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Full text of "Thoroughfare plan for Davidson County, North Carolina"

NORTH CAROLINA 
^DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION^ 



DAVIDSON COUNTY 



THOROUGHFARE PLAN 






r.o.^Si^ 







U984 




THOROUGHFARE PLAN 

for 

DAVIDSON COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA 



Prepared by the: 

Thoroughfare Planning Unit 
Planning and Research Branch 
Division of Highways 
N. C. Department of Transportation 



In Cooperation with: 

The County of Davidson 

The Federal Highway Administration 

U. S. Department of Transportation 



May, 1984 



Persons Responsible for this Report: 

Planning and Research Manager: T. L. Waters, P.E. 

Thoroughfare Planning Engineer: M. R. Poole, PhD., P.E. 

Team Leader: M. L. Tewell, Jr. 

Project Planner: W. I. Beddingfield 

Typist: Word Processing 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 
State Library of North Carolina 



http://www.archive.org/details/thoroughfareplan1984nort 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

CHAPTER PAGE 

I. INTRODUCTION 1 

II. COUNTY THOROUGHFARE PLANNING PRINCIPLES ... 2 

III. URBAN THOROUGHFARE PLANS IN DAVIDSON COUNTY . 8 

IV. DAVIDSON COUNTY-POPULATION, LAND USE, AND 

TRAFFIC 9 

V. THOROUGHFARE PLAN 29 

VI. IMPROVEMENT PRIORITIES 33 

VII. IMPLEMENTATION 38 



APPENDIX A - THOROUGHFARE TABULATIONS, RECOMMENDA- 
TIONS AND TYPICAL CROSS SECTONS A-1 

APPENDIX B - RECOMMENDED DEFINITIONS AND DESIGN 

STANDARDS FOR SUBDIVISION ORDINANCES . . B-1 



LIST OF FIGURES 

FIGURE PAGE 

1. IDEALIZED THOROUGHFARE PLAN 4 

2. SCHEMATIC ILLUSTRATION OF FUNCTIONALLY CLASSIFIED 

RURAL HIGHWAY NETWORK 6 

3. GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION OF DAVIDSON COUNTY 10 

4. SIGNIFICANT LAND USE ELEMENTS 13 

5. HISTORIC AND PROJECTED ADT VOLUMES 19 

6. PERSONS PER VEHICLE TRENDS FOR NORTH CAROLINA AND 

DAVIDSON COUNTY 21 

7. DEFICIENT BRIDGES IN DAVIDSON COUNTY 27 

8. RECOMMENDED THOROUGHFARE PLAN 31 



LIST OF TABLES 

TABLE PAGE 

1. RURAL SYSTEM ROAD MILEAGE DISTRIBUTION 5 

2. HISTORICAL AND PROJECTED POPULATION TRENDS FOR 

DAVIDSON COUNTY 12 

3. DAVIDSON COUNTY LAND USE 12 

4. MINIMUM LEVELS OF SERVICE FOR ROADS AND HIGHWAYS . 16 

5. MINIMUM TOLERABLE LANE WIDTHS 17 

6. DEFICIENT BRIDGES IN DAVIDSON COUNTY 25 

7. ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS 34 

8. BENEFITS EVALUATION OF DAVIDSON COUNTY 35 

9. IMPROVEMENT PRIORITIES AND COST ESTIMATES 36 

10. IMPROVEMENT PRIORITIES FOR DEFICIENT BRIDGES IN 

DAVIDSON COUNTY 37 



I . INTRODUCTION 



The economic growth of a region is largely dependent on 
how efficiently the transportation system can handle travel 
demands. If the system fails to provide the means for quick 
and convenient transportation of people and goods, the 
region's economic growth becomes stagnated and fails to 
reach its full potential. It is necessary that such a 
system not only meet existing travel demands, but also that 
it keep pace with the development of the region. This 
report will set forth a system of thoroughfares to serve the 
anticipated traffic and land development needs of Davidson 
County for the next twenty years. In the development of the 
system of thoroughfares, certain priorities shall be established 
based on maintenance needs, inadequate bridges, poor horizontal 
and vertical alignment, and insufficient present and future 
capacity. 

The system of thoroughfares proposed was developed fol- 
lowing the basic principles of thoroughfare planning as de- 
scribed in Chapter II of this report. Major thoroughfares 
were located based upon existing and anticipated travel de- 
mands, existing streets, existing and anticpated land devel- 
opments, topographic conditions, and field investigations. 
The plan advocates those improvements which are felt to be 
essential for proper traffic circulation within the current 
planning period (1982-2005). The Davidson County Thoroughfare 
Plan does not attempt to modify the thoroughfare plans 
adopted for the Lexington and Thomasville urban area. 

Some of the proposed improvements in the county plan 
will be primarily the responsibility of the North Carolina 
Department of Transportation. However, Davidson County can 
provide assistance in the implementation of the plan through 
subdivision regulations and zoning ordinances. With the 
different governmental agencies involved in developing the 
thoroughfare system, coordination of activities is of prime 
importance. Thus, it will be desirable for the plan to be 
formally adopted by both the County Commissioners and the 
North Carolina Board of Transportation to serve as a mutual 
official guide in providing a well coordinated, adequate, 
and economical major street system. 



II. COUNTY THOROUGHFARE PLANNING PRINCIPLES 



Purpose of Planning 

There are many benefits to be gained from thoroughfare 
planning, but the primary objective is to assure that the 
road system will be progressively developed in a manner that 
will adequately serve future travel desires. Thus, the 
cardinal concept of thoroughfare planning is to make provisions 
for street and highway improvements so that when needs 
arise, feasible opportunities to make improvements exist. 

Streets, roads, and highways perform two primary functions 
They provide traffic service and land service. When combined, 
these two functions are basically incompatible. This conflict 
is not serious if both traffic and land service demands are 
low. When traffic volumes are high, however, access conflicts 
created by uncontrolled and intensely used abutting property 
result in intolerable traffic flow friction and congestion. 

The major benefits derived from thoroughfare planning 
are: (1) Each road or highway can be designed to perform a 
specific function and to provide a specific level of service. 
This permits savings in rights-of-way, construction, and 
maintenance costs; protects residential neighborhoods; and 
encourages stability in travel and land use patterns. (2) 
Local officials are informed of future improvements. Devel- 
opers can design subdivisions to function in a non-con- 
flicting manner. School and park officials can better 
locate their facilities. Damage to property values and 
community appearance that is sometimes associated with road 
improvements can be minimized. 

County Thoroughfare Planning Concept 

The underlying concept of the thoroughfare plan is that 
it provides a functional system of streets, roads and high- 
ways which permit travel from origins to destinations with 
directness, ease, and safety. Different elements in the 
system are designed and called on to perform specific functions 
and levels of service, thus minimizing the traffic and land 
service conflict. 

Within the county plan, elements are considered to be 
either urban or rural. In the urban planning area, the 
local municipality generally has planning jurisdiction. 
Outside the urban planning area, the county has planning 
jurisdiction. In those urban areas where no urban thorough- 
fare plan has been developed, elements are generally consid- 
ered to be rural and under the planning jurisdiction of the 
county. When a thoroughfare plan is developed for an urban 
area that has not previously had a plan, then the area 



defined by that plan would be considered urban and come 
under the planning jurisdiction of the municipality. 

Within the urban and rural systems, thoroughfare plan 

elements are classified according to the specific function 

which they are to perform. A discussion of the elements and 
functions of the two systems follows. 

Urban Thoroughfare Classification System 

In the urban thoroughfare plan, elements are classified 
as either local access streets, minor thoroughfares or major 
thoroughfares . Local access streets which may be further 
classified as residential , commercial , or industrial streets 
are designed only to provide access to abutting property. 
Minor thoroughfare are more important streets in the urban 
system and are designed to collect traffic from local access 
streets and carry it to the major thoroughfare system. They 
may also serve abutting property and serve some minor through 
traffic movements . The major thoroughfares are the primary 
traffic arteries of the urban area providing for traffic 
movements wthin, around, and through the area. 

Due to the limited amount of detail that can be shown 
on a county thoroughfare plan, only urban major thoroughfares 
are shown. A coordinated system of major thoroughfares 
which is most adaptable to desire lines of travel within an 
urban area and reflected in most urban area thoroughfare 
plans is the radial-loop system. The radial-loop system 
includes radials , crosstowns , loops , and bypasses . Radial 
thoroughfares provide for travel from points outside to 
major destinations inside the urban area. Crosstown thorough- 
fares provide for traffic movements across the central area 
and around the central business area (CBD). Loop thoroughfare 
provide for lateral travel movements between suburban areas. 
Bypasses are designed to carry non local traffic around or 
through the area. Occassionally a bypass with low through 
traffic volumes can be designed to function as a portion of 
an urban loop. The radial-loop major thoroughfare system 
concept and concept of functionally classified urban street 
system are illustrated in Figure 1. 



Rural Thoroughfare Classification System 

The rural system consists of those facilities outside 
the urban thoroughfare planning area boundaries. They are 
classified into four major systems: principal arterials, 
minor arterials, major and minor collector roads, and local 
roads. Table 1 indicates generally accepted statewide 
mileage on these systems. 



FIGURE I 



THOROUGHFARE PLAN 




LAND USES 

^ COMMERCIAL 
RESIDENTIAL 
INDUSTRIAL 





Table 


1 








Rural System Road 


Mileage 


Distribution 


, 




Systems 






Percentage of Total ! 
Rural Miles 


Principal 


arterial system 






2- 4 




Principal arterial system 
plus minor arterial road 
system 






6-12 




Collector 
road sys 


(Major plus minor) 
tem 






20-25 




Local road system 






65-75 





Figure 2 gives a schematic illustration of a functionally 
classified rural highway system. 

Rural Principal Arterial System : The rural principal 
arterial system consists of a connected network of 
continuous routes which serve corridor movements having 
trip lengths and travel density characteristics indica- 
tive of substantial statewide or interstate travel. 
The principal arterial system should serve all urban 
areas of over 50,000 population and a large majority of 
those with a population greater than 5000. The Interstate 
System constitutes a significant portion of the principal 
arterial system. 

Rural Minor Arterial System : The minor arterial system 
in conjunction with the principal arterial system forms 
a network which links cities, larger to^-nis , and other 
major traffic generators such as large resorts. The 
minor arterial system generally serves interstate and 
intercounty travel and serves travel corridors with 
trip lengths and travel densities somewhat less than 
the principal arterial system. 

Rural Collector Road System : The rural collector 
routes generally serve intracounty travel rather than 
statewide travel and constitute those routes on which 
the predominant travel distances are shorter than on 
the arterial routes. This system is subclassified into 
major collector roads and minor collector roads. 

