE 159 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. 



Age. 



County. 



Remarks. 



•35c 

'35d 

'3od 

'40 

'3od 

'3ac 

'40 

'3od 

'40 

'40 

•3od 

'3oc 

'40 

'3oc 

'3oc 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'40 

'3od 

'35d 

'40 

'3oc 

'35d 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

'3od 

'40 

'35c 

'3oc 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

'40 , 

'35c i 

'40 ! 

'35c i 

'40 i 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'35c 

•35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 
'40 



64 Kennebec. 
S7 Penobscot. 
84 York. 

74 Oxford 

69 Oxford 

72 York. 



i Phillips, Jarius : Mass. line | Private. . 

Ph Hips, John Mass. line j Private. . 

Philips, Norton ^lass. line j Private.. 

Phillipa, Silence . . . .• j 

Phinney, Ithamar.. .Mass. line i Private. . 

I Phinney, John Mass. line j Private. . 

j Phinney, John j70to Cumberl'd 

I i i ISO 

Pickett, William. . . . Mass. line i Private. . . .\ 

j Pickett, William \ j 

Pierce, Abigail j j 

Pierce, Benjamin. . . Mass. state. . . . Private.. . .1 

1 Pierce, David Mass. line Private.. . .1 

'Pierce, Hannah i 

j Pierce, James Mass. line I ] 

:8th. Regiment. ! | 

j Pierce, John Mass. line Corporal. . . 1 

Pierce, Lemuel Mass. line Private.. . .j 

I Pierce, Nathaniel . . . Mass. state .... Private. . . . 

, Pierce, Nathaniel . . . | j 

! Pierce, Peace i j 

jPike, Dudley N. H. mil : Private 

Pillsbury, Joseph. . . Mass. mil Private.. . . 



69 York. 

76 Cumberland. 

60 Hancock. . . 

74 York. 

S3 Somerset. 

81! York 



Pindexter, Paul. 
Pinkham, Calvin 



Mass. line Private. 



Lincoln. 
72 York. 
64 Lincoln 

83 Penobscot . 
92 Penobscot . . . 

69 York 

71 Oxford. 

81 Cumberland. 

84 Cumberland. 
71 York 



Res. Turner. 



Res. Gorham. 

New Gloucester. 
Res. Sullivan. 



Res. So. Berwick 



d. Sept. 22, 1818. 

Res. Orrington. 
Res. Sou. Berwick 



R. I. line Private.. . .i 79 Lincoln. 



Pinkham, Nathaniel Mass. line Private.. . . 

I Piper, John Mass. line j Private. . . . 

I ; I 

Pitts, Seth : Mass. mil \ P^-t. & Serg 



i Pitts, Shubael ;Mass. state. . . .(Private 



Pittsbury, Nathan. . Mass. line |Private. . . 

Place, Anios Mass. line [Private. . . 

Plaisted, John Mass. line , Private. . . 

Plaisted. John Mass. line (Private.. . 

Plaisted, Lydia ' 

Plaisted, Roger I 

Plummer, Daniel. . -Mass. line | Private.. . 

Plummer, Daniel 1 

Plummer, Edward. . Mass. line I Musician. 

i Plummer, Edward. . j 

I Plummer, Isaac. . . .^lass. line ; Private. . . 

I Plummer, Isaac .... i 

'Plummer, John Mass. line (Private. . . 

I Plummer, John Mass. line .Private.. . . 

I Plummer, John ; 

Plummer, Joseph. . . Mass. line i Private. . . . 

IPlummer, William. . N. H. line iPrivate.. . . 

I Poland, Moses Mass. line ! Sergeant. . . 

I Poland, Seward. . . . Mass. line Private.. . . 

iPoleresky, John. . . . deLouzen's. . . . Corps Maj. 

'Pollard, Barton. ... N. H. line Sergeant.. . 

iPoIlard, .Jonathan... Mass. line Private.. . . 

; Pollard. Timothy... N. H, line Private 

Pompilley, Bennet . . Mass. line Private. . . . 

Pompilley. Bennet . . Mass. line jP\-t. &Serg 



82 Lincoln. 

73 Somerset. 

79 Somerset .... 
76 Kennebec. 
82 Kennebec. . . 
69 Kennebec. 

74 Kennebec. . . 

68 Lincoln.. 
78 York. 

78 Cumberland. 

75 Cumberland. 
72 Cumberland. 
86 York 

75 Cumberland. 

85 Waldo 

76 Kennebec. 

86 Kennebec. . . 

74 Cumberland. 
56 Piscataquis. . 
SO Oxford. 

76 Waldo. 

69 Waldo 

63 Cumberland. 
78 Cumberland. 

81 Oxford 

76 Lincoln 

71 L ncoln 

75 Kennebec. 
65 Cumberland. 

82 Somerset . . . - 

70 Oxford. 
74 C);sford 



Res. Scarborough. 
See also Pendexter 



Res. Madison. 
Res. Augusta. 
Res. Augusta. 



Res. Standish. 
Res. Buxton. 

Res. Palermo. 

Res. Albion. 

Res. Guilford. 

Res. Freedom. 



d. Jan. 28, 1821. 
d. June 19. 1831. 
d. June 8, 1830. 

d. May 6, 1824. 
d. in 1822. 



Pomroy, Joseph . . . . : 67 Penobscot 



1 Pool, Job 1 Mass. lii 



i Pool, Joshua I Mass. mil. 



Pool, Samuel : Mass. line . 

Pool, Thomas Mass. line. 

Poole, Abijah , Mass. line . 

Pope, Isaac j Mass. line . 

Porter, Benjamin J . ' Mass. line . 



Porter, Benjamin J. 
I Porter, Frederick. . 
j Porter, Mo.^es 

Porter, Nehemiah. . 



R. I. line. . 
Mass. line. 
N. H. line. 



Porter, Tyler ; Mass. mil . 



Private. . 
Private. 



71 Cumberland. 
76 Cumberland. 

73 Oxford. 

78 Oxford 

72 Kennebec. 

79 Cumberland. 
78 Kennebec. . 

74 York 



P\-t. &Serg. 
Sergeant.. . 
Lieutenant 
Captain. . . 
Surgeon's. . \ 

Mate 56 Lincoln 

' 77 Waldo 

Private.. . . 73 Kennebec. . . 
FJnsign. ... 82 Kennebec 
Private.. . .\ 76 Cumberland. 
83 Cumberland. 



See also Pumpilly. 
Res. Levant. 

Res. Falmouth. 

Res. Greenwood. 

d. Mar. 4, 1824. 
d. May 9, 1820 
d. June 1820. 

(35c Benj. Jones. 
Res. Camden, 
d. Sept. 1824. 



Private. 



70 Cumberland. 
83 Cumberland. 



Res. North Yar- 
mouth. 

Res. Sebago. 






,v;"'V'ya^- -ifi-sW 






i6o SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. 



iAge. 



County. 



Remarks. 



'40 

'3od 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

'3oc 

'35c 

'3od 

'3oc 

•3od 

'35d 

•40 

'35d 

'35c 

•40 

'35d 

'40 

•40 

•35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

•35d 

35d 

•40 

'40 

•35c 

•35d 

•35c 

'40 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 

•35d 

'35c 

•40 

'40^ 

'35d 

•40 

'35d 

'35c 

•40 

•35c 

'40 

•35c 

'40 

'35d 

•40 

'35d 

'35c 

•40 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

•40 

'35d 

•40 

•35d 

•35d 

'35d 



{Porter field, Cath'ine. \ 

jPorterfield, John. . ..Mass. line 

I Potter, Hugh i Mass. line 

1 Potter, Hugh 1 

I Potter, James [Mass, line 

Potter, James 

I Potter, Oliver (Mass, line 

j Potter, William. . . .Mass. line 
IPrastee. Jonathan. .iMass. line 
Pratt, Benjamin 
Pratt, Cushing. 
Pratt, Dan .... 



Private. 
Private. 



Private. 



Pratt, Elam... . 
jPratt,^ George. . 
I Pratt, George. . 
I Pratt, Joseph. . 
■ Pratt, Joseph. . 
[Pratt, Lydia. . . 
I Pratt, Seth 2nd. 
I Pratt, Seth. . . . 

Pratt, Solomon . 



Pratt, Thaddeus. 



Mass. line . 
Mass. line . 
R. I. state. 



Mass. mil. 
Mass. line . 



Private. . . . 

! Private 

lPvt.<i Serg. 

Private.. . . 

Private. . . . 

Private. . . . 

Pvt.& Serg. 
Private. . . . 



Mass. mil. 



Pvt. «fcSerg. 



Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 
Mass. mil. 

Mass. line . 

Mass. line. 

Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 



Pray, Abraham. 
Pray, Abraham. 
Pray, Peter. . . . 
Pray, Samuel. . . 
Pray, Sarah. . . 
Preble, Mary.. . 



Prentiss, Valentine. . Mass. line . 

Prescott, Nathan. . .|N. H. line. 

Prescott, Samuel. . . plass. line. 

Prescott, Samuel . . . 1 

Pribou, Amasa | 

Pride, John iMass. line. 

j Pride, Thomas plass. mil.. 

i Prince, Amory JMass. mil.. 

I Prince, Benjamin. . . 1 Mass. line. 

I 

I Mass. mil.. 



I Private. . . . 
; Private. . . . 
; Pvt. & Mat 

jross 

Private 

I Private.. . . 

|Pvt!«S:Serg. 
Private. . . . 



'Sergeant.. . 
iPvt. &Serg. 
i Private. . . . 



Pvt. &Serg, 
Private.. . . 
Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 



iPnVtce, Dinah.. . . 
iPritchard, James, 
i Procter, Josiah. . . 
I Proctor, Josiah Mass. mil. 



Mass. line. 



jPulcifer, Joseph. . . . 
jPulcifer, Joseph. . . . 

iPullen, Oliver 

;PulIen,OUver 

jPullen, William . . . . 
\PumpiLly, Elizabeth. 



Mass. line. 
R. I. line"! 



Mass. line . 



N. H. line. 
N. H. line. 



iPurham, Peter. . . . 

Putnam, Tamar. . . 
; Putney, James. . . . 
jQuimby, Benjamin. 
! Quint, John 1 .... 

Rackliff, Joseph. . . .jMass. line. 
I Radford, Benjamin. } Mass. line. 

,Ralf., Jeremiah i 

IRamsdeli. Ebenezer.l 

Ramsdell, James. . . jMass. line. 

Ramsey, Robert .... 

Rand, James 1 Mass. line . 

Rand, John i N. H. line . 

Rand, Michael |Mass. line. 

Rand, Reuben X. H. line. 

Rand, Thomas X. H. line. 

Randal, Caleb 



Private. 



Mariner & 
Seaman. . . 
Private. . . . 



Private. 
Private. 



Private. 



Pvt. (fcSerg. 
Private. . . . 



84iCumberland. 
76|Cumberland. 
70| Kennebec. 
78i Kennebec. . . 
781 Lincoln. 

88; Lincoln 

75' Washington. . 