Major Collector Roads : These routes (1) provide 
service to the larger towns not directly served by 
the higher systems and to other traffic generators 
of equivalent intracounty importance, such as 
consolidated schools, shipping points, county 




LEGEND 

CITIES AND TOWNS 
V VILLAGE 

mm PRINCIPAL ARTERIALS 
■ IHIHIHII MINOR ARTERIALS 

llllllllllllllllllll MAJOR COLLECTORS 



FIGURE 2 



MINOR COLLECTORS 
LOCALS 



# 






[.,.u«6»****' 



wiwwi^^^^^'^'^^l 




A 






♦ .^ ,v^' 



n-'^\ 






SCHEMATIC ILLUSTRATION 

OF FUNCTIONALLY CLASSIFIED 

RURAL HIGHWAY NETWORK 



parks, important mining and agricultural areas, 
etc; (2) link these places with nearby larger 
towns or cities, or with routes of higher classi- 
fication; and (3) serve the more important intra- 
county travel corridors . 

Minor Collector Roads : These routes (1) collect 
traffic from local roads and bring all developed 
areas within a reasonable distance of a collector 
road; (2) provide service to the remaining smaller 
communities; and (3) link the locally important 
traffic generators with their rural hinterland. 

Rural Local Road System : The local roads comprise all 
roads not on one of the higher systems. Local residential 
siibdivision streets and residential collector streets 
are elements of the local road system. Local residential 
streets are either cul-de-sacs, loop streets less than 
2,500 feet in length, or streets less than one mile in 
length that do not connect thoroughfares or serve major 
traffic generators and do not collect traffic from more 
than one hundred dwelling units. Residential collector 
streets are streets which serve as the connecting 
street system between local residential streets and the 
thoroughfare system . 



III. URBAN THOROUGHFARE PLANS IN DAVIDSON COUNTY 



Thoroughfare plans are developed for urban areas and 
counties to assist officials in the development of the most 
logical and appropriate street system to fulfill the existing 
and future travel demands. The municipalities and county 
must cooperate as a team to develop an efficient system for 
travel within the county. 

A Thoroughfare Plan was develeoped in 1978 with revisions 
made in 1980 for the urban area of Lexington in Davidson 
County (Appendix B). 

High priority was given to the following projects in 
Lexington: 

1. US 29/70 and Greensboro Road Intersection 

2. Linwood Road Bridge 

3. NC 8 Connector 

4. NC 8 and US 52 North widening 

5. US 54 East and West widening - 

6. Salisbury Road widening 

7. Raleigh Road widening 

A Thoroughfare Plan was developed in 1980 for the 
Thomasville urban area in Davidson County as part of the 
High Point-Thomasville-Archdale-Jamestown Transportation 
Study (Appendix B). The plan was adopted by the City of 
Thomasville and the North Carolina Department of Trans- 
portation in July, 1980. 

High priority was given to the following projects in 
Thomasville: 

1. "West Belt" Connector 

2. Bryant Street widening 

3. Cloniger Street 

4. Colonial Drive 

5. County Line Road 

6. Cox Avenue Relocation 

For further details and other plan considerations, refer to 
the Lexington Thoroughfare Plan Report, 1979, and the High 
Point Urban Area Transportation Study, "Report on The Adopted 
Plan", August 1, 1981, North Carolina Department of Transpor- 
tation. Appendix B of the reports contain both a map of the 
Lexington and Thomasville plans and a detailing of the 
street systems . 



8 



IV. DAVIDSON COUNTY - POPULATION, LAND USE, AND TRAFFIC 

Davidson County is located in the western portion of 
the Piedmont Triad region of North Carolina. As shown in 
Figure 3, the county is bordered by Forsyth County to the 
North, Davie and Rowan County to the west, Montgomery County 
to the South, and Randolph and Guilford County to the East. 
The major highways are 1-85, US 64, US 52, NC 8, US 29-70, 
NC 49, NC 68, NC 150, NC 109, and NC 47. Rail Service is 
provided by Southern Railway, Winston-Salem Southbound 
Railway and High Point-Thomasville-Denton Railroad. Commer- 
cial airline service is available at Winston-Salem in Forsyth 
County and Greensboro in Guilford County. 

Davidson County is divided into Seventeen townships; 
Abbotts Creek, Alleghany, Arcadia, Boone, Conrad Hill, 
Cotton Grove, Emmons, Hampton, Healing Spring, Jackson Hill, 
Lexington, Midway, Reedy Creek, Silver Hill, Thomasville, 
Tyro, and Yadkin College. Lexington, the county seat is 
located centrally in the County. The other urban center in 
the County is Thomasville located at the Davidson-Randolph 
County line. The Town of Denton is located in the southern 
portion of the County. 

The mean elevation of the County is 750 feet above 
sea-level. The topography consists mainly of gently rolling 
hills. A portion of the Uwharrie Mountain Range extend 
across the southern portion of the County. Most of the 
steep slopes are encountered near streams and rivers and 
most of the very flat land consists of periodically flooded 
stream bottoms. The County is blessed with ample surface 
water. Creeks and streams flow throughout the County into 
the Yadkin River which forms High Rock Lake to the south. 

Factors Affecting Transportation 

Thoroughfare planning is a process whose objective is 
to develop a system of transport which will enable people 
and goods to travel safely and economically. To detemnine 
the needs of a county, the factors of population, land use, 
and traffic must be examined. To properly plan for the 
transportation needs of a county, it is important to understand 
and describe the type and amount of travel which takes place 
in that area, and also to clearly identify the goals and 
objectives to be met by the transportation plan. 

In order to fulfill the objectives of an adequate 
20-year thoroughfare plan, reliable forecasts of future 
travel characteristics must be achieved. Such forecasts are 
possible only when the following major items are carefully 
analyzed: (1) historic and potential population changes; 
(2) significant trends in the economy; (3) character and 



GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION 



-_j:.rLA A, 




DAVIDSON COUNTY 



FIGURE 3 



intensity of land development; and (4) motor vehicle registra- 
tion and usage. Additional items that vary in influence 
include the effects of legal controls such as zoning ordinances 
and subdivision regulations, availability of public utilities 
and transportation facilities, and topographic and other 
physical features of the urban area. 

Population Trends 

The volume of traffic on a section of roadway is a 
function of the size and location of the population it 
serves. An analysis of the population is one of the first 
steps the transportation planner does. The analysis of past 
trends allows the planner to estimate future population and 
traffic which it generates with some degree of reliability. 

The population of Davidson County reflects a steady 
growth from 29,404 persons in 1910 to 47,865 persons in 
1930. The larger increase came from 1920 to 1930 with a 36 
percent increase in population. This could be partially 
attributed to the industrial development around the cities 
of Lexington and Thomasville. Also, increases from 1950 to 
1980 were substantial due to the increases in industrial 
development. More recent development was spurned by a 
countywide water and sewer system. This growth rate, which 
is much larger than the average predicted for North Carolina, 
is consistent with expected growth in the Piedmont Crescent 
Region of the state. 

A least square line analysis of past population growth 
was used to estimate 1990, 2000, and 2005 population for 
Davidson County. A least square line is a straight line 
calculated to fit a series of data such that the sum of the 
squared deviations of the data points from the line is a 
minimum. Using this method, the 2000 and 2005 population 
projections were calculated to be 134,800 and 139,750 persons 
respectively (See Table 2). 



Land Use 

The generation of traffic on a particular street is 
very closely related to the utilization pf adjacent land 
areas. Some type of land uses generate much more traffic 
than others. For example, a commercial or retail area such 
as a shopping center would generate (or attract) much larger 
volumes of traffic than say a residential area. The attrac- 
tion between different land uses varies with the intensity 
of development and the distance between those developed 
areas. It, therefore, becomes necessary to designate land 
uses by type for the purposes of transportation planning. 
An analysis of the distribution of existing land uses serves 
as a basis for forecasting future land use needs and the 
resulting travel patterns . 

11 





TABLE 


2 






HISTORICAL AND PROJECTED 


POPULATION j 




TRENDS FOR DAVIDSON 


COUNTY 


YEAR 


POPULATION 




PERCENT CHANGE 


1910 


29,404 






1920 


35,201 




19.7 


1930 


47,855 




36.0 


1940 


53,377 




11.5 


1950 


62,244 




16.6 


1960 


79,493 




27.7 


1970 


95,627 




20.3 


1980 


113,162 




18.3 


1990 


124,736 




10.2 


2000 


134,827 




8.1 


2005 


139,760 




3.6 







TABLE 


3 






DAVIDSON 


COUNTY 


LAND USE 




TYPE OF LAND 






ACRES 


PERCENT 


Forest 
Agriculture 
Urban + Build up 
Other 






178,100 

112,900 

37,800 

20,640 


51.0 

32.3 

10.8 

5.9 


Total 






349,440 


100.00 



Traffic 

A comparison of 1970, 1975, and 1980 average annual 
daily traffic volumes (ADT) on selected major roads and 
highways in Davidson County is shown in Figure 5 . Also 
shown are projections for the year 2005, assuming no changes 
to the existing street system are made. These projections 
were based on historical and anticipated population and 
economic growth patterns and land use trends. 

Vehicle registration has increased at a much greater 
rate than population since 1940. The increase can best be 
shown by a graph depicting the change in the persons per 
vehicle ratio over a period of time. This ratio is obtained 
by dividing the total population of the area by the total 
number of vehicles registered in that area. Figure 6 shows 
this comparison for North Carolina and Davidson County, and 
includes projections to 2005. The results illustrate the 
transition from a non- automobile oriented society to one 
whose vitality is heavily dependent on the automobile. This 



12 



"V 



\ 
/- 






THOMASVILLE 
fN^SR. a JR. H,S. 



COMM GENERAL 
HOSPITAL 



EAST DAVIDSON H.S. 



HISTORIC SITE- 
YADKIN COLLEGE- 



WEST DAVIDSON H.S, 



BOONE'S CAVE 
STATE PARK- 



l^ 




SIGNIFICANT LAND 
USE ELEMENTS 



FIGURE 4 



DENTON H.S. 



DAVIDSON COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 

NORIH CAROLINA OEPAXtMfNI OF IWNSTORTATION 



change in life style has gradually occurred over many years, 
with the most dramatic difference being between 1940 and 
1950. This is primarily due to the following reasons: 

1) The post-depression increase in the standard of living. 

2) The increase in population including the post World War 
II "baby boom" . 

3) The transition from an agricultural dominated society 
to a more diversfied one (less people on the farm, but 
more need for transportation). 

4) The availability of automobile in the 1960 's and 1970 's 
and the banking credit to buy them (more cars, easier 
credit) . 

Since the early 1970 's however, these reasons for 
purchasing more automobiles have had less influence and have 
led to the expectation that the person per vehicle rate will 
begin to stabilize as projected in Figure 5. This saturation 
effect is expected to stabilize trip-making characteristics 
of families in the middle and upper income categories due to 
the fact they already have the financial means to purchase a 
sufficient number of vehicles to satisfactarily serve their 
transportation needs. On the other hand, moderate growth in 
the trip making characteristics of lower income families is 
projected due to an expected improvement in their financial 
well-being. 

System Deficiencies 

Sections of Davidson County roads have deficiencies in 
lane widths and level of service, and problem accident 
locations . There are areas in which highways do not meet 
state standards, bridges that are obsolete and deficient, or 
in the case of accidents, have experienced worse than the 
state average for that particular type of highway. 

The highway system in Davidson County has primarily two 
important functions: to serve abutting land uses and to 
serve through traffic in the heavily traveled north-south 
corridor and the ever increasing demands for access to the 
major cities in the Piedmont Crescent Section of North 
Carolina. 

Improvements in the north-south corridors are underway 
at this time in North Carolina Department of Transportation 
projects on US 52 north from Lexington to welcome and 1-85 
from US 29-70 south of Lexington to Randolph County. Also, 
an eastwest improvement is needed to provide for future 
traffic along the US 64 corridor. Improvements are needed 
for bridges on SR 1713 (Hebron Church Road) and SR 2005 
(Turner Road) because of the low weight limits and the daily 
school buses that use these facilities. 

15 



Capacity, Width and Alignment Deficiencies 

North Carolina's standard for highway construction 
calls for 11 foot lanes on all highways with traffic volumes 
greater than 2000 ADT (average daily traffic) or design 
speeds greater than 50 miles per hour, including all primary 
arterials. A minimum lane width of 9 feet can be tolerated 
on collector roads with an ADT of less than 400 vehicles per 
day. Minimum level of service for minor collector roads 
dictate a 40 mph design speed during peak traffic conditions. 

Design requirements for thoroughfares vary according to 
the desired capacity and level of services to be provided. 
Universal standards in the design of thoroughfares are not 
practical. Each road or highway section must be individually 
analyzed and its design requirements determined on the basis 
of amount and type of projected traffic, existing capacity, 
desired level of service, and available right-of-way. 

The level of service is a function of the ease of 
movement experienced by motorists using the facility. The 
ability of a motorist to drive at a desired speed is dependent 
upon the physical design of the road; the amount and character 
of traffic control devices; the influence and character of 
traffic generated by abutting property; and imposed speed 
restrictions. The level of service is generally indicated 
by the overall travel speed experienced by traffic. Recom- 
mended minimum levels of service for roads, and highways 
included in the proposed Davidson County Thoroughfare Plan 
are given in Table 4. 

TABLE 4 ^ 

MINIMUM LEVELS OF SERVICE FOR ROADS AND HIGHWAYS 

OVERALL TRAVEL SPEED 
FACILITY DURING PEAK TRAFFIC CONDITIONS 

Major and 

Minor Arterials 50-55 MPH 

Major Collector Roads .^. 45-50 MPH 

Minor Collector Roads ' 40 MPH 



From the standpoint of driver convenience, ease of 
operation, and safety, it would be desirable to widen all 
existing roads and highways to provide a minimum lane width 
of 12 feet. However, when considering overall statewide 
needs and available highway revenues, it is found that these 
levels of improvement applied statewide would be impractical. 
It is necessary, therefore, to establish minimum tolerable 
widths for existing roads with respect to traffic demands 
which would be economically feasible. Table 5 gives the 
widths used in determining the existing lane deficiencies in 
the county . 

16 



TABLE 5 



MINIMUM TOLERABLE LANE WIDTHS (in Feet) 



ADT Principal 
Arterial s 

Over 2,000 11 
400- 2,000 
100-400 
Below 100 



Minor 


Collectors 


Arterials 




11 


11 


10 


10 


10 


9 


- 


9 



An analysis of highways in Davidson County was made to 
determine if the projected traffic (year 2005) would exceed 
the practical capacity of the system. The projected volumes 
are shown in Figure 5. Comparing the projected traffic to 
available capacities, it was anticipated that the following 
roads will be experiencing capacity related problems within 
the design period: 

1. Old US 52 (Common NC 8) North of Lexington 

2. US 64 From East of Lexington to SR 2010 

3. NC 8 south of Lexington 

4. NC 109 From Thomasville to Forsyth Co. 

5. NC 150 From 1-85 (TEMP) to Forsyth County 

6. SR 2205 From 1-85 to SR 2247 

There are a number of major roads in the county that 
have substandard widths. Standards established in Table 4 
were used in the analysis. The width needed to bring these 
roads up to standard are given as the recommended cross 
section. Because of the substantial cost of upgrading all 
secondary roads to standard, narrow widths may have to be 
tolerated until sufficient funds are available to provide 
for improvements . 



Traffic Safety 

Traffic accident records are of assistance in locating 
problem areas on the highway system. The 1981 Safety Program 
Listing, obtained from the Traffic Engineering Branch of the 
North Carolina Department of Transportation, lists 9 locations 
as high accident sections of roadway in the County. These 
locations are listed below, along with its ranking relative 
to other high accident locations in the State. A ranking of 
one (1) is the most hazardous location whether by the number 
of accidents or severity of injuries and property damage. 



17 



^ 



\ 






Z' 



HISTORICAL a PROJECTED 
ADT VOLUMES 



YEAR 


FIGURE 5 

ADT VOLUME 


2005 
1980 
I975_ 
1970 

NA 


= 00000 
= 00000 
= 00000 
= 00000 

NOT AVAILABLE 




DAVIDSON COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 

NOOTH CAROUNA DEPARIMENF Of If 



'"l^!^_..=j..-¥i3. '.- 



m^ 




1940 1950 I960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2005 

PERSONS PER VEHICLE TRENDS 

FOR NORTH CAROLINA AND 

DAVIDSON COUNTY 



FIGURE 6 



Concentration Rank 

1. US 29-52 From SR 1297 to SR 1280 100 out of 383 
(Service Rd. to Service Rd. ) 

2. US 29-70 From SR 2022 to SR 1798 109 out of 383 
(Old US 29-70 to Old Greensboro Rd. ) 

3. US 29-70 From SR 1783 to SR 1881 120 out of 383 
(Thomasville City Dump Rd. to Service Rd. ) 

Intersections 

4. US 64 at SR 1239 12 out of 383 
(Service Rd. at Shoaf Wayside) 

5. SR 2055 at SR 2053 28 out of 383 
(Liberty Dr. at Blair Street) 

6. US 64 at SR 2010-2403 43 out of 383 
(Holly Grove Rd. -Howard Black Rd. ) 

7. US 52 at SR 1457-1841 73 out of 383 
Arnold Rd.-City Lake Rd. ) 

8. US 29B-70B at 9th/Ave 102 out of 383 

9. NC 109 at SR 2060 207 out of 383 
(Vance Road) 

Traffic accident records for 1980 to 1982 were studied 
with the high accident locations (15 and above for three 
years) and number listed as follows: 

Location Number of Accidents 

1. I 85 - US 29 15 

2. I 85 - SR 1297 15 

3. US 52 - SR 1472 15 
(Dr. Zimmerman Rd. ) 

4. NC 50 - SR 1453 15 

5. US 29 - US 29A 15 

6. US 52 - SR 1464 16 
(Homer Leonard Rd. ) 

7. US 29 - SR 2123 16 
(National Highway) 

8. US 52 - SR 1468 16 
(Center Church Rd. ) 

9. US 64 - SR 1239 15 
(Service Rd. at Shoaf Wayside) 

10. NC 109 - SR 1753 16 
(Jessie Green Rd. ) 

11. SR 2051 - SR 2054 16 
(Unity Street-Trinity Street) 

12. US 29 - NC 68 17 

13. NC 8 - NC 47 17 

14. US 29 - US 29 B 18 

15. US 29 - SR 1232 18 
' (Sink Inn Rd. ) 



23 



16. NC 8 - SR 2212 
(Fairview Dr. ) 

17. NC 150 - SR 1192 
(Old US 64) 

18. I 85 - NC 47 

19. SR 1147 - SR 1221 

(Old US 29-70S-Tussey Rd. ) 

20. US 29 - SR 1787 
(Stone Rd. ) 

21. NC 109 - SR 1798 
(Old Greensboro Rd. ) 

22. US 29 - SR 1770 
(Albertson Rd. ) 

23. US 52 - SR 1417 
(Leonard Rd. ) 

24. NC 150 - SR 1508 
(Hickory Tree Rd. ) 

25. US 29A - SR 1772 
(Hasty School Rd. ) 

26. US 64 - SR 2010 
(Holly Grove Rd. ) 

27. US 29 - SR 1147 
(Old US 29-70 South) 

28. I 85 - NC 150 

29. NC 109 - SR 2184 

30. US 29 - NC 109 

31. US 29 - SR 1798 
(Old Greensboro Rd. ) 



18 

18 

19 
19 

22 

23 

24 

24 

25 

27 

28 

29 

30 
32 
34 
56 



Bridge Conditions 

Bridges are a vital and unique element of a highway 
system. First, they represent the highest unit investment 
of all elements of the system. Second, any inadequacy or 
deficiency in a bridge reduces the value of the total invest- 
ment. Third, a bridge presents the greatest opportunity of 
all potential highway failures for disruption of community 
welfare. Finally, and most importantly, a bridge represents 
the greatest opportunity of all highway failures for loss of 
life. For these reasons, it is imperative that bridges be 
constructed to the same design standards as the system of 
which they are a part. 

Congress enacted the National Bridge Inspection Program 
Standards on April 27, 1971, implementing the Federal Highway 
Act of 1968. These standards require that all structures 
defined as bridges located on any of the Federal-Aid Highway 
Systems be inspected and the safe load carrying capacity 
computed at regular intervals, not to exceed two years. A 
sufficiency index number has been calcuated for each bridge 
for the purpose of establishing eligibility and priority for 
replacement. The bridges with the highest priority are 
replaced as Federal-Aid Funds and State funds are made 
available. Additional funds have recently been provided by 
Congress for bridge replacement. 



24 



The North Carolina Bridge Maintenance Unit has been 
assisted by consultants in inspecting all bridges on the 
State Highway System. All bridges in Davidson County have 
been analyzed, rated, appraised, inventoried, and the resulting 
data has been reduced to a more readily useable form as a 
manangement tool . 

A sufficiency rating was used in the analysis to deter- 
mine the deficiency of a particular bridge. The sufficiency 
rating is a method of evaluating factors, which are indicative 
of bridge sufficiency to remain in service. Factors included, 
structural adequacy and safety, serviceability and functional 
obsolescence, essentiality for public use, type structure 
and traffic safety features. The result of this method is a 
percentage in which 100 percent would represent an entirely 
sufficient bridge and zero percent would represent and 
entirely insufficient or deficient bridge. A sufficiency 
rating of 50 or less qualifies for Federal Bridge Replacement 
funds . 