77i Lincoln 

79 Lincoln. 
68i Kennebec. . . 
74i Cumberland. 
72 Oxford. 

79 Oxford 

82 Kennebec. 
70, Somerset. 

76i Franklin 

751 Kennebec. 
82 1 Somerset. . . . 

78 Somerset. . . . 
75 Hancock. 

71 Kennebec. 
80' Somerset . . . . 

79: Oxford. 

85l Oxford 

81 Kennebec. 

79 Kennebec. . . 
87|York. 

79] York. 

741 Somerset. . . 

651 Cumberland. 



Res. Westbrook. 



Res. Gardiner. 

Res. Bowdoin. 
d. Aug. 23. 1831. 
d. Aug. 11, 1S29. 

d. Sept. 8, 1825. 
d. May 14, 1S33. 

Res. Turner. 



Res. Salem. 

Res. Palmyra. 
Res. Bloomfield. 



d. Feb. 6, 1832. 

Res. Buckfield. 
Res. Hallowell. 



841 Kennebec. . 
75i Kennebec 
811 Kennebec 
83 Kennebec. . 

81 i Cumberland. 

82 Cumberland. 
70 Cumberland. 
81 Cumberland. 
77; Cumberland. 
83{ Cumberland. 

1051 York 

751 Waldo. 

79 Oxford 



711 Oxford 

80| Kennebec. 

75, Lincoln.. . . 

86 

78 

67 

67 



Waldo. 

Waldo 

Kennebec. 
Oxford 



Private. ... I 
Private. ... 1 



Private. ... I 



Private. . 
! Private. . 
I Private. . 

Private. . 

Private. . 



Randall, Job Mass. line . 

Randall, Oliver 

Randall, Samuel.. . . X. H. line. 
Randall, Stephen. . . .Mass. mil. 

Randier, Noah Mass. mil., 

i 



Private. 



Corporal. 
Private.. 
Private. . 



84 Penobscot.. 

74 Penobscot . . 

77 Kennebec 

75 Kennebec 

79 York 

69 Cumberland. 
72 Cumberland. 
82 Piscataquis. 

78 Washington. 

63 Washington. 

76 Washington. 

77 Cumberland. 

75 Lincoln 

64 York 

67 Kennebec. . . 
74 Lincoln. 

87 Kennebec. . . 

91 Oxford. 

79 Penobscot. . 

76 Kennebec 
75, York. 

72, York. 



] Res. Chandlerville 
Res. Portland 5th. 
i Ward. 
;d. Sept.4, 1822. 



Res. Hallowell. 
■Res. Minot. 



Res. Falmouth. 
Res. York. 

iRes. Waterford. 

•35c. 

d. Nov. 27, 1820. 
;Res. Bath. 

iRes. Palermo. 

; Res. Turner See 
j also Pompilly. 



Eddington.2 



Res. Sanford. 
d. Dec 15, 1828. 
d. May 20, 1820. 
Res. Abbot. 
Res. Lubec 
d. June 3, '29. 
Res. Charlotte, 
d. Oct. 18, 1827. 
d. Xov. 11, 1826. 
id. Sept. 1824. 
d. June 1, 1831. 

Res. Vassalboro- 
ugh. 



Res. Bangor. 



REVOLUTIOXARY PENSIONERS IN MAINE i6i 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. Age. j County. 



Remarks. 



'35c 

'AO 

'35c 

'35c 

•35c 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

'3oc 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

'40 

'40 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'3oc 

'35d 

'35c 

'40 

'35d 

'35c 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 
'40 

'40 

•3oc 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

'40 

'35d 

'35c 

'35d 

35d 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

'40 

•35d 



Rankin. Robert . . . . i Mass. line i Private. . . . i 

Ranking, Abigail ] j 

Rankins. Andrew. . . Mass. line Private.. . . 

Rankins, John Mass. line Sergeant. . . 

Rawlint:*, Joseph. . . Mass. line Sergeant.. . 

Ray, Eunice 

Raymond, Xathan.. Mass. state. . . .'Pvt. &Serg. 



Lincoln. ' 

Waldo '' Res. Lincolnville. 



Raymond. William. Mass. line. 

Raymond, William 

Rea, Benjamin Mass. mil. 



Private. 



Private & 
Corporal.. . 

Read, George Mass. state .... Private «fc 

1 Corporal. . ., 



York 

Kennebec. . 
Kennebec. 
Cumberland 
York. 

York Res. Lyman. 

Kennebec. 

Kennebec. . . Res. Fayette. 



d. June 11. 1829. 
d. May 1, 1828. 



Res. Otisfield. 



Read, John P 

Record, Abigail ! 

[Record, Jane i 

i Record, Jonathan.. . Mass. line Private. 



Record, Simon Mass. line Private.. 



Redington Asa Mass. state. 



Redlon, Ebenezer. - . Mass. 

Redlon, Ephraim. . . Mass. 
iRedlow, Matthias. . Mass. 

Reed, Abraham. ... N. H. 
iReed, Davad 

Reed, David, 2nd Mass. 

iReed, Jonathan. ... N. H. 

Reed, Josiah Mass. 

iReed, Ward Mass. 

) 

Reed, William W. . . . 

Reed, Josiah 

Remick, Phebe 

Remick, Samuel. ... X. H. 

Rendall, James Mass. 

Reynolds, Daniel. . . Mass. 

Reynolds, DaWd. . . Mass. 



line, 
line, 
mil. , 
line. 



Private & 
i Corporal. . . 

Private. ... 
Private. . . . 
Corporal. . 
Private.. . . i 



83! Hancock. 

75! Kennebec. 
SOJ Kennebec. 
46, Lincoln. . . . 

82 Oxford 

82 Oxford 

84 Oxford. 
90 Oxford .... 
81 Oxford. 
87, Oxford 



mil., 
line, 
line, 
line. 



Private. ... I 
Private.. . . [ 
Private. ... 
Private & 
1 Sergeant.. . : 



line. . 
line . 
line, 
line. 



Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Private.. . . 
Private.. . . 



Reynolds, DaWd. . . Conn, line Private.. 

Reynolds, Eliphalet Conn, line Private.. 



Rhodes, Jacob Mass. 

Rhodes, Jacob 

Rhodes, Moses. . . . Mass. 
Rhodes, Moses 



line, 
line. 



Riant, Thomas 

Rice, Ashbell 

Rice, David 

Rice, Gideon 

Rice, John 

Rice, Joseph 

Rice, Lemuel 

Rice, Luther 

Rich, Joel 

Richards, Bradley . . 

Richards, John 

Richards, Jonathan. 
Richards, Joseph 2d. 
Richards, Joseph . . . 
Richards, Mitchell . . 
Richards, Mitchell.. 
Richardson, Eben'er 
Richardson, Edward 



Mass. 
Cont. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
N. H. 
X. H. 
Mass. 
X. H. 
Mass. 
Mass. 



line. . 
navy, 
line. . 
mil.. . 
line . . 
line . . 
line. . 
line . 
line. , 
line, 
line, 
line. . 
line, 
line. 



Private. 



Private. 



72 Kennebec. 

78 Kennebec. . . 
76 Cumberland. 
74 York. 

84 Kennebec. 
94 Cumberland. 

74 Lincoln 

67 Lincoln. 

81 Cumberland. 

73 Cumberland. 

75 Penobscot. 

85 Penobscot . . 

79 Cumberland. 

73 Hancock. . . 
58 York. 

60 York. 

78 Kennebec. . 

75 Kennebec. 

82 Kennebec . . 
72 Washington. 

74 Washington. 

80 Washington. 
80 York. 

76 York 

78 York. 

74 York 



Private 

Mids'pm'n' 
'Private. . . . 
[Private.. . .i 
j Private. . . . ' 
j Private. . . . ; 
i Private. ... 
I Private.. . . 
I Ensign. ... 
(Private.. . . 
I Private. . . . 
I Private. . . 
1 Private. . . . 



Mass. 



'35d Richardson, James. . Mass. 

'35c Richardson, Joel.. . Mass. 

'35d Richardson, Joseph. Mass. 

'40 ,Richardi,on, Lydia 

'40 Richardson, Molly 

'35d Richmond, Xathan. Mass. 

'35c Ricker, George Mass. 



state . 
mil.. . 



Private. 



line, 
line . 



state, 
line. . 



Lieutenant 
& Captain.' 
Private & 
Seaman. . . 
Private.. . . 
Private. ... 



80 Franklin. . . . 

79 Washington. 

61 Cumb 

74 Cumberland. 

74 Kennebec. 
67 Kennebec. . 

72 Cumb 

73 Oxford 

81 Waldo. 

73 Kennebec. . 

80 York. 

73 Waldo. 

78 Somerset . 

75 York. 

74 Kennebec. 

81 FrankUn.. .. 
38 Hancock. . . 

86 Oxford. 



Res. Augusta. 
Res. Lewiston. 
Res. Buckfield. 
Res. Buckfield. 

Res. Buckfield. 

Res. Buckfield. 

Res. Waterville. 



d. July 15, 1832. 
Res. Boothbay. 



Res. Dixmont. 
Res. Freeport. 
Res. Eden. 



d. May 13. 1832. 
Res. Sidney. 

Res. Addison. 

Res. Lyman. 

Res. Waterbor- 

ough. 
Res. Farmington. 

d. Aug. 11, 1821. 



d. Sept. 11, '26. 
d. Jan. 16, 1827. 
d. Mar. 8, 1831. 

i.d. June 12. '21. 



Res. Temple. 
Res. Castine. 



Private. . 
Private.. 



81 Hancock. 

65 Lincoln ' d. Feb. 23, 1827. 

71 Cumberland. I 

82 Penobscot . . . Res. Xewport. 

87 Cumb Res. Baldwin. 

79 Kennebec. . .j 

81 York Id. Dec 25, 1833. 



m 



i62 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



List. 



Name. 



Rank. Age. County 



Remarks. 



'3od Ricker Matnrian X. H.line. 



'35d Ricker, Noah Cont. Na\'>'. 

'40 i 



•40 

•35c 

'35d 

'3oc 

'3od 

•35d 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 

•40 

'3oc 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

•35c 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'35d, 

••40 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

•35d 



•35d 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'3od 

1794 



•40 

'35c 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

•35d 

'40 

•35d 

'35c 

•35c 

'35d 



Ricker, Reuben. ... 

Ricker, Reuben. . . . Cont. Navy. 

Ricker, Simeon Mass. line . . 

Ricker, Stephen. . . . Mass. line. . 

Ricker, Timothy. . . Mass. mil.. . 

Ricker, Tobias N. H. line. . 



Ricker, Wentworth . N. H. line. 
Rideout, Benjamin. Mass. mil.. 

Rideout, Stephen 

Rider, John Mass. line . 

Rider, Stephen 

Ridley, Daniel Mass. line. 

Ridley, David Mass. line. 

Ridley, George Mass. line. 

Ridlow, Mary 

Ridout, Abraham.. . Mass. line. 
Ridout, Stephen. .. . Mas. line.. 