Table 6 shows deficient bridges located on routes 
included in the thoroughfare plan. 



TABLE 6 


DEFICIENT BRIDGES IN DAVIDSON COUNTY 


MAP 


SUFFICIENCY 






INDEX 


RATING % 




LOCATION 


1 


16.9 


SR 


1800 @ Rich Fork Creek 


2 


18.8 


*SR 


2005 @ Rich Fork Creek 


3 


24.6 


*SR 


1700 @ Abbotts Creek 


4 


24.7 


SR 


1485 @ Muddy Creek 


5 


27.0 


SR 


1738 @ Rich Fork Creek 


6 


27.6 


SR 


1700 @ Abbotts Creek 


7 


27.8 


SR 


1755 @ Abbotts Creek 


8 


27.9 


SR 


1477 @ Reedy Creek 


9 


28.3 


1-85 @ Southern RR 


10 


28.3 


SR 


1104 @ Swearing Creek 


11 


30.0 


SR 


1800 @ Abbotts Creek 


12 


31.5 


SR 


2017 @ Hambys Creek 


13 


32.0 


-SR 


1457 (s> Swearing Creek 


14 


34.4 


*NC 


8 @ Winston-Salam SB RR 


15 


48.1 


SR 


1493 @ Huffmans Creek 


16 


28.4 


1-85 @ Southern RR (Rowan Coilin) | 


17 


49.8 


NC 


47 @ Flat Swamp Creek 


18 


N/A 


SR 


2205 @ Abbotts Creek 



*In current Transportation Improvement Program FY 85-85 
-US 52 project will replace bridge 
N/A not available at this time 



In Figure 7, a map of Davidson County is shown with the 
location of each deficient bridge in reference to the map 
index given. 

25 



V. Thoroughfare Plan 

The recommended thoroughfare plan for Davidson County 
is shown in Figure 8. Elements of the plan are initially 
classified as urban or rural. The areas near Lexington and 
Thomasville are delineated as urban thoroughfare planning 
areas since mutually approved thoroughfare plans are in 
effect for these municipalities. 

Only major thoroughfares are shown within the urban 
planning area. This was necessary due to the limited detail 
that could be shown. 

Elements of the Davidson County Plan are as follows: 

Principal Arterials 

1-85 - South of Lexington to Guilford County 

US 52 - (Under Construction), Lexington to Welcome 

Minor Arterials 

US 64 East - from Lexington to Randolph County; the proposed 
improvement is to widen to a four lane urban section 
from eastern corporate limits of Lexington to SR 2010 
(Holly Grove Road). 

US 64 West - from Lexington to Davie County 

Collector Road System 

The rural collector routes serve primarily intra-county 
travel. The major collector roads supplement the arterial 
system by providing an interconnecting network between 
smaller population centers and the arterial system. The 
minor collector roads collect traffic from the local roads 
and carry it to a higher system facility. Major and minor 
collector roads of Davidson County are as follows: 

Major Collector Roads 

1. NC 150 

2. NC 8 (US 52 Bus. N. ) - It is recommended that this 

section of highway from the northern corporate 
limits of Lexington to SR 1412 be widened to a 
five lane urban section. 

3. NC 8 South - This section of highway is recommended to 

be brought up to 2 lane rural standards from NC 49 
to NC 47. 



29 



4. NC 47 - Construct overpass on NC 47 at Southern Railway 

at Linwood. 

5. NC 109 N. - It is recommended that the section of 

highway from northern corporate limits of Thomas- 
ville to the Forsyth County line be constructed as 
a four lane divided facility on new location. 

6. NC 109 S. - The section from US 64 east to south of 

Thomasville near SR 2057 (Lambeth Rd. ) should be 
constructed as a four lane divided facility. 

7. US 29-70 

8. SR 1002 

9. SR 2010 

10. SR 2205 - It is recommended that the section of highway 

between Talbert Blvd. and 1-85 be brought up to 
five lane urban section and the section of highway 
between 1-85 and SR 2247 be brought up to two lane 
rural standards. 

11. SR 1798 (Old Greensboro Rd. ) 

12. SR 1741 (Wallburg-Hight Point Rd. ) 

Minor Collector Roads 

The following roads are classified as minor collectors 
and require minor widening for safety as listed in Appendix 
A, Table 1. 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 



SR 2304 
SR 2522 
SR 2501 
SR 2351 
SR 2255 
SR 2248 
SR 2104 
SR 2123 
SR 1700 
SR 2928 
SR 1738 
SR 1750 
SR 1744 
SR 1802 
SR 1813 
SR 1499 
SR 1508 
SR 1510 
SR 1505 



Parks Road) 
Handy Road) 

S. Main Street Extension) 
Flat Swamp Road) 
Hedrick Mill Road) 
Allred Road) 
Cunningham Brick Road) 
National Highway) 
Friendship-Ledford Road) 
Miller Road) 
Westover Drive) 



Mock Road) 

Midway School Road) 

Ridge Road) 

Enterprise Road) 

Hickory Tree Road) 

N. Payne Road) 

Payne Road) 

SR 1481-1472 (Welcome-Arcadia Rd.-Dr. Zimmerman Rd. ) 
SR 1468-1457 (Center Church Road-Arnold Road) 
SR 1485-1495 (Hampton Road-Muddy Creek Road) 
SR 1435-1186 (Becky Hill Rd.-Koontz Rd. ) 
SR 1192 (Old US 64 west) 
SR 1208 (Mt. Carmel Road) 
SR 1213 (Tyro Road) 
SR 1147 (Old 29-70 South) 
NC 47 (W. of NC 8) 
SR 1155 (Swicegood Road) 

SR 1104 (Central Carolina Boat Club Rd. ) 

30 



r^ ^^" 



\ 



\ 



r 




FIGURE 8 

DAVIDSON COUNTY 
THOROUGHFARE PLAN 



PRINCIPAL ARTERIflLS 
INTERSTATE 

OTHER 


EXISTING 


PROPOSED 


^^^m 


H 


■■ ■ 


nmiii 


III 


III IMI 


MINOR ARTERIALS 


■ ■■■■■■IMII 


■ !■ 


IBM III 


MAJOR COLLECTORS 


Illlllll Ill 


1 


Illlllll mill 


MINOR COLLECTORS 




... 


.... _. 


URBAN MAJOR THOR0UGHF»1E 







URBAN FREEWAY OR 
EXPRESSWAY 


"""— -~- 


™ 


„„ ... 


URBAN THOROUGHFARE 
PLANNING AREA BOUNDARY 


• • 






* 



DAVIDSON COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 

NOBTH CAfiOUNA DEPABtMiNT OF TRANSPOEIATION 



A y ■. . \ 



s^ \ 



\ .<'' 



VI. IMPROVEMENT PRIORITIES 



An evaluation of the North Carolina highway program 
from administrative, historical, and financial perspectives 
indicates the following objectives are of greatest importance: 

•To improve the North Carolina arterial system to reduce 
travel costs and improve travel service between urban 
centers . 

.To improve the level of service and safety of all roads 
and highways on the State system in a cost effective 
manner . 

.To encourage economic development. 

.To preserve the natural and human environment. 

.To allocate funds to projects in a fair and equitable 
way. 

(1) User benefits, (2) cost, (3) probability that a project 
will stimulate economic development, (4) quantification of 
environmental impacts, and (5) relationship of a project to 
the State arterial system provide a basis for evaluating 
projects as to how well they meet the objectives. 

User benefits include cost savings resulting from an 
improvement project through reduction in vehicle operating 
costs, travel time costs, and accident costs. The estimated 
through travel served by a project provides a measure of the 
importance of a project to the State arterial system. 
Heavier volumes of through traffic are generally found on 
the more important facilities. 

Estimation of environmental impacts of a project is one 
of the more difficult evaluations. Environmental factors 
usually considered in highway project evaluation can be 
divided into three major categories--physical, social and/or 
cultural, and economic environmental considerations (Table 
7). Many of these are accounted for when a project is 
evaluated with respect to user benefits, cost, and economic 
development potential. However, thirteen environmental 
factors are generally not considered in these evaluations. 
They are the environmental impacts of a project on (1) air 
quality (2) water resources, (3) soils and geology, (4) 
wildlife, (5) vegetation, (6) neighborhoods, (7) noise, (8) 
educational facilities, (9) churches, (10) park and recrea- 
tional facilities, (11) historic sites and landmarks, (12) 
public health and safety, and (13) aesthetics. The summation 
of both positive and negative impact probabilities with 
respect to these factors provides a measure of the relative 
environmental impact of a project. 



33 



Table 7 



1 

Environmental considerations 


_^ — ■ 

Physical 


Social and/or 


Economic 


Environment 


Cultural Environment 


Environment 


Air quality 


Housing 


Businesses 


Water resources 


Neighborhoods 


Employment 


Soils and geology 


Noise 


Economic development 


Wildlife 


Education facilities 


Public utilities 


Vegetation 


Churches 


Transportation costs 




Park and recreational 


Capital costs 




facilities 






Public health and safety 


Operation and 
maintenance costs 




National defense 






Aesthetics 





The evaluation of the proposed Davidson County projects 
with respect to user benefits, estimated costs, probability 
that economic development will be stimulated, environmental 
impact, and through travel service is given in Table 8. 



Primary and Secondary Highway System 

Recommended priorites for construction and the estimated 
costs (in 1983 dollars) are shown in Table 9. The recommended 
priorities are based on needs, anticipated future traffic 
volumes, and the technical data developed in this report. 
These projects are placed in three priority groups in order 
of probable need. 

Since conditions are constantly changing with time, 
these priorities should be reevaluated periodically by the 
County and Division Engineer. 

Other desirable improvements are the upgrading of the 
County's unpaved and narrow collectors. Although adequate 
from a capacity standpoint, the poor operational characteris- 
tics of these facilties will make improvements desirable to 
enhance their safety and functional design. 



34 



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1. SR 2205, 1-85 

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Holly Grove R 



f 



Bridge Replacement Priorities 

The following deficient bridges were placed in three 
priorites groups based on computer data information supplied 
by the Bridge Maintenance Unit of the North Carolina Division 
of Highways. Data such as remaining life, length, width and 
sufficiency rating were used to determine the priorities as 
given below in Table 10. 



TABLE 10 



IMPROVEMENT 


PRIORITIES FOR DEFICIENT BRIDGES 


IN DAVIDSON CO. 










Estimated 










Replacement 


Priority 1 






Cost(S1983) 


1. 


SR 1700 


@ 


Creek 


2,010,000 


2. 


SR 1755 


@ 


Creek 


610,600 


3. 


SR 1700 


@ 


Creek 


335,400 


4. 


SR 1457 


@ 


Swearing Creek 


297,600 


5. 


SR 1800 


@ 


Rich Creek 


1,449,600 


5. 


SR 1493 


@ 


Huffmans Creek 


345,600 


Priority 2 








1. 


SR 1738 


@ 


Rich Creek 


455,800 


2. 


SR 1477 


@ 


Reedy Creek 


352,600 


3. 


SR 2005 


@ 


Rich Creek 


566,400 


4. 


SR 2017 


@ 


Hambys Creek 


821,750 


5. 


NC 8 @ Winston-Salem SB RR 


1,884,000 


Priority 3 








1. 


SR 1800 


@ 


Rich Creek 


1,545,500 


2. 


1-85 @ : 


Southern RR 


3,220,000 


3. 


SR 1004 


@ 


Swearing Creek 


1,171,200 


4. 


SR 1485 


@ 


Muddy Creek 


1,210,000 


5. 


1-85 @ : 


Southern RR 


1,171,200 


6. 


NC 47 @ 


Flat Swamp Creek 


1,092,000 

1 



37 



VII. IMPLEMENTATION 



There are several tools which are available for use by 
a county to assist in the implementation of a Thoroughfare 
Plan. They are as follows: 



State-County Adoption of Thoroughfare Plan 

If requested, the Department of Transportation in 
cooperation with a county will cooperatively develop and 
mutually approve a County Thoroughfare plan. The mutually 
approved plan would serve as a guide to the Department of 
Transportation in the development of the road and highway 
system of the County. The approval of the plan by the 
County would enable standard road regulations and land use 
controls to be effectively used to assist in the implementa- 
tion of the plan. 



Subdivision Controls 

The subdivision regulations require every subdivider to 
submit to the county planning commission a plan of his pro- 
posed subdivision and requires that the subdivision be con- 
structed to certain standards. Through this process, it is 
possible to require the subdivision streets to conform to 
the Thoroughfare plan and to reserve or protect necessary 
rights-of-way for projected roads and highways that are to 
become a part of the Thoroughfare plan. The construction of 
subdivision streets to adequate standards would reduce 
maintenance costs and would facilitiate the transfer of the 
streets to the State Highway System. Appendix B outlines 
the recommended design standards. 



Land Use Controls 

Land use regulations are an important tool in that they 
will regulate future land development and minimize undesirable 
development along roads and highways. The land use regulatory 
system can improve highway safety by requiring sufficient 
building setbacks to provide for adequate sight distances 
and by requiring off-street parking. 

Funding 

The majority of the highway improvements are scheduled 
and funded by the Transportation Improvement Program. The 
Board of Transportation regularly conducts public meetings 
to obtain input from the public of their needs for highway 
improvements . 



38 



i 



However, not all roadway improvements are covered by 
this procedure. Nearly all secondary road work is done on a 
county by county basis. These funds (county construction 
account) are used to pave unimproved roads, widen roadways, 
stabilize dirt roads, make minor alignment improvements, and 
even construct short connectors when appropriate. The 
county commissioners are encouraged to work with the Division 
Engineer when the county's priority list is developed. Many 
of the minor improvements recommended may be realized by 
using the county's construction account funds and cooperatively 
developing the county's priority list with the Division 
Engineer. 

WIB/wp 



39 



APPENDICES 



APPENDIX A 
THOROUGHFARE TABULATIONS 

Typical Cross Sections 

Typical cross sections recommended by the Thoroughfare 
Planning Unit are shown in Appendix A, Figure 1, and listed 
in Appendix A, Table 1. 

Cross section "A" is typical for controlled access 
freeways. The 46 foot grassed median is the minimum desir- 
able median width, but there could be some variation from 
this depending upon design considerations. Slopes of 8:1 
into 3 foot drainage ditches are desirable for traffic 
safety. Right-of-way requirements would typically vary up- 
ward from 250 feet depending upon cut and fill requirements. 

Cross section "B" is typical for four lane divided 
highways in rural areas which may have only partial or no 
control of access. The minimum median width for this cross 
section is 30 feet, but a wider median is desirable. Design 
requirements for slopes and drainage would be similar to 
cross section "A", but there may be some variation from this 
depending upon right-of-way constraints. 

Cross section "C", seven lane urban, and cross section 
"D", five lane urban, are typical for major thoroughfares 
where frequent left turns are anticipated as a result of 
abutting development or frequent street intersections . 

Cross sections "E" and "F" are used on major thorough- 
fares where left turns and intersecting streets are not as 
frequent. Left turns would be restricted to a few selected 
intersections . 

Cross section "G" is recommended for urban boulevards 
or parkways to enhance the urban environment and to improve 
the compatibility of major thoroughfares with residential 
areas. A minimum median width of 24 feet is recommended 
with 30 feet being desirable. 

Typical cross section "H" is recommended for major 
thoroughfares where projected travel indicates a need for 
four travel lanes; but traffic is not excessively high, left 
turning movements are light, and right-of-way is restricted. 
An additional left turn lane would probably be required at 
major intersections. 

Thoroughfares which are proposed to function as one-way 
traffic carriers would typically require cross section "I". 
Cross section "J" and "K" are usually recommended for minor 
throughfares since these facilities usually serve both land 



A-1 



service and traffic service functions. Cross section "J" 
would be used on those minor throughfares where parking on 
both sides is needed as a result of more intense development. 

Cross section "L" is used in rural areas or for staged 
construction of a wider multilane cross section. On some 
thoroughfares projected traffic volumes may indicate that 
two travel lanes will adequately serve travel for a consider- 
able period of time. 

The curb and gutter urban cross sections all illustrate 
the sidewalk adjacent to the curb with a buffer or utility 
strip between the sidewalk and the minimum right-of-way 
line. This permits adequate setback for utility poles. If 
it is desired to move the sidewalk further away from the 
street to provide additional separation for pedestrains or 
for aesthetic reasons, additional right-of-way must be 
provided to insure adequate setback for utility poles. 

Right-of-ways shown for the typical cross sections are 
the minimum rights-of-way required to contain the street, 
sidewalks, utilities, and drainage facilities. Cut and fill 
requirements may require either additional right-of-way or 
construction easements. Obtaining construction easements is 
becoming the more common practice for urban thoroughfare 
construction. 

If there is sufficient bicycle travel along the thorough- 
fare to justify a bicycle lane or bikeway, additional right- 
of-way may be required to contain the bicycle facilities.. 
The North Carolina Bicycle Facility and Program Handbook 
should be consulted for design standards for bicycle facili- 
ties . 

Recommended typical cross sections for thoroughfares 
were derived on the basis of projected traffic, existing 
capacities, desirable levels of service and available right- 
of-way. The recommended typical cross sections for the 
thoroughfares are given in Appendix B along with other 
pertinent information. 



The North Carolina Bicycle Facility and Program Handbook , 
Barton-Aschman Associates, Inc., April, 1975. 



A-2 



APPENDIX A 

DAVIDSCDN COUNTY THriROUCHI- ARE PLAN STREET TABULATION AND RECOMMENDA F IONS 

* » » )(• «■ * * » ■)(■ tt » V: )(■ « » » )(■ «■ X «- « » X K- » » ■» * )<■ If If if )f )f -If » «• K- » » M- )(■ jf )f M «• » )f « X- «■ if )f X X- if if X- if X- if if if X X- X- X If if if « if X- » » X X- K if if 

* if EXISTING if ■» if if RECOMMENDED » 
» if X - SECTION x-CAPACITYif « if X - SECTION » 

* FACILITY & SECTION ifDISTxRDWYwROUx-CURRENT if 1932 if 2005 if RDWAY if ROW » 
» K- MI * FT *FT x( FUTURE ix ADTS x ADTS )f (ULT) »(ULT>if 

* « » if » if «■ » if X X- «■ if # if if if X X- «■ » ■» «■ X- X «• «■ K if M- X » if » « X- * if -if X •» if » «• «■ « » » X X X- * if X- X X if X- x -x- «■ «• ■» «• •«■ x; if X « « X- ft * if X » -X -X- X if 

«-I B5< RANDOLPH CO-US 29/70) 30.00 72 400 A88O0 13000 SSOOO ADO ADQ » 

» » 

«US 29/70 (TEfiP I 35) * 

if ROWAN CO. -US 29-70 B 7.34 48 260 52000 2030© 42500 ADO ADQ if 

K US 29-70 B-US 52-NC 8 3.73 48 260 52000 3840© 42500 ADQ ADQ « 

* US 52-NC 8-E CL LEXGTN 1.03 43 480 52000 28500 42500 ADO ADQ if 

* E CL LEXGTN-NC 109 3.21 43 260 52000 24500 42500 ADQ ADQ if 

* NC 109 -RANDOLPH CO. 2.30 48 260 52000 2690© 42500 ADQ ADQ x- 

* » 
» * 
*US 52 (COMMON NC 8 NORTH) if 
» N CL LEXGTN -SR 1412 .33 22 1 OG 6450 14900 2200© B 20© * 

* SR 1412-SR 1499 6.42 43 200 52000 9900 2200© ADO ADQ * 

* SR 1499 -FORSYTH CO. 4.64 48 2©© 52000 900© 22©©© ADO ADQ if 
» tt 

* ■• * 
*US 64 WEST - if 
» DAVIE CO.-NC 15© 3.52 24 150 5200 3400 6200 B 2©0 * 

* NC 150-SR 1237 2.97 24 150 520© 410© _ 620© B 200 » 

* SR 1237-SR 1239 ' .97 36 15© 12000 550© 85©© H ADQ * 

* SR 1239-W CL LEXGTN .07 48 150 5200© 6100 12500 ADQ ADQ if 
if * 
» w 
*US 64 EAST s 

* E CL LEXGTN-SR 201© 1.21 24 1 50 ' 52©© 10©©© 175©© H ADQ « 
» SR 2010-NC 109 7.56 24 150 52©© 4©©0 6200 H 2©0 * 

* NC 109-RANDnLPH CO. 8.54 24 1 50 520© 3000 65©© H 200 » 

* » 
» «■ 
i*NC 3 SOUTH * 
K MONTGOMERY CO.-NC 49 1.67 24 20© 520© 340© 5200 ADO ADO if 
» NC 49-SR 2351 7.45 2© 1©© 4O©0 125© 4200 L ADQ * 

* SR 2351 -HIGH ROCK LAKE 4.14 2© 100 400© 125© 42©© L ADQ * 
•if HIGH ROCK LAKE~SR 1130 3.73 24 60 52©© 25©© 52©© L ADQ » 