Rines, Samuel Mass. line. 

Ripley, Lucy 

Ripley, William. . . . Mass. line. 

Roach, Abigail 

Roach, John Mass. line. 

Robbins, Asa Mass. line. 



Private & 
Seaman. . 
Marine. . . . 



feeaman. 
Private.. 
Private.. 
Private. . 
Private. . 

Private. . 
Private. . 



74 York. 
72 York. 
78 York. . 



Private. . 



Private. . 
Private.. 
Private. . 



.Private.. 
Private.. 
Private. . 



Private. 



Robbins, Daniel 2nd Mass. line. 



Robbins, Daniel. . . 
Robbins, Eli.halet. 
Robbins, Jonathan. 
Robbins, Joseph . . . 
Robbins, Luther.. . 



Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 
N. H.line. 
Mass. mil. 



Robbins, Otis ' Mass. line . . 

Robbins, Samuel. . . N. H. line. . 
Robbins, William . . . Mass. line . . 
Roberts, George. . . . Mass. line. . 
Roberts, Jeremiah. . Mass. State. 



Roberts, Joseph . 
Roberts, Joseph 



Mass. line. 



Roberts, Joseph . . 

Roberts, Love iN. H. hne. 



Roberts, Paul I Mass. line. 



Roberts, Samuel. . . . 

Roberts, Simon 

Robinson, Andrew I. 
Robinson, .\ndrew. . 
Robinson, Daniel. . . 
Robinson, Deborah . 
Robinson, George... 
Robinson, James . . . 
Robinson, Jedediah . 
Robinson, Jedediah. 
Robinson, .John. . . . 
Robinson, John . . . . 
Robinson, .John. . . . 
Robinson, Joshua.. . 



N. H. 
N. H. 



line, 
line. 



Private. . . . 
Corporal . . 

Private . . . . 
Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Corporal . . 
Private.. . . 
Private & 
Quarter 
Master. . . . 
Private.. . . 
Private.. . . 
Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 

Private. . . . 
Carpenter. 



Private. 
Private. 



Private . . 
Seaman. 



Mass. line Private. 



Mass 
Mass 
Mass 



line, 
line, 
mil. . 



Private. . 
Private.. 
Private. . 



Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 



line, 
line, 
line, 
mil. 



'35d Robinson, Meshuck IMa.ss. state. 

•35d Robinson, Moses. . .iMass. mil.. . 

'40 \Robinson, Phebe . . . . | 

'35c i Robinson, Thomas. . '. Mass. line . . 



Private. . . . 
Private.. . . 
Private.. . . 
Private & 
Sergeant.. . 
Private.. . . 
Sergeant.. . 



Ensign. 



83 York 

65 Waldo. 
SO York. 

78 York. 
York. 

74 Oxford. 

80 Oxford 

81 Cumberland. 

79 Lincoln 

80 Lincoln 

70 Kennebec. 
79 Kennebec. . 

75 Lincoln.. 

72 Kennebec. 

57 Lincoln 

74 Kennebec. . 

76 York. 

74 Lincoln. 

76 York. 

75 Waldo 

67 Lincoln 

73 Franklin.. . . 
85 Kennebec. . 

75 Kennebec. 

81 Kennebec. . 

77 Kennebec. 
73 Kennebec 
73 Kennebec. 
73 Oxford. 

76 Kennebec. . 



Res. Waterbor- 

ough. 
Res. Lyman. 



Res. Buckfield. 

d. Aug. 3, 1833. 
;Res. Bowdoin. 

^Res. Albion. 



Id. Dec 31, 1818. 
iRes. Winsdor. 



Res. Montville. 
d. June 27, 1823. 
Res. Wilton, 
d. Aug. 22. 1828. 

Res. Winthrop. 



d. Aug. 7. 1825. 



76 Kennebec. 

77 Lincoln. 
75 Lincoln.. . 
59 Lincoln. 
72 Somerset. 
81 York. 

86 York 

75 Waldo. 



87 Waldo 

84 York. 

88; York 

74 York. 

78' York 

62 York. 

73 York 

84 Waldo 

75 Lincoln. 

86 Cumb 

77; York 

62 York 

66 Lincoln 

68 Kennebec. 

87 Kennebec. . 
81 Cumberland 
66 Cumberland 
58 York. 

81: Kennebec 
70 Penobscot. 
78 Waldo. 

72 Cumb 

79|Someraet. 



d. Oct. 28, 1832. 



Res. Lyman. 

Res. Berwick. 
Lost left arm on 
ship of war 
"Hampden" at 
Siege of Penob- 
scot Aug. 15, 
1779. 

Res. Brooks. 

Res. Lebanon. 

Res. Newfield. 

d. Oct. 5, 1832. 
Res. Searsmont. 

Res. Durham. 
Res. Limington. 
d. Mar. 13, 1819. 
d. Jan. 18, 1833. 

Res. Gardiner. 

d. Feb. 13, 1827. 



Res. Sebago. 



REVOLUTIONARY PENSIONERS IN MAINE 163 



List. 



Name. 



SerWce. 



Rank. Age. County. 



Remarks. 



'3oc 
'3od 
'35c 
•3od 
'3oc 
'3od 
"3od 

'35c 

'35d 

'3od 

'40 

'35c 

^35c 

'40 

'35d 

'35c 

'40 

'40 

'AO 

MO 

'3od 

"40 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

"35d 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

MO 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'3od 

'35d 
'35c 
"3od 
'40 

^AO 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 

'35d 
'35d 

|35c 

'35c 

'40 

•35d 

'40 

'35d 

•40 

'35d 

'35d 

•40 

'3oc 

•40 



Rockwood, Ebenezer Mass. line. 



Mass. mil. 

-Mass. line 

Mass. mil 

X. H.line 

Mass. line 

Mass. line 

(See Bogues). 

Mass. line 

Mass. line 



Rogers, Alexander. 
Rogers, Da\-id . . . 
Rogers, James.. . . 

! Rogers, John 

: Rogers, John 2nd. 
j Rogers, William. . 

Rogues 

IRolf, Jeremiah. . . 
jRolfe. Joseph. ... 

iRolings, Nathaniel.. Mass. mil '! 

; Rollins, Da%-id | • 

Rollins, Eliphalet . .. I Mass. line : 

Rollins, Jabez j X. H. line 

Rollins, Jabez ! | 

Rolhns. James ! Mass. mil \ 

Rollins, John ; R. I. line I 

Rollins, John i j 

Rollins, Joseph \ \ 

Rollins, Susannah.. . j 

Rose, Joseph j ! 

Ross, Isaac i Mass. line ! 



Private.. 
Private. . 
Private.. 
Sergeant. 
Private.. 
Private.. 
Private.. 

Private. . 
Private. . 
Private.. 



Private. . 
Private. . 



Private. 
Private. 



Ross, Jonathan jMass. mil. 



Private. . 
Private. . 



Ross, Joseph j Mass. line j Private. . 

Ross, Sarah j I ....... . 

Roundy, Benjamin. \ 

Rounds, Joseph. . . . Mass. mil. 
Rounds, Theodore. . Mass. line. 

Row, John Mass. line . 

Row, John X. H. line. 

Row, Webber X. H. line. 

Rowe, Caleb |Mass. Une. 

Rowe, John ; Mass. line . 

Rowe, John | 

Rowe, Lazarus X. H. line . 

Rowe, WiUiam X'. H. line. 

Rjwe, Zebulon iMass. line. 

Rowe, Zebulon ; 



I 

Private. ... I 
Private. ... I 
Private. ... 
Private.. . . < 
Private. . . .1 
Private.. . . 
Ensign. ... I 



Private.. 
Private. . 
Corporal. 



Rummery, Dom'c's.Mass. line Private of 

, ; i Artillery. 

Rumsdell, Ebenezer. Mass. line Private.. . . 

Rundle. Xathaniel.. R. I. Corps. . . .Private.. . . 
Runnells, Samuel. . . Mass. State.. . . Sergeant... 
Runnells, Thomas . . i . . . . 



Russell, Hannah. . . .[ j 

Russel, .A.ndrew .... ! 

Russel, 'Levi Mass. line ! Private. 

Russel, Solomon j 

Russell, Andrew. . . . Mass. line j Private. 

Russell, Benjamin. . Mass. state. . . .| Private. 



Russell, Cah-in. 



Mass. line Private. , 



Russell, Jonathan. 
Russell, Solomon . 
Russell, Solomon. 

Russell, William . . 
Ryant, Joseph. . . 



Mass. line Private.. . . 

Mass. line & . . . Private & 

Ma-ss. mil Sergeant.. . 

Mass. state. . . . Private.. . . 

X. H. line Private &| 

Mass. line do I 

Mass. line Private. . . . ' 

ne Private. ... I 



i Sadler, John . . . 

ISadler, John Mass 

Sadler, John ; 

Sampson, James .... Mass. line ■ Private. . . . 

I Sampson ■ 

Sampson, Luther. . . .Mass. mil Private.. . . 



Sanborn, .\bner. ... X. H. line Private.. 

Sanborn, Benjamin. X. H. line Private.. 



Sanborn, Benjamin. Mas 

2nd 

Sanborn, Hannah. ..'.... 



line 



Private. . . 



W Lincoln }d. June 1831. 

73 Lincoln. j 

74 York d. Apr. 1, 1S28. 

77 Lincoln. I 

75 Kennebec. ' 

69 Lincoln d. .\pr. 18. 1824. 

78 Lincoln. j 

74 Somerset. See Ralf. 

80 Kennebec. 

73 Kennebec. I 

65 Kennebec. .. Res. Pittston. 
. . Somerset. 

74 Kennebec. 

73 Kennebec. . . Res. Sidney. 

71 Lincoln. 

77 Kennebec. 

74 Kennebec. . . Res. Augusta. 

85 Kennebec. . . Res. Gardiner. 
87 Penobscot. . . Res. Cornith. 

78 York Res. Limington. 

77 Cumberland. 

84 Cumb Res. X'^o. Yarmouth 

86 York. 

91 York Res. Shapleigh. 

73 Cumb d. Feb. 2, 1827. 

82 Cumb Res. Brunswick. 

48 Kennebec. . . Res. Clinton. 

81 York. 

SO York. * - . 

77 Oxford. 

72 Kennebec 

71 York. 

66 Kennebec . . . d. July 1, 1821. 
60 Oxford. 

82 Oxford Res. Paris. 

108 Kennebec. 

82 Kennebec. 

85 Cumberland. 

91 Cumb Res. New Glouces- 
ter. 

70 W asliington. 

74 Washington. 

SO Lincoln d. Jan. 7, 1825. 

83 Washington. 

79 Cumb Res. Portland 7th 

Ward. 
82 Lincoln Res. Waldoboro'. 