* SR 113©-SR 1254 1.81 2 4 60 520© 4©©0 7500 H 70 » 
•if SR 1254-S CL LEXGTN .99 24 6© 52©© 36©© 1259© H 70 * 
» « 

if ■» 

*NC 47 V: 

* RANDOLPH CO.-NC 1 ©9 .3© 2© 60 577© 1 3©0 260© (L) (10©) if 

* SR 2520-SR 2515 1.55 24 60 750© 254© 4©©© ADO ADQ if 
■K- SR 2515-SR 2501 1.85 44 6© 24©00 4220 8600 ADO ADO if 
» SR 2501 -N CL DENTON .59 18 6© 12©©© 188© 32©0 ADQ ADQ •» 
» N CL DENTON-SR 23©4 9.94 18 6© 52©0 1780 320© CD ■:i©0)if 
« SR 2304-NC 8 3.1© 18 60 520© 178© 32©Q (L) (1Q0)x 



■X 



fl: 



* » 

■ifNC 49 • if 

* RANDOLPH CO.-NC 109 2.21 24 1©© 52©© 28©0 4200 ADQ ADQ * 

* NC 109 -STANLEY CO. 6.56 24 1©© 52©0 39©G 52©© ADQ ADQ if 

* X 

* if 
*NC 62 •)* 
■» RANDOLPH CO.-E CL THOMVL 1.35 2© 6© 52©© 29©© 4300 <L) (lOO)^* 
if X- 



APPENDIX A CONT'D 
DAVIDSON COUNTY THOROUGHFARE PLAN STREET TABULATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS 

K » «• ■)(■ «■ » «■ )(■ X- X- » X- » X- » » «■ ■)(■ X- « )(■ « «• «• «• » ■)(• K j^t )( » X •« » «• «• ■)(■ » » «• «■ «■ «■ X- «• X- X- «• X X- X- « X- «■ X W X- X «■ X- X «■ X' » )(■ X- ■)< )(• X- X )<■ X «• «■ X X- S «■ X 

» X EXISTING » » X » RECOMMENDED « 

« X X - SECTION xCAPACITYx » « X - SECTION » 

X FACILITY & SECTION »DISTxRDWY»ROW»CURRENT » 1982 » 2005 » RDWAY » ROW » 

X X MI X FT xFT xt FUTURE)* ADTS » ADTS w (ULT) x<ULT)x 

X X X- X X X X «• X X X X «• «■ X X K ■)<■ X X X X X X X X « X X X « X «■ X X- X X X X X X X X X X X X K X X- X X X X X X X X- X X X «• •)(• X X X X X X- X X- X X' » X X X- X X X 

»NC 109 

» RANDOLPH CO.-NC 49 

X NC 49-SR 252S 

X SR 2528 -SR 251 1 

« SR 251 1-N CL DENTON 

X N CL DEN TON -US 64 

X US 64-SR 206? 

» SR 2067 -ROYAL OAKS 

* ROYAL OAKS- -GUILFORD ST. 
X GUILFORD ST.-N CL THOMVL 
» N CL THOMVL. -FORSYTH CO. 

X 

*NC 150 

» I 35<TEMP)-SR 1176 

* SR 1 1 76-US 64 
X US 64-SR 1493 
X SR 1493-FORSYTH CO. 

X 

XSR 1001 

X RANDOLPH CO.-SR 2414 

X 

»SR 1002 

X SR 2501 -W CL DENTON 

* U CL DENTON-ROWAN CO. 

X 

»SR 1155 

X NC 1 50 S- NC 1 50 N 

X 

XSR 1457 

» SR 1 463-NC S 

X 

XSR 146S 

X NC 150-SR 1453 

» SR 1453-SR 1457 

X 

»SR 1472 

» SR 1431-SR 1479 

X 

XSR 1 473 

* SR 1502 -US 52 

K 

«SR 1477 

X SR 146a-SR 1441 

X 

«SR 1 479 

X SR 1472-SR 1502 

X 

XSR 1431 

X SR 1 493-SR 1 472 

X 

XSR 1485 

» FORSYTH CO.-SR 1495 

X 

XSR 1 493 

X FORSYTH CO.-NC 150 

X 
K 

















«■ 


"7 i 'T 


20 


100 


5 770 


1 750 


3000 


( L. ) 


( 1 00 ) X 


.45 


24 


100 


7500 


2000 


3200 


ADQ 


ADQ )<■ 


4.74 


20 


60 


5770 


3200 


5200 


<L) 


(1O0)» 


.36 


52 


60 


24600 


5300 


7500 


ADQ 


ADQ X 


9.62 


24 


60 


7500 


5500 


7500 


ADQ 


ADQ X 


5.72 


24 


60 


7500 


7000 


10200 


B 


200 X 


1 .72 


64 


30 


52000 


1 230y 


13200 


ADQ 


ADQ * 


.91 


39 


60 


1 8000 


10900 


15000 


ADQ 


ADQ « 


1 .33 


36 


60 


1 3000 


6500 


9500 


ADO 


ADQ X 


9 . 99 


20 


60 


5770 


5900 


3000 


B 


200 » 


6 . 6 1 


20 


60 


5770 


2500 


4200 


(L) 


<100)» 


2.60 


20 


60 


5770 


4300 


5500 


< 1... ) 


( 1 0O)«- 


5.25 


20 


60 


5770 


5900 


7300 


B 


200 X 


7.12 


20 


60 


5770 


10200 


1 4500 


B 


200 X 

X 


3.16 


72 


60 


6500 


1200 


2000 


(L) 


X 

(lOOix 

X 


.57 


24 


60 


7500 


1 1 00 


1 600 


(L) 


( lOO.lx 


6.90 


18 


60 


5200 


700 


1 200 


(L) 


< 1O0)» 

X 


4.40 


1 a 


60 


5200 


1000 


1400 


( 1... ) 


X 

( 1 00 ) X 
■if 


3.10 


13 


60 


5200 


1 000 


1 300 


< L ) 


(100)* 

X 


2.80 


16 


60 


4500 


700 


1 250 


( L ) 


X 

< 1 00 ) X 


.20 


13 


60 


5200 


700 


1 250 


(L) 


(100)* 
«■ 

X 


. 80 


18 


60 


5200 


700 


1000 


( L ) 


(1O0)x 

X 


1 .00 


18 


60 


5200 


250 


350 


(L) 


X 

( 1 00 ) X 

X 


1 .30 


13 


60 


5200 


300 


450 


(L> 


X 

( 1 00 ) X 

•X 


.70 


13 


60 


5200 


300 


600 


(L) 


( 1 00 )x 

X- 


1 .60 


18 


60 


5200 


350 


450 


(L) 


X 

( 1 00 ) X 

X 


4.10 


16 


60 


4500 


400 


600 


(L) 


X 

<1©0)» 
«• 


4.60 


16 


60 


4500 


400 


600 


(L) 


< 100)x 



APPENDIX A CONT'D 
DAVIDSON fiOUNTY THOROUGHFARE PLAN STREET TABULATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS 

» )<■ X » ■» K » » » « X » » ■» «■ » )( X- X «■ X X X X X X X X X X •)(■ X- X X ¥: X X X- X X X X X » X X «■ X- X X )(• X X X- X X; X X X X X X X X «■ X X X X X •» X X X X- X ■)(■ X X •» 

* » EXISTING X » X » RECOMMENDED x 

* X X - SECTION xCAPACITYx x x X - SECTION » 
X F-ACILITY & SECTION wDISTmRDWY^ROWxCDRRENT x 1932 x 2005 w RDWAY x ROW x 
X X MI •» FT XFT «•'; FUTURE)* ADTS » ADTS x (IJLT) x(ULT)« 

X X X X- X X X X X « X X- X- X X K- ¥r )(■ X M X- X K- X ■)(• X X- X X X X X- «■ X- X X M- X X X- ■)(■ X- X X X' X- X X- X X «• X- X )(■ X X X X X X X X )(■ X X- X X X X X X X X )(■ X X X X X X 

xSR 1495 X 

2.00 16 60 4500 300 600 (L> 



* NC 150-SR 1435 

* 

XSR 1493 

X SR 1 493 -SR 1 49" 

X 

XSR 1 499 

X NC 150-US 52 



2.00 



6.31 



20 60 



18 



5200 



140 



650 1 000 ( L ) 



■;i0O)x 

X- 

«■ 

( 1 00 ) X 

X 

X 

(100)» 



XSR 1700 

* SR 1711 -SR 1793 

X 

XSR 1711 

X SR 2932- FORSYTH CO. 

« 

«SR 172i 

* SR 1802-SR 1 ^22 

X 

»SR i 722 

* SR r721-SR 1716 

X 

XSR 1735 

X SR 1741 -SR 1982 

X 

XSR 1 738 

* SR 1735- GUILFORD CO. 



5 . 20 1 8 60 



5 . 60 



1 .70 



3 60 



1 .70 20 60 



,20 20 60 



60 



5200 



5200 



5750 



5200 



500 



600 (L) 



950 1400 (Li 



,80 20 60 



200 



S0O 



400 (L) 



( I.- ) 



00 (L) 



< 1 ) X 
* 

K 

( 1 0O)» 
X 
X- 

( 100)» 

X 
X 

( 1 ) X 
» 
«• 

( 1 ) * 

X 
X 

( 1 00)x 



XSR 1741 

* SR 1 755 -SR 1 09 

X 

XSR 1 744 

X SR 1733-SR 1755 

X 

*SR 1 755 

X NC 109-SR 1976 

X SR 1976-SR 1761 

X SR 1761 ~SR 1757 

» SR 175 7 -GUILFORD CO. 

X 

*SR 1756 

X NC 109-SR 1755 

X SR 1755-SR 1741 

X 

XSR 1763 

X SR 1776-GUILFORD CO. 

X 

XSR 1772 

X NC 109 -US 29A/70A 

* US 29 A/ 70 A -SR 1 700 

X 

XSR 1 776 

X SR 1772-SR 1763 



6.00 


'? f-i 


60 


5750 


600 


1000 


(L) 


noo5» 

X 


3.50 


1 6 


60 


4500 


330 


600 


( L ) 


(. 1 00)* 

X 


2.00 


18 


60 


5200 


550 


750 


(L) 


(100)» 


.90 


16 


60 


4500 


1 200 


1 300 


■ L ) 


< 1 00 )x 


.60 


24 


60 


7500 


1 700 


2200 


ADO 


ADQ X 


3.40 


18 


60 


5200 


1 700 


2200 


(L) 


< 1 00 ;x 

X 


. 90 


24 


60 


7500 


1000 


1200 


ADO 


X- 

ADO X 


3 . 1 


18 


60 


5200 


700 


1 000 


( 1... :) 


(1 00)M 
X 


1 . 30 


13 


60 


5200 


400 


500 


< L ) 


X 
( 100)* 

X 


2.42 


24 


60 


7500 


2300 


4200 


ADO 


ADQ » 


. 77 


13 


60 


5200 


900 


1200 


(L) 


(1O0)» 



1 . 30 20 60 



5750 



720 1000 (L) 



<100)x 

X* 



APPENDIX A CONT'D 
DAVIDSON COUNTY THOROUGHFARE PLAN STREET TABULATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS 

» « ■» ft » K » «• )(■ K- •» H: » «■ » K- «■ » ■)(■ «• * » ■)(■ » X » X- «• ■» V: » «• ji- » » «■ » » ■)(• )(• ■» » » •» «• «• «• «■ ■)( ■)< » X « X V: X X X X «• X » X X- X- «■ ■» X X X- «■ «■ » * X X- )(■ ■» ■» » 

» * EXISTING « » » * RECOMMENDED « 

X » X - SECTION »CAPACITY» » « X - SECTION * 

* FACILITY 5, SECTION »DISTkRDWYxROUI«CURRENT » 1982 «■ 2005 « RDWAY » ROW « 

•X * MI * FT xFT »( FUTURE)* ADTS ■» ADTS » (ULT) x(ULT)* 

« X X )(■ X X W » )f X- W X « X «• X X- )(■ X » X » X K- X X » X )(• X X X X M X X X X X » W X X » X X X- X )!■ -X- K X ■» X ■» ■» X «■ ■)(■ » X X K X- X- X X K X ■)!■ X X «• X- K X «• «■ )(■ « 

•xSR 1 798 » 

8.24 13 100 



« NC 109 -US 29/70 

» 

»SR 1800 

X NC 109-SR 1802 

»SR 1802 

X BR 2932-SR 1800 



4500 1300 2000 <L) 



2.30 13 60 



4.30 IS 60 5200 



(100)» 

•X 
X 

■; 1 00 ) « 
«■ 

•X 

350 1 1 00 (I... ) ( 1 00) X 



850 1 100 (L) 



*SR 1813 

X SR i993-SR 1344 



,.50 18 60 5200 350 1 1 OO (L) dOO)* 



•XSR 1982 

X SR 1735-FORSYTH CO. 

* 

»SR 2005 

* SR 2123-SR 2010 
» 

*SR 2010 

X SR 21S4-SR 21 18 

X SR 21 13 -US 64 

» 

XSR 2017 

* SR 2010-SR 2020 

X 

XSR 2020- 

•» SR 2123--SR 2010 

X 

XSR 2123 

* US 29/70-SR 2020 

■X 

»SR 2205 

■X I -85SR 2247 

»SR 2247 

X SR 2205-SR 2248 

X 

KSR 2248 

* SR 2247-NC 48 

X 

XSR 2304 

* NC 8-NC 47 

X 

XSR 2351 

» NC 47-W CL DENTON 

X 

*SR 2501 

« SR 1002-SR 2522 

X 

*SR 2517 

* NC 47 -SR 1001 

»SR 2522 

X SR 2501 -RANDOLPH CO. 

■X 
X 



1 .80 18 60 5200 
5.95 20 60 5750 



.30 38 60 18000 300 400 ADQ ADQ » 

2.80 16 60 4500 300 1100 (L) (100)* 

* 

1500 2000 <L) <100)» 
1700 2200 <L) <100)* 

L ) (100) » 
* 

■X 

(100)* 
«■ 

X 

L) (10O)« 

X 



1 .80 20 60 5750 150 200 



1 .90 16 60 4500 



■ps(>t 



300 ( L ) 



.40 20 60 5750 900 1200 



20 18 60 5200 5000 7500 I. 



(100)* 

* 

700 1000 (L) (100)* 

* 

X 

1.60 16 60 4500 650 750 (L) dOO)* 



2.20 20 60 5750 



6.20 16 60 4500 550 



42 44 60 24000 108© 1400 ADQ 



.40 13 60 5200 300 400 (L) 



1 .70 20 60 5750 



4.60 16 60 4500 



200 



(L) (100)* 
* 

ADQ X 
« 
* 

<1O0)» 

* 

* 

400 (L) (100)* 

» 

250 (L) (100)* 



APPENDIX B 

RECOMMENDED DEFINITIONS AND DESIGN STANDARDS 
FOR SUBDIVISION ORDINANCES 



DEFINITIONS: 
I . Streets and Roads : 
A. Rural Roads 

1. Principal Arterial - A rural link in a network 
of continuous routes serving corridor movements 
having trip length and travel density character- 
istics indicative of substantial statewide or 
interstate travel and existing solely to 

serve traffic. This network would consist of 
Interstate routes and other routes designated 
as principal arterials. 

2. Minor Arterial - A rural link in a network 
joining cities and larger towns and providing 
intrastate and intercounty service at rela- 
tively high overall travel speeds with mini- 
mum interference to through movement. 

3. Major Collector - A road which serves major 
intracounty travel corridors and traffic gen- 
erators and provides access to the Arterial 
system. 

4. Minor Collector - A road which provides ser- 
vice to small local communities and links the 
locally important traffic generators with 
their rural hinterland. 

5. Local Road - A local road that serves primarily 
to provide access to adjacent land and for 
travel over relatively short distances. 

B- Urban Streets 

1. Major Thoroughfares - Major thoroughfares 

consist of Interstate, other freeway, express- 
way, or parkway links, and major streets that 
provide for the expeditious movement of high 
volumes of traffic within and through urban 
areas . 



B-1 



2. Minor Thoroughfares - Minor thoroughfares are 
important streets in the city system and per- 
foinn the function of collecting traffic from 
local access streets and carrying it to the 
major thoroughfare system. Minor thoroughfares 
may be used to supplement the major thorough- 
fare system by facilitating a minor through- 
traffic movement and may also serve abutting 
property. 

3- Local Street - A local street is any link not 
on a higher-order urban system and serves 
primarily to provide direct access to abutting 
land and access to higher systems. 

Specific Type Rural or Urban Streets 

1. Freeway, expressway, or parkway - Divided 
multilane roadways designed to carry large 
volumes of traffic at relatively high speeds. 
A freeway is a divided highway providing for 
continuous flow of vehicles with no direct 
access to abutting property or streets and 
with access to selected crossroads provided 
via connecting ramps. An expressway is a 
divided highway with full or partial control 
of access and generally with grade separations 
at major intersections. A parkway is a 
highway for noncommercial traffic, with full 
or partial control of access, and usually 
located within a park or a ribbon of parklike 
development. 

2. Residential Collector Street - A local access 
street which serves as a connector street be- 
tween local residential streets and the thor- 
oughfare system. Residential collector 
streets typically collect traffic from 100 to 
400 dwelling units. 

3. Local Residential Street - Cul-de-sacs, loop 
streets less than 2,500 feet in length, or 
streets less than one mile in length that do 
not connect thoroughfares, or serve major 
traffic generators, and do not collect traffic 
from more than 100 dwelling units. 

4. Cul-de-sac - A short street having but one 
end open to traffic and the other end being 
permanently terminated and a vehicular turn 
around provided. 



B-2 



Frontage Road - A local street or road that 
is parallel to a full or partial access con- 
trolled facility and functions to provide ac- 
cess to adjacent land. 

Alley - A strip of land, owned publicly or 
privately, set aside primarily for vehicular 
service access to the back side of properties 
otherwise abutting on a street. 



II. Property 



A. Building Setback Line - A line parallel to the 
street in front of which no structure shall be 
erected. 

B. Easement - A grant by the property owner for use 
by the public, a corporation, or person(s), of a 
strip of land for a specific purpose. 

C. Lot - A portion of a subdivision, or any other 
parcel of land, intended as a unit for transfer of 
ownership or for development or both. The word 
"lot" includes the words "plat" and "parcel". 

1. Corner Lot - A lot abutting upon two streets 
at their intersection. 

2. Double-Frontage Lot - A continuous (through) 
lot which is accessible from both of the par- 
allel streets upon which it fronts . 

3. Reverse-Frontage Lot - A continuous (through) 
lot which is accessible from only one of the 
parallel streets upon which it fronts. 

III. Subdivision 

A- Subdivider - Any person, firm, corporation or 

official agent thereof, who subdivides or develops 
any land deemed to be a subdivision. 

B. Subdivision - All divisions of a tract or parcel 
of land into two or more lots, building sites, or 
other divisions for the purpose, whether immediate 
or future, of sale or building development, and 
all divisions of land involving the dedication of 
a new street or a change in existing streets; 
provided, however, that the following shall not be 
included within this definition nor subject to 
these regulations: (1) the combination or recombi- 
nation of portions of previously platted lots 
where the total number of lots is not increased 



B-3 



and the resultant lots are equal to or exceed the 
standards contained herein; (2) the division of 
land into parcels greater than five acres where no 
street right-of way dedication is involved; (3) 
the public acquisition by purchase of strips of 
land for the widening or opening of streets; (4) 
the division of a tract in single ownership whose 
entire area is no greater than two acres into not 
more than three lots, where no street right-of-way 
dedication is involved and where the resultant 
lots are equal to or exceed the standards contained 
herein. 

C. Dedication - A gift, by the owner, of his property 
to another party without any consideration being 
given for the transfer. Since a transfer of pro- 
perty is involved, the dedication is made by writ- 
ten instrument and is completed with an acceptance. 

D. Reservation - A reservation of land does not 
involve any transfer of property rights. It 
simply constitutes an obligation to keep property 
free from development for a stated period of time. 



B-4 



Design Standards 
Streets and Roads: 
The design of all streets and roads within 



shall be in accordance with the accepted policies of the 
North Carolina Department of Transportation, Division of 
Highways, as taken or modified from the American Association 
of State Highway Officials' (AASHO) manuals. 

The provision of street rights-of-way shall conform and 

meet the requirements of the thoroughfare plan for 

as adopted by the and the North Carolina 

Department of Transportation. 

The proposed street layout shall be coordinated with 
the existing street system of the surrounding area. Normally 
the proposed streets should be the extension of existing 
streets if possible. 

The urban planning area shall consist of that area 
within the urban planning boundary as depicted on the mutually 

adopted Thoroughfare Plan. The rural planning 

area shall be that area outside the urban planning boundary. 

A. Right-of-way Widths : Right-of-way widths shall 
not be less than the following and shall apply 
except in those cases where right-of-way requirements 
have been specifically set out in the Thoroughfare 
Plan. 

Min. Right of Way, Ft. 

1. Rural 



350 
200 
100 
100 
100 
*60 



*The desirable minimum right-of-way is 50 feet. If 
curb and gutter is provided, 50 feet of right-of-way is 
adequate on local residential streets. 



a. 


Principal Arterial 




Freeways 




Other 


b. 


Minor Arterial 


c. 