81 Somerset .... Res. Madison. 

82 Lincoln. 

82 Somerset .... Res. Solon. 

76 Somerset . 

71 Oxford. 

76 Oxford Res. Xewry. 

72 Somerset . 

78 Somerset. . . . Res. Bingham. 

87 Kennebec... . Res. Winthrop. 
76 Cumberland. 

76 Cumberland. 
74 Oxford. 

78 Kennebec. 
72(;;'umberland. 

72 Lincoln. 

70 Lincoln Res. Georgetown. 

70 Cumberland. 

76 Cumb Res. Olisfield. 

74 Kennebec 

^t) Kennebec. . . Res. Readtield. 

88 York. 

72 Washington. 

78 Washington. . Res. Cherryfield. 

70 Cumberland. 

77 Cumb. . . Res. Minot. 



i64 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. Age. County. 



Remarks. 



'35c 
•35c 
'35d 



•40 

'35c 

'3oc 

'35c 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

'40 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

'40 

'35d 

•35d 

•40 

'35d 

'35d 

•40 

'40 

'35d 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 



Sanborn, John 2nd. . i Mass. line . 

Sanborn, John I .Mass. line . 

Sanborn, Matthew.. X. H. line. 



Private. . 
Private. . 
Private 
Sergeant. 



Sanborn, Matthew P 

Sanborn, Paul Mass. line, 

Sanborn, Peter I Mass. line 

Sanborn, Simon. . . .|Mass. line. 

Sanburn, John i 

Sanderson, Rufus. . .Mass. line. 



I Private. 
Private. 
Private. 



Private. 



Sanford, John 

Santell, John j 

Sargeant, Charles. . . ; Mass. line. . 
Sargeant, Daniel . . | Mass. line. . 
Sargeant, P. DudleyMass. line. . 
Sargent, Benjamin . . Mass. line. . 

SargenU C harify. . . .' . . 

Sargent, Charles. . . . ' 

Sargent, Chase i Mass. state. 



X. H. line. 
Mass. mil.. 
Mass. line. 



: Private. . 
Private. . 
Colonel. 
Private.. 



Sargent, Daniel 2nd 

Sartell, John 

Sautell, Jonas 

Savage, Elijah D 

Savage, Jacob 

Savage, Sarah 

Sawtellc, Eunice 

Saw>er, Barnabas. . 

Saw>'er, Ebenezer. . . 
Sawyer, George . . . . 



Sawyer, 
Sawyer, 
Sawyer, 
Sawyer, 
Sawyer, 
Sawyer, 
Sawyer, 
SawT^r, 
Saw>'er, 
Sawj-er, 
Sawyer, 
Sawyer, 
Sawyer, 



■Private. 

I Private. 
I Private. 
Private. 



Cont. navy. 
Mass. mil. . . 



Mariner. 



Mass. line. 



Private & 
! Fifer. . . . 
i Private. . . . 



ilass. line. 



Isaac Mass. m.il. . 

Jabez 

Jacob I 

Jacob I Mass. mil.. 

John I Mass. line. 

John I ^lass. mil. , 

John 

Josiah plass. line. 

Luke jMass. mil.. 

Solomon. . . Mass. mil. 



j Private & 
Sergeant.. . 
Private 



j Private. . . . 
! Corporal. . 
: Private. . . . 



Thomas. 
William. 
William. 



•35d jSayer X'athaniel. . 
'35d Say ward, George . 



Sayward, Susan. 



'40 

'35d 

'35d 

'35d 

•40 

•40 

'35c 

'35c 

•35c 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 

•35d 

•40 

•35d 

'40 

'35c 

•35d 

'40 

'40 



Mass. line. 



Private. . . . 
Private.. . 
Private.. . . 
Private 



Mass. mil. 
Mass. line. 

Mass. line, 
Mass. mil. 



: Private & 
Surgeon's. . 

j Aiate 

Private. . . . 
Lietuenant. 

jof Artillery 



Scales, Samuel Mass. mil.. 

Mass. line. 
Mass. mil.. 



'.Schwartze, Peter. 
jScribner, Stephen. . 
{Scriggins, Thomas. 
I Scales, Samnet. . . . 
jSears, Barnabas. . . 

jSears, Willard 

jSeates, John 

jSeavy. Ebenezer.. . 
iSeavy, Thomas. . . . 



Sea well. Thomas. 
Sedgeley, John. . 
Sedgeley, John. 
Seger, Xathaniel. 



Selsby, Samuel. 
Senter, .A.bel . . 
Senter. Sal y . . . 
Servall, Henry. 



Private. 
Private. 
Private. 



Mass. line. 
X. H. line. 
Mass. line. 



Private. . 
Private. . 
Private. . 



X. H. state. 



Mass. mil. 
Mass. mil. 



Private < 
Teamster. 
Private. . . 
Private.. . 



Mass. line Private. 



Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 



Private. 
Private. 



92 Cumb 

76 Cumberland. 

72to 

77 Somerset. 

81 Somerset . . . 

72 Cumberland. 

75 Cumb 

73 Oxford 

50 Waldo 

76 Somerset. 

82 Somerset . . . 

80 Lincoln 

81 Waldo 

73 York. 

67 York 

Hancock. 
70 Penobscot. 

76, York 

86 York 

791 York. 

83 York 

eilCumb 

75; Waldo. 

62 Somerset. 
52; Kennebec. . 
681 Somerset . . . 

77 Hancock. . . 

82 Penobscot . . 



d. Jan.4, 18,32. 



Res. Solon. 

d. .\ug. 6, 1S27. 
Id. Xov. 25, 1S33. 
I Res. Monroe. 

Res. Mercer. 
Res. Bath. 
Res. Camden. 

d. in 1827. 



Res. Kittery. 
Res. So. Berwick. 



York. 
York. 
Somerset . 



76 

75! Cumberland. 

72 York 

92] Penobscot. . . 
86, Kennebec. 
74. Cumberland. 
75{ Cumberland. 

75 Cumb 

7li Washington. 
74! Somerset. 
77; Cumberland. 

75! Cumb 

77 Kennebec. . . 



71! Kennebec. 
75! York. 



81! Lincoln. 
87i Waldo.. 



70| Cumberland. 
77! Lincoln. 

75 Kennebec. 

76 York 

Sl'Cumb 

86 Somerset . . . . 
82 Kennebec. . 
82 York. 

53, Oxford 



,Res. Cornish, 
id. .\ug. 16, 1821. 

I 

I Res. Augusta, 
id. Xov. 7, 1826. 
I Res. Mt. Desert. 
Res. Corinna. 



Res. Smithfield. 
do. 



jRes. Buxton. 
Res. Dixxuont. 



Res. Westbrook. 



d. April 11, 1833. 
Res. Greene. 



Residence Waldo 
Plantation. 



!Res. Elliot. 

jRes. Freeport. 

'd, June 29, '21. 

Id. Dec. 13, 1831. 

j 

iRes. Bloomfield. 



69| Hancock. 
83 Kennebec. . 
75 Lincoln. 

80 Lincoln 

79 Oxford. 

85; Oxford 

68| Hancock ... 
76; Cumberland. 

76jCumb 

871 Kennebec. . 



Id. May 4, 1833. 
Res. Bowdoinham 



Res. Bethel, 
d. Feb. 10, 1826. 

Res. Xaples. 
Res. Augusta. 



:/>-.■'..-■; .i^^rr 



:^ui^^ 1 ' r 






REVOLUTIOXARY PEXSIOXERS IN MAINE 



165 



List. 



Name. 



S<^rvice. 



Rank. Age. County. 



Remarks. 



'35c 

'3oc 

'40 

•3od 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'35e 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 

'35d 

'35c 
•35c 
'40 
'35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'35d 

'40 
•35d 

'35d 

'35d 
40 
'35c 
'40 

'35d 
'40 
'35d 
'35c 
'35c 
'35c 
'40 
'35d 
'35d 
'35d 
'40 
'35c 
'35c 
'40 
'35c 
'40 
'35c 
'35c 
'40 
'35c 
'35d 
'35d 
•35d 
'40 
'40 
'35d 
'35c 
'35d 
'35d 
•40 
•35c 
•35d 
35d 
•35d 

'35d 
'35c 



Sessions, David. ... N. H. line. 
Severance. Caleb. . . Mass. line. 

Severance, Elizabeth 

Severance, Joshua. . Ma.ss. line. 
Sevev, Eliakim ; Mass. line . 



Sergeant. 
Private. . 



69iCumberland.'d. Sept. 22, 1824. 
79 Penobscot. 



, Sewall, Dummer Mass. line. ... 

Sewall, Henry Mass. line .... 

i ;X. H. line. . . . 

I 1 2nd. Regiment 

Shackford. Samuel 

Shackley, Joseph. . 

Shattuck, James 

Shaw, Abraham. . . . Mass. line. 



Private. . 
Private. . 



Private. . 
Captain. 



69 Penobscot. 
7S Penobscot. 
71 York. 

77 York 

74 Kennebec. 
67i Kennebec. 



Ma*s. 



>haw, Benjamin. . . 

*havs-, Eliab 

>haw, Elisha 



Mass. line. . 
Mass. line . . 
Mass. state. 



Shaw, Ephraim Mass. line. 

Shaw, George Cont. navy 



Shaw, Jacob Mass. line . 



Shaw, Jairus. 
Shaw, James. 
Shaw, John. . 
Shaw, John. . 
Shaw, Joseph . 

Shaw 



Mass. mil. , 
Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 

Mass. mil. 



Private.. . . 

Private. . . . 

Ensign. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Sergeant & 
Ensign. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Mariner. . . 

. Private. . . . 

1 Private. . . . 
i Ensign. . . . 
I Private. . . . 

I 

I Private & 
j Seaman. . . 



. . I Kennebec. 
79, York 

70 York. 

83 Lincoln . . . . 

71 York. 

71iYork 

SO Washington. 
76 Kennebec . 

76 Kennebec. 
83 Kennebec. 
SO Penobscot. 
861 Penobscot. . 
60. Kennebec. . . 

79' Oxford. 
76; Kennebec. . 
741 Lincoln. 
SSl Lincoln 



Res. Orrington. 
I 
I Res. York. 

Res. Sanford. 
Res. Westport. 
Res. York, 
d. Apr. 24, 1833. 



Res. Exeter. 

d. Aug. 29, 1820. 



d. April 1822. 
Res. Woolwich. 



Shaw, Levi. 



Shaw, Nathaniel. 
Shaw, Nathaniel. 



Shaw, Nathaniel. 
Shaw, Polly 



N. H. mil... 
Mass. state . 
Mass. mil. . . 
Mass. line. . 



Private & 
Corporal. . . 
Private & 
Sergeant. . . 
Private. . . 

Private. . . . 



72 j Cumberland. 

78jCumb Res. Cumberland. 



7oi Cumberland. 



Shaw, Samuel Mass. state. . . . ! Private. 



S9i Oxford. 
71 i Oxford. 

761 Oxford 

59| Cumberland. 
77,Cumb 



Shaw, Thomas . 
Shaw, William . 
Shean, Richard. 
Shed, Daniel. . . 



Shed, John 

Shed, Jonathan.. . , 
Sheldon, Ephraim. 



Ma.ss. line . 
Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 
Cont. navy 

Mass. line . 
Mass. line. 
Mass. mil.. 



Sheldon, William. . 
Shepherd, James . . 
Shepherd, Levi. . . . 
Shepherd, Lewis.. . 
Shepherd, Mary. . . 
[Shepherd, William. 
Sheppard, Levi. . . . 

Sherburn, Job 

•Sherburne, Job. . . . 
Sherman, Isasac. . . 
Sherman, Joseph. . 
Sherman, Nathan.. 



Mass. line. 
iMass. line. 



Private. . . 
Private.. . 
Private. . . 
Seaman. . 

Private. . . 
\ Private. . . 
I Private. . . 

\ Private. . . 
Private. . . 



Mass. line Private.. 



Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 



Private. 
Private. 



N. H. line 
Ma.s5. mil. 
Mass. mil. 
Mass. mil. 



Private. . . 
! Private. . . 

Private. . . 
: Private. . . 



jShorey, Samuel.. . . 
Shuckford, SamueL 
Shurt'itf, William.. 

Sias, John 

Sidgeley, Joseph . . . 
Silley, benjamin.. . 
Silly, Benjamin.. . . 
Silvester, Thomas.. 
Simons Ichabod. . . 
Simmons. Isaac. . . 

Simmons, Lebbeus. 
Simmons, Samuel . 



Mass. mil.. 
Mass. line. 
N. H. line. 
R. I. State. 



Private. . 
Private.. 
Private. . 
Private. . 



Mass. line. 
Ma-ss. line. 
Mass. line. 
Ma.ss. line . 

Mass. line. 
Conn. line. 



Private.. . . | 
! Private.. . . j 

Private.. . | 
j Private Of, 
'inf. &Cav.; 
j Private. . . . j 

Corporal. . 



77! York. 

831 York 

80 Cumberland. 

90 York 

77 Cumb 

73 Penobscot. 
77 Penobscot. . 

71 i Kennebec. 
73 Oxford. 
70 Waldo. 

75 Waldo 

73 Lincoln 

57 Lincoln. 

76 Kennebec. . 
90 Cumb 

79 Lincoln 

60 Lincoln 

81 Kennebec. 

82 Kennebec. . 

76 Kennebec. 
78' York. 

77 Waldo. 

72 Lincoln. 

78 Lincoln 

47 Kennebec. . 

73 York. 

68 Cumb 

77 Oxford. 

78 Lincoln. 

73 Waldo 

73 Waldo. 

75 Cumberland. 

72 Somerset . . . 

72 Lincoln. 

80 Waldo. 

79 Oxford. 



Res. Turner. 



Residence Port- 
I land 5th. Ward. 



Res. Sanford. 



:d. in 1822. 
d. Mar. 31, 1820. 



Res. Brewer. 



Res. Camden, 
d. Sept. 26, 1831. 

Res. Pittston. 
d. Nov. 28, 1822. 
Res. Jefferson, 
d. in 1824. 

Res. Readfield. 



Re.s. Thomaston. 
Res. Sidney. 

d. July 3. 1825. 
Res. Brooks, 
d. Jan. 12, 1833. 



y.lKi\y'd':n'if.h.b 



i66 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



List. 



N.VME. 



Service. 



Rank. jAge. County. 



Remarks. 



'3oc 

'3od 

'40 

'3oc 

•35d 

•40 

•35c 

'40 

'35c 

•35d 

•40 

'35c 

'35d 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

'40 

'40 

'35d 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 



Simonton, Walter.. . Mass. line. 
Simpson, Benjamin. Mass. line. 

Simpson, Lucy . . . , 

Simpson, Simon. . . . Mass. line. 
Simpson. Zedekiah.. Mass. state. 

Simson. Simon 

S'nclair, Joshua. ... X. H. line. . 

Sinclair. .Joshua . . . . 

Skinner, Elisha Mass. line. . 

Skinner, John Mass. line. . 



Private. 
Private. 



Private. 
Private. 



Private. 



Small, Daniel 3rd.. . Mass. line. 

Small , Daniel Mass. line 

Mass. mil.. 

Small Daniel Mass. line . 

Small, Daniel 2nd... Mass. line. 



Surgeon. 
Sergeant. 

Private. . 

Private. . 
Private. . 
Private. . 



I Small, Daniel. 

iSmall, Elisha Mass. line. 

i Small, Elisha 

'Small, Eli^abe-.h. ... 

j Small, Ephraim 

jSmall, Ephraim Mass. state. 

iS trail, Henry Mass. line... 

Small, James Mass. line . . 



Private. . 



Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Sergeant.. . 



'35c 'Small, Jeremiah. . . . Mass. line. . 

'35d Small, Samuel. . . . . . Mass. state. 

'40 

'35d Small, William Mass. mil. 



Private. 
Private. 



Private & 



'35c I Small, Zachariah. 

'35.C Smart, Richard. .. 

'35d Smith, Abraham. . 

'40 jSmith, Abraham. . . . i 

'35d Smith Benjamin, ... Mass. line . 



Mass. 1 ne. 
N. H.Iine. 

Xass. mil. 



Sergeant. 
! Private.. 
' Private. . 
i Private. . 



'40 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 



1 Private & 
I Sergeant.. . 



Smith, Charles 2nd..; Mass. line : Private. 



Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
|Smith, 
Smith, 
ISmith, 
; Smith, 
Smith, 
\ Smith, 

Smith, 
Smilh, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
■Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 



Charles Mass. line . . 

Daniel Mass. state . 

Daniel ! N . H . line . . 

David X. H. line. . 

David 

Doniinicus . . . Mass. line . . 
Ebenezer. . . . ] Mass. line . . 
Ebenezer. . . . ; Mass. line . . 
Elizabeth. . . . i 



Private. . 
Private. . 
Private. . 
Private. . 



Private. . 
Private. . 
Captain. 



Ephraim ..; Mass. line. 

Hannah ! 

Heman Z^Iass. line. 

Isaac ' Ma.ss. line . 

Jacob j Mass. line . 

James Mass. line . 

Jaziel :R. J. line. .. 

Jeremiah. . . . X. H. line. 

Jesse ; Mass. line . 

John 4th. . . . [Mass. line. 
John : Mass. line . 



'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 ' 1 

'35c Smith John 1st j Mass. line . 

'35d Smith, John I Mass. line . 

'35d Smith, John 2nd.. . . -Mass. line. 

'35c Smith, John 3rd. ... Mass. line. 

'35c iSmith, John K Mass. line. 

'40 Smith, John K. 



i Private. . 



35e Smith, Kilby. 



35d Smith, Jonathan. . 

I 



. Sergeant.. . 
. Private. . . . 

Private.. . . 
. Private.. . . 
. Private. . . . 

Private. . . . 
. Private. . . . 
.Private.. . . 
.; Private &i 
IFife Major. 

Private. . . . 
Private. ... 
Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Captain. . . 



Mass. line. 



Mass. mil. 



6th. Regi- 
ment Cap- 
tain 

Sergeant.. . : 



I I 

iCumb Id. in 1826. 

York !d. Feb. 9, 1 833. 

I York Res. Elliot. 

Kennebec. 

d. Jan. S, 1S33. 
Res. Winslow. 



York 

Kennebec. 
Waldo. 
Penobscot. 
Penobscot . 
Lincoln. 

Lincoln Res. Lewiston. 

Cumb d. Feb. 21, 1S21. 



Res. Old Town, 
d. X'^ov. 1827. 



7^1 Washingtom. 
SO Cumberland. 

75 York. 

80 York 

76 Cumb 

78 'Cumberland. 
82; Washington. . 

SljYork 

811 Lincoln 

74 Kennebec. . . 
63 York. 

77 Cumberland. 
83, Cumb 



Res. Limington. 
Res. Raymond.. 

Res. Cherryfield. 
Res. Limington. 
Res. Baldwin. 



84 Cumberland. 

77; Lincoln. 

83' Lincoln 



Res. Scarbor- 

ough. 



75 York 

56 Cumberland. 

71 Hancock. . . 

72 Kennebec. 
78 I'ranklin.. . . 



78 Waldo. 

83 Waldo 

79 Waldo. . 

85 Waldo 

66 Lincoln 

72 Washington. 

67 Kennebec. . 

74 Hancock. 
42 Kennebec. . . 
79 \ork. 

75 Kennebec. . 
75 Lincoln. 
85i\ork 



82 Cumberland. 

731 Waldo 

73 Lincoln 

69 Lincoln. 

73 York. 

76 York. 

72 Kennebec. 

80 Cumb 

69 Penobscot. . 

81 Hancock. . . 

77 Kennebec. 

83 Kennebec. . . 

74 Cumberland. 
74 Cumberland. 
74 Cumberland. 
72 
68 



Res. Phipsburg. 

d. May 1827. 
Res. Farmington. 

Res. Hope. 

Res. Belfast. 

d. Dec. 17, 1831. 

d. Aug. 24, 1824. 

Res. Readteld. 

d. Sept. 1822. 

Res. Waterbo- 
rough. 

Res. Belfast, 
d. Jan. 7, 1820. 



d. Aug. 12, 1832. 
d. Xov. 22. '29. 
d. Jan. 7, 1828. 



Res. Wayne. 



86 



Hancock. . . 
Cumberland. 

Cumb Res. Portl'd 

Ward. 



Id. May 11, 1824. 
ith. 



. . .! Cumberland. 

76! Somerset. . . 



d. June 14, "33. 



REVOLUTIONARY PENSIONERS IN MAINE 167 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. 



Age. 



County. 



Remarks. 



'40 

'40 

'Sod 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'3oc 

'3oc 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

•40 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 

'35c 
'35c 
'35e 
'35d 
'35c 
•35d 
40' 
'35c 
'40 
'35c 
'35c 
'35e 
'40 
35 c 
'35c 
'35c 
'40 
'35d 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 
1794 



Smith, Josiah 

Smith, Ju-!i'h ! ! 

Smith, Laban Mass. line Private. . . . | 

Smith, Laban | 

Smith, Moses Mass. line Private.. . .| 



Smith, Nathan. . . 
Smith, Nathaniel. 

Smith, Noah 

Smith, Peleg 

Smith, Peter 2nd. 
>mith, Rowland. 



N. H. line Private.. 

N. H. line Private.. 

Mass. line Private. . 

Mass. line Private. . 

Mass. line Private.. 

Mass. line Private.. 



Smith, Samuel Mass. line Sergeant.. 



Smith, Samuel Mass. line Private. . . 



Mass. mil Private.. . 



Smith, Samuel. 

Smith, Sarah 

Smith, Stephen Mass. line Private.. 

Smith, Thomas ^Nlass. line Private 

Sergeant. 

Smith, William >ra33. line Private. . 

Smith, William Mass. line Private. . 

Smith, William Mass. line Sergeant. 

Snell, Thaddeus. . . . Mass. line Private.. 

Snow, Aaron R. I. line Private.. 

Snow, Harding Mass. line Private.. 



line Private.. 