Major Collector 


d. 


Minor Collector 


e. 


Local Road 



B-5 



Min. Right of Way, Ft. 
2. Urban 

a. Major Thoroughfare Other 

than Freeway and 

Expressway 90 

b. Minor Thoroughfare 70 

c. Local Street *60 

d. Cul-de-sac **Variable 

The subdivider will only be required to dedicate a 
maximum of 100 feet of right-of-way. In cases where over 
100 feet of right-of-way is desired, the subdivider will be 
required only to reserve the amount in excess of 100 feet. 
In all cases in which right-of-way is sought for an access 
controlled facility, the subdivider will only be required to 
make a reservation. 

A partial width right-of-way, not less than sixty (50) 
feet in width, may be dedicated when adjoining undeveloped 
property that is owned or controlled by the siibdivider; 
provided that the width of a partial dedication be such as 
to permit the installation of such facilities as may be nec- 
essary to serve abutting lots. When the said adjoining 
property is subdivided, the remainder of the full required 
right-of-way shall be dedicated. 

B. Street Widths : Widths for street and road classi- 
fications other than local shall be as required by 
the Thoroughfare Plan. Width of local roads and 
streets shall be as follows: 

1. Local Residential 

Curb and gutter section 26 feet, 

to face of curb 
Shoulder section - 20 feet to edge of 

pavement, 4 foot shoulders 



*The desirable minimum right-of-way is established as 
60 feet. If curb and gutter is provided, 50 feet of right- 
of-way is adequate. 

**The right-of-way dimension will depend on radius used 
for vehicular turn-around. Distance from edge of pavement 
of turn around to right-of-way should not be less than dis- 
tance from edge of pavement to right-of-way on street ap- 
proaching turn-around. 



B-6 



2 . Residential Collector 

Curb and gutter section 34 feet, face 

to face of curb 
Shoulder Section 20 feet to edge of 

pavement, 6 foot shoulders 

C. Geometric Characteristics : The standards outlined 
below shall apply to all subdivision streets 
proposed for addition to the State Highway System 
or Municipal Street System. In cases where a 
subdivision is sought adjacent to a proposed 
thoroughfare corridor, the requirements of dedica- 
tion and reservation discussed under Right-of-Way 
shall apply. 

1. Design Speed 

The design speeds for subdivisions type streets 
shall be: 

Desirable (Minimum) 

Level Rolling Mountainous 
Rural 

Minor Collector Roads 60 (50) (40) (30) 

Local Roads including 50 (50)* (40)* (30)* 
Residential Collectors 
and Local Residential 

Urban 

Major Thoroughfares 60 (50) (50) (50) 

Other than Freeway or 

Expressway 

Minor Thoroughfares 60 (50) (40) (40) 

Local Streets 40 (40)** (30)** (20)** 



*Based on projected annual average daily traffic of 
400-750. In cases where road will serve a very limited area 
and small number of dwelling units, minimum design speeds 
can be reduced further. 

**Based on projected annual average daily traffic of 
50-250. 



B-7 



Maximum and Minimum Grades 

a. The maximum grades in percent shall be: 



Design Speed 


Level 


Rolling 


Mountainous 


60 


3 


4 


6 


50 


4 


5 


7 


40 


5 


6 


8 


30 




9 


10 


20 






12 



b. A minimum grade for curbed streets 
normally should not be less than 0.5%, a 
grade of 0.35% may be allowed where 
there is a high type pavement accurately 
crowned and in areas where special 
drainage conditions may control. 

c. Grades for 100 feet each way from inter- 
sections should not exceed 5%. 

d. For streets and roads with projected 
annual average daily traffic less than 
250, short grades less than 500 feet 
long, may be 150% greater. 

3. Minimum Sight Distances 

In the interest of public safety, no less 
than the minimum sight distance applicable shall 
be provided in every instance. Vertical curves 
that connect each change in grade shall be provided 
and calculated using the following parameters. 
(General practice calls for vertical curves to be 
multiples of 50 feet. Calculated lengths shall be 
rounded up in each case): 



B-8 



Design Speed, MPH 

Stopping Sight Distance - 
Min. Distance, Ft. 
Des. Distance, Ft. 

Min. K* Value For: 



20 



150 
150 



30 



200 
200 



40 



275 
300 



50 



350 
450 



60 



475 
650 



Min. 


Crest Curve 


16 


28 


55 


85 


160 


Des . 


Crest Curve 


16 


28 


65 


145 


300 


Min. 


SAG Curve 


-24 


35 


55 


75 


105 


Des . 


SAG Curve 


>24 


35 


60 


100 


155 



Passing Sight Distance - 

Min. Passing Distance, 
Feet (2 lane) 
Min. K* Value For Crest 
Vertical Curve 



1100 1500 1800 2100 
365 686 985 1340 



Sight distance provided for stopped vehicles 
at intersections should be in accordance with, "A 
Policy on Geometric Design of Rural Highways". 

4. The following table shows the maximum degree 
of curve and related maximum superelevation 
for design speeds. The maximum rate of 
roadway superelevation (e) for rural roads 
wth no curb and gutter is .08. The maximum 
rate of superelevation for urban streets with 
curb and gutter is .06 with .04 being desirable. 



*K is a coefficient by which the algebraic difference 
in grade may be multiplied to determine the length in feet 
of the vertical curve which will provide minimum sight 
distance. 



B-9 







Minimum 


Maximum Degree 






Radius 


of Curve 


Design Speed 


Maximum 


(Rounded) 


(Rounded) 


MPH 


e* 


Feet 


Degrees 


20 


.04 


125 


45.0 


30 


.04 


300 


19.0 


40 


.04 


560 


10.0 


50 


.04 


925 


6.0 


60 


.04 


1410 


4.0 


20 


.06 


115 


50.0 


30 


.06 


275 


21.0 


40 


.06 


510 


11.5 


50 


.06 


830 


7.0 


60 


.06 


1260 


4.5 


20 


.08 


110 


53.5 


30 


.08 


250 


23.0 


40 


.08 


460 


12.5 


50 


.08 


760 


7.5 


60 


.08 


1140 


5.0 



*e = rate of roadway superelevation, foot per foot 
D. Intersections 

1. Streets shall be laid out so as to intersect 
as nearly as possible at right angles, and no 
street should intersect any other street at 
an angle less than sixty (60) degrees. 

2. Property lines at intersections should be set 
so that the distance from the edge of pavement, 
of the street turnout, to the property line 
will be at least as great as the distance 

from the edge of pavement to the property 
line along the intersecting streets. This 
property line can be established as a radius 
or as a sight triangle. Greater offsets from 
the edge of pavement to the property lines 
will be required, if necessary, to provide 
sight distance for the stopped vehicle on the 
side street. 

3. Off-set intersections are to be avoided 
unless exception is granted by the Divison of 
Highways for intersections involving the 
State Highway System, or the Planning Board 
for intersections involving only the municipal 
street system. Intersections which cannot be 
aligned should be separated by a minimum 
length of 200 feet between survey centerlines. 



B-10 



E. Cul-de-sacs 

Cul-de-sacs, unless exception is granted by the 
local planning board, shall not be more than five 
hundred (500) feet in length. The distance from the 
edge of pavement on the vehicular turnaround to the 
right-of-way line should not be less than the distance 
from the edge of pavement to right-of-way line on the 
street approaching the turn-around. Cul-de-sacs should 
not be used to avoid connection with an existing street 
or to avoid the extension of an important street. 

F. Alleys 

1. Alleys shall be required to serve lots used 
for commercial and industrial purposes except 
that this requirement may be waived where 
other definite and assured provision is made 
for service access. 

Alleys shall not be provided in residential 
subdivisions unless necessitated by unusual 
circumstances . 

2. The width of an alley shall be at least 
twenty (20) feet. 

3. Dead-end alleys shall be avoided where possible, 
but if unavoidable, shall be provided with 
adequate turn-around facilities at the dead-end 
as may be approved by the Planning Board. 

4. Sharp changes in alignment and grade shall be 
avoided. 

G. Permits For Connection To State Roads 

An approved permit is required for connection to 
any existing state system road. This permit is required 
prior to any construction on the street or road. The 
application is available at the office of the nearest 
District Engineer of the Divison of Highways. 

H. Offsets To Utility Poles 

Poles for overhead utilities should be located 
clear of roadway shoulders, preferably a minimum of at 
least 30 feet from the edge of pavement. On streets 
with curb and gutter, utility poles shall be set back a 
minimum distance of 6 feet from the face of curb. 



B-11 



I . wheel Chair Ramps 

In accordance with Chapter 136, Article 2A, §135-44.14, 
all street curbs in North Carolina being constructed or 
reconstructed for maintenance purposes, traffic operations, 
repairs, correction of utilities, or altered for any 
reason after September 1, 1973, shall provide wheelchair 
ramps for the physically handicapped at all intersections 
where both curb and gutter and sidewalks are provided 
and at other major points of pedestrian flow. 

Wheelchair ramps and depressed curbs shall be 
constructed in accordance with details contained in the 
Department of Transportation, Divison of Highways, 
Publication entitled, "Guidelines, Curb Cuts and Ramps 
for Handicapped Persons". 

J. Horizontal Width on Bridge Deck 

1. The clear roadway widths for new and recon- 
structed bridges serving 2 lane, 2 way traffic 
should be as follows: 

a. Shoulder Section Approach 

i. Under 800 ADT Design Year 

Minimum 28 feet width face to face 
of parapets of rails or pavement 
width plus 10 feet, whichever is 
greater. 

ii. 800-2000 ADT Design Year 

Minimum 34 feet width face to face 
of parapets or rails or pavement 
width plus 12 feet, whichever is 
greater. 

iii. Over 2000 ADT Design Year 

Minimum 40 feet 

Desirable 44 feet width face to 

face of parapets or rails. 

b. Curbs and Gutter Approach 

i. Under 800 ADT Design Year 

Minimiim 24 feet face to face of 
curbs . 



B-12 



ii. Over 800 ADT Design Year 

Width of approach pavement measured 
face to face of curbs. 

Where curb and gutter sections are used on 
roadway approaches, curbs on bridges shall 
match the curbs on approaches in height, in 
width of face to face of curbs, and in crown 
drop. The distance from face of curb to face 
of parapet or rail shall be 1'5" minimum, or 
greater if sidewalks are required. 

The clear roadway widths for new and recon- 
structed bridges having 4 or more lanes 
serving undivided two-way traffic should be as 
follows : 

a. Shoulder Section Approach - Width of 
approach pavement plus width of usable 
shoulders on the approach left and 
right. 

Min . 8 ' 
Des. 10' 

b. Curb and Gutter Approach - Width of ap- 
proach pavement measured face to face of 
curbs . 



B-13 



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