77 Oxford 

79 Kennebec. . 

74 Oxford 

79 Kennebec. . . 
74 Waldo. 

81 Waldo 

69 Kennebec . 
76 Kennebec. . 

73 York 

83 Lincoln 

74 Cumberland. 
71 Kennebec. 
85 York. 

91 York 



Snow, James Mass. 

Snow, James 

Snow, James Mass. 

Snow, Joshua Mass. 

Snow Joshua N. H. 

Snou-deul. Elizabe'h 

Sommers, Jonathan Mass. 

Soul, James Mass. 

Soule, Asa Mass. 

Soule, James 

Soule, Jesse Mass. 

Soule, .Jonathan. . . . Mass. 



line, 
line. 



Sergeant. 
Sergeant. 
Sergeant. 



line, 
line, 
line. 



Corporal. 
Private. . 
1 Private. . 



76 Waldo. 

82 Waldo. 
75 York. 
73 Waldo . 

83 Waldo. 



81 Lincoln. 

74 York 

e4 York. 

York. 
77 Kennebec. 

80 York. 

79 Penobscot. 

84 Penobscot . . . 
SO Cumberland. 
87 Cumb 

75 Cumberland. 
59 Cumberland. 

. . . Cumberland. 

75 Lincoln 

67 Cumberland. 

81 Cumberland. 
70 Penobscot. 

85 Cumb 



state. - . . Private 

I Mariner, 
mil Private. . 



Sourcee, Francis .... N. H. line Private. . 

Southard, Abraham Mass. line Private.. 

Southart. Constant. Mass. line Private.. 

Soward, Richard.. . . N. H. line Private.. 

Spalding, William. . Mass. line Private.. 

Sparks, David Mass. line Private.. 

Sparrock or Spar- i 

I hawk, Jacob Mass. line Private.. 

jSpaulding, Eleazer. . .Mass. line Private.. 

Spaulding, Ezekiel.. 7th. Mass. regt Sergeant. 



75 York. 
78 Cumoer'and. 
84 Cumberland. 
67 Kennebec 
78 Kennebec. 
63 Somerset . . . 

92 York 

75 Somerset. 
75 Lincoln 



Res. Buckfield. 
Res. Winthrop. 

Res. Mt. Vernon. 

Res. Prospect, 
d. Aug. 25. ]S.^2. 
d. May 2 1833. 
d. Dec. 3, 1829. 
d. June 12, 1832. 



iRes. Kennebunk- 
port. 

I Res. Monroe. 

1 

Res. Knox, 
d. April 1828. 



Res. Hampden. 
Res. Scarborough. 

1 
I 

iRes. Thomaston. 
Res. Freeport. 
Res. Freeport. 



d. March 1826. 
d. Oct. 6, 1832. 



d. Mar. 6, 1820. 



69 Kennebec. 
77 Penobscot. 



Mass. line Private. 



Spaulding, Joseph. 
Spaulding, Josiah. 
Spaulding, Josiah. 



Spaulding, Samuel. . N. H. line i Private. 



'40 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

'35c I Spencer, Solomon 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 



Spaulding, William. 

Spearing, John . 

Spencer, Elean.cr 



. N. H. line Private. 



79 Penobscot . 
84 Somerset. 
79 Somerset . 

71 Waldo. 

76 Waldo 

82 Somerset . , 



'40 
'35d 



Mass. line i Private. ... 

Spencer, Thomas . . . Mass. line Private. ... 

Spencer, William . . . Mass. line Private. . . . 

Spinney, Caleb N. H. line Sergeant.. . 

Spinney, Caleb Mass. state. . . .Corporal <!t 

I Sergeant.. . 

Spinney, Hanna h ; 

Spinney, Jeremiah. . Mass. line ^Private of 

1 Artillery. . . 



67 Waldo... 
75 Cumb. . . 

72 Somerset , 
69 York. 

73 York. 
95 York. 

84 York. 
86 York. . . . 



Res. Georgetown, 
Injured 1777, 
loading a wagon 

Res. Dixmont. . . . 

Res. Norridge- 
wock. 

Res. Frankfort. 
Res. Norridge- 

wock. 
d. Nov. 9, 1831. 
iRes. Baldwin. 
I 



Res. Elliot. 



74 Lincoln. 



7y,..; , ,q. 






l/Jirnj^Vi''' f"$ 



■i Wl" 



i68 SPR.\GUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



List. 


Name. 


Service. 


Rank. 


Age.! County. 


Remarks. 


'40 


, 






77 


Lincoln 


Res. Georgetown. 




•3od 


Sprague, James 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


95 


Oxford. 




'35c 


Sprasue, John 


Mass. line 


Private 


(i7 


Kennebec. . . 


d. Jan. 4. 1821. 


35d 


Sprague, Samuel.. . . 


Mass. line 


Private 


81 


Somerset. 




'3od 


Sprague, William. . . 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


68 


Lincoln. 




'40 








73 


Lincoln 


Res. Phipsburg. 




'3oc 


Sprague, "^Uliam. . . 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


61 


Kennebec. 




'3oc 


Spring, Josiah 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


75 


Oxford. 




'35d 


Spring, Seth 


N. H.line 


Private.. . . 


SO 


York. 




•35d 


Spring. Thomas. . . . 


Mass. mil 


Private. . . . 




Oxford. 




'3od 


Springer, John 


Mass. mil 


Private. . . . 


75 


Lincoln. 




•3od 


Springer, John 


Mass. mil 


Private 


72 


Hancock. 




'40 


Sprcul, Jean 






78 


Lincoln 


Res. Bristol. 


'3od 


Sproul, Robert 


Mass. mil 


Private 


79 


Lincoln. 




'35d 


Sproul, WiUiam .... 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


74 


Lincoln. 




'35d 


Spurr, Enoch 


Mass. line 


P\t. & Ser. 


73 


Cumberland. 




'40 








79 


Cumb 


Res. Otisfield. 




'40 


Stacey, Eunice 






80 


Yorl- 


Res. EUiot. 


'35d 


Stackpole Absalom.. 


Mass. state 


Private 


82 


York. 




'40 


Stacpole, Absalom. . 






88 


York 


Res. No. Berwick. 


'35c 


Stacy, John 


X. H.line 


Private.. . . 


80 


York. 




'3oc 


Stacv, Wilham 


Cont. navy .... 


Seaman. . . 


76 


York. 




'3oc 


Stanford, John 2nd. 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


77 


Lincoln. 




'35c 


Stanford, John 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


73 


Cumberland. 




'40 








77 


Cumb 


Res. Cape E'zab'h 




'35d 


Stanley, Adin 


Mass. line 


Private & 


80 










Mass. state 


Matross . . . 


73 


Kennebec. 




'40 








78 


Kennebec. . . . 


Res. Winthrop. 




'3oc 


Stanley, James 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


71 


York. 




'35d 


Stanley, Nathaniel.. 


Mass. mil 


Corporal. . 


79 


Washington. 




'35d 


Stanley, Real 


Mass. mil 


Drummer& 
& Fifer.... 


76i Kennebec. 




'40 


Stanley, Rial 






80 Kennebec 


Res. Winthrop. 


'35d 


Stanton, Paul 


Mass. mil 


Private. . . . 


76'Cumberland. 




'40 








82iCumb 


Res. Poland. 




'35c 


Stan wood, Daniel. . . 


Mass. line 


Lieutenant 


82' Lincoln. 




'35c 


Staples, Edward 


X. H. Une 


Private. . . . 


78 York. 




'35c 


Staples, John 


R. Mine 


Private. . . . 


70 Hancock. 




'35c 


Staples, Joseph 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


72 York 


d. Jan. 21,1832. 


'40 


Staples, Lou-sz 






77 York 


Res. Biddeford. 


'35d 


Staples, William 


Mass. state 


Private. . . . 


76 York. 




'35c 


Staples, William. . . . 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


72 Oxford 


d. Feb. 5, 1832. 


1792 


Starbard, Anthony.. 


Col Rose's regt 


Private. . . . 




(1794). Res. Pep- 
perreiboro ugh. 
Lost sight of 


























' 








one eye and 














received other 
injures about 
Apr. 1777. 


'35c 


Starbird, Anthony... 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


93 


York 


d. Aug. 15, 1823. 


'35c 


Starbird, John 


Mass. line 


Ensign. . . . 


68:Cumb 


d. Nov. 4, lb24. 


'35d 


StarUng, Josiah 


Mass. mil 


Private 


70 Lincoln 


d. Dec. 28, 1832. 


'35c 


Stenson, WiUiam . . . 


Mass. line 


Musician. . 


61 Lincoln. 




'35c 


Stephens, Bartholo- 












mew 


X. H.line 


Private. . . . 


75 Somerset .... 


d. in 1823. 


•35d 
'35d 


Stephens, James. . . . 
Stephens, Jonas .... 


]Mass mil 


Private 


73 Kennebec 




Mass. line 


Sergeant.. . 


84 Oxford 


d. Feb. 9, 1823. 


'40 


Stephens, Jowel. . . . 






94 York 


Res. Kennebunk. 


'35c 


Stephens, Pelatiah.. 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


77 York. 




'35c 


Stephens, Samuel. . . 


Mass. line 


Private 


74 Kennebec. . . 


d. Sept. 14, '33. 


'35d 


Stephens, Sylvanus . 


Mass. line 


Private & 
Musician. . 


76 Oxford. 




•35c 


Stephens, Thomas. . 


Mass. line 


Corporal.. . 


76l Lincoln. 




'35c 


Stephens, Thomas. . 


-MaiS. line 


Private. . . . 


70; Lincoln. 




'35c 


Stephens, Thomas 3d 


Mass. line 


Private 


69, Hancock. 




'35d 


Stephens, William. 


X. H.line 


Private. . . . 


80 Kennebec. 




'35c 


Sterry, Dayid 


Ma.-s. Une 


Private 


77| Kennebec. 




'35c 


Stetson, Batchelor. . 


-Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


66 Kennebec. 




'35d 


Stetson, Elijah 


Mass. mil 


Private.. . . 


94 Cumberland. 




'35c 


Stetson, EUjah 


Ma.<s. line 


Private.. . . 


70 Cumberland. 




'35d 


Stetson, Elisha 


-Mass. state. . . . 


Private 


74: Cumberland. 




'40 
'35d 








81;Curab 

81 i Oxford. 




Stetson, Hezekiah . . 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 




•35c 


Stetson, Joseph 


Mass. Une 


Private. . . . 


711 Hancock. . . . 


d. July 17, 1825. 


•40 
'35d 








44| Lincoln 

79jOxford. 


Res. Warren 


Stevens. Jeremiah . . 


Mass. mil 


Private. . . . 





REVOLUTIONARY PENSIONERS IN MAINE 169 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. 



Age. County. 



Remarks. 



'35d 

'40 

•3od 

'35d 

'40 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

'40 

'40 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

•40 

'35d 

'3oc 

'3oc 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'35d 



'40 

'35d 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'35e 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

•35d 

'35c 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 



Stevens, Joel JMass. mil [Private., 

Stevens, Joel | \ 

Stevens, Joel Mass. mil Private. 

Stevens, John Mass. state. . . . Private. 



'Stevens, Manj | ._ . . , 

Stevens, Moses iMass. mil... 

Stevens, Peliliah. .■ . . } 

Stevens, Thomas . . . i 

Stevens, Thomas. . . 

Stevens, William. . . Cont. nav>-. 

Steward, .\masa. ... 

Steward, Daniel. . . . Mass. line. . 

Sfeward, Snlly 

Stewart, Amasa. . . . Mass. line. . 
Stewart, Benjamin.. Mass. line. . 
Stewart, Daniel. . . . Mass. line. . 

Stewart, Henry X. H. line. . 

Stewart, Hugh Mass. line. . 

Stickney, Benjamin ' 

iStickney. Benjamin Mass. line.. 
1 I 

^Stickney, Polly ! 

Stickney, Samuel. . . Mass. state. 

Stiles, Ezra . Mass. line . . 

Stinchfield, Ephr'm Mass. line. . 

: Stinson, Abiah 

iStinson, Samuel. . . . Mass. line. . 



Private. 



seaman. 
Private.. 



Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 
Private.. . . , 
Private. . . . ; 



85 York. j 

88! Oxford 1 

79 Oxford \ 

76 York. i 

82 York 

92 Oxford 

89 York 

83 York 

82 Kennebec. . . 

74 Hancock 

75 Cumberland. 

75 Somerset .... 

76 Somerset. 

77 Penobscot . . 
69 Somerset. I 
67 Somerset . . . . : 
76 York. 

71 Waldo. I 

83 Kennebec. 

84 Kennebec. ... 



Res. Norway. 

Res. Kittery. 
Res. Waterford. 
d. Dec. 5, 1S32. 
Res. So. Berwick. 
Res. Sidney. 
Res. Brooksville. 

Res. St. Albans. 

Res. Newport. 

d. Feb. 7, 1820. 



Musician 
also Private! 
&FifeM'jri 



Musician . 
Private. . . 
Private.. . 



Private. 



Stinson, Thomas. . . 
Stirbird, Samuel .... 
Stober, Ebenezer. . . 

Stockbridge, John . . 
Stockbridge, Joseph. 
Stockbridge, Micah. 
Stockbridge, Sarah. . 
Stoddard, N'athaniel 
j Stone, David 

Stone, George 

1 Stone, John 

iStone, John 

! Stone, John 

Stone, Jonathan. . . . 

Stone, Jonathan. . . . 

Stone, Jonathan. . . . 



Mass. line. 
Mass. line., 
Mass. line. 
2nd. Regt. 
Mass. line. 
Mass. line . 
Mass. line. 



< Private. . . 
-Sergeant. 



Mass. line. 
Mass. mil. 



Mass. line. , 
Mass. line. , 
Cont. na\'y ■ 



'Mass. mil., 
: Mass. line. 



Lieutenant , . . . . 

Private.. . .i 61 

Private. . . . j 74 

Private. . . . | 77 

I 79 

Private....: SO 

Private. . . .' 72 

i i 78 

Private 79 

Private. . . .\ 77 

Mariner. . .i 76 
' 82 

'Private ' 88 

Private & 

■Corporal... 80 

. , . . . 1 77 



Kennebec. 

Piscataquis 

Penobscot. 

Oxford .... 

Cumberland 

Kennebec. 

Hancock. 

Hancock. . 

Lincoln. 

Lincoln. 

Cumberland. 

Oxford 

Lincoln. 
Cumberland. 

Lincoln 

Washington. 
Oxford. 

Oxford 

York. 
York. 
York. 

York 

York. 



Cumberland. 
York 



Stone, William ; Mass. state 

'35d i Stone, William Mass. mil.. , 



'40 
•40 



Stone, William. 
Storer, Eben. . . 



'35c Storer, Elias Mass. line . . 

'35d Storer, Isaac Mass. mil.. . 

'35c IStorer, William Mass. line. . 

'35d iStorers, Joseph Mass. state. 

'35d Story, William Mass. mil.. . 

'35c jStov^er, Christopher Mass. line.. 

'40 \Stowe, Anne 

'40 Stowers, Samuel 

'35d Stowers, Samuel. . . . Mass. line 

Mass. mil.. . 

'35d Stratton, Elijah .... Mass. mil. . . 



I 

Private i 88 

.Private & 

Corporal... 72 

■ ' 75 

. I , 80 

i • to90 

'Private 60 

' Private , 74 

Private.. . . 63 
Private & 

Musician. . 77 

Private. ... I 68 

. Private ; 72 

• i ..1 76 



York. 

Kennebec. 
Kennebec. . 
Cumberland. 



Lincoln. 
York. 
Oxford . 



Res. Hallowell. 

Res. Brownville. 
d. March 1826. 
Res. Litchfield. 
Res. Deer Isle. 

d. Aug. 23, 1820. 
Res. Bath. 
Res. Sweden. 

Res. Parsonsfield. 



Res. Kennebunk- 
port. 



,Res. Augusta. 
Res. Gorham. 

jd. Sept. 1824. 

!d. March 1826. 



York 

Cumb 

Lincoln.. . , 
Kennebec. 
Franklin. . . 



•35c 

'40 

•35d 

'35c 

•40 

'40 

'40 



Stratton, Nehemiah. N. H. line 



Straw, Daniel 

Strout, Prince 

Stuart, Daniel j 

Sluirt, Hannah. . . .! 
Stuart, Henry j 



N. H. state. 
Mass. line. . 



'. Private. . . . 
: Private & 
Treamster. 
■ Private.. . . 

Private. . . . 
Private. . . . 



76 Kennebec. 



78 



Hancock. 
Kennebec 
Kennebec . . 

York 

Cumberland. 

York 

Penobscot . . 
Waldo 



id. Sept. 30, 1833. 

d. Nov. 5, 1832. 
id. Sept. 8, 1823. 
I Res. Leeds. 

Res. Farmington. 



Res. Albion. 
id. Nov. 7, 1833. 

[Res. Wells. 
I Res. Newport. 
Res. Unity. 



m 



vj;^>..:;i.ft':'£!l. 



I70 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY. 



List. 



Name. 



Ser^-ice. 



Rank. Age. County. 



Remarkfl. 



•3od 

'3oc 

•40 

'35c 

'35c 

•40 

'35d 

'35c 

•35c 

•35d 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

•40 

•40 

'35c 

'35c 

•35d 

'35d 
'35c 
•35c 

•35d 
•35d 

•35d 

•40 

'35c 

'40 

'40 

'35d 

'35c 

'35d 

'35d 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 
•40 

'40 

'35d 

•35d 

•35d 

'35c 

•35c 

'35d 

1794 



'35c 

'35c 

•35c 

•35d 

•40 

•35c 

•40 

•35d 

'40 

'35d 

•40 

•35c 

'35d 

•40 

'35d 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

•35d 



Stuart, Peter 

Stuart, Samuel 

iStubbs, Joseph 

iStubbs, Richard. . . . 

jStubbs, Samuel 

|Sturdevant, Andrew 
jSturges, Jonathan . . 
iSturtevant, Andrew 
ISturtevant, Asa . . . . 
jSturtevant, Francis. 

iSturtevant, Jesse. . . 
Sturtevant, Joseph.. 
Sturtevant, Lot. . . . 



Mass. line. 
N. H.line. 



[Private. . 
Private. . 



Mas 
Mas 



line 
line 



Sergeant. 
Ensign. . 



Mass. line. 
Mass. line. 
Mass. line . 
Mass. line. 

Mass. line. 
Mass. line . 
Mass. line. 



Private.. . . 
Private.. . . 
Private. . . 
Sergeant & 
Pvt. of .Art. 
Lieutenant 
Private.. . . 
Private. . . . 



Sturtevant, Seth.. - . Mass. line [Private.. . . 



Sufferance, Ru'h i 

Sullivan, Barnabas.. N. Carolina line 

Sully, Daniel R.I. line 

Summers, Thomas. . Mass. mil 



Sunborn, Jonathan. Mass. mil.. 

Sutton, John Mass. line . 

Sutton, John Mass. line . 

Su'ton, Lois 

Swain, Joseph Mass. line . 

Swain Samuel Mass. mil. 



Private. ... 
Private.. . . 
Private &. 
Teamster. . 
Private.. . . 
Private. . . . 
Private 



Swan James : Mass. mil. 



Swan, Nathan ; Mass. line 

Sweetland, Rebecca . 
Sweatland, Stephen 
iSweet, Ebenezer. . . 

i Sweet, Israel 

Sweet, Joshua 



Sergeant.. . 
Private & 
Corporal.. 
Private. ... 
1 : 

Private. ... 



90 Cumberland. 
73 Penobscot . . . 

47 Waldo 

73 Cumb 

73 Kennebec. . 
79 Kennebec. . 
92 Cumberland. 
94 Kennebec 

74 Penobscot. 

79 Oxford. 

67 Hancock. . . . 

74 Oxford. 

75 Kennebec 

81 Kennebec. . . 

74 Oxford. 

80 Oxford 

76 Waldo 

70 Lincoln 

83 York. 

76 Hancock. 
73 Cumberland. 

82 York 

75 York 

76 York 

72 Oxford. 

72 Oxford. 

73 Oxford. 

77 Oxford 

80, Oxford 

82| Kennebec. . 



Mass. mil 

Mass. line 

Mass. line & 
Mass. state. . . . 
Mass. mil 



'Sweet, Samuel . 

jSweetland, Stephen, i Mass. mil 

I Sweetser, Richard. 

ISweetsere Richard. 

ISwett, John 



Private. 
Private. 

Private. 
Private. 
Private. 



'Swett, Joshua. 



Swett, Samuel. 
ISwift, Enoch.. 
j Swift, Joseph. 
! Sylvester, Elisha 



Mass. line 

Mass. line &I 
Mass. state . . . . < 



Private. 
Private. 



.1 79 

I 94 

76 

' 71 

.i 74 

.1 73 

I 90 

.; 84 



Waldo. 

Kennebec. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 
Lincoln. 
Kennebec. . 
Kennebec. 



Mass. mil j Private. . . . 

Mass. line Private.. . . 

Mass. line iPriv of Art. 



Sylvester, Job ; Mass. line I Private. . 

Mass. line j Private. . 

Mass. line ■ Private. . 

Kamball's Co. of Private. . 
militia. 



Si'monds, Ebenezer. 
Symonds, Thomas. 
Symms, William.. 



Taggart. John.. . . 
Taggart, Robert.. 
Talbert, Abraham 
Talbot, Joseph. . . 



Tarbell, Joseph. 
Tarbox, CarU . . 



Tarbox, Samuel. 

Tarr, Abraham. . 

Tarr, Abram. . . . 
I Tarr, Joseph. . . . 
ITarr, Joseph. . . . 



I Taylor, Elias 

Taylor, Ephraim. 



I Taylor, John. . . 
I Taylor, Samuel. 



j 77| Cumberland. 

I 82jCumb 

i70toiCumb 

180 i 

I 76' Cumb 

' 74 Kennebec. 
\ 74 Oxford. 

81 Kennebec 

94 Cumberland. 

65i York. 

731 Oxford. 



d. July 12. '32. 
Res. Frankfort, 
d. Jan. 21. IS20. 
d. Mar. 3. 1S23. 
Res. Favette. 



d. Sept. 1. 1818. 



Res. W^aterville. 

Res. Sumner. 

Res. Knox. 

d. Mav 7, 1830. 



d. Nov. 18, 1819. 
d. Nov. 18, 1819. 
•Res. Limington. 



Res. Bethel, 
d. July 22, 1833. 
Res. Gardiner. 
Res. Hope. 



Res. Waterville. 



Res. Windham. 
Res. Gorham. 



N. H. line 'Sergeant. 

N. H. line j Private.. 

Mass. line | Private.. 

Mass. mil Private.. 



Mass. line . 



Mass. mil. 
Mass. mil. 



Private. 



Private. 
Private. 



Mass. line Private. 

Mass. mil I Private. 



Mass. mil | Private. 

Mass. line ; Private. 



N. H. line Private. 

Mass. line Private. 



' 93 Kennebec. . 
i 72i Kennebec. . 
\ 77 Kennebec. . 
j 70 Cumberland. 

I 76 Cumb 

! 76 Somerset. 

;70toiYork 

;80 1 

76: Cumberland. 

I 82 Cumb 

I 73i Lincoln. 

I 781 Lincoln 

. . Lincoln. 
I 76 Lincoln. 

I 82 Lincoln 

i 72 Kennebec. 

I 76 Lincoln. 

j 81 Lincoln 

72 Oxford. 

74i Lincoln. 



Res. Gray. 



Res^ Washington, 
Wounded at bat 

I tie of Benning- 
ton, Aug. 1777. 

d. in 1822. 

d. July 29, '23. 



Res. Freeport. 
Res. Hollis. 

Res. Danville. 
Res. W^hitefield. 

Res. Bowdoin. 

Res. New Castle. 



m 



^ 



REVOLUTIONARY PENSIONERS IN MAINE 171 



List. 


Name. 


Service. 


Rank. 


A^. 


County. 


Remarks. 


•35c 1 


Tavlor, Simeon 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


78 Kennebec. . 


d. Feb. 3, 1823. 


•3oc 


Teague, Beni 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


70 Oxford 


d. Jan. 15, 1820. 


'40 


Tebbets. Ephraim. . 






78 York 


Res. Berwick. 


'40 


Temple, John 




84 Lincoln 


Res. Bowdoin. 


'3od 


Temple, John 


Mass. line 


IJeutenant 


77 Kennebec. 




'35c 


Terrv David 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


99| Lincoln 


d. June 8 1828. 


'35c 


Terry, John 


Cont. navy. . . . 


Mariner. . . 


70 Lincoln. 




^AO 


Terry, Susannah.. . . 






71 Waldo 


Res. Montville. 


'35c 


Thayer, Jeremiah. . . 


Mass. line 


Private 


76 


Kennebec. 




•35c 


Thaver. Philip 


^lass. line 


Private. . . . 


SO 


Kennebec. 




"35d 


Thing, Levi 


Mass. mil 


Private & 
Corporal. . . 


71 


Kennebec. 




'35d 


Thing, Nathaniel. . . 


Mass. line 


Private & 
Sergeant.. . 


87 


York. 




'35d 


Thomas, Charles. . . 


Mass. mil 


Private.. . . 


S4 


Cumberland. 




'40 








82 


Cumb 


Res. Brunswick. 


'35d 


Thomas, Charles . . . 


Mass. line & 










Mass. state. . . . 


Private. . . . 


74 


Cumberland. 




'35d 


Thomas, Holmes. . . 


Mass. state. . . . 


Private. . . . 


79 


Oxford. 




'35d 


Thomas, Ichabod. . . 


Mass. mil 


Private. . . . 


77 


Penobscot. 




MO 








82 


Piscataquis . . 


Res. Brownville. 


'35d 


Thomas, Joseph. . . 


Mass. line & 










Mass. state .... 


Corporal. . . 


94 
or87 


Cumberland.. 




'35d 


Thomas, Joseph. . . . 


Mass. state 


Private of 
Artillery. . . 


74 


Cumberland. 




'35c 


Thomas, Jonathan. 


N. H. line 


Sergeant.. . 


84 


Kennebec. . . 


d. June 1824. 


'35c 


Thomas, Joshua. . . . 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


60 Hancock. 




''AO 








80 Lincoln 

76 Hancock. 


Res. Thomaston. 


'35d 


Thomas, Nathan . . . 


Mass. state .... 


Private & 










Bombardier 






'35d 


Thomas Samuel. . . . 






1 






Widow of 


Mass. line 


Private & 












Corporal. . . 


79 Hancock 


d. Aug. 14, 1832. 


'40 


Thomas, Spencer. . . 






76 York 


Res. Limington. 


'40 


Thomas, Spencer. . . 






53 Oxford 


Res. Dixfield & 










Peru. 


'35c 


Thompson, Alex. . . . 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


74 Lincoln. 




'35c 


Thompson, Alex. 2d 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


64 Kennebec. . . 


d. Feb. 23, 1830. 


•35d 


Thompson, Benj. . . 


Mass. state. . . . 


Private.. . . 


80 York. 




1792 


Thompson, Benj . . 


Col. Brewer's 














regt 


Lieutenant 






(1794) Res. Tops- 
ham. Commis- 
sioned Nov. 6, 
1776. Contrac- 
ted disease on 
retreat from Ti- 
cond e r o g a in 


'35d 


Thompson, Cornel- 










1777. 




ius 


Mass. line 


Private 


78 Hancock. 




'35c 


Thompson, David. . 


Mass. line 


Corporal. . 


77; York. 




'35c 


Thompson, Ephr'm. 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


72 York. 




'35d 


Thompson, James. . 


Mass. state. . . . 


Lieutenant 


86 Lincoln 




'35d 


Thompson, James. . 


Mass. line 


Private 


73 York. 




'40 








79|York 


Res. Kenneb'kp't 




'40 


Thompson, Joel .... 








86l Lincoln 


Res. Lewiston. 


•35d 


Thompson, Joel. . . . 


Mass. mil 


Sergeant.. . 


72i Lincoln. 




•35c 


Thompson, John. . . 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


80, York. 




•40j 


Thompson, John. . . 







7l|Oxford 


Res. Porter. 


'35c 


Thompson, Jonath' a 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


94 York 




'35d 


Thompson, Joseph. . 


Mass. state. . . . 


Private & 
Musician. . 


1 
821 York. 




'40 








88; York 


Res. Cornish. 




'35c 


Thompson, Joseph. . 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


72 Lincoln 


d. June 1827. 


•35d 


Thompson, Joseph. . 


Mass. line 


Private. . . 


69; York. 




'35d 


Thompson, Nathan. 


Mass. rail 


Private.. .. 


80 York. 




•40 








85 York 


Res. Kennebunk- 
port. 




'35c 


Thompson, Richard. 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


64 Lincoln. 


•35c 


Thompson, Robert.. 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


67 Oxford. 




•35d 


Thompson, .>amuel. 












Widow of 


Mass. mil 


Private. . . . 


79 Lincoln 


d. Dec. 13, 1833. 


'3od 


Thompson, William. 


Mass. mil 


Private.. . . 


75jCumberland. 




'35c 


Thompson, William 


Mass. line 


Private. . . . 


74: Kennebec. 




'35c 


Thorns, Samuel 


Mass. line 


Captain. . . 


76' Penobscot. . . 


d. Feb. 13, '23. 


'35c 


Thorndike, Joshua.. 


Ma.ss. line 


Private.. . . 


69 Lincoln 


d. Dec. 2, 1824. 


•35d 


Thorndyke, Robert. 


Mass. mil 


Private & 












Seaman. . . 


74 


Lincoln. 





#■ 



ivr:?'f .■■';. :i.,--i: 



172 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



List. 



Name. 



Service. 



Rank. 



.\ge.! County. 



Remarks. 



'40 



'35c Thornton, Michael.. Mass. line. 

'35c Thorp, Thomas Mass. line. 

'35c iThurlo, John Mass. line . 

'35cl iThurlow", Asa Mass. mil.. 

'35c Thurston. Jacob.. . . Mass. line. 

'40 Tibbets. Ichabod 



' Private. . 

Sergeant. 
Private. . 
Private. . 
Private. . 



'35d Tibbets, Nathaniel.. Mass. mil Private.. 

'40 Tibbets, Simeon 

'40 Tibbets, Stephen '. 

'35c Tibbetts, Giles Mass. line. . 

'35d Tibbetts, Ichabod.. Mass. state. 



'35c Tibbetts, John R. I. line. 

'40 Tibbetts, Nathaniel 

'35c Tibbetts, Stephen.. Mass. line 

'35d Tibbitts, Ephraim. . Mass. line. 

'35d Tillson, William. ... N. H. line. 



Private. . . . 
Private & 
Sergeant.. . 
Private. . . . 



'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'35d 

'35d 

'35c 

'40 

'35d 

'35c 

'40 

•35d 

'40 

'35c 

•35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'35c 

'Joe 

'35d 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'35d 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 

'35c 

'35d 

'35c 

'35d 

'40 

'35c 

'35c 

'40 

'35d 

'35d 

'35d 

'35d 



Tinan, Joseph Mass. line. 

Tinkham, John Mass. line. 

Titcomb. John Mass. mil.. 

Titus, Samuel Mass. mil.. 

Tobey, Barnabas. . . Mass. mU.. 

Tobey, John Mass. line. 

Tobey, Mnry 

Tobey, William Mass. line. 

Tobin, Samuel Mass. line. 

Tolbot, Abram , 

|Tolman, Samuel.. . . Mass. mil. 

iToothaker, Seth 

jToothaker, Soth. . . . Mass. line. 
jToppon, ^Iichael, .. Mass. line. 

;Tory, Elisha Mass. line. 

j Tourtelott Abraham U. I. line . . 

Touridotte, Leah 



Private. . . . | 
Private. . . .\ 
Corporal &\ 
Sergeant.. . 

Private. . . . | 
Private. . . .t 
Private. . . . j 
Private. ... I 
Private. . . . ! 
Private. . . . ! 



79 Lincoln Res. Thomaston. 

72 Washington., d. Dec. 2, '25. 
SO Washington. 

6S Cumb d. March 1, 1S34. 

74 Oxford. I 

57 Cumberland, t 

90 Waldo ,Res. Liberty. 

82 Kennebec. ! 

88 York I Res. Newfield. 

88 Lincoln jRes. Bristol. 

77 Lincoln 'd. July 12. 1S32. 

84 Lincoln. '\ 

71 Penobscot. . .|d. June 1S26. 

85 Franklin jRes. New Sharon. 

SO Lincoln. 

72 York. 



Private. . 
Private. . 



'Private. 



Pr